Current Course Offerings

Spring 2022

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 100. Goyne. 2012: CA1, HC1, OC   2016: HC, LL, OC     CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.      

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

MWF 2:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 306.  Satz.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

An introduction to the literature of racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, the disabled, and the LGBTQ community. This course will investigate such common themes as alienation, oppression from the dominant community and oneself, and divergent cultural values. It will also explore such current controversial topics as diversity, inclusion and critical race theory. Literary and theoretical works will be included. Mid-term, final, and two short papers.

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Fondren Science 157 101.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Fondren Science 157.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 343.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 343.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.      2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001— Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

MWF 2:00-2:50. Umphrey Lee 228. Atkinson.        2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

“To see a ship tossed, and threatened every moment by the merciless waves,” says the Roman philosopher Lucretius, “is a spectacle which those that stand safe at shore, cannot but behold with pleasure as well as compassion.” In our class we will put ourselves in the position of both the spectator and the sailor as we explore one of the most ancient and enduring literary subjects: the shipwreck. Our course will begin on dry land, where we will ponder why humans are compelled to leave safe harbors for the danger of the high seas. As the semester progresses we will use literary texts – novels, short stories, and poetry – as well as true accounts, to trace an oceanic voyage culminating in the terror of shipwreck. Finally we will find ourselves on a distant shore, contemplating the physical and psychological transformations produced by disaster – what Shakespeare calls “something rich and strange.” Shipwreck compels us to ask questions about human longing and curiosity, about our relationship with oceans, and about the miracle of salvation. The writings of Homer, Shakespeare, Aphra Behn, Defoe, Poe, and others will guide us as we plunge “full fathom five” into the history of the shipwreck tale.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Clements 334.  Newman.          2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“I, too, dislike it,” the poet Marianne Moore famously said about poetry; “there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.” She is acknowledging the difficulty many readers have making sense of what is ostensibly written for pleasure and yet requires that we do some kind of intellectual or imaginative work. After all, a poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art, not of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us, and why we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so provides something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works. It can also bring a pleasure that grows on you slowly—or all at once. 

Texts: Helen Vendler’s Poems, Poets, Poetry and others TBD. Assignments: four shorter papers of increasing length, totaling 15-20 pages; 1-2 presentations; frequent discussion board postings; occasional short exercises; midterm and final exams.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Rosendale.         2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Life is better with poetry.  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s supercool and worth caring a lot about. We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning. We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding and then to pleasure. We’ll read lots of great poems, quite a few good ones, and a few terrible ones, from the middle ages to the present day. We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it. We’ll argue sometimes about what a poem means, but it will be okay: that’s part of how thoughtful, interesting reading works.  We’ll become better readers, thinkers, and writers.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

MWF 8:00-9:20. Harold Clark Simmons Hall 107.  Spencer. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Biologists have been warning us since the 1960s that we are irrevocably changing the natural world around us. In the 1980s scientists started talking about human-caused climate change, and in 2008, geologists formally proposed a name tying the planet’s sixth mass extinction to human activity—the Anthropocene. But while scientists have created models to predict the changing world around us, fiction writers have imagined its impact on individuals and society in varying and creative ways. In this course we will learn common approaches to literary analysis through the work of recent U.S. novelists who have wrestled with this environmental breakdown or prophesied an ecological apocalypse to come. Whether our demise comes about through uncontrollable global warming, nuclear holocaust, a global epidemic, or the slow decay of our bodies due to our own toxic waste, U.S. writers use fiction to reflect on our world by imagining a possible future where greed, blindness, or just sheer stupidity (as Vonnegut would say, “thanks, big brain”) tip our world into destruction. Potential novels to read this semester include Kurt Vonnegut’s Galapagos, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, and Ana Castillo’s So Far from God. Some of these works are hopeful and some are not, but all of them imagine the moments in which human beings face the inevitable consequences of our own choices as a species.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

TTh 3:30-4:50.  Dallas Hall 153.  Degrasse.            2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fictional American literature from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries with a particular emphasis on Gothic elements. The American Gothic, according to literary critic Charles L. Crow, is “the imaginative expression of the fears and forbidden desires of Americans… [and] it offers a forum for discussing some of the key issues of American society, including gender and the nation’s continuing drama of race.” This course will cover a variety of fictional texts from the Gothic genre and will interrogate what it is about Gothic themes, elements, and plots that American authors have found so useful in their explorations of central issues in American society. How can seemingly fantastic, supernatural, grotesque, and terrifying stories provide grounds for serious discussions and critiques of life in America three hundred years later? We will think about these and other questions throughout the course of the semester. Possible texts: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, Hangsaman by Shirley Jackson, and short stories by Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and Shirley Jackson.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 105.  Hennum.           2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

Do we want our world to be different? Could it be different? Can fiction help us imagine a different world? Can fiction help us make a different world? What is the difference between fiction and the world, anyways? Where does the one end and the other begin? In this course, we will study these questions by looking at works of fiction that complicate our understanding of this category, as well as fictions that ask us to think critically and creatively about the worlds that produced them and the worlds in which they are read. Along the way, we will think extensively and intensively about our world, our place in it, and fiction’s relationship to both.

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Connery.            2012: CA1, OC, W    2016: LL, OC, W  

The drama of Ireland in the twentieth century developed simultaneously with the struggle for independence from Great Britain and with a volatile debate about national identity. Irish theatre subsequently produced playwrights and work that quickly achieved renown throughout the English-speaking world: W.B. Yeats, Lady Augusta Gregory, Sean O’Casey, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, and Martin McDonagh, among others. 

            Throughout this course, we’ll think about how the plays respond to and represent their social and political context, and we’ll practice using our theatrical imagination to think about these scripts in performance, exploring how the essential nature of drama – its immediacy, its public nature, its exchanges between performer and audience, and its calls to judgment – make it a particularly effective vehicle for social and political expression.

            Curiosity is the major course pre-requisite, and a commitment to diligent reading and active participation is the major requirement for the course.  No prior knowledge of Irish history or culture or of drama is expected.  Class meetings will be primarily discussion with some lecture.  Students will share a weekly reading response, take a short factual quiz on each play, and write two take-home tests. 

 

ENGL 2313-002—Introduction to Drama: Acting Like an American

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2314-001H Introduction to Poetry

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Rosendale.     2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W      CC: LAI, W

Life is better with poetry.  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s supercool and worth caring a lot about. We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning. We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding and then to pleasure. We’ll read lots of great poems, quite a few good ones, and a few terrible ones, from the middle ages to the present day. We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it. We’ll argue sometimes about what a poem means, but it will be okay: that’s part of how thoughtful, interesting reading works.  We’ll become better readers, thinkers, and writers.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 143.  Pergadia.           2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

How does literature represent identity and how does it approach encounters with difference? In this course, we will read literary texts alongside recent criticism in order to develop a vocabulary and skillset for further work in literary studies. We will discuss the relationship between literature and history and between literature and philosophy, attending to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. One of the main questions we will ask: How do texts address us as readers and how do we respond to their address? As we discern what is at stake in being a reader, we will learn how to unpack the way a text generates its meaning. Tentative reading list includes works by William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice), Eliza Haywood (Fantomina), Mary Shelley, (Frankenstein)Nella Larsen (Passing), Toni Morrison (“Recitatif”), and Claudia Rankine (Citizen).

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Embrey Engineering 129.  Kiser.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

This class will introduce you to a variety of genres and how they make meaning in their own unique ways by exploring the class theme “Seeing and Being Seen.” We will move through the semester by asking questions such as: How do we “see” knowledge or meaning in text? How are characters, plots, and tropes made visible? Is what is not visible in a text just as important—or even more so—than what we do see? What are the politics of visibility? And perhaps most importantly, do texts play hide and seek? Our class will progress towards answering these questions, and many more, through fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry, tv, and film. We will draw from works by a variety of authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Ann Petry, Claude McKay, Sherwood Anderson, Elizabeth Bishop, and more. 

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 152. Smith.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

This course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing flash fiction stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing

M 2:00-4:50.  Harold Clark Simmons Hall 318.  Rubin.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

MW 10:30-11:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Hermes.                   2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in poetry and fiction. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class meeting, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

MWF 12:00-12:50. Dallas Hall 149.  Rivera. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This course is designed both for beginning writers who have never had the opportunity to study poetry-writing in a classroom setting and for more experienced writers striving to improve the fragile braid that is content, communication, and craft. Students will learn the fundamental elements of poetry, practice literary analysis and critique, improve their creative and critical writing skills, and thoughtfully consider their work as well as that of others via annotated and facilitated dialogue. Students should be willing to hone their poems by testing various techniques, styles, formats, and aesthetics and experimenting with what they have written to develop a small writing portfolio and a better understanding of what being a practicing writer means.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Rivera.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Fiction inundates us with a constant fare of death, divorce, destruction, disillusion, dysfunction, and dystopia—and simultaneously offers escape, revelation, return. In this course, we will annotate, read, discuss, argue the merits and failures of the genre in addition to writing short stories that test which components a writer may include or exclude to create plot. As we explore the current limits of the form, we will attempt a radical reimagining of what we consider inexorable rules.  This course familiarizes students with the fears and risks and conflicts and failures inherent to writing any specific narrative of our culture, even as we immerse ourselves in other milieus—real and imagined—trying to impart greater understanding of the human condition. Via writing vignettes and stories, students will learn to incorporate daily observations and consider how these ideas may fit into or shape their narrative vision. When we invest ourselves in either portraying or witnessing life’s exigencies as well as experiencing its conflicts, we commit ourselves to the ongoing work of defining what living might mean.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year’s Words

Th 3:30-6:20.  Dallas Hall 137.  Brownderville.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

“last year’s words belong to last year’s language 
And next year’s words await another voice.”

                              —T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”

It is sometimes said that literature has always been, and will always be, about love and death. If so many books already engage these great themes, why do we need new writing?  As James Baldwin put it, the human story “has another aspect in every country, and a new depth in every generation.” It must be told again.

This course is a poetry workshop, where timeless themes meet the new words of now. Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communication skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

Next Year’s Words is about the tremendously exciting, and culturally necessary, adventure of the young writer. It’s about singing truth-song in a voice not heard before on earth.

This year can’t write the poems of 2022. Next year’s poetry needs next year’s words.

 

ENGL 2390-007—Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures

MWF 11:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 357.  Rivera. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

Small, intimate, bodily gestures possess the ability to illuminate everything from motives and intentions to physical and psychological states. What is true of the body is also true of the written word: creative writers deploy allusive gestures to the arts, history, regions, academic fields of study, and popular culture — sometimes working with and sometimes against what the text is doing aurally and structurally. Focusing on these figurative nods, this course provides intermediate to advanced practice in the craft of poetry and poetics vis-à-vis the fine balance of playfulness and emotion embedded in the creative process. By exploring literary nods and gestures in the work of contemporary poets of the United States (from the 1960s to present day), we will investigate our own assumptions, biases, and prejudices about who makes up the canon of American letters—especially considering the linguistic diversity of the personal and cultural landscapes from which we all pull.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

MW 9:00-10:20.   Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 223.  Greenspan.

This is a gateway course to the English major designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? How do paths and pathways to texts change in a digitized, multimediated environment? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading and researching to the written analysis of texts? 

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. 

 

ENGL 3341-001— British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

MWF 1:00-1:50.   Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 100.  Newman.  2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

Officially known as “Wordsworth through Yeats,“ this course familiarizes students with some of the main currents in British literature during the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods--that is, from the “Age of Revolutions” beginning around 1780 to the period between the two World Wars. We begin with the self-conscious turn in the Romantic period to the language of ordinary people and the experiences of ordinary life. But we also consider the continuing attraction of the strange, the unusual, and the visionary that gripped both readers and writers throughout all three historical periods. And we attend to the ways that the literary imagination, beginning with the Romantics, finds the extraordinary in the ordinary and recalibrates its sense of the real and how to represent it. 

We will give significant attention to the social and historical contexts to which writers were responding. Therefore, though we will focus on big-name, canonical British writers (e.g., Blake, Wordsworth, Dickens, Woolf), we will also include some lesser-known Black and women writers. In short, we will trace a story about the canon of British literature, while keeping in mind that there are other ways of telling the story. The writing assignments are designed to help you learn the skills of close reading and improve your written expression. About 15-20 pages of formal paper-writing (3-4 papers, including one with a creative options); three timed exams (one on each of the literary periods); frequent small “low-stakes” homework assignments to practice the skills.

Texts: An anthology, to be determined; Dickens, A Christmas Carol; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway.

 

ENGL 3366-801—American Literary History II: America the Multiple

2012: CA2, HC2, W    2016: HFA, HSBS, W  CC: LAI, W

Lecture: MW 12:00–12:50. Hyer 201. Greenspan.

Enrollment in one discussion section is required:

Discussion section 001: F 12:00–12:50. Umphrey Lee 233. Rhodes.

Discussion section 002: F 12:00–12:50. Dallas Hall 105. Thriffiley.

Our course will explore a wide variety of fictional voices and visions produced in America over the period 1900 to the present. A continuing focus will be on ways that writers interrelate historical and fictional time. This version of the generic "American Literary History II" is specifically offered with an awareness that it comes at a time of extraordinary historical instability, agitation, and activism in the United States. History lives! Readings are chosen to reflect issues of current concern that have roots in our history, such as immigration, racial division, gender authority, control over the writing and interpretation of the past, and the relationship between media and the public sphere. Our intent and goal is to provide means for each of us to arrive at a fuller understanding of our rich cultural heritage (however each of us defines it) and a finer-grained appreciation of the grounding of current issues in earlier times.

Writers to include Abraham Cahan (The Rise of David Levinsky), Willa Cather (My Antonia), Gertrude Stein (Melanctha), Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), Flannery O'Connor ("Good Country People" and "A Good Man Is Hard to Find"), Toni Morrison (Song of Solomon), Octavia Butler (Kindred), Maxine Hong Kingston (The Woman Warrior), and Richard McGuire (Here).

 

ENGL 3367-001— Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 357.  Satz.       2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W       2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W  CC: HD, OC, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White, accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

T 3:30-6:20. Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.           2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

Discussing the work of Katherine Porter, the writer Mary Gaitskill names an important advantage the form of the short story has over visual media: "Film, both movies and television," Gaitskill writes, "may accomplish something like this [moment in Porter's work], or try to. But it is precisely the medium's felicity to the seen world that so often makes its attempts to portray the unseen world buffoonish." 

This class will explore the way great fiction evokes the world of the unseen. How is such a thing done? And what can make evocations of this unseen place so thrilling, consoling, and even spooky?  In addition to studying the work of contemporary authors—and the writers who influenced them—students will be asked to read interviews and essays. This class is a fiction-writing workshop with an emphasis on reading and craft.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Creating Fiction

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 152.  Smith.      2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing short stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry: Crafting Lyrical Gestures

CANCELED

 

ENGL 4332-001— Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Sudan.            2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

 

ENGL 4339-001— Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy. 2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

Archives are where people put stories that they want to preserve. They’re also where they bury stories that they hope will be forgotten. What could we learn about the past if we looked at literature alongside diaries, love letters, scrapbooks, and the other textual remains that ordinary people leave behind? This course is a hands-on workshop on using archival resources in literary studies. We’ll dig into the lives of obscure and not-so-obscure individuals from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, using both physical and digitized archives. We’ll try to see what the past looks like through their eyes, and we’ll compare that with what it looks like through the eyes of several canonical authors. Each student will undertake an archival research project, culminating in a narrative essay that uses archival evidence to understand cultural and literary history anew.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

W 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Edwards.     2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

What does it mean to have a sexual identity? How does the concept of sexuality change over time? How have people described their desires and expressed their erotic feeling? This course examines a range of American voices that engage in queer desire, identity, and conceptions of the family. Beginning with these questions, the course looks to canonical and non-canonical authors to explore a multitude of perspectives on sexuality. Although the regulation of gender and sexual behavior—and transgression of sex/gender norms—have been central to American culture from its beginnings, this course focuses on texts from the second half of the nineteenth century through the very contemporary. By addressing these concerns, students will come to their own questions of the texts that go beyond finding moments of heightened desire and sexual transgressions. How do moments of quiet contemplation or moments of camp, play, and protest become places for queerness? With help from queer theorists and social historians, we will pay close attention to how discourses shape queer expression, and how queer authors have changed culture. It will thus be important for us to interrogate not only the meaning of “American” and “queer” but what is likewise the consequence of labeling these texts as part of a canon. The course will end, then, with a reflection on what we missed, the potential pitfalls of interdisciplinarity, and the problems that might emerge from an (over)emphasis on sexuality in the practice of queer theory and analysis.

 

ENGL 6330-001— Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

M 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Sudan

We are all global subjects, or so the saying goes, and even in these restrictive times of the plague, we still turn to other ways to access the “world” from our desks. But what counts as “the” world? “A” world? What sensory evidence do we use to convince ourselves that the world exists as an epistemological phenomenon? Focusing on early modern Europe—a historical period that extends through the eighteenth century--this course will explore the various human and non-human environments that shape our collective understanding of worlds, worlding, and, finally, the world. We will question the myriad assumptions underwriting and informing that innocent yet definitive article and question, as James C. Scott does, the “imposition of a single political authority” upon a variety of ecological settings.

 

ENGL 6360-001— Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

F 12:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Sae-Saue       

With a focus on the novel, this course will explore regional, national, and international violence in the contexts of ethnic communities of the US West. The texts we will read will address several seismic moments of US history and a range of social crisis, including: expansionism and settler colonialism; The US-Mexico War; The Seditionist Movement of South Texas; ecological destruction; regional mass incarceration, civil-rights uprisings, immigration, poverty, and more.  In particular, students will study how ethnic art negotiates this regional violence as a political culture, including how it resists and may be complicit with forms of regional and ethnic oppression.

 

ENGL 7311-001—Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Th 3:00-5:50.  Dallas Hall 138. Edwards.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to American Studies, beginning by addressing the vexed and recurring question of “What is American Studies?” and continue to explore a variety of themes, theoretical influences, and methodological approaches currently alive in the field, particularly engaging perspectives on globalization and transnationalism, representational and semiotic communication, material and visual evidence, popular and consumer culture, and individual and group identity formations. During the semester, you will have the opportunity to craft an autobiographical statement, lead a class discussion, review and report on a variety of readings, design an American Studies syllabus, and review and assess critical work in the field.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

T 3:30-6:20.  Dallas Hall 138.  Pergadia.

Beyond the dyad of black/white American racial politics are encounters, conflicts, and alliances between multiple racial and ethnic minority groups. This course traces the common goals and conflicts between African American, Asian American, Latinx, and the eclipsed Native American presence in the U.S. to ask: How do racial alliances form? What are the political possibilities or pitfalls of racial analogy in either building coalition or erasing difference? We’ll read literature by minority writers alongside efforts in sociology, law, and critical/comparative race/ethnic studies that comprehend or aim to police racial imaginaries in a diverse America. Given the pitfalls of multiculturalism and post-racial discourse, we seek a language, comparative method, and narrative to make sense of America’s myriad minority racial forms. We’ll investigate, for example, the relationship between chattel slavery and Asiatic coolieism, between the Civil Rights Movement and immigration reform. How does literature, film, and art respond to the shifting terrain of U.S. race relations to reimagine multi-racial coalitions?

Primary texts may include: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Dark Princess (1928)Charles Johnson’s Oxherding Tale (1982), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989)Anna Deavere Smith’s Twilight: Los Angeles (1992), Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda (1998), Cristina Garcia’s Monkey Hunting (2003), Toni Morrison’s A Mercy (2008)Shailja Patel’s Migritude (2008), Karen Tei Yamashita’s I Hotel (2010)Ishmael Reed’s Conjugating Hindi (2018), Cathy Park Hong’s Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning (2020)

 

ENGL 7376-001—Seminar: Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 120.  Wheeler.

Why do we (contemporary audiences) find medieval texts and objects deeply seductive at the same time that we recoil from their perceived difference, difficulty, and political deviance? The highly valorized English medieval writers Chaucer and Malory form the core of our common work but we share responsibility for designing our seminar around varieties of genres and authors.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

PRTH 100

2012: CA1, HC1, OC
2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Satz

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 306

2012: CA1, HD
2016: LL, HD

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

PRTH 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Levy

TTh

11:00

12:20

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Roudabush

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 155

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

Atkinson

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry

Newman

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

Degrasse

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312 003
Fiction: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This
Hennum
MWF
9:00
 9:50 DH 105

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

 

LAI, W

2313

001

Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

Connery

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

 

2313

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

 

2314

001H

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 143

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

EMBY 129

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes

MW

10:30

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

Rivera

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 149

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

Rivera

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 101

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

Th

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390
007
Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures
Rivera
MWF  11:00 11:50
DH 357

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Greenspan

MW

9:00

10:20

PRTH 223

 

 

3341

001

British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

1:00

1:50

PRTH 100

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3366

801

American Literary History II: America the Multiple

Greenspan

MW

12:00

12:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3366

N10

American Literary History II

Pollard

F

12:00

12:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3366

N20

American Literary History II

Thriffiley

F

12:00

12:50

DH 105

 

 

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 357

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

T

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Creating Fiction

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

CANCELED

CANCELED

       


 

4332

001

Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

Sudan

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, IL, OC
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

Sudan

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

Sae-Saue

F

12:00

2:50

DH 137

 

 

7311

001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Edwards

Th

3:00

5:50

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

Pergadia

T

3:30

6:20

DH 138

 

 

7376

001

Seminar, Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

Wheeler

W

2:00

4:50

DH 120

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2312 003
Fiction: There's Gotta Be Something Better Than This
 Hennum MWF 9:00
9:50
DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2313

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, OC, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry

Newman

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

PRTH 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390
007
Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures
Rivera
MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 357

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3390

003

CANCELED

CANCELED

 

 

 

 



ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2390 004
 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

Rivera
MWF
12:00
12:50
DH 149

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

4332

001

Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

Sudan

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

3341

001

British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

1:00

1:50

PRTH 100

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Satz

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 357

2012: CA1, HD 2016: LL, HD

LAI, HD

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

Atkinson

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 143

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

Rivera

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 101

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Greenspan

MW

9:00

10:20

PRTH 223

 

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes

MW

10:30

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3366

801

American Literary History II: America the Multiple

Greenspan

MW

12:00

12:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

Sudan

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

7376

001

Seminar, Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

Wheeler

W

2:00

4:50

DH 120

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

3366

N10

American Literary History II

Pollard

F

12:00

12:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3366

N20

American Literary History II

Thriffiley

F

12:00

12:50

DH 105

 

 

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

Sae-Saue

F

12:00

2:50

DH 137

 

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

002

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2313

001

Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

Connery

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, OC, W

 

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

EMBY 129

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

PRTH 100

2012: CA1, HC1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Levy

TTh

11:00

12:20

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Roudabush

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 155

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2314

001H

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Creatiing Fiction

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

Degrasse

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

 

7311

 001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Edwards
Th
 3:00 5:50
DH 138
   

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

T

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

Pergadia

T

3:30

6:20

DH 138

 

 

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

Th

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

Fall 2021

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Owens Fine Arts 2020.  Goyne.         2012: CA1, HC1, OC      2016: LL, HC, OC    CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.

 

ENGL 1330-001—The World of Shakespeare 

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Umphrey Lee 241.  Rosendale. 2012: CA1   2016: LL    CC: LAI

Time to (re-)introduce yourself to our language’s greatest writer. In this course, you will meet Shakespeare’s princes, tyrants, heroes, villains, saints, sinners, lovers, losers, drunkards, clowns, outcasts, fairies, witches, and monsters. You’ll watch and listen as they love, woo, kiss, charm, hate, curse, mock, fool, sing to, dance with, get drunk with, sleep with, fight with, murder, and haunt each other. You will visit Renaissance England, a place and time as strange, troubled, exciting, delightful, fearful, thoughtful, political, magical, bloody, sexy, and confused as your own. You will read poetry you will never forget.

Our introductory survey will cover 6–8 plays in all of the major Shakespearean genres: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, as well as some poetry (all texts are digital and free, with a print option for students who prefer print). Background readings, lectures, and films will contextualize Shakespeare’s achievement within Renaissance society and life (and death), engaging the religious, political, cultural, and economic debates of that glorious but tumultuous age.

Coursework includes frequent quizzes, written midterm and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. No papers.

ENGL 1330 satisfies the Language and Literature requirement for the University Curriculum, and counts toward the English major and minor

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Levy.        2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

English 1365 examines questions of individual and collective identities from historical, contemporary and literary perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about who “We, The People” are. These include: “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Identity Politics,” “Cancel Culture,” “Pluralism,” etc.   We look at identity as both self-selected and imposed, as fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as permanent and situational. 

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 100.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 100.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 351.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W    CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priority goes to graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 351.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.       2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priority goes to graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001—Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Clements Hall 334.  Ray.               2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

What does it mean to author a text? Does all of this creative energy come from the author, or can some of it (or all of it) be located elsewhere? Is this notion of authorship more in line with concepts of prophecy and prophets, religious or otherwise? Where does the concept of inspiration fit in? This class will grapple with these questions as far back as the Old Testament and as modern as the current decade. We will read parables, journals, letters, fiction, science fiction, satire and science. Along the way, we will think deeply about the relationship between author and text, inventor and invention, artist and art.

 

ENGL 2310-002—Imagination and Interpretation: Greco-Roman Ideas in Early Modern Literature

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: A Poet Guided Tour

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Junkins 205.  Moss.                   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

In this course, the poets themselves guide us through the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry. During the first half of the semester, each week will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focusing on a representative poet in each case. We will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg. The second half explores perennial themes: poets addressing and questioning God; poets protesting social injustice; poets in love; poets struggling with age and loss; poets pondering nature, art, and poetry itself. Guest speakers include John Donne, Aphra Behn, John Keats, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Gwendolyn Brooks, Seamus Heaney, and many more. Who knew there were so many poets? Come meet them. Course requirements: two papers (one short, one longish), regular posts to an online discussion board, midterm exam, final exam, recitation, and the dreaded-at-first-later-beloved creative exercise. Course text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 6th edition.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry: The Language Distillery

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 105.  Brownderville. 2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Life goes down in sips and swigs of language, and poets, being the best distillers around, serve words that quicken our sense of wonder and play and meaning. Unlike some other inebriants, poetry actually improves our thinking—critical thinking, sure, but that’s not the best of the buzz: when we open ourselves to poems, we get better at beautiful thinking and thereby turn our minds into amazing places to live. That’s what this course is really about. We’ll visit the imaginary distillery together, enjoy the liquor of language, and try to figure out how the magic is made and why we crave it. Course requirements: one short paper, one longer paper, one creative exercise, one recitation, regular participation, midterm, and final. Course text: TBD.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Caruth Hall 161.  Bozorth.              2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and Christmas carols. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, teen-age rebellion, God, Satan, and what the difference is between “cliché” and “cliched.”You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

MWF 8:00-8:50.  Dallas Hall 149.  Spencer.            2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Biologists have been warning us since the 1960s that we are irrevocably changing the natural world around us. In the 1980s scientists started talking about human-caused climate change, and in 2008, geologists formally proposed a name tying the planet’s sixth mass extinction to human activity—the Anthropocene. But while scientists have created models to predict the changing world around us, fiction writers have imagined its impact on individuals and society in varying and creative ways. In this course we will learn common approaches to literary analysis through the work of recent U.S. novelists who have wrestled with this environmental breakdown and prophesied the ecological apocalypse to come. Whether our demise comes about through uncontrollable global warming, nuclear holocaust, a global epidemic, or the slow decay of our bodies due to our own toxic waste, U.S. writers use fiction to come to grips with a civilization teetering on the edge of destruction out of greed, blindness, or just sheer stupidity (as Vonnegut would say, “thanks, big brain”). Potential novels to read this semester include Kurt Vonnegut’sGalapagos, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, and Ana Castillo’s So Far from God. Some of these works are hopeful and some are not, but all of them imagine the moments in which human beings face the inevitable consequences of our own choices as a species.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Hyer Hall 110.  Hermes.   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Hyer Hall 110.  Hermes.            2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2312-004H—Introduction to Fiction

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Umphrey Lee 228.  Sae-Saue.       2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goals of the class are for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to understand how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships while also imagining particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. How does a text construct a cultural and social landscape? How does fiction organize ways human consciousness makes sense of determinate historical events? How does fiction articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.

 

ENGL 2312-005—Introduction to Fiction: Magic and Science in Fiction

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Heroy 153.  Jones.                     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

MWF 11:00-11:50. Clements Hall 225.  Cassedy.       2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there’s something about what it’s doing that you can’t quite put into words. This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text. You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are difficult to pin down. Tentative reading list includes texts by Karen Russell (Swamplandia!), William Shakespeare (King Lear), Leslie Jamison (The Empathy Exams), Edgar Allan Poe (Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), Mat Johnson (Pym), and Emily Dickinson. Four essays, a midterm, and a final.

 

ENGL 2315-003—Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Kiser.                        2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

This class will introduce you to a variety of genres and how they make meaning in their own unique ways. We will approach this topic by exploring the class theme: “Women Who Wonder & Wander” and we will ask questions such as: What do these women, found throughout cultural production, search for? What do they lack in their current lives? How does the theme of wander intersect with that of wonder? How are such topics, which are portrayed by taking up both interior and exterior space, represented in narrative? Our class will progress toward answering these questions, and many more, through fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry, tv, and film.

 

ENGL 2315-002—Introduction to Literary Study

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Harold Simmons Hall 207.  Hennum.                2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

MWF 11:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 137. Condon.            2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 2390-002H—Introduction to Creative Writing

T 2:00-4:50.  Harold Simmons Hall 107.  Rubin.          2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Brownderville.                     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote that poetry “purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being. It compels us to feel what we perceive, and to imagine that which we know.” Ezra Pound, more succinctly, instructed his fellow poets to “make it new!” Pound believed that poets should make the world new—and make poetry new—by presenting life in bold, original verse. 

Students will analyze published poems, write and revise their own poems, and respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communication skills. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary. Students will be invited to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary American poetry.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Smith.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

In this class, students will write, critique and revise short fiction and analyze published texts using the elements of fiction. A significant portion of class will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to research literary journals and submit a carefully revised story. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

TTh 3:30-4:50.  Heroy 153.  Hermes.          2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in prose and poetry. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class meeting, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Umphrey Lee 233.  Greenspan.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading to the written analysis of texts?

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

Texts: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Art Spiegelman, Maus, 2 volume set; Art Spiegelman, MetaMaus; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Schedule of Course Modules: Module 1 – Introduction to the Study of Texts; Module 2 – Reading and Responding to Pride and Prejudice; Module 3 – Reading and Responding to Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Module 4 – Reading and Responding to The Marrow of Tradition; Module 5 – Reading and Responding to Maus.

 

ENGL 3320-001—Topic in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Amsel.       2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: LAI, W

Are you ready to explore fact and fiction in the literature of the Middle Ages? How is it that we make history? And, how do we discern truth? Sounds familiar to us because we are still grappling with questions of real truths vs. fake truths in our everyday lives. This course examines real and imagined medieval histories and legends, including stories of King Arthur and Joan of Arc, so we can learn about medieval paradigms still present in contemporary culture.

 

ENGL 3346-001—American Literary History I

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 152.  Cassedy.     2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

“America”: it’s not just a place, but also a set of concepts and ideas. The place has always been here; the concepts and ideas had to be invented. This course is an introduction to the texts and stories through which the meanings of “America” and “Americans” were invented, from the first European contact to the Civil War, as seen through major literary works of the period. Readings to include texts by Benjamin Franklin, Susanna Rowson, Frederick Douglass, Edgar Allan Poe, Phyllis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Horatio Alger, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

 

ENGL 3348-001—History of Print and Digital Culture in America

TTh 2:00-3:20. Fondren Science 158.  Greenspan.     2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in

America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the

present era of digital and multimedia culture. In moving across four centuries of writing,

it will introduce students from various disciplinary tracks to the sprawling multidiscipline

of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical

dimensions. Its goals will be to expose them, first, to a literary history of the United

States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and

consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to

communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property,

access to information, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the

institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and

houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies

that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture,

and society.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national

formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship,

reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of

literacy; formations of lowbrow, middlebrow, and highbrow culture; the history of

libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the ongoing shift from print-based to

digital-based culture.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Pergadia.      2012: CA2, HD, W   2016: HFA, HD, W   CC: HD, W

Since the nineteenth century, the slave narrative has been central to the U.S. imagination. After the 1960s, novelist, filmmakers, and visual artists repeatedly turned to and reimagined this form, an act that both commemorates legacies of slavery and comments on the racial politics of thepresent. This survey of African American literature centralizes the “neo-slave narrative,” a genre of writing that resurrected and reimagined the history of slavery. These postmodern works are often anachronistic, experimental, irreverent. They defy strict genre labels, pushing aesthetic form to lodge their critiques. After studying the canonical works of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, we’ll turn to contemporary imaginative works that remember, memorialize, and recreate the experience of American slavery—the novels of Octavia Butler and Patricia Powell, the visual artwork of Kara Walker and Glenn Ligon, the films of Jordan Peele and Boots RileyThe 1619 Project. Students will gain an understanding both of the lives of Americans in bondage and how those lives transformed into stories that continue to shape our national consciousness. We’ll consider, for example, how Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987) rewrites the story a fugitive slave and speaks to the political history of the Reagan era. Students will learn how to analyze literary and visual art to ask: How do aesthetic forms become vehicles for social and political protest? What are the ethics of remembering? 

Texts: 

·       Frederick Douglass, Excerpts from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845)

·       Harriet Jacobs, Excerpts from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)

·       Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979)

·       Octavia Butler, Wild Seed (1980)

·       Charles Johnson, Oxherding Tale (1982)

·       Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987)

·       Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda (1998)

·       Kara Walker, selected works

·       Glenn Ligon, selected works

·       Jordan Peele, Get Out (2017)

·       Boots Riley, Sorry to Bother You (2018)

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

MW 3:00-4:20. Dallas Hall 343.  Condon.    2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

When we read poetry by other people, we consume and internalize not only their ideas but also their methods. In this sense even history’s greatest poets were apprentices all of their lives, constantly learning from the aesthetic choices of other writers. We will continue our own apprenticeship in this advanced workshop by cultivating a daily reading and writing practice. At the center of our practice is the daybook, a large sketchbook that modernist writers often used for their daily musings, doodles, and drafts. We will use our daybooks in much the same way, with the added prompt of transcribing and then imitating a poem by another writer. Such transcription is a physical practice—it works that poet’s linguistic perspective and formal attention into our memory. Our original, imitative draft that follows transcription attunes us to the aesthetic modes we feel most comfortable in and challenges us to write beyond them. You will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Rubin.        2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this advanced course students will work on their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops we will analyze exemplary models of the form and watch film clips. Readings will include such classics as Casablanca as well as newer scripts like Lady Bird and Get Out. ENG 2390 is a prerequisite for this course although Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 343.  Smith.    2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this class students will take a deeper dive into the elements of fiction. They will write revise, and analyze imaginative prose. Discussions will center on the students' writing and on published works that demonstrate solid craftsmanship.

 

ENGL 4323-001—Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

TTh 9:30-10:50.  REMOTE.  Wheeler.            2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

What’s it like to be a writer in the middle of a pandemic? Chaucer is our greatest example in English poetry. In his wise and hilarious stories, his poetry urges us to balance life’s delights and difficulties.

Reading: The Norton Chaucer (e-text) and background texts.

Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations, longer paper.

 

ENGL 4333-001—Renaissance Writers: The Big Four

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Moss.      2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

Beyond the outsize influence of Shakespeare’s drama in general, four tragedies in particular—Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear—have at one time or another emerged as the playwright’s greatest achievement and, by virtue of Shakespeare’s limitless prestige and viral popularity, each has seemed for a time the most influential and important play in the Western world. While the “Big Four” tragedies are no longer so consistently elevated above the rest of Shakespeare’s work, or for that matter the rest of drama, they remain central to Shakespeare scholarship, theater repertories, and artistic innovation of all types. Yet because the giant reputation of these four plays lingers on in our cultural imagination and any one of them could anchor a class or headline a theatrical season, they are rarely taught or performed together anymore, depriving students and audiences of their deep continuities and cumulative power. At the same time, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, as four of Shakespeare’s most searching and troubling accounts of society and the self under pressure, have rarely if ever been more relevant and revealing as in the troubled present.

Each of these four tragedies gets equal billing in this course, occupying a quarter of the semester. We will not only read and discuss each play, but in each case we will watch a theatrical performance (live, if any of the plays are being produced locally), as well as an innovative film adaptation. In addition to weekly discussion boards and critical papers (one short, one long), students should expect to create, collaborate, and perform as we seek new access to these perennially famous plays.

 

ENGL 4360-001— Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature of the US West and Southwest

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Sae-Saue.           2012: CA2, IL, W   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course will explore how novels, plays, and poems produced during and after the US annexation of northern Mexico (now the US Southwest) have communicated social, political, and economic dilemmas of US nation-making, including matters of race, class, gender, and citizenship. This means that we will also attend to important texts that deal with Texas in particular.

Primarily, we will look at texts produced by Mexican Americans, Chicana/os, and Native Americans in order to examine life in the region from an ethnic perspective. We will begin by looking at texts written in the 19th century and conclude having examined contemporary works in order to explore their various formal qualities, and the competing ethnic, political, and national ideologies they articulate.  

 

ENGL 4360-002— Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Studies in the American Novella

CANCELED

 

ENGL 4397-001—Distinction Seminar

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 102.  Satz.          2012: CA2, IL, W   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course fulfills the first part of the requirements for Distinction in English

The center of the Distinction requirement is an independent study project in literature or creative writing that the student undertakes with a member of the faculty. This course is designed to provide a variety of skills to the student to prepare for this venture.  The student will engage in projects ranging from a two minute oral report to creating an abstract  to a longer essay leading toward the ultimate project.   This course will deal with critical race, gender, and disability theory and literary texts that provide rich occasions to discuss those critical theories.  

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies

W 2:00-4:50.  Florence Hall 308.  Rosendale          

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

M 2:00-4:50.  Umphrey Lee 278.  Pergadia.

This course introduces graduate students to some of the central debates in cultural and literary theory through foundational texts that formulate or complicate our understanding of the subject. Students will learn how to write and speak about theoretical texts and how to recognize the theoretical assumptions that underlie acts of interpretation. Theoretical approaches include: structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminist and queer theory, postcolonial theory; critical race studies, and posthumanism. As we begin to disentangle the meanings of what we mean when we say “I,” we will inevitably analyze the relationships between the subject and subjection, ideology and power, language and authorship, theory and politics. To this end, we will consider the synergy between theories of the subject and contemporary feminist and postcolonial interventions. We will ground our analyses within particular literary, visual, and theoretical works, learning how to read cultural production as theory, rather than “applying” theory to selected texts.  The course is geared towards developing skills of close-reading and critical writing. 

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  Prothro Hall 207.  Stephens.

English 6312 (Teaching Practicum) is a year-long course designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. During the fall semester, in addition to all of the texts assigned on the WRTR 1312 syllabus, students will read and write critical responses to composition theory and the classroom. These texts will provide an overview of the history of rhetoric and methods for fostering critical thinking and writing. Students will also critically assess and review contemporary criticism of rhetorical pedagogy.

 

ENGL 6370-001— African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

T 2:00-4:50.  Dedman Life Science Building 132.  Edwards.

Through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison shaped and reshaped Black literature, providing a critical lens toward religion, gender, culture, music, politics, and love. This graduate seminar places these authors' works at the center of African American studies, focusing on recent theoretical and methodological trends in afro-pessimism, Black feminism, speculative fiction, and queer of color critique. Additionally, to better understand these African American literature pillars, there will be readings from Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, and Octavia Butler. By the end of the course, students will question how we might think of these writers within the context of American and African diasporic traditions across the Atlantic. What are the limits of their contributions to African American studies, and where might we be able to turn our attention within the world of literature for better answers?

 

ENGL 7340-001— Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Newman.

As a literary mode, realism reached its high-water mark in British literature with the Victorian novel. But eighteenth-century novelists like Defoe were writing under the sway of an empiricism and anti-idealism that seem “realist”; and Virginia Woolf, writing a self-consciously modern(ist) novel, rejected the recognizably realistic representational practices of some of her contemporaries on the grounds that they focused on superficial things that did not adequately or meaningfully represent reality. So what do we mean by “realism”?

The word “realist” enters Anglophone literary decades after the emergence of the mainstream Victorian novel in the 1840s. The unidiomatic ordering of this course’s subtitle, which puts “practice” before “theory,” reflects that anachronism, and is the starting point for our inquiry into what “realism” is.

We will also explore the changing fortunes of realism in literary theory and criticism, especially since the anti-realist turn of post-structuralist critics writing in the later twentieth century. Some questions we will ask in their wake: does realism resign us to a quietist acceptance of the status quo, promote and reinforce an ideology of bourgeois individualism, and express a naïve understanding of representation? Or does it express a healthy adult skepticism about heroism, idealism, and easy consensus about what “reality” is—or is like? 

Book list: Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey; Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair; E. C. Gaskell, Mary Barton; Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone; Eliot, George, Middlemarch; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway. Optional: Pam Morris, Realism (Routledge New Critical Idiom series)

Writing assignments to be specified, but will certainly culminate in one longer (15pp) seminar paper and include at least one presentation, as well as shorter, informal writing assignments throughout the semester.

 

ENGL 7376-001— Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

T 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Satz.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 2020

2012: HC, LL, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

ULEE 241

2012: CA1
2016: LL

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTH

2:00

3:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA1, HD 2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

2102

002

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 138

WRTR 2305

002H

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

WRTR 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 138

WRTR 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

WRTR 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Roudabush

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

WRTR 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

ACSH 213

WRTR 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

ACSH 213

WRTR 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

ACSH 213

WRTR 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

9:30

10:50

PRTH 220

WRTR 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Bozorth

TTH

9:30

10:50

OFAC 2030

WRTR 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

11:00

12:20

PRTH 220

WRTR 2305

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Atkinson

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 1030

WRTR 2305

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

12:30

1:50

PRTH 220

WRTR 2305

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 102

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

Ray

MWF

9:00

9:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

2311

001

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

JKNS 205

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry: The Language Distillery

Brownderville

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

003

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTH

2:00

3:20

CARU 161

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

DH 149

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA2, OC, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

11:00

12:20

HYER 110

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004H

Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTH

12:30

1:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

005

Fiction: Magic and Science in Fiction

Jones

TTH

2:00

3:20

HERY 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

11:00

11:50

CLEM 225

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study

Hennum

MWF

10:00

10:50

HCSH 207

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2315  003 Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander
Kiser
MWF
 9:00 9:50
ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002H

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

T

2:00

4:50

ACSH 107

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Brownderville

TH

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 343

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

Hermes

TTH

3:30

4:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

Greenspan

TTH

9:30

10:50

ULEE 233

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature

Amsel

TTH

11:00

12:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3346

001

American Literary History I

Cassedy

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

Greenspan

TTH

2:00

3:20

FOSC 158

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

Pergadia

TTH

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

MW

3:00

4:20

DH 343

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Rubin

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 343

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4323

001

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTH

9:30

10:50

REMOTE

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4333

001

Shakespeare: The Big Four

Moss

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 101

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit

Sae-Saue

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

4360

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 102

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Rosendale

W

2:00

4:50

FLOR 308

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Pergadia

M

2:00

4:50

ULEE 278

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 207

6370

001

African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

Edwards

T

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

7340

001

Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Newman

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 156

7376

001

Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

Satz

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC

2310

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

           

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

DH 149

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL,  W

LAI, W

WRTR 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hennum

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 106

 

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

Ray

MWF

9:00

9:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2315  003 Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander Kiser MWF  9:00  9:50 ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

WRTR 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 138

 

 

2311

001

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

JKNS 205

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study

Hennum

MWF

10:00

10:50

HCSH 207

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

 

 

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

ULEE 241

2012: CA1
2016: LL

LAI

WRTR 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

 

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

11:00

11:50

CLEM 225

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

WRTR 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Roudabush

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

ACSH 213

 

 

4360

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

 

WRTR 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

ACSH 213

 

 

3346

001

American Literary History I

Cassedy

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, HC2, W
2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

4333

001

Shakespeare: The Big Four

Moss

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 101

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

WRTR 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

ACSH 213

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

MW

3:00

4:20

DH 343

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Pergadia

M

2:00

4:50

ULEE 278

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Rosendale

W

2:00

4:50

FLOR 308

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 207

 

 

WRTR 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

9:30

10:50

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Bozorth

TTH

9:30

10:50

OFAC 2030

 

 

2312

002

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

Greenspan

TTH

9:30

10:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 343

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

4323

001

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTH

9:30

10:50

REMOTE

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit: Literature of the US West and Southwest

Sae-Saue

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 2020

2012: HC, LL, OC
2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

WRTR 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

11:00

12:20

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Atkinson

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 1030

 

 

2311

002

Poetry: The Language Distillery

Brownderville

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

11:00

12:20

HYER 110

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, (OC), W

LAI, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 343

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature

Amsel

TTH

11:00

12:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

12:30

1:50

PRTH 220

 

 

2312

004H

Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTH

12:30

1:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

Pergadia

TTH

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTH

2:00

3:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA1, HD
2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 102

 

 

2311

003

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTH

2:00

3:20

CARU 161

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

005

Fiction: Magic and Science in Fiction

Jones

TTH

2:00

3:20

HERY 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

Greenspan

TTH

2:00

3:20

FOSC 158

2012: CA2, HC2, W
2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

Hermes

TTH

3:30

4:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002H

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

T

2:00

4:50

ACSH 107

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

6370

001

African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

Edwards

T

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

 

 

7376

001

Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

Satz

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Brownderville

TH

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Rubin

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

7340

001

Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Newman

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 156

 

 

Summer 2021

MAY & SUMMER SESSION 2021 COURSES

 

Cat #

Sec

Session

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

CC

2311

091

May

Poetry (Taos)

Rosendale

M-F

9:00

1:00

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

001

May

Introduction to Creative Writing

Condon(Hermes)

M-F

11:00

3:45

VIRTUAL

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2312

0011

S1

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

M-F

2:00

3:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3367

0011

S1

Ethical Impl - Children's Lit

Satz

M-F

10:00

11:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3379

0011

S1

Contexts of Disabilitiy

Satz

M-F

12:00

1:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, OC, W

HD, OC, W

2302

0012

S2

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

M-F

12:00

1:50

ULEE

303

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

MAY & SUMMER 2021 SESSION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGL 2312-0011—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

M – F 2:00-3:50. VIRTUAL.  Hermes.        2012: CA2, W, OC     2016: LL, W, OC   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

ENGL 3367-0011 Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

M – F  10:00-11:50. VIRTUAL. Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Palac io, Wonder and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3379-0011—Contexts of Disability

M – F  12:00-1:50.  VIRTUAL.  Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 2302-0012 Business Writing

M – F  12:00-1:50. Umphrey Lee 303.  Dickson-Carr, C.    2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.