Current Course Offerings

Fall 2021

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Owens Fine Arts 2020.  Goyne.         2012: CA1, HC1, OC      2016: LL, HC, OC    CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.

 

ENGL 1330-001—The World of Shakespeare 

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Umphrey Lee 241.  Rosendale. 2012: CA1   2016: LL    CC: LAI

Time to (re-)introduce yourself to our language’s greatest writer. In this course, you will meet Shakespeare’s princes, tyrants, heroes, villains, saints, sinners, lovers, losers, drunkards, clowns, outcasts, fairies, witches, and monsters. You’ll watch and listen as they love, woo, kiss, charm, hate, curse, mock, fool, sing to, dance with, get drunk with, sleep with, fight with, murder, and haunt each other. You will visit Renaissance England, a place and time as strange, troubled, exciting, delightful, fearful, thoughtful, political, magical, bloody, sexy, and confused as your own. You will read poetry you will never forget.

Our introductory survey will cover 6–8 plays in all of the major Shakespearean genres: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, as well as some poetry (all texts are digital and free, with a print option for students who prefer print). Background readings, lectures, and films will contextualize Shakespeare’s achievement within Renaissance society and life (and death), engaging the religious, political, cultural, and economic debates of that glorious but tumultuous age.

Coursework includes frequent quizzes, written midterm and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. No papers.

ENGL 1330 satisfies the Language and Literature requirement for the University Curriculum, and counts toward the English major and minor

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Levy.        2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

English 1365 examines questions of individual and collective identities from historical, contemporary and literary perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about who “We, The People” are. These include: “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Identity Politics,” “Cancel Culture,” “Pluralism,” etc.   We look at identity as both self-selected and imposed, as fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as permanent and situational. 

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 100.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 100.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 351.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W    CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priority goes to graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 351.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.       2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priority goes to graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001—Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Clements Hall 334.  Ray.               2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

What does it mean to author a text? Does all of this creative energy come from the author, or can some of it (or all of it) be located elsewhere? Is this notion of authorship more in line with concepts of prophecy and prophets, religious or otherwise? Where does the concept of inspiration fit in? This class will grapple with these questions as far back as the Old Testament and as modern as the current decade. We will read parables, journals, letters, fiction, science fiction, satire and science. Along the way, we will think deeply about the relationship between author and text, inventor and invention, artist and art.

 

ENGL 2310-002—Imagination and Interpretation: Greco-Roman Ideas in Early Modern Literature

MWF 8:00-8:50.  Fondren Science 157.  Jones.             2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

Greco-Roman ideas permeate every genre of Early Modern literature, but authors reinterpreted them to reflect the values and concerns of their own time period. This course will examine how and why Early Modern authors used and altered Greco-Roman texts. To do so, we will discuss historical context and how it affected each author’s perspective. This course will provide a survey of both Early Modern and Greco-Roman authors, including Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Cavendish, Shakespeare, Jonson, Milton, Ovid, Plato, Plutarch, and Livy. Students will be expected to complete two essays and exams, as well as actively participate in discussions.

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: A Poet Guided Tour

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Junkins 205.  Moss.                   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

In this course, the poets themselves guide us through the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry. During the first half of the semester, each week will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focusing on a representative poet in each case. We will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg. The second half explores perennial themes: poets addressing and questioning God; poets protesting social injustice; poets in love; poets struggling with age and loss; poets pondering nature, art, and poetry itself. Guest speakers include John Donne, Aphra Behn, John Keats, Robert Frost, W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Gwendolyn Brooks, Seamus Heaney, and many more. Who knew there were so many poets? Come meet them. Course requirements: two papers (one short, one longish), regular posts to an online discussion board, midterm exam, final exam, recitation, and the dreaded-at-first-later-beloved creative exercise. Course text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 6th edition.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry: The Language Distillery

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 105.  Brownderville. 2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Life goes down in sips and swigs of language, and poets, being the best distillers around, serve words that quicken our sense of wonder and play and meaning. Unlike some other inebriants, poetry actually improves our thinking—critical thinking, sure, but that’s not the best of the buzz: when we open ourselves to poems, we get better at beautiful thinking and thereby turn our minds into amazing places to live. That’s what this course is really about. We’ll visit the imaginary distillery together, enjoy the liquor of language, and try to figure out how the magic is made and why we crave it. Course requirements: one short paper, one longer paper, one creative exercise, one recitation, regular participation, midterm, and final. Course text: TBD.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Caruth Hall 161.  Bozorth.              2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and Christmas carols. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, teen-age rebellion, God, Satan, and what the difference is between “cliché” and “cliched.”You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

MWF 8:00-8:50.  Dallas Hall 149.  Spencer.            2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Biologists have been warning us since the 1960s that we are irrevocably changing the natural world around us. In the 1980s scientists started talking about human-caused climate change, and in 2008, geologists formally proposed a name tying the planet’s sixth mass extinction to human activity—the Anthropocene. But while scientists have created models to predict the changing world around us, fiction writers have imagined its impact on individuals and society in varying and creative ways. In this course we will learn common approaches to literary analysis through the work of recent U.S. novelists who have wrestled with this environmental breakdown and prophesied the ecological apocalypse to come. Whether our demise comes about through uncontrollable global warming, nuclear holocaust, a global epidemic, or the slow decay of our bodies due to our own toxic waste, U.S. writers use fiction to come to grips with a civilization teetering on the edge of destruction out of greed, blindness, or just sheer stupidity (as Vonnegut would say, “thanks, big brain”). Potential novels to read this semester include Kurt Vonnegut’sGalapagos, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, and Ana Castillo’s So Far from God. Some of these works are hopeful and some are not, but all of them imagine the moments in which human beings face the inevitable consequences of our own choices as a species.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Hyer Hall 110.  Hermes.   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Hyer Hall 110.  Hermes.            2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2312-004H—Introduction to Fiction

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Umphrey Lee 228.  Sae-Saue.       2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goals of the class are for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to understand how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships while also imagining particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. How does a text construct a cultural and social landscape? How does fiction organize ways human consciousness makes sense of determinate historical events? How does fiction articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.

 

ENGL 2312-005—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Heroy 153.  Hermes.                     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Owen Fine Arts 2030.  Cassedy.       2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there’s something about what it’s doing that you can’t quite put into words. This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text. You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are difficult to pin down. Tentative reading list includes texts by Karen Russell (Swamplandia!), William Shakespeare (King Lear), Leslie Jamison (The Empathy Exams), Edgar Allan Poe (Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), Mat Johnson (Pym), and Emily Dickinson. Four essays, a midterm, and a final.

 

ENGL 2315-003—Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Kiser.                        2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

This class will introduce you to a variety of genres and how they make meaning in their own unique ways. We will approach this topic by exploring the class theme: “Women Who Wonder & Wander” and we will ask questions such as: What do these women, found throughout cultural production, search for? What do they lack in their current lives? How does the theme of wander intersect with that of wonder? How are such topics, which are portrayed by taking up both interior and exterior space, represented in narrative? Our class will progress toward answering these questions, and many more, through fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry, tv, and film.

 

ENGL 2315-002—Introduction to Literary Study: Texts & Contexts

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Harold Simmons Hall 207.  Weisenburger.                2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

Our course focuses on two essential modes of scholarly reading: first, close attention to the verbal means by which a text conveys its meanings, or close reading; second, how those meanings invoke significant prior expressions and times, or contextual reading. In close reading we engage with what the text says, literally and figuratively, and how the writing will at times and in critical ways seem powerfully clear, or ambiguous, or unclear, even self-contradictory. Close readings also invite us to reconsider any text in light of its contexts: how it invokes and uses prior writings as well as the stuff of social and historical experiences and references—in sum, beyond the imagined experiences and world(s) of the text in our hands. These reading practices are essential not only to literary study but to the interpretation of writing in general, across the disciplines of—for example, law and history. In this class we will study ways of reading age-old literary forms: novels and short stories, kinds of poetry, as well as classic dramatic works. In reading and discussing them we strive always for a blend of close and contextual practices. This work will also enable us to improve your writing and critical skills, through a series of essays that ask students to write responsively to our readings.

      So, what does it take to succeed in ENGL 2315?  First: contribute to class discussions, which requires keeping up with our readings.  Second: in applying methods of close and contextual literary study, make a practice of being a re-reader, marking-up texts and taking notes and forming questions about the text in hand. Third: develop and apply those critical reading skills that will be essential to your work in the world.

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

MWF 11:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 137. Condon.            2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 2390-002H—Introduction to Creative Writing

T 2:00-4:50.  Harold Simmons Hall 107.  Rubin.          2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Brownderville.                     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote that poetry “purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being. It compels us to feel what we perceive, and to imagine that which we know.” Ezra Pound, more succinctly, instructed his fellow poets to “make it new!” Pound believed that poets should make the world new—and make poetry new—by presenting life in bold, original verse. 

Students will analyze published poems, write and revise their own poems, and respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communication skills. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary. Students will be invited to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary American poetry.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Smith.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

In this class, students will write, critique and revise short fiction and analyze published texts using the elements of fiction. A significant portion of class will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to research literary journals and submit a carefully revised story. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

TTh 3:30-4:50.  Heroy 153.  Hermes.          2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in prose and poetry. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class meeting, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Umphrey Lee 233.  Greenspan.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading to the written analysis of texts?

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

Texts: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Art Spiegelman, Maus, 2 volume set; Art Spiegelman, MetaMaus; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Schedule of Course Modules: Module 1 – Introduction to the Study of Texts; Module 2 – Reading and Responding to Pride and Prejudice; Module 3 – Reading and Responding to Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Module 4 – Reading and Responding to The Marrow of Tradition; Module 5 – Reading and Responding to Maus.

 

ENGL 3320-001—Topic in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Annette Simmons Hall 218.  Amsel.       2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: LAI, W

Are you ready to explore fact and fiction in the literature of the Middle Ages? How is it that we make history? And, how do we discern truth? Sounds familiar to us because we are still grappling with questions of real truths vs. fake truths in our everyday lives. This course examines real and imagined medieval histories and legends, including stories of King Arthur and Joan of Arc, so we can learn about medieval paradigms still present in contemporary culture.

 

ENGL 3346-001—American Literary History I

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 152.  Cassedy.     2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

“America”: it’s not just a place, but also a set of concepts and ideas. The place has always been here; the concepts and ideas had to be invented. This course is an introduction to the texts and stories through which the meanings of “America” and “Americans” were invented, from the first European contact to the Civil War, as seen through major literary works of the period. Readings to include texts by Benjamin Franklin, Susanna Rowson, Frederick Douglass, Edgar Allan Poe, Phyllis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Horatio Alger, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

 

ENGL 3348-001—History of Print and Digital Culture in America

TTh 2:00-3:20. Hyer Hall 107.  Greenspan.     2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in

America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the

present era of digital and multimedia culture. In moving across four centuries of writing,

it will introduce students from various disciplinary tracks to the sprawling multidiscipline

of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical

dimensions. Its goals will be to expose them, first, to a literary history of the United

States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and

consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to

communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property,

access to information, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the

institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and

houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies

that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture,

and society.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national

formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship,

reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of

literacy; formations of lowbrow, middlebrow, and highbrow culture; the history of

libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the ongoing shift from print-based to

digital-based culture.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Pergadia.      2012: CA2, HD, W   2016: HFA, HD, W   CC: HD, W

Since the nineteenth century, the slave narrative has been central to the U.S. imagination. After the 1960s, novelist, filmmakers, and visual artists repeatedly turned to and reimagined this form, an act that both commemorates legacies of slavery and comments on the racial politics of thepresent. This survey of African American literature centralizes the “neo-slave narrative,” a genre of writing that resurrected and reimagined the history of slavery. These postmodern works are often anachronistic, experimental, irreverent. They defy strict genre labels, pushing aesthetic form to lodge their critiques. After studying the canonical works of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, we’ll turn to contemporary imaginative works that remember, memorialize, and recreate the experience of American slavery—the novels of Octavia Butler and Patricia Powell, the visual artwork of Kara Walker and Glenn Ligon, the films of Jordan Peele and Boots RileyThe 1619 Project. Students will gain an understanding both of the lives of Americans in bondage and how those lives transformed into stories that continue to shape our national consciousness. We’ll consider, for example, how Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987) rewrites the story a fugitive slave and speaks to the political history of the Reagan era. Students will learn how to analyze literary and visual art to ask: How do aesthetic forms become vehicles for social and political protest? What are the ethics of remembering? 

Texts: 

·       Frederick Douglass, Excerpts from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845)

·       Harriet Jacobs, Excerpts from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861)

·       Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979)

·       Octavia Butler, Wild Seed (1980)

·       Charles Johnson, Oxherding Tale (1982)

·       Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987)

·       Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda (1998)

·       Kara Walker, selected works

·       Glenn Ligon, selected works

·       Jordan Peele, Get Out (2017)

·       Boots Riley, Sorry to Bother You (2018)

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

MW 3:00-4:20. Dallas Hall 343.  Condon.    2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

When we read poetry by other people, we consume and internalize not only their ideas but also their methods. In this sense even history’s greatest poets were apprentices all of their lives, constantly learning from the aesthetic choices of other writers. We will continue our own apprenticeship in this advanced workshop by cultivating a daily reading and writing practice. At the center of our practice is the daybook, a large sketchbook that modernist writers often used for their daily musings, doodles, and drafts. We will use our daybooks in much the same way, with the added prompt of transcribing and then imitating a poem by another writer. Such transcription is a physical practice—it works that poet’s linguistic perspective and formal attention into our memory. Our original, imitative draft that follows transcription attunes us to the aesthetic modes we feel most comfortable in and challenges us to write beyond them. You will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Rubin.        2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this advanced course students will work on their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops we will analyze exemplary models of the form and watch film clips. Readings will include such classics as Casablanca as well as newer scripts like Lady Bird and Get Out. ENG 2390 is a prerequisite for this course although Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 343.  Smith.    2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this class students will take a deeper dive into the elements of fiction. They will write revise, and analyze imaginative prose. Discussions will center on the students' writing and on published works that demonstrate solid craftsmanship.

 

ENGL 4323-001—Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 149.  Wheeler.            2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

What’s it like to be a writer in the middle of a pandemic? Chaucer is our greatest example in English poetry. In his wise and hilarious stories, his poetry urges us to balance life’s delights and difficulties.

Reading: The Norton Chaucer (e-text) and background texts.

Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations, longer paper.

 

ENGL 4333-001—Renaissance Writers: The Big Four

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Moss.      2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

Beyond the outsize influence of Shakespeare’s drama in general, four tragedies in particular—Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear—have at one time or another emerged as the playwright’s greatest achievement and, by virtue of Shakespeare’s limitless prestige and viral popularity, each has seemed for a time the most influential and important play in the Western world. While the “Big Four” tragedies are no longer so consistently elevated above the rest of Shakespeare’s work, or for that matter the rest of drama, they remain central to Shakespeare scholarship, theater repertories, and artistic innovation of all types. Yet because the giant reputation of these four plays lingers on in our cultural imagination and any one of them could anchor a class or headline a theatrical season, they are rarely taught or performed together anymore, depriving students and audiences of their deep continuities and cumulative power. At the same time, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, and King Lear, as four of Shakespeare’s most searching and troubling accounts of society and the self under pressure, have rarely if ever been more relevant and revealing as in the troubled present.

Each of these four tragedies gets equal billing in this course, occupying a quarter of the semester. We will not only read and discuss each play, but in each case we will watch a theatrical performance (live, if any of the plays are being produced locally), as well as an innovative film adaptation. In addition to weekly discussion boards and critical papers (one short, one long), students should expect to create, collaborate, and perform as we seek new access to these perennially famous plays.

 

ENGL 4360-001— Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature of the US West and Southwest

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Sae-Saue.           2012: CA2, IL, W   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course will explore how novels, plays, and poems produced during and after the US annexation of northern Mexico (now the US Southwest) have communicated social, political, and economic dilemmas of US nation-making, including matters of race, class, gender, and citizenship. This means that we will also attend to important texts that deal with Texas in particular.

Primarily, we will look at texts produced by Mexican Americans, Chicana/os, and Native Americans in order to examine life in the region from an ethnic perspective. We will begin by looking at texts written in the 19th century and conclude having examined contemporary works in order to explore their various formal qualities, and the competing ethnic, political, and national ideologies they articulate.  

 

ENGL 4360-002— Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Studies in the American Novella

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Clements Hall 324.  Weisenburger.     2012: CA2, IL, W   2016: HFA, IL, OC

Situated (or stubbornly wedged) between the short story and the novel, the novella is one of our most beloved and hard to place narrative forms. Among the great novellas worldwide are Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis (1915) and James Joyce’s The Dead (1914), or Tolstoy’s The Kreutzer Sonata (1889) and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1902). The novella is partly the product of modern (post-1840s) magazine publishing, and partly an offshoot of what was formerly known as “the tale.” Publishers are ambivalent, though: production costs being quite nearly the same as for a 200-page novel, why not give the buyer more for her or his dollar, or else why not just roll the novella into a volume with some short stories? Readers love novellas nonetheless. A novella like Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea sits light and easy in your hand; and you can finish it in, say, three hours. The better then to re-read it!

      What the novella is, however, is a question that vexes literary people. They assert that a novella runs about forty thousand words, give or take; therefore they chuck The Great Gatsby (at 50K) out of this category. Yet why should an empirical metric such as that be taken as decisive? Instead shouldn’t we be asking formal, that is, narratological questions about exemplary novellas? How may contemporary narrative theory (and perhaps also book history research) help us to see and define representative features, aspects, and practices of American novellas, so to better understand and appreciate the form and its considerable popularity?  What can we learn from comparative studies of the nine novellas on our syllabus? What aesthetic and cognitive experiences and pleasures are unique to this form?

 

ENGL 4397-001—Distinction Seminar

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 102.  Satz.          2012: CA2, IL, W   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course fulfills the first part of the requirements for Distinction in English

The center of the Distinction requirement is an independent study project in literature or creative writing that the student undertakes with a member of the faculty. This course is designed to provide a variety of skills to the student to prepare for this venture.  The student will engage in projects ranging from a two minute oral report to creating an abstract  to a longer essay leading toward the ultimate project.   This course will deal with critical race, gender, and disability theory and literary texts that provide rich occasions to discuss those critical theories.  

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies

W 2:00-4:50.  Florence Hall 308.  Rosendale          

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

M 2:00-4:50.  Umphrey Lee 278.  Pergadia.

This course introduces graduate students to some of the central debates in cultural and literary theory through foundational texts that formulate or complicate our understanding of the subject. Students will learn how to write and speak about theoretical texts and how to recognize the theoretical assumptions that underlie acts of interpretation. Theoretical approaches include: structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminist and queer theory, postcolonial theory; critical race studies, and posthumanism. As we begin to disentangle the meanings of what we mean when we say “I,” we will inevitably analyze the relationships between the subject and subjection, ideology and power, language and authorship, theory and politics. To this end, we will consider the synergy between theories of the subject and contemporary feminist and postcolonial interventions. We will ground our analyses within particular literary, visual, and theoretical works, learning how to read cultural production as theory, rather than “applying” theory to selected texts.  The course is geared towards developing skills of close-reading and critical writing. 

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  Prothro Hall 207.  Stephens.

English 6312 (Teaching Practicum) is a year-long course designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. During the fall semester, in addition to all of the texts assigned on the WRTR 1312 syllabus, students will read and write critical responses to composition theory and the classroom. These texts will provide an overview of the history of rhetoric and methods for fostering critical thinking and writing. Students will also critically assess and review contemporary criticism of rhetorical pedagogy.

 

ENGL 6370-001— African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

T 2:00-4:50.  Dedman Life Science Building 132.  Edwards.

Through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison shaped and reshaped Black literature, providing a critical lens toward religion, gender, culture, music, politics, and love. This graduate seminar places these authors' works at the center of African American studies, focusing on recent theoretical and methodological trends in afro-pessimism, Black feminism, speculative fiction, and queer of color critique. Additionally, to better understand these African American literature pillars, there will be readings from Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, and Octavia Butler. By the end of the course, students will question how we might think of these writers within the context of American and African diasporic traditions across the Atlantic. What are the limits of their contributions to African American studies, and where might we be able to turn our attention within the world of literature for better answers?

 

ENGL 7340-001— Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Th 2:00-4:50.  Umphrey Lee 104.  Newman.

 

ENGL 7376-001— Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

T 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Satz.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 2020

2012: HC, LL, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

ULEE 241

2012: CA1
2016: LL

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTH

2:00

3:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA1, HD 2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hennum

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 106

 

 

WRTR 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

 

 

WRTR 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Roudabush

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

ACSH 213

 

 

WRTR 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

ACSH 213

 

 

WRTR 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

ACSH 213

 

 

WRTR 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

9:30

10:50

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Bozorth

TTH

9:30

10:50

OFAC 2030

 

 

WRTR 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

11:00

12:20

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Atkinson

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 1030

 

 

WRTR 2305

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

12:30

1:50

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 102

 

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

Ray

MWF

9:00

9:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

002

Imagination and Interpretation: Greco-Roman Ideas in Early Modern Literature

Jones

MWF

8:00

8:50

FOSC 157

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

JKNS 205

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry: The Language Distillery

Brownderville

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

003

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTH

2:00

3:20

CARU 161

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

DH 149

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA2, OC, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

11:00

12:20

HYER 110

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004H

Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTH

12:30

1:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

005

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

2:00

3:20

HERY 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

11:00

11:50

OFAC 2030

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Texts & Contexts

Weisenburger

MWF

10:00

10:50

HCSH 207

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2315  003 Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander
Kiser
MWF
 10:00 10:50
ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002H

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

T

2:00

4:50

ACSH 107

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Brownderville

TH

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 343

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

Hermes

TTH

3:30

4:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

Greenspan

TTH

9:30

10:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature

Amsel

TTH

11:00

12:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3346

001

American Literary History I

Cassedy

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

Greenspan

TTH

2:00

3:20

HYER 107

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

Pergadia

TTH

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

MW

3:00

4:20

DH 343

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Rubin

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 343

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4323

001

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 149

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

4333

001

Shakespeare: The Big Four

Moss

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 101

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit

Sae-Saue

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

4360

002

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit: Studies in the American Novella

Weisenburger

MWF

12:00

12:50

CLEM 324

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 102

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Rosendale

W

2:00

4:50

FLOR 308

 

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Pergadia

M

2:00

4:50

ULEE 278

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 207

 

 

6370

001

African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

Edwards

T

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

 

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Newman

TH

2:00

4:50

ULEE 104

 

 

7376

001

Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

Satz

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC

2310

002

Imagination and Interpretation: Greco-Roman Ideas in Early Modern Literature

Jones

MWF

8:00

8:50

FOSC 157

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction in Contemporary American Fiction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

DH 149

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL,  W

LAI, W

WRTR 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hennum

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 106

 

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Authorship and Prophecy

Ray

MWF

9:00

9:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2315  003 Introduction to Literary Study: Women Who Wonder & Wander Kiser MWF  9:00  9:50 ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

WRTR 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 138

 

 

2311

001

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

JKNS 205

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Texts & Contexts

Weisenburger

MWF

10:00

10:50

HCSH 207

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

 

 

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

ULEE 241

2012: CA1
2016: LL

LAI

WRTR 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

 

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

11:00

11:50

OFAC 2030

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

WRTR 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Roudabush

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

 

 

WRTR 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

ACSH 213

 

 

4360

002

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit: Studies in the American Novella

Weisenburger

MWF

12:00

12:50

CLEM 324

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

WRTR 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

ACSH 213

 

 

3346

001

American Literary History I

Cassedy

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, HC2, W
2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

4333

001

Shakespeare: The Big Four

Moss

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 101

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

WRTR 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

ACSH 213

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

MW

3:00

4:20

DH 343

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Pergadia

M

2:00

4:50

ULEE 278

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Rosendale

W

2:00

4:50

FLOR 308

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Literacy

C Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 100

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 207

 

 

WRTR 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

9:30

10:50

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Bozorth

TTH

9:30

10:50

OFAC 2030

 

 

2312

002

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

Greenspan

TTH

9:30

10:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 343

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

4323

001

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 149

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemp American Lit: Literature of the US West and Southwest

Sae-Saue

TTH

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, IL, W
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 2020

2012: HC, LL, OC
2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

WRTR 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

11:00

12:20

PRTH 220

 

 

WRTR 2305

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

Atkinson

TTH

11:00

12:20

OFAC 1030

 

 

2311

002

Poetry: The Language Distillery

Brownderville

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

11:00

12:20

HYER 110

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, (OC), W

LAI, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTH

11:00

12:20

DH 343

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature

Amsel

TTH

11:00

12:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

12:30

1:50

PRTH 220

 

 

2312

004H

Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTH

12:30

1:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Rewriting Slavery

Pergadia

TTH

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTH

2:00

3:20

ACSH 218

2012: CA1, HD
2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

WRTR 2305

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar I:
Problems of Knowledge

McConnell

TTH

2:00

3:20

DH 102

 

 

2311

003

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTH

2:00

3:20

CARU 161

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

005

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

TTH

2:00

3:20

HERY 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

Greenspan

TTH

2:00

3:20

HYER 107

2012: CA2, HC2, W
2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

Hermes

TTH

3:30

4:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002H

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

T

2:00

4:50

ACSH 107

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

6370

001

African-American Literature: Hurston, Baldwin, Morrison

Edwards

T

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

 

 

7376

001

Seminar: Special Topics: Disability and Literature

Satz

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: Make it New!

Brownderville

TH

2:00

4:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting

Rubin

TH

2:00

4:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

7340

001

Seminar in British Lit: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

Newman

TH

2:00

4:50

ULEE 104

 

 

Summer 2021

MAY & SUMMER SESSION 2021 COURSES

 

Cat #

Sec

Session

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

CC

2311

091

May

Poetry (Taos)

Rosendale

M-F

9:00

1:00

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

001

May

Introduction to Creative Writing

Condon(Hermes)

M-F

11:00

3:45

VIRTUAL

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2312

0011

S1

Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes

M-F

2:00

3:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3367

0011

S1

Ethical Impl - Children's Lit

Satz

M-F

10:00

11:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3379

0011

S1

Contexts of Disabilitiy

Satz

M-F

12:00

1:50

VIRTUAL

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, OC, W

HD, OC, W

2302

0012

S2

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

M-F

12:00

1:50

ULEE

303

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

MAY & SUMMER 2021 SESSION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGL 2312-0011—Introduction to Fiction: The Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

M – F 2:00-3:50. VIRTUAL.  Hermes.        2012: CA2, W, OC     2016: LL, W, OC   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

ENGL 3367-0011 Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

M – F  10:00-11:50. VIRTUAL. Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Palac io, Wonder and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3379-0011—Contexts of Disability

M – F  12:00-1:50.  VIRTUAL.  Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 2302-0012 Business Writing

M – F  12:00-1:50. Umphrey Lee 303.  Dickson-Carr, C.    2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

Spring 2021

ENGL 1363-001—The Myth of the American West

TTh 3:30-4:50. Heroy  153.  Weisenburger.        2012: CA1, HC1   2016: CA, HC                 CC: CA, CAA

Our studies take up a long and bloody record of settlement in the trans-Mississippi West—a history of land grabs, Indian wars, outlawry and bravado; of ranch, railroad, town, and state building—and how they became the stuff of legend and myth. That process began in 19th century American popular culture, and continues today. We study the substance and uses of these legend- and myth-making efforts; and ask why western mythmaking flourished in the modern period (1900 to 1960), well after the frontier was settled.  We begin with three case studies: first, the story of Texas immigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche, retold for decades in multiple media; second, Deadwood Dick, a classic of “Dime Novel” western storytelling; third, a biography of Buffalo Bill Cody, a late-19th century international celebrity —“The Last of the Great Scouts.” We also study 20th century classics of western fiction and film, art and photography from the modern period, and conclude with the “revisionist Western” that, after 1960, upends The Standard Myth—of borderland spaces, horse culture, white manhood and violence, as they play out in various print and visual media.

 

ENGL 1380-001— Introduction to Literature: From Stone Tablets to Hypertext

TTh 9:30-10:50. Heroy Hall 153.  Wilson.                 2012: CA1     2016: CA   CC: CA, CAA

How can we think of literature as technology? From Ashurbanipal’s massive library of stone tablets in the 7th century BCE to modern digital literature projects aiming to teach computers to “read” a million texts, books have had a hold on our collective imagination. Every age has experimented to find the perfect “text technology” to share new ideas, to inspire, to challenge the status quo, and to dream. In this course, we’ll encounter a series of books ranging from stone engravings and Medieval manuscripts to early printed books, experiments in visual poetry printing, and Instapoets, each of which represents an innovative way in which people have “upgraded” their reading technology, and we’ll think about how these different stories and their technologies make meaning, both philosophical and aesthetic, for us. You'll learn methods of detailed reading as well as ways of using technology to analyze any and every kind of book you may encounter. 

 

ENGL 1385-001— Power, Passion, and Protest in British Literature

TTh 12:30-1:50. Fondren Science 133.  Rosendale.               2012: CA1, HC1     2016: CA, HC    CC: HC

A high-speed, high-altitude survey of a thousand-plus years of British literature and history, with special attention to literature’s role as an instrument of various forms of desire and power. From its prehistoric and colonial origins through the medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, imperial, and modern eras, the story of Britain is full of kings, queens, wars, resistance, sex, beheadings, treachery, heroism, magic, belief, doubt, progress, failure, and marvelous literature that can improve your life. As we survey this history, we will consider not just great literature, but also its relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written. Exams, quizzes, discussion boards, attendance & participation.

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 101.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 102.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 102.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 102.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.       2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001— Imagination and Interpretation: Eve’s Reply

MWF 9:00-9:50. VIRTUAL.  Jones.                         2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

“Frailty, thy name is woman!” Hamlet’s famous declaration is hardly alone; many male poetic geniuses throughout the western literary canon expound upon the flaws of women. Yet despite lack of educational access, low literacy rates, and other institutional barriers, several women took up their pens to provide a female perspective that counters the misogynistic ideas and established gender roles of their time periods. This course will survey proto-feminist texts that take the form of plays, speeches, poems, political pamphlets, biographies, and novels. Some authors we will encounter include Sappho, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Wroth, Margaret Cavendish, Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, and Mary Shelley. Students should expect class assignments to include two essays, a midterm, a final, and occasional quizzes. 

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

TTh 2:00-3:20.  VIRTUAL.  Bozorth.                      2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry: Lifting the Veil

TTh 12:30-1:50.  VIRTUAL.  Condon (Hermes).   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“Poetry,” wrote Percy Bysshe Shelley, “lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were unfamiliar.” He’s right: poetry reveals the unexpected beauty and strangeness in the ordinary landscapes, people, and emotional situations we encounter every day. Yet, the famous stereotype of poetry suggests that the genre doesn’t reveal anything without a lot of decoding on a reader’s part—that the poem is the veil that hides a complicated message. In this course, we will explode this stereotype by learning about poetic characteristics and devices that are meant to delight readers, not confuse them. Each week we will focus on a different poetic technique or form—image, repetition, the sonnet—and discuss how poets across the centuries have used them to bring us pleasure, making something as mundane as grass seem suddenly breathtaking and strange. Requirements include a midterm and final exam, two papers, one creative exercise, a poetry recitation, and regular participation in discussions both on Canvas and in class. Course Text: TBD

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Women Who Wonder & Wander

MWF 8:00-9:20. Hyer Hall 107.  Kiser.        2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This class will introduce you to elements of fiction through texts that represent women who wonder and wander in a variety of ways. We will ask questions such as: What do these women, found throughout American literature, search for? What do they lack in their current lives? How does the theme of wander intersect with that of wonder? How are such topics, which are portrayed by taking up both interior and exterior space, represented in narrative? Our class will progress toward answering these questions, and many more, through Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Henry James’ The Portrait of a Lady, short stories by Mary Hunter Austin, Nella Larsen’s Quicksand, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and more.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Self and the Other

MWF 2:00-2:50.  VIRTUAL.  Newman.      2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

The relationship between self and other is a theme of many short stories and novels. But it is more than just a theme; it is also central to how fiction works. What we have learned to call “point of view” is a series of strategies by which writers ask us to experience the world as others do. Prose fiction asks us to empathize with others whose perspectives differ from ours whether because of gender, class, ethnicity, “race,” age, religion, or some other category. By attending to these strategies and related aspects of narrative, this course aims to help you learn to read fiction intelligently and pleasurably. It also helps you practice and hone your analytical writing skills.

Texts include Junot Diaz, This Is How You Lose Her; Leila Aboulela, Minaret; either Butler, Kindred, or Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; and an anthology of short fiction. Four papers totaling 15-20 pages; frequent short “low-stakes” writing assignments.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

MWF 12:00-12:50.  VIRTUAL.  Hermes, R.                       2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the major areas and periods of literary fiction, from Poe to the present day. We will build a set of tools for writing effectively about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it and the significance of those features. And we’ll engage in scholarly argument about fiction by putting these skills into practice on the page, in our own analyses. Readings include Kate Chopin, Oscar Wilde, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Gish Jen, J. M. Coetzee, and Mohsin Hamid. Two papers and two exams.

 

ENGL 2312-004—Introduction to Fiction: Technology and 20th Cen. American Fiction

MWF 10:00-10:50. Dedman Life Sciences Building 110.  Clemmer.         2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W      CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fiction focused on depictions of technology in 20th century American writing. The main goal of this course is that students learn to recognize the basic narrative, formal, and structural conventions of fiction so they can understand how they function in a given text.

Each text we read prominently features a technology or set of technologies—sometimes fictional but often real—that profoundly shape both its narrative and its world. We will learn how the basic conventions and devices of fiction function by closely examining the text’s depiction of both its major technology or technologies and the larger social and political consequences of its development and implementation.

We will spend most of our class time discussing a series of 20th century American novels where technology plays a major thematic role. A likely—but not final—list of these texts includes Black No More (1931) by George Schuyler, Player Piano (1952) by Kurt Vonnegut, The Crying of Lot 49 (1965) by Thomas Pynchon, Flight to Canada (1976) by Ishmael Reed, White Noise (1985) by Don DeLillo, and Parable of the Sower (1993) by Octavia Butler. We may also read selections from secondary texts that will enrich our understanding of a given novel, but these texts will make up a much smaller portion of our reading and available via Canvas.

Grade coursework will include class participation, weekly discussion posts, a written midterm consisting primarily of short-answer questions, and a final 10-12 page paper.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

MWF 1:00-1:50.  VIRTUAL.  Pergadia.                   2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

How does literature represent identity and how does it approach encounters with difference? In this course, we will read a series of literary texts alongside recent criticism and theory to develop a vocabulary and skillset for further work in literary studies. We will discuss the relationship between literature and history and between literature and philosophy, attending to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. One of the main questions we will ask: How do texts address us as readers and how do we respond to their address? As we discern what is at stake in being a reader, we will learn how to unpack the way a text generates its meaning. Tentative reading list includes texts by William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice), Eliza Haywood (Fantomina), Emily Dickinson, Nella Larsen (Passing), Vladimir Nabokov (Lolita), Toni Morrison (“Recitatif”), and Claudia Rankine (Citizen).

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Pomp and Circumstantial Evidence

TTh 11:00-12:20.  VIRTUAL.  Dickson-Carr, Darryl.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

ENGL 2315 is an introduction to the pleasing art of literary study and to the English major. We will read, contemplate, and discuss poetry, short stories, essays, and novels from different nations and literary traditions to enjoy their many rich complexities. We will begin with different ways of defining literature, then proceed to examine how and why we read various genres and the roles that literature may play in our world. In addition, we will discover and discuss a few of the more prominent issues in contemporary literary studies. By the end of the course, the student should be able to read and write critically about literary works. This skill will serve each student well in other courses in English and elsewhere. Assignments: regular writings (in class and on your own); three papers; and five short benchmark exams will be required.  NOTE: We will watch a few selected films outside of regular class time. Tentative texts: A Handbook to Literature, Twelfth Edition, ed. William Harmon; James, The Turn of the ScrewBest American Essays of the Century, ed. Joyce Carol Oates; Shakespeare, King Lear; WisÅ‚awa Szymborska, Poems: New & Collected, 1957-1997; Derek Walcott, Omeros; selected poems by Caroline Crew, Kay Ryan, et al.

 

ENGL 2315-003— Introduction to Literary Study: Danger: Novels

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Hyer Hall 201.  Sudan.                  2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W    CC: CA, CAA, W

“[Novels] impair the mind’s general powers of resistance which lays the mind open to terror and the heart to seduction.” So writes Hannah More at the end of the eighteenth century, noting that the noble pleasure of reading was tainted by the scurrilous seductions of prose. But what is it about this literary form that caused such a panic among the educated classes of Britain? This course will examine the dangerous and often scandalous genre of the novel in order to answer some of this question. We will begin our investigation at the end of the eighteenth century, with the advent of the Gothic novel, and extend our inquiry through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, thinking about other dangerous forms—film, social media—along the way.

 

ENGL 2318-001— Introduction to Digital Literature

TTh 8:00-9:20. Heroy Hall 153.  Wilson.                 2012: W    2016: LL, TM, W   CC: LAI, W

What is digital literature? What is the relationship between technology and the humanities? How can technology advance our understanding of language, literature, and culture? These are some of the large-scale questions that we will explore in this course. We rely on technologies such as digital maps, e-books, search engines, and databases every day, and understanding them and being able to work with them is a vital part of preparing for professional life. This course offers a hands-on introduction to using these technologies in academic research to analyze literature, and as well as enhancing your skills in academic work, the skills you learn are of immediate value to employers in the job market.

 

ENGL 2390-001H—Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

T 3:30-6:20. VIRTUAL. Brownderville.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“last year’s words belong to last year’s language 
And next year’s words await another voice.”

                              —T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”

It is sometimes said that literature has always been, and will always be, about love and death. If so many books already engage these great themes, why do we need new writing? As James Baldwin put it, the human story “has another aspect in every country, and a new depth in every generation.” It must be told again.

This course is a poetry workshop, where timeless themes meet the new words of now. Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communication skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

Next Year’s Words, the honors section of our introductory creative writing course, is about the tremendously exciting, and culturally necessary, adventure of the young writer. It’s about singing truth-song in a voice not heard before on earth.

This year can’t write the poems of 2021. Next year’s poetry needs next year’s words.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing

M 2:00-4:50.  VIRTUAL.  Rubin.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and helpfully discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 3:30-4:50.  VIRTUAL.  Condon (Hermes).           2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 9:30-10:50. Dedman Life Sciences Building 110.  Smith.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W                                                                                                                           CC: CA, CAC, W

In this class, students will write, critique and revise short fiction and analyze published texts using the elements of fiction. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to research literary journals and submit a carefully revised story. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer's Toolkit

MWF 2:00-2:50.  VIRTUAL.  Hermes, R.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in prose and poetry. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

            During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class period, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

MWF 3:00-3:50.  VIRTUAL.  Hermes, R.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in prose and poetry. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

            During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class period, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches to Literature

TTh 9:30-10:50.   VIRTUAL.  Greenspan.

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading to the written analysis of texts? 

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. 

Texts: Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition; Art Spiegelman, Maus, 2 volume set; Art Spiegelman, MetaMaus; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Schedule of Course Modules: Module 1 – Introduction to the Study of Texts; Module 2 – Reading and Responding to Pride and Prejudice; Module 3 – Reading and Responding to Uncle Tom’s Cabin; Module 4 – Reading and Responding to The Marrow of Tradition; Module 5 – Reading and Responding to Maus.

 

ENGL 3341-001— British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

MWF 12:00-12:50.   VIRTUAL.  Newman.  2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

Officially known as “Wordsworth through Yeats,“ this course familiarizes students with some of the main currents in British literature during the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods--that is, from the “Age of Revolutions” beginning around 1780 to the period between the two World Wars. We begin with the self-conscious turn in the Romantic period to the language of ordinary people and the experiences of ordinary life. But we also consider the continuing attraction of the strange, the unusual, and the visionary that gripped both readers and writers throughout all three historical periods. And we attend to the ways that the literary imagination, beginning with the Romantics, finds the extraordinary in the ordinary and recalibrates its sense of the real and how to represent it.

We will give significant attention to the social and historical contexts to which the writers were responding, while also practicing the skills of close reading and writing about literature. In short, we will trace a story about the canon of British literature, while keeping in mind that there are other ways of telling the story. About 15-20 pages of formal paper-writing (3-4 papers), a midterm and final; frequent small “low-stakes” homework assignments.

            Texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature (possibly a customized version); Dickens, Oliver Twist; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway.

 

ENGL 3346-001— American Literary History I: One Nation under Multiplicity

TTh 2:00-3:20.   VIRTUAL.  Greenspan.    2012: CA2, HC2, W    2016: HFA, HSBS, W  CC: LAI, W

E pluribus unum -- The motto for the seal of the United States, first proposed in 1776, serves as the motto of this course. But what has it meant to writers of all backgrounds during the early years of the Republic? And what does it mean for us, looking backward at the period 1776-1900? This course will explore the literary responses of a wide array of major American writers who explored that founding issue. Writers to include Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Hannah Foster, William Apess, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Abraham Lincoln, Henry James, Mark Twain, and Charles Chesnutt, and Kate Chopin.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature: Fugitive Literatures

TTh 11:00-12:20.  VIRTUAL.  Edwards.      2012: CA2, HD, W     2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: HD, W

American film and television have been a prime site for liberatory action, where heroes lead bold escapes from chain gangs, gladiatorial slave pits, and prison of war camps. Nevertheless, this liberation, in both fantastic and realistic settings, often figures only within reach of the white slave or prisoner. This course examines the relationship between the experiences of Black Americans and their portrayal in historical narratives of slavery, the convict-lease system, and the modern carceral state. Starting with the writings of Frederick Douglass, William and Ellen Craft, and Harriet Jacobs, the class builds on literature that built sympathy for enslaved people. From there, students become familiar with the changing definition of liberation that develops into mainstream popular culture. Appropriating the definitions of freedom from Black American experiences, film has suggested that white experiences are synonymous with narratives of Black enslavement and imprisonment. Works as diverse as I am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang to The Great Escape to Shawshank Redemption have provided white heroism in the face of systems of imprisonment that likewise keep traumatic histories of racial injustice perpetually obscured. In addition, the course looks at postmodernist trends of the last half-century that have allowed Black filmmakers and their allies to use film, such as Django Unchained as a place for fulfilling fantasies and historical narratives of revolt. The class considers how incarceration narratives position the representation of Black Americans as perpetually enslaved in an unceasing reenactment.

 

ENGL 3363-001—Chicana/Chicano Literature

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Sae-Saue.               2012: CA2, HC2, W    2016: HFA, HSBS, W    CC: LAI, HD, W

This class will examine the aesthetic and thematic attributes of key texts of the Mexican American and Chicana/o literary archives. Our primary goal is to map the literary development of Chicana/o consciousness. That is, we will examine how essential Chicana/o texts mobilize literary elements in order to organize perceptions of social interaction, articulate political needs, and to explore cultural values. With particular emphasis on Chicana/o novels and Mexican American culture, we shall learn to recognize how each narrative engages issues of race, class, and gender within a diverse set of social circumstances. As such, we shall attend to how the selected texts articulate the Chicana/o imagination not as something “essential,” but rather as the means by which to conceive of community within disparate and complex social-historical situations. In this regard, this class will examine how Chicana/o literature negotiates racial injustice, legal disenfranchisement, economic exploitation, and cultural eradication, among other topics. This class will pay particular attention to texts that explore life in Texas and at the US-Mexico border.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop

W 2:00-4:50. VIRTUAL.  Rubin.      2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

An advanced workshop devoted to the craft of creative nonfiction, this class will apply the tenets of fiction writing to the construction of the personal essay. In addition to participating in regular workshops, students will study nonfiction masterpieces by such authors as Virginia Woolf and James Baldwin along with the work of brilliant contemporary essayists currently expanding the form.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop

TTh 12:30-1:50. Hyer Hall 111.  Smith.        2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this class students will write, revise, and analyze imaginative prose. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. The primary focus will be on revision. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to research literary journals and submit a carefully revised story. Prerequisite: Pre-written 5 page short story.

 

ENGL 4323-001—Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

TTh 2:00-3:20.  VIRTUAL.  Wheeler.          2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

What’s it like to be a writer in the middle of a pandemic? Chaucer is our greatest example in English poetry. In his strong, wise, and rich narratives, his (frequently hilarious) poetry urges us to balance the delight with the difficulty of life.

Reading: The Norton Chaucer and background texts

Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations and memorization, short and longer paper.

 

ENGL 4330-001—Renaissance Writers: Welcome to Faerieland, Eden, and Hell

TTh 12:30-1:50.  VIRTUAL.  Moss. 2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

As Renaissance poets, Edmund Spenser (c. 1552–99) and John Milton (1608–74) are counterparts: the former’s Faerie Queene celebrates the English monarch and her realm in an elaborate and open-ended allegorical fiction, while the latter’s Paradise Lost appeals directly to the Bible for its authority, depicting England’s king as a satanic usurper intent on destroying the commonwealth. Spenser mesmerizes his readers with the intricacy of his rhymed stanzas and with his narrative’s infinite convolutions, while Milton’s exacting language and sublime metaphors push us inexorably toward the climactic Fall from Eden and beyond. As they apply themselves to the praise and critique of their nation and its institutions of faith and government, both poets transform the English language and the culture that language serves and expresses.

            In this course, we will read about half of Spenser’s Faerie Queene and the entirety of Milton’s Paradise Lost, as well as shorter poems and illuminating prose by both poets. In our efforts to build working interpretations of each poem, we will examine biblical, classical, medieval, and Renaissance sources, explore the culture and politics of Renaissance England, and evaluate modern critical accounts of these landmark texts.

 

ENGL 4343-001— Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Eliot

MWF 9:00-9:50.  VIRTUAL.  Satz. 2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

We will read with a variety of critical approaches six great novels: Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Jane Eyre, Villette, Mill on the Floss, and Middlemarch. This course is an opportunity to savor some of the monumental works of literature. Requirements: three short papers (4 pp.) and one longer paper (10 pp.); mid-term and final.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

TTh 3:30-4:50.  VIRTUAL.  Edwards.        2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

What does it mean to have a sexual identity? How does the concept of sexuality change over time? How have people described their desires and expressed their erotic feeling? This course examines a range of American voices that engage in queer desire, identity, and conceptions of the family. Beginning with these questions, the course looks to canonical and non-canonical authors to explore a multitude of perspectives on sexuality. Although the regulation of gender and sexual behavior—and transgression of sex/gender norms—have been central to American culture from its beginnings, this course focuses on texts from the second half of the nineteenth century through the very contemporary. By addressing these concerns, students will come to their own questions of the texts that go beyond finding moments of heightened desire and sexual transgressions. How do moments of quiet contemplation or moments of camp, play, and protest become places for queerness? With help from queer theorists and social historians, we will pay close attention to how discourses shape queer expression, and how queer authors have changed culture. It will thus be important for us to interrogate not only the meaning of “American” and “queer” but what is likewise the consequence of labeling these texts as part of a canon. The course will end, then, with a reflection on what we missed, the potential pitfalls of interdisciplinarity, and the problems that might emerge from an (over)emphasis on sexuality in the practice of queer theory and analysis.

 

ENGL 6340-001—Proseminar in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions

M 3:00-5:50. Clements Hall 225.  Sudan    

This course examines the structures of British imperialism as they are reflected in literature, science, and technology. The premise for our examination, however, is that such structures were nor necessarily European in origin. Resisting the self-image of the “Enlightenment” as it was developed in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe, we will investigate how “Enlightenment” values and socio-political norms prized by modernity also had roots in cultures and geographies other than Europe. Our focus will be on the critical encounters between England and Asia with an eye to deconstructing legacies of Eurocentrism. Ultimately, we will consider the implications of these histories in relation to our own (post)modern understanding of imperial identity and the assumptions about legacy, power, and control in the global marketplace.

 

ENGL 7340-001—Seminar in British Literature: Allegory and Allusion in Spenser's Poetry

T 3:30-6:20.  VIRTUAL. Moss.

Edmund Spenser’s Faerie Queene, the longest major poem in English, is at once the early modern period’s most ambitious and successful allegory and a comprehensive guide to the phenomenon and practice of intertextuality. We will begin with the youthful pastoral, The Shepheardes Calender (1579), introducing ourselves to Spenserian modes of allegory, intertextuality, pastoral, and paratext, while locating Spenser’s poetic career and Protestant theology in their humanist and Reformation contexts. Following two crash-course weeks in theories of allegory and intertextuality, alongside the groundwork of reading Virgil, Ovid, and Chaucer, we will pivot to The Faerie Queene, which we will read in its entirety over the remaining classes, supported by relevant criticism both classic and current.

            Key to this course will be learning to balance minute close-reading (your dreams will begin to rhyme ababbcbcC) with large-scale claims embracing a sprawling text, its major intertexts, and the historical, political, and theological preoccupations of the period. We will explore early modern English theories and prejudices regarding ethnic difference, including Spenser’s own notorious tract, A View of the Present State of Ireland, as well as the troubled relationship between an intensely patriarchal humanism and an aging, unmarried queen with her cult of virginity. We will navigate the generic borderlands between didactic allegory and delightful romance, and we shall have to decide whether we are rooting for the knights or the dragons.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature: Rethinking Race and Posthumanism

W 3:00-5:50.  VIRTUAL.  Pergadia.

This course explores the semantic, ideological, aesthetic and material conflations and connections between the human, animal, and object through the racial inflections of these categories. We will analyze contemporary debates in animal studies, posthumanism, and critical race studies that renews the investment in the connection between race, animality, and posthumanism. Is the connection between race and animality always a debased alliance? How does race re-signify species and vice versa? Students will gain dexterity with recent debates of posthumanism and will develop historically-specific, materially-attuned accounts of the relationship between race, animality, and posthumanism. The archive for the seminar consists of texts in contemporary American fiction: Toni Morrison, Octavia Butler, Ruth Ozeki, Art Spiegelman. Theoretical texts by Sylvia Wynter, Jacques Derrida, Cary Wolfe, Alexander G. Weheliye, Zakiyyah Iman Jackson, Donna Haraway.

 

ENGL 7376-001—Seminar: Special Topics: Arts of Violence

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dedman Life Science Building 132.  Weisenburger.

This seminar takes up studies of violence in American fiction, from 1939 to 2016—Chandler, to Whitehead. As a fact and an eternal scourge of American life, bloody violence is as prominent in our time as in prehistory. Our readings in modern and postmodern American fictions will span seventy-seven years of modern and contemporary history. It’s an age as immersed in violence as any other. And as in any other historical period and place, violence in our period of study is the seedbed or ur-stuff of heroes and Hitlers, of legends, critiques, entertainment, moral & political analyses, and of spiritual crises. Violence has also been, from the early-twentieth century onward, a subject of intense critical and philosophical analyses. In those efforts, he secondary texts listed below are exemplary yet surely not alone in the approaches and analyses those critics have developed.

            By semester’s end each participant in our seminar will have developed a critical approach to a particular text (or more) and the challenges it poses. Looking forward, be prepared to present, at the mid-point in the semester, a short, 15- to 20-minute presentation that discusses your project, where it’s going, and why. 

 

ENGL 7376-002—Seminar: Special Topics: On the Road [again]

Th 3:30-6:20. Clements Hall 225.  Rosendale.

         This course will survey one of literature’s oldest and most flexible structural tropes: the journey.  What is it that has made travel, and its combination of temporal and geographic movement, so irresistible to three millennia of Western writers?  What range of different uses have they made of this deeply resonant metaphor, and what possibilities has it offered?  How are later road narratives in conversation with earlier ones?  (And why, until quite recently, have so few of them been written by women?)  From ancient Greece to 20thC America, we will read epics, novels, poems, plays, captivity and slave narratives, and criticism to better understand the depth and variations of a trope so pervasive that we may hardly have noticed it.

         Authors will likely include Homer, Chaucer, Bunyan, Johnson, Voltaire, Rousseau, Tennyson, Douglass, Whitman, Conrad, Lawrence, Eliot, Hemingway, Beckett, and Kerouac.  Further possible additions include The Wanderer, Dante, Spenser, Cavendish, Swift, Mark Twain, Faulkner, Steinbeck, O’Connor, Pirsig, Heat-Moon; other suggestions from seminar enrollees are welcome.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

1363

001

The Myth of the American West

Weisenburger

TTh

3:30

4:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

CA, CAA

1380

001

Introduction to Literature:
From Stone Tablets to Hypertext

Wilson

TTh

9:30

10:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1 2016: CA

CA, CAA

1385

001

Power, Passion, and Protest in British Literature

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 133

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

HC

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

DH 101

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

DH 102

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 102

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 102

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 157


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 157


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 157


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Miller

MWF

11:00

11:50

DLSB 132


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

Virtual


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

HYER 106


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ray

TTh

9:30

10:50

FOSC 152


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

HYER 106


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Bozorth

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 106


 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ivie

TTh

12:30

1:50

DLSB 110

 

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

HYER 106


 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Eve’s Reply

Jones

MWF

9:00

9:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry: Lifting the Veil

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: Women Who Wonder & Wander

Kiser

TTh

8:00

9:20

HYER 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Self and the Other

Newman

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: Forms & Functions of
the Stories We Tell

Hermes, R.

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004

Fiction: Technology & 20th C. American Fiction

Clemmer

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

1:00

1:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study:
Pomp and Circumstantial Evidence

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study: Danger: Novels

Sudan

MWF

1:00

1:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2318

001

Introduction Digital Literature

Wilson

TTh

8:00

9:20

HERY 153

2012: W 2016: LL, TM, W

LAI, W

2390

001H

Introduction to Creative Writing:
Next Year's Words

Brownderville

T

3:30

6:20

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Condon, K.

TTh

3:30

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

9:30

10:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing:
The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes, R.

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing:
The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes, R.

MWF

3:00

3:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Greenspan

TTh

9:30

10:50

Virtual

 

 

3341

001

British Literary History II:
The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3346

001

American Literary History I: One Nation under Multiplicity

Greenspan

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African–American Literature: Fugitive Literatures

Edwards

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

3363

001

Chicana/Chicano Literature

Sae-Saue

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

LAI, HD, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 111

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4323

001

Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

4330

001

Renaissance Writers:
Welcome to Faerieland, Eden, and Hell

Moss

TTh

12:30

1:50

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions:
Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Eliot

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary
American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

TTh

3:30

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

6340

001

Proseminar in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions

Sudan

M

3:00

5:50

CLEM 225

 

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature: Allegory and Allusion in Spenser's Poetry

Moss

T

3:30

6:20

Virtual

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature:
Rethinking Race and Posthumanism

Pergadia

W

3:00

5:50

Virtual

 

 

7376

001

Seminar: Special Topics: Arts of Violence

Weisenburger

TTh

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

 

 

7376

002

Seminar: Special Topics: On the Road [again]

Rosendale

Th

3:30

6:20

CLEM 225

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

UC Tag

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 157

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Eve’s Reply

Jones

MWF

9:00

9:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions:
Austen, Charlotte Bronte, and Eliot

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 157

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2312

004

Fiction: Technology & 20th C. American Fiction

Clemmer

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3363

001

Chicana/Chicano Literature

Sae-Saue

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

LAI, HD, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 157

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Miller

MWF

11:00

11:50

DLSB 132

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2312

003

Fiction: Forms & Functions of the Stories We Tell

Hermes, R.

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3341

001

British Literary History II:
The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

12:00

12:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study:
Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

1:00

1:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study: Danger: Novels

Sudan

MWF

1:00

1:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2312

002

Fiction: The Self and the Other

Newman

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing:
The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes, R.

MWF

2:00

2:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing:
The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes, R.

MWF

3:00

3:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

DH 101

 

 

6340

001

Proseminar in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions

Sudan

M

3:00

5:50

CLEM 225

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

DH 102

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature:
Rethinking Race and Posthumanism

Pergadia

W

3:00

5:50

Virtual

 

 

2312

001

Fiction: Women Who Wonder & Wander

Kiser

TTh

8:00

9:20

HYER 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2318

001

Literature and Digital Humanities: An Introduction

Wilson

TTh

8:00

9:20

HERY 153

2012: W 2016: LL, TM, W

LAI, W

1380

001

Introduction to Literature: From Stone Tablets to Hypertext

Wilson

TTh

9:30

10:50

HERY 153

2012: CA1 2016: CA

CA, CAA

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

HYER 106

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ray

TTh

9:30

10:50

FOSC 152

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

9:30

10:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Greenspan

TTh

9:30

10:50

Virtual

 

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

HYER 106

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Bozorth

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study:
Pomp and Circumstantial Evidence

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

3362

001

African–American Literature: Fugitive Literatures

Edwards

TTh

11:00

12:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

1385

001

Power, Passion, and Protest in British Literature

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 133

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

HC

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 101

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 106

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ivie

TTh

12:30

1:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2311

002

Poetry: Lifting the Veil

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 111

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4330

001

Renaissance Writers:
Welcome to Faerieland, Eden, and Hell

Moss

TTh

12:30

1:50

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

 7376  001  

Seminar: Special Topics: Arts of Violence

Weisenburger
TTh
12:30  1:50 DLSB 132
   

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 102

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

014H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

HYER 106

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3346

001

American Literary History I:
One Nation under Multiplicity

Greenspan

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

4323

001

Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

Wheeler

TTh

2:00

3:20

Virtual

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

 1363  001  

The Myth of the American West

Weisenburger  TTh 3:30
4:50
DLSB 132

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

 

CA, CAA

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Condon, K.

TTh

3:30

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary
American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

TTh

3:30

4:50

Virtual

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

2390

001H

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

T

3:30

6:20

Virtual

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature:
Allegory and Allusion in Spenser's Poetry

Moss

T

3:30

6:20

Virtual

 

 

7376

002

Seminar: Special Topics: On the Road [again]

Rosendale

Th

3:30

6:20

CLEM 225