Current Course Offerings

Spring 2023 Registration Guide

Spring 2023

ENGL 1362-001—Speculative Fiction

MWF 10:00-10:50. Dedman Life Science 131. Dickson-Carr, D., 2012: CA1, HC1, OC   2016: HC, LL, OC    CC: LAI

This introductory survey of selected 20th-century novels and short stories emphasizes both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts that generate these ideas. We study speculative fiction, which comprises such genres as science fiction, fantasy, historical fiction, and post-apocalyptic fiction, among others. All of the works we study either imagine possible futures or reimagine the past. We will look at speculative fiction’s history, place the works we read and their authors in historical contexts, and examine how different authors build worlds that allow us to understand our own.

Coursework includes regular quizzes, written midterm and final exams, two short response papers, and participation.

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

T 6:00-8:50. Dallas Hall 116.  Levy.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, literary, and contemporary social perspectives. We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity. These include: “Nation” “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Black Lives Matter,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc. We examine the ways these categories have been deployed to assert and marginalize identity, seeing identity as both self-selected and imposed, fixed and flexible, located and displaced, secure and situational. In addition, we examine the status of “minority” literature as a category within the American literary and cultural canon, and critique the ways in which this imposed status has been used to diminish the craftsmanship and aesthetic reach of literature written by women, LGBQT authors and peoples of color.

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

HIST 2306-001H—The Kids Are Alright: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Childhood and Adolescence

TR 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 116.  Levy & Deluzio.    2016: KNOW, HC    CC: HC, W

Note: this course counts towards the English major or minor as a 2000-level elective. Intended for students in the University Honors Program.

The Kids Are Alright examines from historical, literary, and other disciplinary perspectives key issues associated with American youth. The course explores childhood and adolescence as flexible social constructs that reflect – and respond to – larger forces of historical change. Among the questions we will seek to answer are these: At any given historical moment, what were the prevailing expectations for girls and boys growing up and how did those expectations resonate with broader cultural hopes, longings, and anxieties? How were young people shaped by prevailing expectations for growing up and how did they play a role in shaping those expectations and the wider society in return? What has changed and what has stayed the same regarding how children were viewed and treated and how they lived their lives over the course of U.S. history, and with what consequences for children’s lives in the present? We will consider children and adolescents in a variety of contexts: in the family, at school, at work, and at play, as well as examine their roles and influence as objects of reform, consumers, social activists, and cultural icons. Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to the multiple paths of growing up in the United States, especially to the ways in which experiences and representations of childhood and adolescence have been shaped by the categories of gender, race, ethnicity, and social class.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Lifting the Veil

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dedman Life Science 132.  Condon.         2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“Poetry,” wrote Percy Bysshe Shelley, “lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were unfamiliar.” He’s right: poetry reveals the unexpected beauty and strangeness in the ordinary landscapes, people, and emotional situations we encounter every day. Yet, the famous stereotype of poetry suggests that the genre doesn’t reveal anything without a lot of decoding on a reader’s part—that the poem is the veil that hides a complicated message. In this course, we will explode this stereotype by learning about poetic characteristics and devices that are meant to delight readers, not confuse them. Each week we will focus on a different poetic technique or form—image, repetition, the sonnet—and discuss how poets across the centuries have used them to bring us pleasure, making something as mundane as grass seem suddenly breathtaking and strange. Requirements include a midterm and final exam, one long paper, several short reflections, a poetry recitation, and regular participation in class.

Course Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed

 

ENGL 2311-002H—Introduction to Poetry

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 157.  Caplan.   2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“Poetry is language that sounds better and means more,” the poet Charles Wright once observed. “What’s better than that?” This class will train the students to hear the many sounds and many meanings that great poems articulate. In addition to writing critical essays, we will compose formal imitations, write brief analyses of particular elements of the assigned poetry, and perform a poem from memory. We also will have the pleasure of having two poets visit our class via Zoom to discuss their work with us. In short, we will spend the semester considering language that sounds better and means more, and, as the poet put it, what’s better than that?

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry: American Poetry Since 1960—Legitimate Dangers

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Rivera.            2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Typically, most students in the United States view legitimate poetry as that of fixed forms or the work of established writers accepted into the traditional canon of American literature. However, contemporary American poetry continues to inundate readers with an ever-widening corpus that includes and celebrates writers from the margins, writers within academia, and workaday journey poets who experiment both with form and content to document myriad lyrical impulses. These poetic efforts form a type of call-and-response dialogue that widens concepts of inclusiveness—which many view as threatening. In this course, we will annotate, read, discuss, argue the merits and failures of the poems in addition to acquiring a system of shared language with which to discuss poets and their work. As we engage with the unending font of American poets, we will attempt a radical reimagining of what we consider poetry. We will attempt to embrace these newer voices—as we look to a more capacious understanding of exigencies of the human condition within contemporary American poetry.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction

TTh 8:00-9:20. Dallas Hall 101.  STAFF. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: Dangerous Novels

TTh 9:30-10:50. Clements Hall 325.  Sudan.           2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Dallas Hall 157.  Hermes.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Teju Cole, Yaa Gyasi, Mohsin Hamid, Han Kang, and Pitchaya Sudbanthad.

 

ENGL 2312-004—Introduction to Fiction

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Sae-Saue.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels.  The primary goals of the class are that students learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities. We will investigate how fiction constructs cultural identities, comments on determinate historical moments, and organizes human consciousness around social history. In doing so, we shall ask: how does fiction articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relationships. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected works organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically, understanding how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of literary representation.

 

ENGL 2312-005—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 153.  Hermes.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Teju Cole, Yaa Gyasi, Mohsin Hamid, Han Kang, and Pitchaya Sudbanthad.

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: Modern Drama and the Reinvented Self

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 102.  Moss.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

From Antigone to Hamilton, the most memorable reflections on human nature and the most provocative critiques of social and political life have taken dramatic form, presented onstage before mass audiences. This trans-historical success is largely the result of the unique nature of drama, which alone fully unites the arts: writing, speech, gesture, and costume at a minimum, but often incorporating song, dance, and related arts, as in ancient Greece or the modern musical. Thanks to drama’s popular appeal, theaters and the troupes acting in them have always been at the heart of Western culture, from the choruses of the Festival of Dionysus to the Lord Chamberlain’s Men in London’s Globe to Broadway and its stars. At the same time, drama has lent its powerful voice to social protest and revolution, especially in the twentieth century, as traditional power structures crumbled and empires fell.

The course is divided into three “Acts”: the rise of comedy and tragedy in ancient Greece, the ascendance of Shakespeare and his company in Renaissance England, and the radical left-wing and anti-imperialist theater of the mid-twentieth century. Smaller “Interludes” provide short introductions to medieval and eighteenth-century English drama, and the syllabus closes with a brief glimpse of the theater and film of present-day America. To facilitate a sense of contemporary drama’s continuity with ancient and early modern precursors, most of the works we will study toward the end of the semester respond directly to plays covered by the first half of the syllabus. Additionally, throughout the semester, we will be honing our critical writing skills, with three class sessions devoted to the topic.

 Course Requirements: In keeping with drama’s multimedia essence, coursework will take the form of daily posts to the class discussion board, one shorter paper with a required revision, one longer paper incorporating secondary research, and a brief oral presentation or performance.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Race in the English Renaissance and Beyond

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 152.  Atkinson.           2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

This course introduces the discipline of literary study by tracing literary representations of race and “the Other” from the Renaissance to the present. Drawing on a variety of texts – plays, poems, essays, and true accounts – we will consider how beliefs and attitudes from the early modern period have been revisited, refined and questioned by modern authors. The work of this class will be to examine how literature represents evolving perceptions of racial and cultural difference and to think about how literature can be a tool of self-reflection, both for the cultures who produce it and for us as modern readers. This work will be accomplished through analytical reading and writing, which we will used to develop nuanced and thoughtful interpretations. 

Possible texts include Montaigne’s “On Cannibals,” Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative, James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room, Derek Walcott’s Omeros. Major assignments include two short papers and one long, with weekly short reflections. 

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: On the Road (again): Road Narratives from Homer to Kerouac

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 102.  Rosendale.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

This course will survey one of literature’s oldest, best, and most useful tricks: the journey.  What is it that has made travel so irresistible to 3000 years of Western writers?  What range of different uses have they made of this deeply resonant metaphor, and what possibilities has it offered? How are later road narratives in conversation with earlier ones?  (And why, until quite recently, have so few of them been written by women?)  From ancient Greece to 20thC America, we will read epics, novels, poems, plays, and other kinds of texts to better understand the depth and variety of a mechanism so pervasive that you may hardly have noticed it.

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Shapes of Fiction

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 152.  Farhadi.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

 In this course, we’ll read a variety of fictional genres and styles to analyze the particular decisions writers use to give their stories shape.  While structure will be our entry point, we’ll also focus on the smaller scale choices writers make in order to develop characters, further plot, and stimulate, satisfy, and subvert expectations in the service of providing a compelling read.

 Throughout the course we’ll use critical and creative assignments to develop our craft vocabulary.  Students will write their own full-length short stories, which we’ll workshop in the second half of the semester.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing: Short-Form Creative Writing

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Smith.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

This course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing flash fiction stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Art of Listening

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Lama.            2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Poetry always begins and ends,” remarks W.S. Merwin, “with listening.” In this class, we will learn to listen—to the sky, the earth, the body, the live language, the song in language, the language in song. Through recitations, we will explore the lyre of the lyric in our own throats. In addition to sound, we will practice other fundamentals of poetry such as the line, image, metaphor, and form through creative assignments and workshops. We will imitate and emulate the great poets from classical to contemporary with the goal of finding our own voice and music. “The quieter you become,” says Rumi, “the more you hear.” In this class, we will learn to be quiet but also ecstatic. 

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing: Short-Form Creative Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 351.  Smith.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing flash fiction stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

MW 3:00-4:20.  Dallas Hall 152.  Hermes.              2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”

― Anton Chekhov

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in poetry and fiction. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about how great writing gets made. These readings are meant to provide artistic models and stimulate discussion about craft. Together, we’ll identify the “moves” successful pieces of writing make and practice incorporating them in our own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. With engaged participation, we will have an opportunity to sharpen both our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: Writing Creative Nonfiction

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.        2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genre of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-007—Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry Unbound—How Dare We! Write

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Rivera.   2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This course is designed for beginning writers or those who have never had the opportunity to study creative writing in a classroom setting while also applying and synthesizing the use of literary and rhetorical devices. More experienced writers may gain insight from reevaluating both their work and the creative work of others. No matter how advanced a writer’s skills become, the journey-artist still strives to improve the fragile braid that is content, communication, and craft. Students will learn the fundamental elements of poetry in addition to critiquing their work as well as that of others via marginalia and facilitated dialogue. Instrumental to this class is the required idea journal in which students will accumulate ideas, complete artistic exercises, and draft poems. Final grades are largely dependent upon the amount of writing, revising, and rewriting one does throughout the semester. Students should be willing to hone their poems by testing various techniques, styles, formats, and aesthetics. By experimenting with what they have written and what they have internalized about writing as process, students will develop a small portfolio and a better understanding of what being a practicing writer means.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

MWF 10:00-10:50.   Dallas Hall 120.  González.       CC: WIM

This foundational course presents students with the process of researching and writing critically about literary texts, the many forms a literary text might take, and the critical methods that have been established in the discipline of English upon which successful interpretation and analysis is based. Engaging with literary texts in this way creates new knowledge, underscores the significance of these texts, and helps us understand the many contexts in which these works of literature exist. Students will examine exemplar literary texts across media through an array of critical lenses while refining their research and critical writing skills. Several short papers, one presentation, one exam, and one research paper will create the core of the student assessment.

 

ENGL 3346-001—American Literary History I

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Hyer Hall 200.  Cassedy. 2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W  CC: LAI, W

“America”: it’s not just a place, but also a set of concepts and ideas. The place has always been here; the concepts and ideas had to be invented. This course is an introduction to the texts and stories through which the meanings of “America” and “Americans” were invented, from the first European contact to the Civil War, as seen through major literary works of the period. Readings to include texts by Benjamin Franklin, Susanna Rowson, Frederick Douglass, Edgar Allan Poe, Phyllis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Horatio Alger, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman.

Three essays, a midterm, and a final.

 

MDVL 3351-801: The Pilgrimage

Th 11:00 – 12:20. Dallas Hall 306. Wheeler.     2016: KNOW, LL, W    CC: LAI, W

A look at the medieval world through one of its own literal and metaphorical images, investigating the music, art, monuments, and literature of pilgrimage during the Middle Ages.

Students seeking credit towards the English major or minor must contact Prof. Beth Newman, Director of Undergraduate Studies, once they have enrolled, and include their SMU ID numbers.

 

ENGL 3360-401—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Women in Popular Culture

TTh 11:00-12:20.  ONLINE.  Garelick.   2012: CA2, HD, OC, W  2016: HFA, HD, OC, W  CC: LAI, W

(Offered as online course with some synchronous meetings)

Popular culture (including film, television, magazines, music, social media, the worlds of fashion and shopping, and more) floods us daily with images that shape our understanding of the world—including our notions of gender, sexuality, class, race, social and economic life. Often, we are so saturated with these images that we stop even noticing them, even while we continue to absorb their influence. In this

class, we shall seek to read popular culture consciously and thoughtfully, to examine the way its illusions and myths about women, its female avatars and characters shape our world view. We shall consider the historical roots of these images, how the images have (or haven’t!) changed over time, and what they reveal to us about ourselves.

This class will range widely over genres and time periods, going back two thousand years to the ancient Roman poet, Ovid, moving through 18th and 19th century folk and fairy tales, and continuing up to the present day. We will look at popular genres—such as television shows and films—alongside literary, critical, or theoretical texts.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 105.  Pergadia.  2012: CA2, HD, W  2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: LAI, HD, W

This course surveys the history of African American aesthetic forms from the nineteenth century to the present. We will engage the debates that animated contestations over black literary form, including the role of the realist aesthetic, naturalism, modernism, folklore and dialect, Pan-Africanism and diasporic alliances. We will identify connections between literary texts and historical contexts – slavery, reconstruction, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, the civil rights movement, mass incarceration – but will also consider the autonomy of art, the hybrid literary forms emerging from a Black aesthetic tradition, and worlds remade through the word. Primary texts may include: Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845); Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861); W.E.B. Du Bois, Data Portraits (1900)Nella Larsen, Passing (1929); Octavia Butler, Kindred (1979); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Claudia Rankine, Citizen (2014); Jordan Peele, Get Out (2017); Boots Riley, Sorry to Bother You (2018).

 

ENGL 3364-401—Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales and the Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

TTh 2:00-3:50.  ONLINE.  Torres de Veneciano.  2012: CA2, HD, OC  2016: HFA, HD, OC  CC: LAI

Offered as online course with some synchronous meetings)

This course reads the femme fatale as a figure of certain powers of provocation, as both threatening and target of threat. We borrow the term from visual media to help us identify and unfold the dualities and duplicities informing seven archetypical figures of Mexican culture. They are at once mythical and historical: Coatlicue, la Malinche, la Virgen de Guadalupe, Sor Juana Inéz de la Cruz, la Llorona, la Calavera Catrina, and Frida Kahlo.

We take the concept of fatales in the sense of fate or destiny and applies it critically to reading the inscription and reception of these seven figures. We will examine the destinies that befell these figures and the alternate destinies they imply. Destiny is understood here as social inscription and therefore patriarchal and discursive. We will weave visual historical, literary critical, postcolonialist, and poststructuralist methodologies in conducting feminist readings of select literature and visual art.

Our feminism therefore will be more rhetorical-practical than historical—a form of feminist praxis conducted by critically reading (analyzing) the discursive constructions of culture, gender, and patriarchy. This course is very much interdisciplinary in its ways of teaching and learning. Students will learn to interweave and apply conceptual and interpretive methods from critical prose and poetry, visual art analysis, feminist practice, historical contextualization, mythology and its psychoanalytic receptions, and philosophies of destiny. Using these methods, we will analyze and interpret texts (prose, poetry) and visual cultural material (art, film, video, advertising).

Short essays; final exam.

 

ENGL 3367-001—Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Satz.       2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W       2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W   CC: LAI, HD, OC, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White, accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things AreThe Giving TreeAmazing GraceCurious GeorgeBabar; chapter books for young children such as WilderLittle House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop

T 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.           2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

An advanced workshop devoted to the craft of creative nonfiction, this class will apply the tenets of fiction writing to the construction of the personal essay. In addition to participating in regular workshops, students will study nonfiction masterpieces by such authors as Virginia Woolf and James Baldwin, along with the work of brilliant contemporary essayists currently expanding the form.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: The Art of Voice

TR 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 115.  Condon.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

Find your voice! the old writer says to the young writer, as if a signature artistic sound were as simple to locate as a spare house key hidden inside of a ceramic toad. But what if I told you that it is that easy? Voice, though it has a reputation for being elusive, is an ultimately simple idea: that the way we talk in a poem is what blesses our speakers with personality. In this course, we will experiment with many kinds of voices, from the colloquial to the authoritative, with the goal of creating dynamic and captivating speakers interesting enough to hold our audience’s attention. You will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

Course text: The Art of Voice by Tony Hoagland

 

ENGL 4330-001—Renaissance Writers: Poetic Occasions

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Moss.      2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

In the Renaissance, everything from falling in love to falling into sin to falling off your horse called for a poem, and by focusing our readerly attention on the occasions for poetry, we can begin to comprehend the sheer variety of the early modern period’s lyric modes and forms. Certain occasions, such as aristocratic weddings, the celebration of a famous person, or the urgent need for a short, devastating insult prompted poets—especially those in the humanist tradition—to translate or adapt classical subgenres like the epithalamium, ode, and epigram. Devout Catholic and Protestant poets, on the other hand, generated an astonishing mix of fresh tones and forms as they sought a language both dignified and humble enough to address heaven (or angry enough to condemn the heresies of opposing Christian sects). In an age of church censorship, royal spy networks, and public executions, many English poets turned to allegory and the broad social critiques of satire to express displeasure with the monarchy, the church, and the patriarchy. Perennial occasions like love, sex, drinking, and death, meanwhile, drove poets to innovate so as not to sound endlessly cliché, with astounding (and still-quotable) results. Poets to be discussed include famous names like Thomas Wyatt, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, William Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, John Donne, George Herbert, and John Milton, as well as ought-to-be-famous names like George Gascoigne, Mary Sidney, Robert Southwell, Mary Wroth, Aemelia Lanyer, Henry Vaughan, Anne Bradstreet, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn.

Written work for the course includes two papers (one shortish, one longish), weekly discussion posts, and a creative exercise. Students are expected to recite poetry and present in groups.

 

ENGL 4339-001—Transatlantic Studies I: A Is For American: New Media in the Atlantic World, 1650–1850

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Cassedy. 2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC 

In this course, we will study the spread of print and other new communication technologies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries — a "media shift" that anticipated the electronic communications revolution that we are living through now. How did people who lived through the early modern communications revolution make sense of it? How did new media technologies affect the emergence of new American and British identities? We’ll study the social and technological developments that made written expression and mass communication available to unprecedented audiences, with special attention to print, literacy, newspapers, and diaries. Readings to include fiction and poetry by Jonathan Swift, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Daniel Defoe, John Bunyan, Hannah Foster, Washington Irving, and Phyllis Wheatley, and autobiographical writing by John Marrant, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Franklin, Samson Occom, and John Gilchrist.

Weekly response papers; lively class discussions; seminar paper.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Contemporary American Poetry

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Dallas Hall 357.  Caplan.           2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This class will study the work of the most exciting poets writing today. We will examine how they create art with our moment’s particular resources: the language, technologies, pleasures, and anxieties that mark contemporary life. They reinvigorate older forms and invent new ones. They write love poetry, mixing intense longing and keen ambivalence, and political poetry fueled by anger, fear, and, more faintly, hope. We will closely read several recent collections and enjoy Zoom conversations with their authors. Likely assigned poets include Denise Duhamel, Erica Dawson, Randall Mann, Claudia Rankine, and Albert Goldbarth.

Short essays and responses, a midterm exam, and a take-home final.

 

ENGL 4360-002—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature : Literature at the US-Mexico Borderlands

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Sae-Saue.           2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course will explore how novels, plays, and poems produced during and after the US annexation of northern Mexico (now the US Southwest) have communicated social, political, and economic dilemmas of nation making, including matters of race, class, gender, and citizenship.

Primarily, we will look at texts produced by Mexican Americans, Chicana/os, and Native Americans in order to examine American life in the region from an ethnic perspective. We will begin by looking at texts written in the 19th century and conclude having examined contemporary works in order to explore their various formal qualities, and the competing ethnic, political, and national ideologies they articulate. 

 

ENGL 6330-001— Early Modern British Literature: Eminent Non-Shakespeareans, 1500-1700

T 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Rosendale

Time to fill in some important gaps!  This course is essentially a high-level survey of important early modern writers who wander in the shadow of Shakespeare—extraordinary talents that might, had they been not been contemporaries of the sweet swan of Avon, been the greatest figures of another era.  Living and writing in an era of profound religious, political, and social change, these authors still speak to aftertimes in surprising and compelling ways about sex, politics, agency, form, subjectivity, progress, epistemology, economics, God, aspiration, authority, identity, gender, desire, truth, representation, ethics, social organization, reading, good & evil, and much more.  Each week we will focus on a small number of writers and carefully think about their work in its own time; we will also consider that work’s significance in the intellectual, political, literary, and critical times to come, including our own.

 

ENGL 6370-001—African American Literature: Contemporary Narratives of Slavery

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 137. Pergadia

Since the nineteenth century, the slave narrative has been central to the U.S. imagination and a genre that some scholars claim as foundational to American literature itself. After the 1960s, novelist, filmmakers, and visual artists repeatedly turned to and reimagined this form, an act that both commemorates legacies of slavery and comments on power dynamics of the present. Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), for example, rewrites the story of a fugitive slave and speaks to the political history of the Reagan era. This course centralizes the “contemporary narrative of slavery,” a genre of writing that resurrected and reimagined the history of slavery. These postmodern works are often anachronistic, experimental, irreverent. They defy strict genre labels, pushing aesthetic form to lodge their critiques. After studying the canonical works of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, we’ll turn to contemporary imaginative works that remember, memorialize, and recreate the experience of American slavery—from works as varied as the novels of Margaret Atwood and Kazuo Ishiguro, the visual artwork of Kara Walker and Glenn Ligon, the films of Jordan Peele and Boots Riley, to The 1619 Project. Students will gain an understanding both of the lives of Americans in bondage and how those lives transformed into stories that continue to shape national consciousness and animate aesthetic forms.

 

ENGL 7311-001—Seminar in Literary Theory: Narratology and Narrative Theory

M 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  González     

This course is a graduate-level exploration of the expansive field of Narrative Theory, from its Aristotelian roots to recent developments in cognitive science and neuroscience. As we trace our way through the major movements of this field, we will apply our understanding of these theoretical positions to a number of exemplar texts. We will consider developments in Narrative Theory from Barthes, Chatman, Booth, Todorov, Genette, Richardson, Rimmon-Kenan, Cohn, McHale, Phelan, Herman, Prince, Warhol, Fludernik, Ryan, González, Palmer, Aldama, Hogan, and many others. At its core, this journey through Narrative Theory will make you more cognizant of the structural and dynamic features that undergird how narratives are created, how they are experienced, and how they persist in our changing world. Students with specific thematic or scholarly interests are encouraged to integrate them into the coursework whenever possible. Students should plan to engage in and at times lead productive discussions based on the theoretical and commonplace readings; develop ideas via questions posed in response to the readings; hone the skills presenting before an academic audience, continue to develop writing via short, analytical essays, and write a final seminar paper aimed at publication in a peer-reviewed journal or section of a dissertation. We will continually test our theoretical readings against two works of fiction: Chris Ware’s Rusty Brown and Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing.

 

ENGL 7372-001—Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Enclosures

Th 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Sudan.

We will identify and analyze the material and figurative implications of “enclosure” from the late seventeenth century through to the virtual demise of the second British empire (including the effects of the idea that this demise is “virtual”). I have purposely used the plural form of “enclosure” in order to engage the myriad of meanings this term evokes, particularly its oppositional definitions. We will identify the ways in which the quotidian activity of the intellectual life of the Enlightenment--seeing, sensing, reading, understanding, knowing—may be understood as acts of “enclosure.” What are the implications for the emergence of aesthetic, philosophical, and scientific truth, method, and form in the Enlightenment, especially when juxtaposed with the legal history of “enclosure”?

 

ENGL 7374-001—Problems in Literary History: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Newman.

The words “realist” and “realism” enter Anglophone writing about literature decades after the emergence of the mainstream Victorian novel in the 1840s, meaning that this mode of writing was identified and theorized after the fact. Precise definition remains elusive—as we shall see.

We will read several novels spanning from Austen to Hardy or Woolf, some of which, like George Eliot’s Middlemarch, are iconically “realist,” others exemplifying realism more problematically. We will also read some important critical and theoretical statements about realism drawn from the twentieth century and from contemporary scholarship. Finally, we’ll consider the relationship of the nineteenth-century realist canon to the problematic of secularization—that is, to recent scholarship that has engaged with contemporary critiques of the secularization thesis, which has either explicitly or tacitly undergirded most humanities and social sciences scholarship throughout the twentieth century.

Texts will be drawn from the following: Austen, Northanger Abbey; Dickens, Oliver Twist (or an alternative); E. Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Collins, The Moonstone; Thackeray, Vanity Fair; Eliot, Middlemarch; Ward, Robert Elsmere; Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; essays by Auerbach, Barthes, Bersani, Lukács, Freud, Jameson, and more recent theorists of realism. End of semester seminar paper (approx. 15 pages + bibliog.), presentation and write-up, posts to discussion board.

 

 

 

Cat#

 

 

Sec

 

 

CourseTitle

 

 

Instructor

 

 

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Start

 

 

End

 

 

Room

 

 

UCTags

 

CC

Tags

 

 

1362

 

 

001

 

 

SpeculativeFiction

 

Dickson-Carr,D.

 

 

MWF

 

 

10:00

 

 

10:50

 

DLSB131

 

 

2016:LL

 

 

 

1365

 

 

001

 

 

LiteratureofMinorities

 

 

Levy

 

 

T

 

 

6:00

 

 

8:50

 

 

DH116

2012:CA1,HD

2016:HD,LL

 

LAI,HD

 

 

2102

 

 

001

 

 

SpreadsheetLiteracy

 

Dickson-Carr,C.

 

 

W

 

 

3:00

 

 

3:50

 

HYER106

 

 

 

 

2102

 

 

002

 

 

SpreadsheetLiteracy

 

Dickson-Carr,C.

 

 

M

 

 

3:00

 

 

3:50

 

HYER106

 

 

 

 

 

2302

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

BusinessWriting

 

 

Dickson-Carr,C.

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

VSNI203

2012:IL,OC,W

2016:IL,OC,

W

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

2302

 

 

 

002

 

 

 

BusinessWriting

 

 

Dickson-Carr,C.

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:20

 

 

VSNI203

2012:IL,OC,W

2016:IL,OC,

W

 

 

 

W

 

 

2311

 

 

001

 

 

Poetry:LiftingtheVeil

 

 

Condon

 

 

TR

 

 

2:00

 

 

3:20

 

DLSB132

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2311

 

 

002H

 

 

Poetry

 

 

Caplan

 

 

MWF

 

 

1:00

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH157

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2311

 

 

003

 

Poetry:AmericanPoetrySince1960—Legitimate Dangers

 

 

Rivera

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH137

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2312

 

 

001

 

Fiction: Alt-Narratives in AmericanLiteratureSince1945

 

 

STAFF

 

 

TR

 

 

8:00

 

 

9:20

 

 

DH101

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2312

 

 

002

 

 

Fiction:DangerousNovels

 

 

Sudan

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

CLEM325

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W


 

 

2312

 

 

003

 

 

Fiction:TheGlobalNovel

 

 

Hermes

 

 

MWF

 

 

11:00

 

 

11:50

 

 

DH157

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2312

 

 

004

 

Fiction: Ethnic LiteraryImaginations

 

 

Sae-Saue

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH156

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2312

 

 

005

 

 

Fiction:TheGlobalNovel

 

 

Hermes

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH153

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2313

 

 

001

 

 

Drama

 

 

Moss

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH102

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:LL,W

 

LAI,W

 

 

2315

 

 

001

IntroductiontoLiteraryStudy:Race in the English RenaissanceandBeyond

 

 

Atkinson

 

 

MWF

 

 

2:00

 

 

2:50

 

 

DH152

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:CA,W

CAA,CA,W

 

 

2315

 

 

002

IntroductiontoLiteraryStudy:

OntheRoad(again):

RoadNarrativesfromHomertoKerouac

Rosendale

 

 

TR

 

 

11:00

 

 

12:20

 

 

DH102

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:CA,W

CAA,CA,W

 

 

2390

 

 

001

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:TheShapesofFiction

 

 

Farhadi

 

 

TR

 

 

11:00

 

 

12:20

 

 

DH152

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,W

 

 

2390

 

 

002

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:Short-FormCreativeWriting

 

 

Smith

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH120

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,

W

 

 

2390

 

 

003

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:TheArtofListening

 

 

Lama

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH156

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,W

 

 

2390

 

 

004

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:Short-FormCreativeWriting

 

 

Smith

 

 

TR

 

 

12:30

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH351

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,W

 

 

2390

 

 

005

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:

TheMovesWritersMake

 

 

Hermes

 

 

MW

 

 

3:00

 

 

4:20

 

 

DH152

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,

W

 

 

2390

 

 

006

 

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:

WritingCreativeNonfiction

 

 

Rubin

 

 

R

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH137

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,CA,W

 

 

2390

 

 

007

IntroductiontoCreativeWriting:

Poetry Unbound—How Dare We!Write

 

 

Rivera

 

 

MWF

 

 

1:00

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH137

 

2012:CA1,W

2016:CA,W

CAC,

CA,W

 

 

3310

 

 

001

 

Research and CriticalWriting forLiteraryStudies

 

 

González

 

 

MWF

 

 

10:00

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH120

 

 

 

WIM


 

 

 

3346

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

American Literary History I

 

 

 

Cassedy

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:20

 

 

HYER200

2012:CA2,HC2,

W2016:HFA,

HSBS,W

 

 

LAI,W

 

 

 

3360

 

 

 

401

Topics in Modern and

Contemporary American Literature:

Women in Popular

Culture

 

 

 

Garelick

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

12:20

 

 

 

ONLINE

2012:CA2, HD,OC,W2016:HFA,

HD,OC,W

 

 

LAI,W

 

 

 

3362

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

AfricanAmericanLiterature

 

 

 

Pergadia

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

 

DH105

2012:CA2,HD,

W2016:HFA,

HD,W

 

LAI, HD,W

 

 

 

3364

 

 

 

401

 

WomenandtheSouthwest:

Mujeres Fatales and the Fates of

Feminism in Mexican America

 

 

TorresdeVeneciano

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:50

 

 

 

ONLINE

2012:CA2,HD, OC2016:HFA,

HD,OC

 

 

 

LAI

 

 

 

 

 

3367

 

 

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

 

Ethical Implications of Children'sLiterature

 

 

 

 

 

Satz

 

 

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

 

 

9:00

 

 

 

 

 

9:50

 

 

 

 

 

DH115

2012:

CA2,HD,

KNOW,OC,

W2016:

HFA,HD,

KNOW,

OC,W

 

 

LAI,

HD,

OC,

W

 

 

3390

 

 

001

 

 

CreativeWritingWorkshop

 

 

Rubin

 

 

T

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH137

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:HFA,W

 

 

W

 

 

3390

 

 

002

 

Creative Writing Workshop: TheArt of Voice

 

 

Condon

 

 

TR

 

 

11:00

 

 

12:20

 

 

DH115

 

2012:CA2,W

2016:HFA,W

 

 

W

 

 

4330

 

 

001

 

 

RenaissanceWriters

 

 

Moss

 

 

TR

 

 

12:30

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH120

 

2012:IL,OC

2016:IL,OC

 

 

OC

 

 

4339

 

 

001

 

TransatlanticStudiesI:

AIsForAmerican

 

 

Cassedy

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH101

 

2012:IL,OC

2016:IL,OC

 

 

 

 

4360

 

 

 

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary

American Literature: 

Contemporary

AmericanPoetry

 

 

 

Caplan

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

11:50

 

 

 

DH357

2012:

CA2,IL,OC

2016:HFA,

IL,OC

 

 

 

 

4360

 

 

 

002

StudiesinModernand ContemporaryAmerican

Literature:

Literature at the US-MexicoBorderlands

 

 

 

Sae-Saue

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

2:50

 

 

 

DH156

2012:

CA2,IL,OC

2016:HFA,

IL,OC

 

 

 

6330

 

 

001

Early Modern

British Literature:

Eminent Non-Shakespeareans,1500-1700

 

 

Rosendale

 

 

Tu

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH138

 

 


 

 

6370

 

 

001

AfricanAmericanLiterature:

Contemporary Narratives of Slavery

 

 

Pergadia

 

 

W

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH137

 

 

 

 

7311

 

 

001

 

SeminarinLiteraryTheory:

Narrative Theory

 

 

González

 

 

M

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH138

 

 

 

 

7372

 

 

001

 

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature:Enclosures

 

 

Sudan

 

 

R

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH138

 

 

 

 

7374

 

 

001

Problems in Literary History: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

 

 

Newman

 

 

TR

 

 

12:30

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH138

 

 

 



 

 

 

Cat #

 

 

Sec

 

 

Course Title

 

 

Instructor

 

 

Days

 

 

Start

 

 

End

 

 

Room

 

 

UC Tags

 

CC

Tags

 

 

 

 

 

3367

 

 

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

 

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

 

 

 

 

 

Satz

 

 

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

 

 

9:00

 

 

 

 

 

9:50

 

 

 

 

 

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW,

OC, W

 

 

 

LAI, HD, OC, W

 

 

1362

 

 

001

 

 

Speculative Fiction

 

Dickson-Carr, D.

 

 

MWF

 

 

10:00

 

 

10:50

 

DLSB 131

 

 

2016: LL

 

 

 

3310

 

 

001

 

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

 

 

González

 

 

MWF

 

 

10:00

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH 120

 

 

 

WIM

 

 

2312

 

 

003

 

 

Fiction: The Global Novel

 

 

Hermes

 

 

MWF

 

 

11:00

 

 

11:50

 

 

DH 157

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

 

4360

 

 

 

001

 

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Contemporary American Poetry

 

 

 

Caplan

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

11:50

 

 

 

DH 357

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA,

IL, OC

 

 

 

2311

 

 

003

 

Poetry: American Poetry Since 1960—Legitimate Dangers

 

 

Rivera

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

2312

 

 

004

 

 

Fiction

 

 

Sae-Saue

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH 156

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

2312

 

 

005

 

 

Fiction: The Global Novel

 

 

Hermes

 

 

MWF

 

 

12:00

 

 

12:50

 

 

DH 153

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

2311

 

 

002H

 

 

Poetry

 

 

Caplan

 

 

MWF

 

 

1:00

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH 157

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

007

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry Unbound—How Dare We! Write

 

 

 

Rivera

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

1:00

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

 

DH 137

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W


 

 

 

2315

 

 

 

001

 

Introduction to Literary Study: Race in the English Renaissance and Beyond

 

 

 

Atkinson

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

2:50

 

 

 

DH 152

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAA, CA, W

 

 

 

4360

 

 

 

002

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature at the US-Mexico

Borderlands

 

 

 

Sae-Saue

 

 

 

MWF

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

2:50

 

 

 

DH 156

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA,

IL, OC

 

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

005

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

 

 

 

Hermes

 

 

 

MW

 

 

 

3:00

 

 

 

4:20

 

 

 

DH 152

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

7311

 

 

001

 

Seminar in Literary Theory: Narrative Theory

 

 

González

 

 

M

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH 138

 

 

 

 

2102

 

 

002

 

 

Spreadsheet Literacy

 

Dickson-Carr, C.

 

 

M

 

 

3:00

 

 

3:50

 

HYER 0106

 

 

 

 

6370

 

 

001

 

African American Literature: Contemporary Narratives of Slavery

 

 

Pergadia

 

 

W

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH 137

 

 

 

 

2102

 

 

001

 

 

Spreadsheet Literacy

 

Dickson-Carr, C.

 

 

W

 

 

3:00

 

 

3:50

 

HYER 0106

 

 

 

 

2312

 

 

001

 Fiction

 

 

STAFF

 

 

TR

 

 

8:00

 

 

9:20

 

 

DH 101

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

2312

 

 

002

 

 

Fiction: Dangerous Novels

 

 

Sudan

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

CLEM 325

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

2313

 

 

001

 

 

Drama

 

 

Moss

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH 102

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

002

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short-Form Creative Writing

 

 

 

Smith

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

9:30

 

 

 

10:50

 

 

 

DH 120

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

003

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Art of Listening

 

 

 

Lama

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

9:30

 

 

 

10:50

 

 

 

DH 156

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

4339

 

 

001

 

Transatlantic Studies I: A Is For American

 

 

Cassedy

 

 

TR

 

 

9:30

 

 

10:50

 

 

DH 101

 

2012: IL, OC

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016: IL, OC

 

 

 

 

2315

 

 

 

002

 

Introduction to Literary Study: On the Road (again): Road Narratives from Homer to Kerouac

 

 

 

Rosendale

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

12:20

 

 

 

DH 102

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAA, CA, W

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

001

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Shapes of Fiction

 

 

 

Farhadi

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

12:20

 

 

 

DH 152

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

 

3360

 

 

 

401

 

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Women in Popular Culture

 

 

 

Garelick

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

12:20

 

 

 

ONLINE

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA,

HD, OC, W

 

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

 

3390

 

 

 

002

 

 

Creative Writing Workshop: The Art of Voice

 

 

 

Condon

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

11:00

 

 

 

12:20

 

 

 

DH 115

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA,

W

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

2302

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

Business Writing

 

 

Dickson-Carr, C.

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL,

OC, W

 

 

 

W

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

004

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short-Form Creative Writing

 

 

 

Smith

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

 

DH 351

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

 

3362

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

African American Literature

 

 

 

Pergadia

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

 

DH 105

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA,

HD, W

 

 

LAI, HD, W

 

 

 

4330

 

 

 

001

 

 

Renaissance Writers: Poetic Occasions

 

 

 

Moss

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

12:30

 

 

 

1:50

 

 

 

DH 120

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL,

OC

 

 

 

OC

 

 

7374

 

 

001

 

Problems in Literary History: The Realist Novel in Practice and Theory

 

 

Newman

 

 

TR

 

 

12:30

 

 

1:50

 

 

DH 138

 

 

 

 

 

2302

 

 

 

002

 

 

 

Business Writing

 

 

Dickson-Carr, C.

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:20

 

 

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL,

OC, W

 

 

 

W

 

 

2311

 

 

001

 

 

Poetry: Lifting the Veil

 

 

Condon

 

 

TR

 

 

2:00

 

 

3:20

 

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

 

 

LAI, W


 

 

 

3346

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

American Literary History I

 

 

 

Cassedy

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:20

 

 

HYER 200

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA,

HSBS, W

 

 

 

LAI, W

 

 

 

3364

 

 

 

401

 

Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales and the Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

 

 

Torres de Veneciano

 

 

 

TR

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

3:50

 

 

 

ONLINE

2012: CA2, HD, OC 2016: HFA,

HD, OC

 

 

 

LAI

 

 

 

3390

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

Creative Writing Workshop

 

 

 

Rubin

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

4:50

 

 

 

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA,

W

 

 

 

W

 

 

6330

 

 

001

Early Modern British Literature: Eminent Non-Shakespeareans, 1500-

1700

 

 

Rosendale

 

 

T

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH 138

 

 

 

 

 

1365

 

 

 

001

 

 

 

Literature of Minorities

 

 

 

Levy

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

6:00

 

 

 

8:50

 

 

 

DH 116

2012: CA1, HD

2016: HD,

LL

 

 

LAI, HD

 

 

 

2390

 

 

 

006

 

 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Writing Creative Nonfiction

 

 

 

Rubin

 

 

 

R

 

 

 

2:00

 

 

 

4:50

 

 

 

DH 137

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA,

W

 

 

CAC, CA, W

 

 

7372

 

 

001

 

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Enclosures

 

 

Sudan

 

 

R

 

 

2:00

 

 

4:50

 

 

DH 138

 

 

 


Fall 2022

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 115. Wheeler. 2012: CA1, HC1, OC   2016: HC, LL, OC     CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.

 

ENGL 1330-001—World of Shakespeare

MWF 10:00-10:50. Dedman Life Science 131.  Moss.      2012: CA1   2016: LL   CC: LAI

Time to (re-)introduce yourself to our language’s greatest writer. In this course, you will meet Shakespeare’s princes, tyrants, heroes, villains, saints, sinners, lovers, losers, drunkards, clowns, outcasts, fairies, witches, and monsters. You’ll watch and listen as they love, woo, kiss, charm, hate, curse, mock, fool, sing to, dance with, get drunk with, sleep with, fight with, murder, and haunt each other. You will visit Renaissance England, a place and time as strange, troubled, exciting, delightful, fearful, thoughtful, prejudiced, political, magical, bloody, sexy, and confused as your own. You will read poetry you will never forget.

Our introductory survey will cover 7 plays in all of the major Shakespearean genres: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance (all texts are digital and free, with a print option for students who prefer Shakespeare’s preferred format). Background readings, lectures, and films will contextualize Shakespeare’s achievement within Renaissance society and life (and death), engaging the religious, political, cultural, and economic debates of that glorious but tumultuous age.

Coursework includes frequent short quizzes, written midterm and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. No papers.

ENGL 1330 satisfies the Literary Analysis and Interpretation requirement for the Common Curriculum, and counts toward the English major and minor.

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 306.  Levy.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, literary, and contemporary social perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity. These include: “Nation” “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Critical Race Studies,” “Black Lives Matter,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc.   We examine the ways these categories have been deployed to assert and marginalize identity, seeing identity as both self-selected and imposed, fixed and flexible, located and displaced, secure and situational.  In addition, we examine the status of “minority” literature as a category within the American literary and cultural canon, and critique the ways in which this imposed status has been used historically to diminish the craftsmanship and aesthetic reach of literature written by women, LGBQT authors and peoples of color.

 

ENGL 1365-002—Literature of Minorities

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 102.  González.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

This course will provide students with an excellent opportunity to explore literature by and about historically-marginalized communities in the United States. Because the presence of diverse peoples and literatures reaches back to even before the founding of the United States, an exploration of multicultural, so-called "minority" literature in U.S. is no small matter. The aim of this course is to engage substantively with this rich and rewarding tradition of literary and cultural production. We will explore literature from a range of diverse authors and forms that highlight the cultural experiences of many Americans across varied media forms and genres (fiction, poetry, life writing, etc.). 

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Bozorth.             2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and Christmas carols. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, teen-age rebellion, God, and Satan, and learn the difference between “cliché” and “cliched.” You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 8:00-9:20.  Dallas Hall 101.  Luttrel.     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

For many, poetry can seem intimidating or prohibitively difficult. In this class, we’ll demystify poetry and explore the ways in which it can enrich your life and your understanding of the world. We will learn about form, sound, and language, as well as how they impact meaning. We will read poems from both canonical and contemporary authors, covering themes that range from romantic love to nature to social justice to notions of God. We’ll write a few poems and analyze many more. By the end of the course, poetry will no longer be intimidating, but rather a way to understand yourself and the world we live in.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Caplan.           2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“Poetry is language that sounds better and means more,” the poet Charles Wright once observed. “What's better than that?” This class will train the students to hear the many sounds and meanings that great poems articulate. We will use a number of methods to listen more carefully. In addition to writing critical essays, we will compose formal imitations, write brief analyses of particular elements of the assigned poetry, and perform a poem from memory. We also will have the pleasure of having poets visit our class via Zoom to discuss their work with us. The visitors will include Diane Seuss, whose collection, frank: sonnets, won this year's Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In short, we will spend the semester considering language that sounds better and means more, and, as the poet put it, what’s better than that?

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 2:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 106.  Hermes. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohsin Hamid, Rattawut Lapcharoensap, and Bapsi Sidwa.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 3:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 106.  Hermes. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohsin Hamid, Rattawut Lapcharoensap, and Bapsi Sidwa.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Harold Clark Simmons Hall 107.  Urban.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

“Writin’ is fightin’.”

—Ishmael Reed

Of course, we all know the cliché about how the pen is mightier than the sword — but is Ishmael Reed’s statement about writing merely rehashing a stale saying, or trying to express something different? As a Black American writer, Reed contends that oppositional texts necessarily subvert conventions, undermine power structures, and provide counter narratives to dominant epistemologies. Writing, in Reed’s sense, requires strategy, planning, preparation, and training. We proceed from the idea that art — whether it be music, literature, film, virtual performance, etc. — has the potential to expose structural inequities that appear natural and/or inevitable, but which are, as the late anarchist David Graeber notes, ultimately, “something that we make, and could just as easily make differently.” With this sentiment in mind, students will read, analyze, and critique a range of literary texts that counter the status quo. Additionally, students will read “alt-narratives” by writers from a range of backgrounds who, in some sense, rely on fiction to expose how visual and textual representations reinforce dominant, heteronormative ideas about race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Some, but not all, of the texts will include: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems, selections from Ed Sanders’s Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts, Ishmael Reed’s Mumbo Jumbo, Darius James’s Negrophobia, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee, Kathy Acker’s Don Quixote, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen. In addition to these primary sources, students will read short articles that attend to a given text’s literary form, genre, and historical context(s). At the end of the semester, students will watch Obscene: A Portrait of Barney Rosset and Grove Press.

 

ENGL 2312-004—Introduction to Fiction: Shipwrecks & Their Spectators

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Atkinson.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

“To see a ship tossed, and threatened every moment by the merciless waves,” says the Roman philosopher Lucretius, “is a spectacle which those that stand safe at shore, cannot but behold with pleasure as well as compassion.” In our class we will put ourselves in the position of both the spectator and the sailor as we explore one of the most ancient and enduring literary subjects: the shipwreck. Our course begins on dry land, where we will ponder why humans are compelled to leave safe harbors for the danger of the high seas. As the semester progresses we will use literary texts as well as true accounts to trace an oceanic voyage culminating in the terror of shipwreck. Finally we will find ourselves on a distant shore, contemplating the physical and psychological transformations produced by disaster – what Shakespeare calls “something rich and strange.” Shipwreck compels us to ask questions about human longing and curiosity, about our relationship with oceans and the divine, and about the miracle of salvation. But equally important, examining the literary history of shipwrecks will allow us to explore the purposes behind storytelling as a human pastime.

 

ENGL 2312-005—Introduction to Fiction: Contemporary Short Stories since 1970: Salty, Thirsty, Savage, Woke

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Dallas Hall 357.  Rivera.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

No matter that fiction inundate readers with a constant fare of death, divorce, destruction, disillusion, dysfunction, and dystopia—while occasionally offering escape, revelation, return—this discussion-based course in contemporary literature introduces students to formidable works of short fiction. Throughout the semester, we will annotate, read, discuss, and critique the merits and shortcomings of the genre in addition to performing analyses of narrative forms and structures that test the limits of characterization, setting, plot, and style. Students will consider narrative tropes juxtaposed against a backdrop of historical and current events as one method of considering broader literary movements. Based upon a framework of literary and rhetorical devices, this course relies upon academic research, writing, and technical presentations to witness the fears and risks and conflicts and failures intrinsic to understanding any specific narrative of our culture. Thus, our class will seek to understand the culturally ubiquitous sentiment of “I can’t believe that happened here” and impart greater awareness of the range of the human condition. 

 

ENGL 2312-006—Introduction to Fiction: Surveying Literary Novellas since 1965: Women on Top

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Rivera.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This reading-intensive, contemporary literature course introduces students to novellas by women through the paradigm of intersectionality. Through consistent, classroom-based dialogue, students will situate their own feminist interrogations of novellas by Dura, El-Saadawi, Erdrich, Ferrante, Keegan, Lessing, Moore, Morrison, Okorafor, Otsuka, Rhys, and Winterson. Via journal responses, class-curated annotated bibliographies, close reading, literary analysis, and comparative literary synthesis, students will chart the throughlines of how women writers create fictive realities in this condensed narrative form as one possible mode of social commentary. We will attend to conventions and tropes of this genre—while we evaluate the centrality of one or two complex characters, the narrowing of conflict, the broad strokes used to structure aesthetic pacing, and the limitations of chronological locality. Further, students should expect to both consider and discuss the complex psycho-social beliefs and motives intrinsic to the identity-politics of race, gender, class, ability, religion, gender, gender identity, sexuality, orientation, class, age, education, religion, and national origin vis-à-vis the historicity of women’s lives as we contextualize the aesthetic choices of these writers and the specific use of their voices to question and challenge the socio-political exigencies and oppressions of community.

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: Modern Drama and the Reinvented Self

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy.         2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there’s something about what it’s doing that you can’t quite put into words. This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text. You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are difficult to pin down. Tentative reading list includes texts by Karen Russell (Swamplandia!), William Shakespeare (King Lear), Leslie Jamison (The Empathy Exams), Gabriel García Márquez (One Hundred Years of Solitude), and Emily Dickinson. Four essays and a final exam.

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Black and Banned

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Annette Caldwell Simmons Hall 225.  Rivera.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W  

CC: CA, CAA, W

An ongoing discussion exists within the United States about who gets to decide what’s appropriate for inclusion in the academic classroom as well as school libraries. As we acknowledge that within the context of community standards, both censorship and book bans have existed throughout American history, across all artistic genres and media. However, given the necessity for literacy for modern survival/autonomy, and this country’s specific history of limiting educational access and funding for marginalized groups, how does an individual construct and contribute to interpreting meaning within shared or contested spaces? Through class discussions, journal entries, research, short papers, and technical presentations, students will analyze instances of banned Blackness by directly interpreting the work of M. K. Asante, James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Ernest Gaines, Mikki Kendal, Kiese Laymon, Toni Morrison, Ijeoma Oluo, and Junauda Petrus.

 

ENGL 2315-003— Introduction to Literary Study: Manner, Method, and Meaning

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 102.  Goyne.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

Have you ever read a story or finished a novel or poem and wondered, “Well, what did that mean?”  You had the feeling something was going on that you didn’t quite get?  In this course we will explore a variety of texts—novels, short stories, poems, maybe films—from particular literary points of view that  reveal historical moments and places, and raise cultural questions about gender, economic class, and racial inequality.  By coming to some conclusions about how authors create meaning in their writing, we will gain a better understanding of how literature engages and enthralls us, tickles our fancy, or moves us to action.  Percy Bysshe Shelley claimed, “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.”  Let’s see how they do it.

 

ENGL 2315-004— Introduction to Literary Study: Bad Mothers

CANCLED

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 351. Condon.   2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

M 2:00-4:50.  Crum Residential Commons 132.  Rubin.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genre of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Hermes.                2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”

―Anton Chekhov

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in poetry and fiction. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about how great writing gets made. These readings are meant to provide artistic models and stimulate discussion about craft. Together, we’ll identify the “moves” successful pieces of writing make and practice incorporating them in our own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. With engage participation, we will have an opportunity to sharpen both our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 105.  Smith.    2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing short-form stories. Students will read, create, and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: Art of Listening

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 343.  Lama.            2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Poetry always begins and ends,” remarks W.S. Merwin, “with listening.” In this class, we will learn to listen—to the sky, the earth, the body, the live language, the song in language, the language in song. Through recitations, we will explore the lyre of the lyric in our own throats. In addition to sound, we will practice other fundamentals of poetry such as the line, image, metaphor, and form through creative exercises, workshops, and a final portfolio. We will imitate and emulate the great poets from classical to contemporary with the goal of finding our own voice and music. “The quieter you become,” says Rumi, “the more you hear.” In this class, we will learn to be quiet but also ecstatic.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Shapes of Fiction

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Umphrey Lee 228.  Farhadi.        2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

In this course, we’ll read a variety of fictional genres and styles to analyze the particular decisions writers use to give their stories shape.  While structure will be our entry point, we’ll also focus on the smaller scale choices writers make in order to develop characters, further plot, and stimulate, satisfy, and subvert expectations in the service of providing a compelling read.

Throughout the course we’ll use critical and creative assignments to develop our craft vocabulary.  Students will write their own full-length short stories, which we’ll workshop in the second half of the semester.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

TTh 12:30-1:50.   Dallas Hall 120.  Sudan.

This course fulfills the “Criticism and Theory” requirement for English majors.

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches critics have taken to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does the interpretation of texts reflect on our psycho-social presence in our culture; for example, how do ideologies of race get reflected in our reading and analysis of texts?

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

 

ENGL 3320-001—Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Clements Hall 325.  Amsel. 2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W  CC: LAI, W

Are you ready to explore fact and fiction in the literature of the Middle Ages? How is it that we make history? And, how do we discern truth? Sounds familiar to us because we are still grappling with questions of real truths vs. fake truths in our everyday lives. This course examines real and imagined medieval histories and legends, including stories of King Arthur and Joan of Arc, so we can learn about medieval paradigms still present in contemporary culture.

 

ENGL 3340-001—Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Satz.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W 

We will read with a variety of critical approaches six great novels: Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Jane Eyre, Villette, Mill on the Floss, and Middlemarch. This course is an opportunity to savor some of the monumental works of literature. Requirements: three short papers (4 pp.) and one longer paper (10 pp.); mid-term and final.

 

ENGL 3355-001—Transatlantic Encounters III: Possible Futures: Feminist Theory and Speculative Fiction.

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Boswell.   2012: CA2, GE, W   2016: HFA, GE, W  CC: HD 

Cross-listed with WGST 3370

What do feminist theory and speculative fiction have in common? Both genres engage with our culture through imaginative critique, using the “possible future” to envision the ways our world could change for the better—or the worse. Feminist thought has often turned to fiction to imagine “what if” and to engage with ideas of sex, gender, and sexuality. In this course, we will examine a variety of speculative texts alongside works of feminist theory. By making our world and assumptions strange to us, these speculative fictions offer a kind of testing ground for many ideas in feminist theory. This course will examine the underlying systems that have shaped our concepts of sex, gender, race, and other categories. Students will end the semester by giving a researched oral presentation over a literary work or film of their choosing.

 

ENGL 3360-001—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 152.  Sae-Saue.   2012: CA2, HD, OC, W   2016: HFA, HD, OC, W  CC: LAI, W

This course interrogates and examines violence as the condition of the US West. Of course, violence expresses itself in many fashions, not all of which the course will be able to address. We will begin with the US enterprise of expansion and Native American genocide and move through historical and contemporary social crises, including cultural eradication, police brutality, mass incarceration, local Texas rebellions, the Mexican Revolution, the “zoot suit riots,” social uprisings of the 60s, The American War in Viet Nam (as expressed and experienced by ethnic writers of the West), Asian immigration restrictions, anti-miscegenation laws, and more. Moving through these historical concerns (organized as thematic ones in our course texts), students will examine primarily how Native American and Latinx writers have deployed literary strategies in order to narrate historical correctives to US national (organizing) myths such as manifest destiny (and others) in order to examine how fiction articulates ethnic experiences and social crises, imagines social resolutions, and grapples with paradoxes and impasses of their own representative limits in an era of neo-liberalism.

 

ENGL 3360-002—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Caribbean Theater and Performance

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3363-001—Chicana/Chicano Literature

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dedman Life Science 132.  González.      2012: CA2, HD, W     2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: HD, W

This course will examine how contemporary Chicana/o novelists, poetry, and short story writers, use a variety of different storytelling forms to create characters and events that open readers' eyes to new ways of perceiving the world. The goal will be to balance close literary readings with larger socio-political concerns specific to the Chicana/o experience. As such, we will not only direct our attention to issues of form--such as how a given author employs specific narrative voices and point of view, for example--but also how each author addresses issues of Chicana/o identity and experience at the thematic level. We will also explore how Chicana/o writers expand our understanding of race, gender, class, and sexuality as constituted within the Chicana/o community (and that varies from region to region, from urban to rural, for example) and within a larger U.S. mainstream.

 

ENGL 3364-001C—Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales: The Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3379-001—Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Satz.       2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W       2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W   CC: HD, OC, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Poetry Workshop: Lyric Address and Apostrophe: Listen Up, I’m Talking to You

TTh 3:30-4:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Condon.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this course we will study and write poetry that employs lyric address and apostrophe. We will discover how directly addressing our worst enemy or our secret crush, the West Wind or a Wendy’s drive-thru, transforms poems from monological recollections into active dialogues. In addition to writing free-verse poetry, we will practice the poetic forms that spotlight lyric address and apostrophe, such as odes, elegies, and ghazals. You will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.           2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this course students will present their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops we will analyze exemplary models of the form and study film clips to understand the ways compelling dialogue is written and satisfying scenes are structured. Readings will include such classics as Casablanca and Chinatown as well as newer scripts like Lady Bird and Get Out. ENGL 2390 is a prerequisite for this course although Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 105.  Smith.      2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing characters. Students will create and critique literary narratives focused on character development, and will learn how to change a flat character into a well-rounded character. By the end of the short semester class, students will complete a portfolio and present a revised story in class. We will read stories, excerpts, and craft references that are heavily focused on character development.

 

ENGL 4321-001—Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Wheeler.             2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W   2016: HSBS,  IL, KNOW, OC, W

Medieval literature is richly populated by fantasy, fable, magic, broad humor and deep spirituality. Even in its earliest poetic forms, English poetry unsettles and challenges readers. We will experience a wide variety of this imaginative literature from the “masterpieces” like Beowulf and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to odd poems, treatises, and plays found in dark corners of the imagination. Each student will choose a monster to search and a marvel to  share. Weekly comments, in-class presentations, final synthetic paper.

 

ENGL 4343-001—Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender and Sexuality

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 120.  Newman.         2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

The word “Victorian” has been a synonym for “prudish” for about a hundred years. One historian has asserted that the sexes were regarded as more radically, absolutely different during the nineteenth century than any time before or since. Clearly we’re nothing like them--right?

If that’s the case, why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to many of us about what it means to be a man or woman? And why do some icons of what we now think of as “queer” identity first appear in the latter part of the nineteenth-century? Moreover, in nineteenth-century England prostitution, birth control, what it means to consent to sex and the age when one could do so were all being debated, the term “homosexual” was coined, and gender roles and strict gender difference were first rigidly imposed, and later openly questioned. We will explore these issues through novels, poetry, essays, and contemporary criticism.

Likely Texts: Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Charles Dickens, David Copperfield; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; various poems; relevant critical essays.

Assignments: Two short and one longer, multi-source paper or creative project supported by relevant research; various shorter low-stakes writing assignments.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Dickson-Carr, D.          2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course focuses on American speculative fiction—comprising science fiction, fantasy, dystopian fiction, and historical fiction—of the 20th and 21st centuries. Speculative fiction, broadly speaking, imagines or reimagines past and future worlds in ways that both depend on and alter reality, or the world we think we perceive and know. In many cases, these works build worlds beyond an Apocalyptic moment, often a cataclysmic shift in the environment, major political upheaval, wars, or—yes—a global pandemic. Although We will pursue several general questions along the way, including—but not limited to—the following: How have American writers (re)imagined American cultures and histories to comment upon the past and predict the future? How might we use their work to track shifting views of humanity’s fate? What, if anything, makes these works distinctly “American,” other than the authors’ origins? What kinds of guidance may be found in these works? How do these works function aesthetically, as literature? How do they exist in or interact with other genres?

Given the vast number of texts that fall in this genre, we will be reading or viewing a relatively small sample consisting of both renowned texts and those less known. These will range from short stories and novels to films and television shows. TENTATIVE List of Authors: Paul Beatty; Ray Bradbury; Octavia Butler; Ta-Nahisi Coates; Samuel R. Delany; Tananarive Due; Percival Everett; William Gibson; Ursula K. LeGuin; Cormac McCarthy; Richard Matheson; Toni Morrison; George S. Schuyler; The Wachowskis. Written and Other Requirements: Short responses; an oral presentation; three major papers, including a paper requiring research.

 

ENGL 4397-001—Distinction Seminar

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dallas Hall 137.  Newman

Open by invitation. An undergraduate writing project that truly merits distinction in English demands considerable planning, research, and preparatory writing, whether the project is creative or critical. This seminar is devoted to that preparatory work. By the end of the semester you should have most of your research behind you and a fairly detailed writing plan in order, plus some writing under your belt that you can build on over winter break. All of this preparation will position you to complete a viable draft (approximately 25-30 pages) by the end of next spring break, so that you can spend the remainder of the spring semester, probably your final one, revising, honing, and polishing your project into a superior piece of creative or critical work.

Obviously, a distinction project entails a serious commitment of time. That commitment begins, at least in a preliminary way, over the summer. During this time you should think about the work that has excited you the most and write at least one informal proposal of 350-500 words describing the general topic you wish to write about, or the general kind of creative project you wish to write. (Examples furnished upon request, or after registration. Write to bnewman@smu.edu.)

Our syllabus will be partly student-generated, using scholarship and creative writing located by members of the class and relevant to their projects. Writing assignments are conceived as scaffolding for the work to be done in the spring, and some of it will be workshopped in class. Students working on creative writing projects will also work with Dr. Richard Hermes, and should expect to meet with him, whether individually or as part of a group, about eight times during the semester, sometimes in lieu of regular class meetings.

Required textbook: Aaron Ritzenberg and Sue Mendelson, How Scholars Write (Oxford University Press).

Required writing: informal proposal(s), 350-500 words; preliminary bibliography of relevant sources (not annotated); annotated bibliography (12-15 sources for critical writers, fewer for creative writers, in both cases focusing on their relevance to student project); possible draft of poster for Research Day in the spring semester; literature review-style bibliographic essay of relevant work (approx. five pages); final proposal, heuristic outline, and several draft pages of the project itself.

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies

F 12:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 120. Caplan

This course prepares doctoral students for literary studies. We will evaluate various genres of professional writing – the book review, the journal article, the conference paper, the abstract, the fellowship proposal. We will also grapple with some current debates around the methods and objectives of literary study – the archival turn, the digital humanities, postcritique, the environmental humanities. Students will also produce and workshop genres of academic writing, gaining experience in the collegial art of giving and receiving editorial feedback.  

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

T 12:30-3:20.  Dallas Hall 138.  Sae-Saue.   

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  Prothro Hall 200.  Stephens.  

English 6312 (Teaching Practicum) is a year-long course designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. During the fall semester, in addition to all of the texts assigned on the WRTR 1312 syllabus, students will read and write critical responses to composition theory and the classroom. These texts will provide an overview of the history of rhetoric and methods for fostering critical thinking and writing. Students will also critically assess and review contemporary criticism of rhetorical pedagogy.

 

ENGL 6330-001— Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Moss

This course is conceived as a reintroduction to Shakespeare’s dramatic works through constant and sustained comparison to drama by his colleagues, peers, and rivals. It seeks to reinvigorate and ultimately answer the age-old, cliché, tautological, and generally useless question, “What makes Shakespeare Shakespeare?” through careful attention to the elements that constituted his art and informed his process. That is no different, of course, from any well-historicized Shakespeare survey, but here the emphasis shifts from the usual source-study, recovery of political context, and application of modern theoretical models to the simultaneous and cumulative study of analogous texts, especially plays by Marlowe and Jonson, informed throughout by recent trends in early modern theater studies (most often in a materialist mode). Put another way, we will familiarize ourselves with the ways and means of early modern English theater companies—their stages, properties, rhetorics, texts, personnel, audiences, and professional practices—while distinguishing between Shakespeare’s application of those resources and response to their limitations on the one hand, and alternative dramaturgies on the other.

While our emphasis will be on weekly paired plays, each week will feature two or more critical selections to help us feel somewhat at home in the altogether different playmaking and playgoing environment of early modern London. Further context will be provided by the examination of important supplementary primary materials (e.g., the account book of an important playhouse manager, records of court performance, apprenticeship contracts for boy actors). Lest we mistake living theater for dead text, we will further supplement our study with viewings of modern performances, perhaps even a live local performance. Students should expect to contribute copiously both on Canvas and in class, to write both critically and creatively (!), and to present on some key aspect of one of the plays we study.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Th 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Dickson-Carr, D.  

This seminar will focus on critical issues and debates within African American literary and cultural history, with a particular emphasis on satire and African American rhetorical traditions and texts. We will place these works in conversation with African American critical theory from various scholars and critics. Our goal will be to examine how these debates manifested themselves in the literature in both implicit and explicit forms. We will begin in the mid-19th century and end in the present. In the process, we will have an opportunity to read literature of various genres, movements, and perspectives. Requirements: Weekly critical responses; an oral presentation; one article-length paper; regular and vocal participation.

TENTATIVE Texts: Napier (ed.), African American Literary Theory; Gates and Burton, Call and Response (excerpts); Studies in American Humor Fall 2022 issue; selected works by Baker, Baldwin, Beatty, Bell, Bennett, Coates, Douglass, Du Bois, Ellison, Everett, Gates, L. Guerrero, Himes, Hurston, Jacobs, Mat Johnson, Jones, King, Malcolm X, B. Manning, D. Fuentes Morgan, Morrison, Obama, Rankine, Schuyler, Thurman, Patricia Williams, C. Wright, R. Wright, Walker, M. Johnson.

 

ENGL 7372-001—Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

M 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy.

Archives are where people put stories that they want to preserve. They’re also where they bury stories that they hope will be forgotten. What could we learn about the past if we looked at literature alongside diaries, love letters, scrapbooks, and the other textual remains that ordinary people leave behind? This course is a hands-on workshop on the theories, practices, and methods of using archival resources in literary studies. Designed to be useful to students working in any national, period, or genre specialization, this course will survey recent work being done with archives by literary and cultural historians, introduce students to a variety of archival resources, and provide practical training in working with physical and digitized materials. Each student will develop and undertake an archivally driven research project, culminating in a narrative essay that uses archival evidence to understand cultural and literary history anew.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 115

2012: HC1, CA1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 131

2012: CA1 2016: LL

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTh

2:00

3:20

HYER 200

2012: CA1, HD

2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

1365
002
Literature of Minorities
González
 TTh 11:00
12:20
DH 102

2012: CA1, HD

2016: HD, LL

 

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry

Luttrell

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 101

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311
003
Poetry
Caplan
MWF
10:00
10:50
DH 120

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

3:00

3:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

Urban

MWF

9:00

9:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004

Fiction: Shipwrecks & Their Spectators

Atkinson

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

 2312 005
Fiction: Contemporary Short Stories since 1970: Salty, Thirsty, Savage, Woke Rivera    MWF 11:00
11:50
DH 357

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312
006
Fiction: Surveying Literary Novellas since 1965: Women on Top Rivera
   MWF 12:00
12:50
DH 156

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2313

001

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Black and Banned

Rivera

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 225

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 102

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315 004
 

CANCELED

CANCELED
 
 
 

 

 

 

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

CMRC 132

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

Hermes

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Lama

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 343

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing

Farhadi

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Sudan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

 

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

Amsel

TTh

9:30

10:50

CLEM 325

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

 

3355

001

Transatlantic Encounters III: Feminist Theory & Spec Fiction

Boswell

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 101

2012: CA2, GE, HD 2016: HFA, GE, HD

HD

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

Sae-Saue

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W

3360
002
CANCELED CANCELED



   

3362

001

CANCELED

CANCELED

           
3363
001
Chicana/Chicano Literature González TTh
2:00
3:20
DSLB 132
2012: CA2, HD, W  2016: HFA, HD, W  LAI, HD, W 

3364

001C

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

 

3379

001

Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Poetry Workshop: Lyric Address and Apostrophe: Listen Up, I’m Talking to You

Condon

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 105

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

Wheeler

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 137

2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W 2016: HSBS, IL, KNOW, OC, W

 

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender & Sexuality

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 120

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 137

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Study

Caplan

F

12:00

2:50

DH 120

 

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue

T

12:30

3:20

DH 138

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 200

 

 

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

Moss

W

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Dickson-Carr, D.

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

Cassedy

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

2312

003

Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

Urban

MWF

9:00

9:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Black and Banned

Rivera

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 225

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Lama

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 343

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3379

001

Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 131

2012: CA1 2016: LL

LAI

2311
003
Poetry
Caplan  MWF
10:00
10:50
DH 120

2012: CA2, W     

2016: LL, W 
LAI, W 

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

 

2312
005
Fiction: Contemporary Short Stories since 1970: Salty, Thirsty, Savage, Woke Rivera MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 357

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

 

LAI, W

2312 006
Fiction: Surveying Literary Novellas since 1965: Women on Top
Rivera MWF
12:00
12:50
DH 156

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315
003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

Hermes
MWF  12:00 12:50

DH 137

DH 137

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

Wheeler

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 137

2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W 2016: HSBS, IL, KNOW, OC, W

 

2312

001

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing

Farhadi

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3360
002
CANCELED CANCELED



 
2312
002

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes
 MWF 3:00
3:50
DH 106

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

CMRC 132

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

Cassedy

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

Moss

W

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Study

Caplan

F

12:00

2:50

DH 120

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 200

 

 

2311

002

Poetry

Luttrell

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 101

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004

Fiction: Shipwreck & Their Spectators

Atkinson

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study: Manner, Method, and Meaning

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 102

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

Amsel

TTh

9:30

10:50

CLEM 325

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3355

001

Transatlantic Encounters III: Feminist Theory & Spec Fiction

Boswell

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 101

2012: CA2, GE, HD 2016: HFA, GE, HD

HD

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 115

2012: HC1, CA1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1365
002
Literature of Minorities  González   TTh 11:00
12:20
DH 102

2012: CA1, HD 

2016: HD, LL 
LAI, HD 

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

Sae-Saue

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender & Sexuality

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 120

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Sudan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

 

3364

001C

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

 

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTh

2:00

3:20

HYER 200

2012: CA1, HD 2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2313

001

CANCELED

CANCELED

         

 

3362

001

CANCELED

CANCELED

 

 

 

 

   
3363
001
Chicana/Chicano Literature  González  TTh
2:00
3:20
DLSB 132
2012: CA2, HD, W  2016: HFA, HD, W  LAI, HD, W 

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 137

 

 

 2315 004  

CANCELED

CANCELED  
 
 

 

 

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Poetry Workshop: Lyric Address and Apostrophe: Listen Up, I’m Talking to You

Condon

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue

T

12:30

3:20

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Dickson-Carr, D.

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Summer 2022

MAY & SUMMER SESSION 2022 COURSES

 

Cat #

Sec

Session

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

CC

3367

0011

S1

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

M-F

10:00

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W

2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

HD, OC, W

3379

0011

S1

CANCELED

CANCELED


 

HD, OC, W

3385
0011
S1
Literature of the Holocaust
Mueller
M-F
12:00
1:50
DH 143
2012: CA2, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, OC, W
HD, OC, W

2302

0012

S2

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

M-F

2:00

 

3:50

ULEE 242

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

 2311 0012
S2
Poetry
McConnell
M-F
10:00
1150
DH 149

2012: CA2, W  2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

0012

S2

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

M-F

2:00

3:50

DH 156

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W



 

 

 


 

 

 

MAY & SUMMER 2022 SESSION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

ENGL 3367-0011 Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

M – F  10:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 138. Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White, accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things AreThe Giving TreeAmazing GraceCurious GeorgeBabar; chapter books for young children such as WilderLittle House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3379-0011—Contexts of Disability

M – F  12:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 3385-0011— Literature of the Holocaust

M – F  12:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 134.  Mueller. 2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: HD, OC, W

How can a few pages of a short story or lines of a poem shed light upon something as horrific as the Holocaust? In this course, we will examine how various Holocaust literary genres illuminate our understanding of the atrocities that took place across Europe during the Holocaust. In this course, we will examine how the Holocaust is represented in literature. This course is a writing-based seminar course and will consists of short analytical writing responses, essay, and one final analytical research essay.

 

ENGL 2302-0012 Business Writing

M – F  2:00-3:50. Umphrey Lee 242.  Dickson-Carr, C.     2012: IL, OC W     2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2311-0012Poetry

M – F  10:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 149.  McConnell.     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W  CC: LAI, W

In 1910, the poet William Henry Davies complained, “What is this life, if full of care, / We have no time to stand and stare.” In the eleventy-two years since then, changes in lifestyle and advances in communication technology—from television to texts to tweets—have nearly destroyed our capacity for standing and staring. Poetry is the antidote to this trend. Poetry yields itself slowly. Poetry demands that we silence distractions and pause in our frantic rushing from place to place. And in so doing, it heals us. In this summer course, we will pursue an immersive, meditative program of standing and staring at a huge range of texts, from medieval Finnish epic to 21st-century Instapoetry. We will read poems carefully and insightfully, so that we can truly understand and appreciate our objects of study. There are precious few opportunities in this hectic life to stand and stare, and this course is one of them. The authors that we will study include William Shakespeare, John Milton, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Countee Cullen, Pablo Neruda, Stevie Smith, and the astoundingly prolific Anonymous (to name but a few).

 

ENGL 2390-0012— Introduction to Creative Writing:
Notice How You Notice

M – F 2:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 156. 2012: CA1, W     2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we wil