Current Course Offerings

Fall 2020

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry: COURAGE! HONOR! SHAME! ROMANCE! DRAGONS!

TTh 11:00-12:20.  REMOTE.  Goyne.     2012: CA1, HC1, OC      2016: LL, HC, OC

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in literature, history, and culture from the Middle Ages to modern times, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Stories from King Arthur form the central thread around which we will examine chivalric education and adventure, sin and atonement.  This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, mid-term exam, presentations, final exam, and participation.

 

ENGL 1330-001—The World of Shakespeare 

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Moody Mil.  Rosendale & Moss.     2012: CA1   2016: LL 

Time to (re-)introduce yourself to our language’s greatest writer. In this course, you will meet Shakespeare’s princes, tyrants, heroes, villains, saints, sinners, lovers, losers, drunkards, clowns, outcasts, fairies, witches, and monsters. You’ll watch and listen as they love, woo, kiss, charm, hate, curse, mock, fool, sing to, dance with, get drunk with, sleep with, fight with, murder, and haunt each other. You will visit Renaissance England, a place and time as strange, troubled, exciting, delightful, fearful, thoughtful, political, magical, bloody, sexy, and confused as your own. You will read poetry you will never forget.

Our introductory survey will cover 6–8 plays in all of the major Shakespearean genres: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, as well as some poetry (all texts are digital and free, with a print option for students who prefer print). Background readings, lectures, and films will contextualize Shakespeare’s achievement within Renaissance society and life (and death), engaging the religious, political, cultural, and economic debates of that glorious but tumultuous age.

Coursework includes frequent quizzes, written midterm and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. No papers.

ENGL 1330 satisfies the Language and Literature requirement for the University Curriculum, and counts toward the English major and minor.

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities: “Otherness” and Identity in American Culture

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Fondren Science 133.  Levy.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, contemporary and literary perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the myriad key words that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity, including: “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc.  

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50.  201 Hyer Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize data, professionally format worksheets, use and link worksheets, create tables and charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Students must bring laptop with most recent version of Excel to each class as exercises are done real-time in class.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50.  107 Hyer Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize data, professionally format worksheets, use and link worksheets, create tables and charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Students must bring laptop with most recent version of Excel to each class as exercises are done real-time in class.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50.  107 Hyer Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

Introduction to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. First priority is given to Markets & Cultures majors; second priority is given to upper-class Dedman students. Prerequisite: DISC 1312 or DISC 2305

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  126 Clements Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

Introduction to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. First priority is given to Markets & Cultures majors; second priority is given to upper-class Dedman students. Prerequisite: DISC 1312 or DISC 2305.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

TTh 2:00-3:20.  REMOTE.  Bozorth.               2012: CA2, W, OC     2016: LL, W, OC

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 12:30-1:50.  REMOTE.  Newman.           2012: CA2, W, OC     2016: LL, W, OC

“I, too, dislike it,” the poet Marianne Moore famously said about poetry; “there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.” She is acknowledging the difficulty many readers have making sense of what is ostensibly written for pleasure and yet requires that we do some kind of intellectual or imaginative work. After all, a poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art, not of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us, and why we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so provides something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works. It can also bring a pleasure that grows on you slowly—or all at once. 

Texts: Helen Vendler’s Poems, Poets, Poetry and others TBD. Assignments: four shorter papers of increasing length; 1-2 presentations; discussion board postings; occasional short exercises; blue-book midterm and final exams.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

MWF 1:00-1:50.  REMOTE.  Moss.                  2012: CA2, W, OC     2016: LL, W, OC

In this course, the poets themselves guide us through the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry. During the first half of the semester, each week will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focusing on a representative poet in each case. We will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg. The second half explores perennial themes: poets addressing and questioning God; poets protesting social injustice; poets in love; poets struggling with age and loss; poets pondering nature, art, and poetry itself. Guest speakers include John Donne, Ben Jonson, John Keats, Robert Frost, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Seamus Heaney, and many more. Who knew there were so many poets? Come meet them. Course requirements: one short paper, one longer paper, one creative exercise, one recitation, regular posts to an online discussion board, midterm exam, final exam. Course text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 6th edition.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction

MWF 1:00-1:50.  110 Hyer Hall.  Weisenburger. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W

This course takes up the conventions and innovations in American fictions, from 1850 to the present. We are interested in how writers’ formal practices—in the short story, the novella, and the full-length novel—have changed over that century and a half; and in the ways that writers have used, for example, humor, fantasy, and historical incidents in their work. Along the way we will acquire a critical vocabulary and key concepts for thinking about some exemplary texts from a century and a half of American fictions. Our aim: to better think about, discuss, and appreciate what fictions do, and how, and why. Our texts: Herman Melville, Bartleby & Benito Cereno; Kate Chopin, The Awakening & Selected Stories; Nella Larsen, Passing: Nathanael West, Miss Lonelyhearts & The Day of the Locust; Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep; Ishmael Reed, Mumbo Jumbo; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men; and Denis Johnson, Train Dreams.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: US Ethnic Literatures

TTh 11:00-12:20.  111 Hyer Hall.  Sae-Saue.          2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels.  The primary goals of the class are that students learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. 

Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities. We shall investigate how fiction constructs cultural identities, comments on determinate historical moments, and organizes human consciousness around social history.

As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically, understanding how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of literary representation.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: Classic Short Stories and Contemporary Novels

TTh 8:00-9:20.  REMOTE.  Edwards.              2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W

What makes a good story? Does it entice its readers with a grand epic narrative, lovable characters, and a twist ending that sticks in the mind for years to come? Does it have to do anything at all? This course explores a variety of stories from the short stories of Washington Irving and Edgar Allan Poe to the searing critiques of modern society in Sylvia Plath and Toni Morrison. Throughout the semester, students will look for connections between American stories of the past and their relationship to our present. In particular, the class will think through how writers understand and deal with issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality to the ever-changing concept of the canon. What we might find is not simply an evolution of thought from Antebellum America to our present day but a variety of ways of constructing and performing the self. By the end of the class, students will be able to engage with concepts of narrative, character, plot, and historic contexts.

 

ENGL 2312-004—Introduction to Fiction: Art & Identity during the Harlem Renaissance

TTh 8:00-9:20.  100 Hyer Hall.  Kiser.                    2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W

The Harlem Renaissance can be broadly defined as a cultural, social, and artistic movement that spanned the 1920’s and 1930’s, a time when African American writers, artists, and musicians sought to represent themselves within American culture through their work. This course will explore why such a movement burgeoned around the end of WWI, what this group of intellectuals hoped to gain from their movement, and why they turned to the arts to reach their political, cultural, and social goals. We will ask questions such as: How does representing a collective identity become complicated when various perspectives and voices are at stake? Is art always political or can it exist just for art’s sake? Progressing towards answering, “What was the Harlem Renaissance?,” we will explore why black writers during the Harlem Renaissance turned to fiction to debate and investigate the above questions.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: All Those Who Wander

TTh 11:00-12:20.  153 Fondren Science.  Wilson.             2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W

Wanderers and wanderings have been literary staples from medieval quests to Oscar-winning films. In turn, the experience of reading a book or film for the first time can take on the quality of an unexpected journey, in which you are hopeful that the destination will be an interesting one, but you are not entirely sure either what it will be or how you will get there. This course will introduce methods of reading and approaches to texts that will help you to navigate a wide range of new literary landscapes by developing habits of wandering productively. Our journey will take us from the classical world to 21st-century America, through a wide array of genres, and accompanied by many different types of speaker. As we will seek to foster our individual literary critical voices, we may all end up at very different destinations but throughout we will be learning how best to make sense of even the most unexpected encounters.

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: What Makes Sense

MWF 2:00-2:50.  REMOTE.  Cassedy.            2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there’s something about what it’s doing that you can’t quite put into words.  This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text.  You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are difficult to pin down.  Tentative reading list includes texts by Vladimir Nabokov (Lolita), William Shakespeare (King Lear), Leslie Jamison (The Empathy Exams), Edgar Allan Poe (Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym), Mat Johnson (Pym), and Emily Dickinson.  Four essays, a midterm, and a final.

 

ENGL 2315-003— Introduction to Literary Study: After Emancipation

MWF 9:00-9:50.  REMOTE.  Edwards.                       2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W

In understanding the changing nature of Black citizenship and subjecthood in the United States, “After Emancipation” traces a century of Black intellectual thought responding to the conception of freedom and liberty. In the wake of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth Amendment in 1863 and 1865, respectively, Black Americans developed a complex literature that reckoned with these ideas. Although early theories of freedom suggested that the end of chattel slavery would reveal to white Americans the possibilities of a Black citizenry, this period instead led to new restrictions that prescribed roles for the newly emancipated. Yet as emancipation gave way to Black codes, Jim Crow, and other forms of institutional racism, Black novels, plays, poetry, and music responded in kind by defining the contours of Black life. This course looks to major transitions in conceptions of Black freedom, from the creation of cultural practices at the turn of the twentieth century, to the international aspects of the Harlem Renaissance, to the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Dream.” By examining this rich literary tradition, students will come to understand the multifaceted ways that these texts are in conversation with the changing contours of the United States. The course ends by putting one of the most important abolitionist texts, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, in conversation with Toni Morrison’s radical rewrite of the aftermath of Emancipation. As students finish their final assignments, this “looking backwards” provides an opportunity to think back upon the course to remind us all of the changing discourses of freedom.

Designed as an entry level course for prospective majors and those completing their distribution requirements, “After Emancipation” focuses on reading primary texts and close readings. Students will submit ten reading responses and two critical essays during the semester.

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20. REMOTE. Rubin.           2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genre of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of “reading like a writer” while developing their own work and helpfully discussing their classmates’.

 

ENGL 2390-002H—Introduction to Creative Writing: MAKE IT NEW!

TTh 3:30-4:50.  REMOTE.  Brownderville.    2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

Percy Bysshe Shelley once wrote that poetry “purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being. It compels us to feel what we perceive, and to imagine that which we know.” Ezra Pound, more succinctly, instructed his fellow poets to “make it new!” Pound believed that poets should make the world new—and make poetry new—by presenting life in bold, original verse.

Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary. Students will be invited to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary American poetry.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 2:00-2:50.  115 Dallas Hall.  Smith.                2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

In this class, students will read, write, critique and revise fiction. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to the workshop of students’ short stories. Toward the end of the semester, students will be required to present one of their stories publicly.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 12:00-12:50.  115 Dallas Hall.  Smith. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

In this class, students will read, write, critique and revise fiction. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to the workshop of students’ short stories. Toward the end of the semester, students will be required to present one of their stories publicly.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

TTh 2:00-3:20.  REMOTE.  Hermes, R.. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in prose and poetry. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published workalong with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class period, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches to Literature

TTh 9:30-10:50.   REMOTE.  Greenspan.

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading to the written analysis of texts?
The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

 

ENGL 3320-001—Topic in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature

TTh 12:30-1:50.   REMOTE.  Amsel.               2012: CA2, W  2016: HFA, W

This course looks at fact and fiction in literature from and about the Middle Ages, exploring issues of real and imagined histories and legends. How is it that we make history? And, how do we discern truth? Sounds familiar to us because we are still grappling with questions of real truths vs. fake truths in our everyday lives. Our readings will take us from a popular grail story, back through medieval sources and texts, to learn about medieval paradigms still present in contemporary culture.

 

ENGL 3355-001—Transatlantic Encounters III: Political Theater: Modern Drama and the Arts of Assembly

MWF 10:00-10:50.   REMOTE.  Kastleman.    2012: CA2, GE, HD   2016: HFA, GE, HD

Politics relies on spectacle. Many core components of political action—from campaigns to protests, from conducting trials to enacting laws—require political actors to attend to certain elements of theater, including performance, audience, and setting the scene. The fact that the activities of modern politics borrow from the theater was not lost on major modern playwrights, who harnessed the structural features of theater in order to create new spaces for political deliberation and social transformation. Dramatists such as Bertolt Brecht celebrated the theater as a means of developing the capacity for political judgment, while contemporary playwrights including Suzan Lori-Parks and Larissa FastHorse have shown how theater can prompt reckonings with historical injustice. These innovative dramatists have explored theater’s distinctive “art of assembly,” in which audiences are drawn together to form judgments in the company of others. In this course, we consider how the theater both reflects and generates the mechanisms of political decision-making. We approach these topics by examining a wide range of influential dramatic works from throughout the English-speaking world. Our conversations will continually attend to aspects of live performance, including dramaturgy, design, embodiment, movement, and direction, and students will be asked to view at least one live theater event over the course of the semester. Students will hone their ability to analyze dramatic form and to evaluate the cultural, historical, and political contexts of performance.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature: Reimagining Slavery

TTh 12:30-1:50.  REMOTE.  Pergadia.           2012: CA2, HD, W     2016: HFA, HD, W

This course considers a variety of imaginative works that remember, memorialize, and recreate the experience of American slavery—the neo-slave novels of Toni Morrison and Octavia Butler, the artwork of Kara Walker, the cinematic adaptation of Solomon Northup’s 12 Years a Slave, The 1619 Project. Beginning with the canonical slave narratives of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, students will gain an understanding both of the lives of Americans in bondage and how those lives transformed into stories that continue to shape our national consciousness. Students will learn how to analyze literary and visual art to ask: How do aesthetic forms become vehicles for social and political protest? What are the ethics of remembering? 

 

ENGL 3366-001—American Literary History II: America the Multiple

TTh 2:00-3:20.  REMOTE.  Greenspan.         2012: CA2, HC2, W    2016: HFA, HSBS, W

This course will explore a wide variety of fictional voices and visions produced in America over the period 1900 to the present. A continuing focus will be on ways that writers interrelate historical and fictional time. Writers to include Abraham Cahan (The Rise of David Levinsky), Willa Cather (My Antonia), Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), William Faulkner (Go Down, Moses), Toni Morrison (Song of Solomon), Octavia Butler (Kindred), Tillie Olsen (Tell Me a Riddle), Michael Chabon (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay), and Richard McGuire (Here).

 

ENGL 3367-001—Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

MWF 11:00-11:50.  REMOTE.  Satz.                2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W    2016: HFA, HD KNOW, OC, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3370-001—Special Topics: Life Writing

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

TTh 3:30-4:50.   REMOTE.  Rubin.       2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W

In this advanced course students will present their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops we will analyze exemplary models of the form and study film clips to understand the ways compelling dialogue is written and satisfying scenes are structured. Readings will include such classics as Casablanca and Chinatown as well as newer scripts like Lady Bird and Get Out. ENGL 2390 is a prerequisite for this course although Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Voice

TTh 12:30-1:50.  REMOTE.  Brownderville.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W

Long before poems were written down or printed in books, they were sung, chanted, or spoken. The voice of a deft reciter gave poetry a special timbre and texture.

In the modern era, when speaking of a poet’s “voice,” we have mostly used the term metaphorically. A writer’s voice is largely a matter of style: diction, syntax, formal habits, rhetorical idiosyncrasies, and so on. Because of the technology of the book, we have learned to think of poetry primarily as a thing we encounter not as sounds in the air but as words on a page. The printing press, if never quite rendering the human voice obsolete as a vehicle of literature, certainly went a long way toward ending the oral tradition as we had known it.

In the twenty-first century, all of that is changing, and changing rapidly. Take, for instance, the growing popularity of well-written podcasts. Many of us, while walking the dog, cooking dinner, or commuting, are listening to podcasts regularly, some of us obsessively. Human beings might be listening to carefully crafted language more than at any time in recent history. Which is to say: technology, which once took the oral tradition away from us, is now giving it back.

What does this mean for poetry, and for our ideas about poetic “voice” and genre? What special opportunities does current technology present to word-artists? These questions are at the heart of ENGL 3390: VOICE.

In this workshop-based course, we will attend to the conventional elements of craft that contribute to poetic voice in the metaphorical sense (i.e. style). But we will also explore how podcasts, live poetry events, and video can change the ways we make and experience poems.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

MWF 12:00-12:50.  REMOTEHermes, K. (Condon).          2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W

When we read poetry by other people, we consume and internalize not only their ideas but also their methods. In this sense even history’s greatest poets were apprentices all of their lives, constantly learning from the aesthetic choices of other writers.

We will continue our own apprenticeship in this advanced workshop by cultivating a daily reading and writing practice. At the center of our practice is the daybook, a large sketchbook that modernist writers often used for their daily musings, doodles, and drafts. We will use our daybooks in much the same way, with the added daily prompt of transcribing and then imitating a poem by another writer. Such transcription is a physical practice—it works that poet’s linguistic perspective and formal attention into our memory. Our original, imitative draft that follows transcription attunes us to the aesthetic modes we feel most comfortable in and challenges us to write beyond them.

We will read and write toward poems by Anne Carson, Rita Dove, Dorothea Lasky, Frank O’Hara, W.S. Merwin, Joy Harjo, Kenneth Koch, Rainier Maria Rilke, Louise Glück, and June Jordan, to name just a few.

 

ENGL 4323-001—Chaucer: Chaucer’s Shorter Poems

TTh 11:00-12:20.  REMOTE.  Wheeler.           2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

Geoffrey Chaucer’s corpus of prose and poetry, its literary, historical, philosophical contexts, served with a sprinkling of some of Chaucer’s favorite classics. Textbook: The Riverside or Wadsworth Chaucer. Other authors include Homer, Virgil, Boethius, and Ovid. Weekly commentaries, several oral presentations, one term paper.

 

ENGL 4330-001—Renaissance Writers: Donne & Herbert

MWF 1:00-1:50.  152 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.         2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

This course focuses on the amazing work of two of early modern England’s greatest (and most formally innovative) lyric poets and analysts of desire.  John Donne and George Herbert were two seventeenth-century Anglican clergymen—the latter a quiet country parson, the former a brilliantly urbane (and often scandalous) social climber and eroticist—who also happened to be remarkable poets, the best-known writers of what has retrospectively become known as “metaphysical poetry.”  We’ll read many of Donne’s poems, and nearly all of Herbert’s, taking time to focus in depth on a selected number of them.  Our readings of the poetry will be complemented by some of their prose works, and by extensive engagement with current criticism.  By the end of the course, you will know these writers

 

ENGL 4341-001—Victorian Writers: The Novels of the Brontës

TTh 3:30-4:50.  REMOTE.  Newman.            2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

When the novels of Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (known to posterity as Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë) appeared within three months of one another in 1847, they created a sensation.  Who were these unknown writers who produced such fresh, imaginative, compelling (or, as some thought, immoral, disgusting) stuff? Were they really one person, as some people claimed, and if so, male or female?  Today the novels of the three Brontë sisters are among the most widely read English novels in the world.  This is a good time to study them.  The year 2020 marks the bicentenary of Anne Brontë’s birth.  The often-invoked “Brontë myth”—the story of three sheltered, virginal, untutored sisters from a backward village in the north of England who lived austere lives but somehow understood passion—has been studied, corrected, debunked.  Meanwhile, films, novels based on the Brontës, novels about the Brontës, new biographies, and new scholarship continue to appear. 

Let’s see what the fuss is about.  We’ll read the six main novels in the context of their times; consider their lives, the reception of their work over the last century and three quarters, and the development of the “myth”; and perhaps peek at some film versions as well.  Texts:  C. Brontë: Jane Eyre; Shirley; Villette; E. Brontë: Wuthering Heights; A. Brontë: Agnes Grey; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall. (Please buy the Oxford editions of everything except Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, for which we will use my Bedford and Broadview editions respectively.)  

Requirements:  2-3 Short papers; “low-stakes” discussion board postings; one research paper on a topic to be determined in consultation with instructor; 1–2 in-class presentations; possible blue-book midterm and/or final.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: End Times: American Apocalyptic Fictions

MWF 2:00-2:50.  110 Dedman Life Sciences Building.  Weisenburger. 2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

Visions of the end-times have circulated at least since the apostle John’s revelation in the Bible’s last book. Secular versions of the last days, as in English writer Mary Shelley’s 1826 novel, The Last Man, have focused on world-ending crises such as pandemic disease, nuclear warfare, and environmental catastrophe. And yet, grim as these fictions are, they remain in circulation. Indeed, the acclamation for Ling Ma’s multi-award winning 2019 novel Severance, published a year before the 2020 coronavirus pandemic, underscores the wide and sustained public interest in these fictions, and gives our studies a timely, sharper edge. We will work chronologically through our required texts. Plan on two short papers, a mid-term, and a longer final paper to wrap up our work.  

 

ENGL 5310-001—Seminar in Literary Theory

MWF 10:00-10:50.  REMOTE.  Satz.

This is course fulfills the first part of the requirements for Distinction in English

The center of the Distinction requirement is an independent study project in literature or creative writing that you undertake with a member of the faculty.   This course will deal with critical race, gender, and disability theory and literary texts that provide rich occasions to discuss those critical theories.  Examples of literary texts:  Morrison, The Bluest Eye, Campbell, 24 Hour Hold, Bronte, Villette  The course is also designed to advance research skills.  The student will projects ranging from a two minute oral report to a longer essay leading toward a distinction project.

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies

Th 3:30-6:20.  REMOTE.  D. Dickson-Carr. 

An introduction to advanced graduate work in literary studies. Our course will focus on definitions of texts and the languages within them, standards and processes of careful literary scholarship, and the profession’s complexities. The first unit will comprise a short survey of book and manuscript history, including how oral and written texts become books, with the attendant authority and problems contained therein. The second unit will focus on scholarly indexes and databases, both analog and digital; archival research; creation of bibliographies and their uses. The final unit will focus on our profession: how the study of literature developed into a profession; the roles of critical theory; professional organizations; developing and presenting scholarly work in professional settings; the paths to publication; the means to enter different levels of the professoriate. In addition to readings that explore all of these subjects, our course will make use of the DeGolyer and Bridwell Libraries, the occasional guest speaker, and participants’ regular short writings and in-class presentations. We will surround a number of short literary texts—stories and poems--and one longer work with secondary readings that define and challenge the goals of literary scholarship. The longer text is to be determined.

Texts: MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing, Third Edition; Introduction to Scholarship in Modern Languages and Literatures, Third Edition; Handbook for Academic Authors, Fifth Edition, by Beth Luey.

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

M 3:00-5:50.  117 Dedman Life Sciences Building.  Sudan.

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  REMOTE.  Stephens.

English 6312 is designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. Students will read and present texts on pedagogical approaches, as well as participate in teaching observations. Students need permission to enroll in this course.

 

ENGL 6330-001—Early Modern British Literature: The Digital Edition

TTh 12:30-1:50.  428A Heroy Hall. Wilson.

In 2000, Jonathan Sawday and Neil Rhodes co-edited The Renaissance Computer charting the information revolution that came about with the advent of printed books and considering the ramifications of this revolution for all kinds of different branches of study and inquiry. The collection traces connections between information innovations in early modern Europe and those taking place in our modern digital information culture. Twenty years on, this course revisits this approach to set modern advances in networked information and digital communications and analytical capabilities alongside parallel advances in the earlier information revolution that both characterizes and catalyzes the early modern period, the printing press and its concomitant vocabulary documenting and driving the expansion of knowledge and knowledge horizons. Are there only metaphoric or actual, living genealogical connections between the early modern and modern information explosions? What can we learn by putting modern digital ideas into dialogue with early modern precursors or counterparts?  What did it mean then, and what does it mean now, to live in an information society? We will begin by thinking in theoretical terms about ways in which early modern and modern people conceptualize information, its creation, organization, and dissemination. Then in the second part of the course we will put these theories into practice, working with early modern books from our own archives on campus to understand how these were originally printed, and then to apply modern digital technology to create our own encoded digital editions and interpretations of these texts. Through a combination of theory and practice we will seek new understandings of the relationship between literature and technology, and what this relationship means both for early modern people and for us today.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature

T 3:30-6:20.  203B Umphrey Lee Center.  Sae-Saue.

This course explores how Chicanx literature, from the 19th century to the contemporary era, articulates historical and social concerns through aesthetic designs. We will read some of the most influential texts of the canon and examine how their formal arrangements communicate the community’s diverse political values across distinct episodes of US history. As such, students will learn to recognize the relationship between ideology and form in Chicanx culture, including the significance of its aesthetic experiments. Furthermore, students will familiarize themselves with the field’s critical history in order to position themselves to make possible interjections in on-going (and sometimes contentious) conversations surrounding this political culture.  

Texts include: George Washington GómezLoving in the War Years (lo que nunca pasó por sus labios); The People of Paper; The Squatter and the Don; Caballero; works by Teatro Campesino; God’s Go Begging; and more.

 

ENGL 7372-001—Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

W 3:00-5:50.  REMOTE.  Cassedy.

A hands-on workshop in the theories, practices, and methods of using archival resources in literary studies.  Designed to be useful to students working in any national, period, or genre specialization, this course will survey recent work being done with archives by literary and cultural historians, introduce students to archival resources available in and around Dallas, and provide practical training in working with physical and digitized archival materials.  Each student will develop and undertake an archivally driven research project, culminating in a seminar paper.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry: COURAGE! HONOR! SHAME! ROMANCE! DRAGONS!

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

REMOTE

2012: CA1, HC1, OC 2016: LL, HC, OC

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Rosendale/

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

MoodyMil

2012: CA1 2016: LL

1365

001

Literature of Minorities: “Otherness” and Identity in American Culture

Levy

TTh

2:00

3:20

FOSC 133

2012: CA1 , HD 2016: LL, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 201

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 107

 

2302

001

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 107

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

CLEM 126

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

WRTR 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DSLB 110

 

WRTR 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 142

 

WRTR 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

CLEM 126

 

WRTR 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

REMOTE

 

WRTR 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

REMOTE

 

WRTR 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

REMOTE

 

WRTR 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

CLEM 126

 

WRTR 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

 

WRTR 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

CLEM 126

 

WRTR 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 152

 

WRTR 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Bozorth

TTh

11:00

12:20

REMOTE

 

WRTR 2305

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Ivie

TTh

12:30

1:50

DLSB 132

 

 WRTR 2305
013H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Ray
MWF  9:00  9:50 DH 115
 
 WRTR 2305  014H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery
MWF
12:00
12:45
DH 142
 

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTh

2:00

3:20

REMOTE

2012: CA2, OC, W 2016: LL, (OC), W

2311

002

Poetry

Newman

TTh

12:30

1:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, OC, W 2016: LL, (OC), W

2311

003

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss

MWF

1:00

1:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, OC, W 2016: LL, (OC), W

2312

001

Fiction: Forms, Modes, & Kinds

Weisenburger

MWF

1:00

1:50

HYER 110

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

2312

002

Fiction: US Ethnic Literatures

Sae-Saue

TTh

11:00

12:20

HYER 111

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

2312

003

Fiction: Classic Short Stories and Contemporary Novels

Edwards

TTh

8:00

9:20

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

 2312 004
 

Fiction: Art & Identity during the Harlem Renaissance

Kiser
 TTh  8:00 9:20
FOSC 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study: All Those Who Wander

Wilson

TTh

11:00

12:20

FOSC 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: What Makes Sense

Cassedy

MWF

2:00

2:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

2315

003

Intro to Literary Study: After Emancipation

Edwards

MWF

9:00

9:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Rubin

TTh

11:00

12:20

REMOTE

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

002H

Intro to Creative Writing (Honors): MAKE IT NEW!

Brownderville

TTh

3:30

4:50

REMOTE

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

CANCELED


 

 
 

2390

005

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 2390 006

Intro to Creative Writing:
The Writer’s Toolkit

Hermes. R
TTh
 2:00  3:20

REMOTE

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Greenspan

TTh

9:30

10:50

REMOTE

 

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truths in Medieval Literature

Amsel

TTh

12:30

1:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

3355

001

Transatlantic Encounters III: Political Theater: Modern Drama and the Arts of Assembly

Kastleman

MWF

10:00

10:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, GE, HD 2016: HFA, GE, HD

3362

001

African-American Literature: Reimagining Slavery

Pergadia

TTh

12:30

1:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

3366

001

American Literary History II: America the Multiple

Greenspan

TTh

2:00

3:20

REMOTE

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

MWF

11:00

11:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD KNOW, OC, W

3370

001

Special Topics: Life Writing

CANCELED

 

 

 

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

TTh

3:30

4:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Voice

Brownderville

TTh

12:30

1:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Hermes, K. (Condon)

MWF

12:00

12:50

REMOTE

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

4323

001

Chaucer: Chaucer's Shorter Poems

Wheeler

TTh

11:00

12:20

REMOTE

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4330

001

Renaissance Writers: Donne & Herbert

Rosendale

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4341

001

Victorian Writers: The Novels of the Brontës

Newman

TTh

3:30

4:50

REMOTE

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: End Times

Weisenburger

MWF

2:00

2:50

DLSB 110

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

5310

001

Distinction Seminar

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

REMOTE

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Study

Carr,Darryl

Th

3:30

6:20

REMOTE

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sudan

M

3:00

5:50

DLSB 117

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

REMOTE

 

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: The Digital Edition

Wilson

TTh

12:30

1:50

HERY 428A

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature

Sae-Saue

T

3:30

6:20

ULEE 203B

 

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: The Archives Workshop

Cassedy

W

3:00

5:50

REMOTE

 

                 

Summer 2020

SUMMER SESSION 2020 COURSES

 

Cat #

Sec

Session

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

2302

0011

S1

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

MTWThF

1:00 AM

2:50 AM

REMOTE

 

3367

0011

S1

Ethical Impl - Children's Lit

Satz,Martha G

MTWThF

10:00 AM

11:50 AM

REMOTE

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W

2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

3379

0011

S1

Contexts of Disabilitiy

Satz,Martha G

MTWThF

12:00 PM

1:50 PM

REMOTE

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W

2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, OC, W

 2302  0022  S2  

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.
 

MTWThF

 1:00 PM
 2:50 PM
 REMOTE  
ENGL/ DISC 2306

0012

S2

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Doyle

MTWThF

10:00 AM

11:50 AM

REMOTE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FIRST SUMMER 2020 SESSION 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGL 2302-0011 Business Writing

M – F  1:00-2:50. 102 Dallas Hall. Dickson-Carr, C.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 3367-0011 Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

M – F  10:00-11:50. 105 Dallas Hall. Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things AreThe Giving TreeAmazing GraceCurious GeorgeBabar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Yang, American Born Chinese; and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3379-0011—Contexts of Disability

M – F  12:00-1:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

FIRST SUMMER 2020 SESSION 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

ENGL 2302-0022 Business Writing

M – F  1:00-2:50. REMOTE. Dickson-Carr, C.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

ENGL 2306-0012Honors Humanities Seminar II

M – F  10:00-11:50. REMOTE. Doyle.

Spring 2020

ENGL 1330-001—The World of Shakespeare. 

TTh 9:30–10:50.  110 Hyer Hall.  Neel.        2012: CA1  2016: LL.

Introductory study of eight major texts, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics.  Five tests, written mid-term and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity.  Play texts from the free Folger Shakespeare Library Digital Archive; lecture templates posted electronically on Canvas.  Theme for the semester: Shakespeare’s use of Ancient Rome for his plays.  We will begin with “The Rape of Lucrece,” which recounts the founding of the Roman Republic in 509 BCE, and end with Titus Andronicus, which describes Rome at the collapse of the Roman Empire about 380 CE.  And by reading such plays as Julius CaesarAntony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, we will trace the trajectory of Rome through the flourishing and collapse of the Republic followed by the expansion and collapse of the Empire. Satisfies UC 2016 Breadth: Language and Literature; counts as an elective in both the English major and the English minor.

 

ENGL 1363-001—The Myth of the American West.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  115 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.    2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC.

In this course we study how and why 19th century realities of conquering the American West morphed into 20th century legend and myth. We also ask what defines those forms, how they changed, and why they endure. Our case studies include Texas emigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche people, as presented in factual, fictional, and cinematic versions; and then make a similar study of Buffalo Bill Cody’s celebrity in the late-19th century. We next turn to the ways that the romance of horse culture and gunfighters in late-19th and early-20th century paintings and sculpture, fictions and films, brought the Myth of the American West to its fullest expression. We conclude by studying revisions of that myth in contemporary film and fiction. Readings include historical and biographical sources, three classic Western novels, and a selection of popular Western films from the Silent Era to the present. Course requirements: evening viewing of 3 feature films, brief response papers, mid-term, and final exam. 

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel.

M 3:00–3:50.  149 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel.

W 3:00–3:50.  149 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.    2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002—Business Writing.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Image, Form, Experiences.

TTh 9:30–10:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.           2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry: Image, Form, Experiences.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.           2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry.

MWF 11:00–11:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.     2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

Can poetry help you live a better life?  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s fun, interesting, and important.  We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning.  We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding (of poems, ideas, the world, and ourselves) and then to pleasure.  We’ll read lots of great British and American poems, many good ones, and a few awful ones, from the middle ages to the present day.  We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it.  We’ll talk and sometimes argue, as we should, about what, and how, poems mean.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it. 

University Curriculum: 2012 Creativity and Aesthetics II and Writing; 2016 Language & Literature and Writing

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: (In)tolerable Heroines.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  142 Dallas Hall.  McWilliams.       2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

Tolerable. Ungrateful. Untried and nervous. These are but a few of the terms used to describe the female protagonists who appear on our syllabus this semester. How do these women come to acquire such labels? Under what evaluative frameworks do they receive their unflattering titles? What social structures necessitate their defamation? This introduction to fiction focuses on the figure of the strange, nonconforming, and occasionally intolerable woman and that woman’s relationship to those around her. Our class time will prioritize discussion and the critical thinking that comes with close reading. Expect three essays, a final, occasional reading quizzes, and robust classroom discussion.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The American Novel, 1960-2020

TTh 11:00–12:20.  357 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.            2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

A course sampling some of the most compelling voices in American fiction, 1960-2020: novels treating violence, race, eco-disaster, love, loss, and escape. Our readings also span a range of fictional modes: detective fiction and fantasy, humor and satire, and especially modes of historiography in fiction. Our novels: Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (1966); Leslie Marmon Silko, Ceremony (1977); Don DeLillo, White Noise (1985); Toni Morrison, Beloved (1987); Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990); Sherman Alexie, Indian Killer (1994); Denis Johnson, Train Dreams (2002); Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men (2005); Colson Whitehead, Underground Railroad (2016). A mix of discussion and lecture. Required work includes: four essays, a mid-term, and final. 

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: Classic Short Stories and Contemporary Novels.

TTh 8:00–9:20.  143 Dallas Hall.  Hill.         2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

This course is an introduction to narrative fiction. The goal is to introduce you to the structural elements of fiction (point of view, character, story and discourse, setting, style, tone, etc.) and to teach you how to recognize these elements and analyze the roles they play in the assigned texts. We will begin by reading several “classic” or canonical 19th and 20th short stories before moving on to three 21st century novels. Close and careful reading and active participation are essential to your success in this class.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study.

MWF 10:00–10:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Wilson.          2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

Wanderers and wanderings have been literary staples from medieval quests to Oscar-winning films. In turn, the experience of reading a book or film for the first time can take on the quality of an unexpected journey, in which you are hopeful that the destination will be an interesting one, but you are not entirely sure either what it will be or how you will get there. This course will introduce methods of reading and approaches to texts that will help you to navigate a wide range of new literary landscapes by developing habits of wandering productively. Our journey will take us from the classical world to 21st-century America, through a wide array of genres, and accompanied by many different types of speaker. As we will seek to foster our individual literary critical voices, we may all end up at very different destinations but throughout we will be learning how best to make sense of even the most unexpected encounters.

 

ENGL 2315-002—Introduction to Literary Study: Danger: Novels.

TTh 11:00–12:20.  138 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.              2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

“[Novels] impair the mind’s general powers of resistance which lays the mind open to terror and the heart to seduction.” So writes Hannah More at the end of the eighteenth century, noting that the noble pleasure of reading was tainted by the scurrilous seductions of prose. But what is it about this literary form that caused such a panic among the educated classes of Britain? This course will examine the dangerous and often scandalous genre of the novel in order to answer some of this question. We will begin our investigation at the end of the eighteenth century, with the advent of the Gothic novel, and extend our inquiry through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, thinking about other dangerous forms—film, social media—along the way.

 

ENGL 2390-001H—Honors Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year’s Words.

T 3:30–6:20.  221 Annette Simmons Hall.  Brownderville.         2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

“last year’s words belong to last year’s language

And next year’s words await another voice.”

                                                            —T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”

It is sometimes said that literature has always been, and will always be, about love and death. If so many beautiful books have already been written on these great themes, why do we need new writing? As James Baldwin put it, the human story “has another aspect in every country, and a new depth in every generation.” It must be told again.

This course is a poetry workshop, where timeless themes meet the new words of now. Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

Next Year’s Words, an Honors section of our introductory Creative Writing course, is about the tremendously exciting, and culturally necessary, adventure of the young writer. It’s about singing truth-song in a voice never heard before on earth.

This year can’t write the poems of 2020. Next year’s poetry needs next year’s words.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing.

TTh 3:30–4:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Gabbert.             2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

The subject of this course is the magic of language. How do writers use voice, imagery, metaphor, character, plot, and other elements of their craft to compel the reader’s imagination? To begin answering this question, students will write and revise their own pieces; respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work; and analyze published texts. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students hone their skills as oral communicators and collaborative thinkers. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 3:00–3:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Smith.               2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

In this class, students will write and revise stories, respond to one another’s work, research literary journals and give an oral presentation, and analyze published texts. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to present one of the stories to the class. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 11:00–11:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Smith.             2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

In this class, students will write and revise stories, respond to one another’s work, research literary journals and give an oral presentation, and analyze published texts. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to present one of the stories to the class. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 9:00–9:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Smith.  2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

In this class, students will write and revise stories, respond to one another’s work, research literary journals and give an oral presentation, and analyze published texts. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to present one of the stories to the class. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches to Literature.

MWF 10:00–10:50.  143 Dallas Hall.  Murfin.

What counts as “literature”?  How do we read or otherwise experience it—and why?  How can students make sense and use of literary criticism?  This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well by examining original literary texts and some radically divergent interpretations of them.  (We will begin the course with historicist and deconstructive readings of Joseph Conrad’s story “The Secret Sharer” and end with postcolonial approaches to another classic text.)

 

CLAS 3312-001—Classical Rhetoric.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  102 Hyer Hall.  Neel.        2012: HC2, W, KNOW 2016: HSBS, W, KNOW

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world’s first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE. Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and study of philosophy emerged into history. Two out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and five reading quizzes. Satisfies three UC 2016 requirements: Writing Proficiency; Ways of Knowing; and Depth: History, Social, and Behavioral. Satisfies one course requirement for the Classical Studies program and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.

 

ENGL 3318-001—Literature as Data.

MWF 11:00–11:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Wilson.        2012: W  2016: W, LL, TM

How can literature function as data? This course examines a range of theoretical and technological approaches which allow us to think about literature as data and about what that means for literary interpretation. By interrogating theoretical and practical approaches to using technology to analyze literary texts and comparing these with traditional literary scholarship, this course taps into big questions about how – if at all – digital methods change literary studies, and the extent to which thinking about literature as data really is a new idea. How do data-driven approaches to literary analysis fit in with a broader continuum of textual interpretation? We will work with a broad range of texts spanning different time periods and modes to see if digital methods work differently for different types of writing, with possible readings including John Milton's Paradise Lost, poems by Walt Whitman and Alfred Tennyson, and plays from our archives here at SMU, drawing on these experiences to think about what it means to treat literature as data.

 

ENGL 3320-801C/MDVL 3320-801C—Topics in Medieval Literature: Heading to Heaven?.

Th 11:00–12:20.  306 Dallas Hall.  Wheeler.          2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

Literal and literary medieval pilgrimage culminating in study of two spectacular medieval writers, Dante and Chaucer. Weekly comments, mid-term, final.

Attention English majors: Students may use this class to fulfill the 4000-level English major requirement by undertaking additional work in the course. Contact Prof. Wheeler (bwheeler@smu.edu) for details.

 

ENGL 3320-N20C/MDVL 3320-N20C—Topics in Medieval Literature.

T 11:00–12:20.  306 Dallas Hall.  STAFF.          2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

This course must be taken along with ENGL 3320-801C/MDVL 3320-801C.

 

ENGL 3330-001—Topics in Early Modern Literature: Identity and English Comedy.

MWF 9:00–9:50. 156 Dallas Hall.  Connery.            2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

After a brief examination of classical comedy (Plautus and Terence), we’ll read chronologically a variety of the great comedies of the Elizabethan and Restoration periods (Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont & Fletcher, Behn, Dryden, Wycherley, Vanbrugh) and consider a handful of eighteenth-century sentimental comedies (Cibber, Steele, Pix).  While tracing comic history, we’ll focus on the unique perspective that comedy offers on the relation between social and personal identity. We’ll conclude with selections allowing us to consider the modern and contemporary legacy of classic English comedy. Supplementary readings in theories of funniness and the comic. Class will be largely discussion-based. Students will write and share weekly online responses to the readings, complete take-home midterm and final tests, and write a longish paper.

 

ENGL 3340-001—Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen’s Novels: Money, Manners, and Morals.

TTh 2:00–3:20. 116 Dallas Hall.  Holahan. 2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

This course covers the six major novels by Jane Austen.  It considers her repeated variations of courtship rituals: proposal, rejection or acceptance, and marriage.  Along the way, it also studies the literary techniques of narration, characterization, plot development, and style.  Certain topics (e.g., Austen’s various ‘limitations’) are studied in relation to historical background as well as in relation to stylistic      or literary concerns.  We will recall that one person’s focus is another person’s narrowness, and that  something similar might be said of ages.  Attention also goes to Austen’s idea of the novel and to the purposes of writing novels. This topic inevitably raises issues of authorial self-consciousness. Some (Henry James) claim that she had little or none; others (this instructor) claim that she had a good deal, that she plants a landscape garden or map for the modern novel.  Norton Critical Editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. Essays of short to middle length; and a final exam.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African American Literature: Voice & Form in African American Women’s Writing.

TTh 9:30–10:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Kiser.     2012: CA2, W, HD 2016: HFA, W, HD

In a 1962 speech, Malcolm X declared that “the most disrespected person in America is the black woman. The most unprotected person in America is the black woman. The most neglected person in America is the black woman.” This class will take up the literary works of those women to explore how African American Women Writers posited their voices into the black literary aesthetic. This class will strive to understand how black women’s literature has been shaped by history, culture, and the writers' lived experiences. We will also question what forms were best for representing that work and why. Moving rather quickly, the course will begin with Harriet Jacobs, and then explore Harlem Renaissance novelists Zora Neale Hurston and Jesse Fauset, drama by Lorraine Hansberry and Alice Childress, and take a deep dive into the Black Arts Movement to explore the poetry and short stories of Nikki Giovanni, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sonia Sanchez, Octavia Butler, and contemporary novels by Jesmyn Ward and the late Toni Morrison.

 

ENGL 3379-001—Contexts of Disability.

MWF 10:00–10:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Satz. 2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW 2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child; Jamison, Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind; Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton, May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: Digging Deeper.

MWF 1:00–1:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Smith.                2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

In this class, students will focus on development of elements of fiction, including characterization, scene, dialogue, plot, setting, significant detail, and perspective. In workshop, students will draft two short stories; complete several writing exercises, attend and respond to literary events, as well as read and critique original narratives by peers.  Workshop members will also analyze published short stories in conjunction with chapters in Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft and craft articles by various authors. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to researchliterary journals, and give an oral presentation and present one of the stories to the class.

 

ENGL 3390-002—Creative Writing Workshop.

T 3:30–6:20.  153 Dallas Hall.  Kimzey.                2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

 

ENGL 4339-001—Transatlantic Studies I: Going Native.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.                        2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

This course is about two related narratives in Anglo-American culture: the narrative of being taken captive, and the narrative of going native.  Captivity narratives took a number of different forms in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including stories of whites being carried off by Indians, women being imprisoned by nefarious men with sexual designs on them, and sailors being stranded in strange lands and waters.  Some of those captives resisted captivity.  Others embraced it, “going native” and finding that their solitude or captivity allowed them to access parts of themselves that their home societies did not. Readings to include Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Neville, Isle of Pines; Swift, Gulliver’s Travels; Aubin, Charlotta Du Pont; Winkfield, The Female American; Twain, Huckleberry Finn.

 

ENGL 4343-001—Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender and Sexuality.

TTh 11:00–12:20.  106 Dallas Hall.  Newman.                    2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

The word “Victorian” has been a synonym for “prudish” for about a hundred years.  One historian has asserted that the sexes were regarded as more radically, absolutely different during the nineteenth century than any time before or since.  Clearly we’re nothing like them--right?  

If that’s the case, why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to many of us about what it means to be a man or woman? (Think of Jane Eyre, which is still a very popular romance novel.) And why do some icons of what we now think of as “queer” identity first appear in the latter part of the nineteenth-century? (Think of Oscar Wilde, perhaps one of the most famous figures of dissident sexuality even now.) Moreover, in nineteenth-century England prostitution, birth control, what it means to consent to sex and the age when one could do so were all being debated, the term “homosexual” was coined, and gender roles and strict gender difference were first rigidly imposed, and later openly questioned.  We will explore these issues through novels, poetry, essays, dramatic literature, and possibly some contemporary films.

Requirements: 2 short papers (4-5 pages); 1 annotated bibliography plus proposal for related research paper; 1 longer paper with secondary sources—min. 10 pages plus bibliography, which may (optionally) integrate some material from a short paper; 1 in-class presentation; some postings to Canvas discussion board; possible in-class quizzes.

Texts (subject to tweaking!): Brontë, Jane Eyre; Dickens, Great Expectations; Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; Schreiner, The Story of an African Farm; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; essays by Walter Pater, poetry by Tennyson, D.G. Rossetti, and Michael Field (the pen name of Katharine Bradley and Edith Cooper); possible other short readings posted on line or distributed in class.

 

ENGL 4369-001—Transatlantic Studies III: LGBT Writing Before and After Stonewall.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  157 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.              2012: IL, OC, HD 2016: IL, OC, HD

The Stonewall Riots of June 1969 marked the birth of the modern LGBT rights movement, and the decades since have seen the “coming out” of lesbian, gay, and transgender literature as well.  We’ll be reading some of the most influential works by UK and US queer writers from the 1960s to the present, considering the aesthetic, psychological, social, political and other elements.  Among issues we’ll explore:  the ongoing fascination of stories about growing up, coming out, and sexual discovery; the search for a queer ancestry and the creation of personal and collective histories in textual form; the spiritual meanings of queer sexuality, love, drag, disco, and sequins; the tensions (and harmonies) between sexual identity and race, ethnicity, and gender; the personal and political challenges posed by HIV/AIDS.  We’ll consider how artists adapt aesthetic forms to grapple with such things, whether in a coming-of-age novel, memoir, film, or stage play.  If this class were a movie, it would get an NC-17 rating:  this course requires an adult capacity to think, talk, and write explicitly about sex and the body in an academic context.  We will use a Discussion Board to post question and topics for class consideration, and students will collaborate on leading class discussions, reflecting their interests and research outside of class.  Writing assignments:  shorter and longer analytical papers, including a final research-based paper, totalling 25 pages. Probable texts:  Alison Bechdel, Fun-Home; Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man; Cleve Jones, When We Rise; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Annie Proulx, Brokeback Mountain; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.

 

ENGL 6330-001—Early Modern British Literature: English Renaissance Drama: The Elements of Style.

Th 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Moss.

What do we mean by such phrases as “Shakespearean tragedy,” “Jonsonian comedy,” “tragicomedy in the manner of Beaumont and Fletcher”? What do we mean, in short, by “dramatic style”? It is fine to collect adjectives in response—to specify that Shakespearean tragedy is characteristically ironic and uncompromising, Jonsonian comedy caustic and moralizing, Jacobean tragicomedy romantic and conservative—but such descriptions provide little sense of the material conditions out of which early modern drama emerged, the cultural conditions in which it thrived, or the critical trends coloring its reception. The conservative, chivalric emphasis of Beaumont and Fletcher, for example, makes more sense in light of these playwrights’ work for private, aristocratic audiences; Jonson’s urbanity has much to do with the internecine professional squabbles twentieth-century criticism dubbed “The War of the Theaters”; the dizzying reversals of fortune that made Shakespeare famous had more to do with his long-term engagement with the Lord Chamberlain’s Men and his mastery of the evolving conditions of dramatic production than with any innate authorial bent or the whimsies of genius.
           In this course, we will aim for a new precision in our sense of dramatic style—its origins, definition, development, and reception—by focusing on selected authors’ engagement with the resources of dramatic production in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The reading list will seem rather unorthodox, as this is not a survey of the greatest hits of the Jacobean stage (though there will be a famous play or two); instead, we will focus on experimental plays, collaborations, sequential works, and other anomalies in pursuit of fresh perspectives on dramatists at work and in context. Establishing that context will require research into contemporary documents associated with the theater and its personalities, as well as recent critical and historical discussions of early modern English drama (in addition to the most recent studies, we will construct a historiography of critical accounts of dramatic style).
           The course reading list is still coming together, but will certainly include plenty of Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont and/or Fletcher, maybe some Marlowe and Middleton, a few anonymous plays, and ancillary readings in poetry and source documents from the period, in addition to plenty of criticism and a smattering of performance theory, New Historicism, and the like.

 

ENGL 6360-001—Modern and Contemporary American Literature.

M 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Satz.

This course melds an exploration of the emerging field of disability studies with an examination of how that theory may be applied to life writing and works of fiction. Disability theory will be explored from such earlier works as Goffman’s Stigma and Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic, through works such as Thomson’s Extraordinary Bodies and Scarry’s The Body in Pain and recent post-modernist and feminist writings in disability theory such as Erevelles’  Disability and Difference in Global Contexts and Kristeva’s writings on the abject. The course will delve into definitional quandaries concerning disability in a cultural context and ethical dilemmas particularly emerging from new reproductive technologies and the exploding field of genetics. Life Writings will be chosen from such work as Mairs, Waist-High in the World, Kuusisto, Planet of the Blind, Greely, Autobiography of a Face, Patchett, Truth and Beauty, Berube, Life as We Know It, Cohen, Dirty Details, Skloot, In the Shadow of Memory, Lorde, Cancer Journals, and Johnson, Too Late to Die Young, Prahlad’s The Secret Life of a Black Aspie. Fictional works will be chosen from such works as Dickens, Our Mutual Friend, Lessing, The Fifth Child, Petry, The Street, Walker, Meridian, Brontë, Villette, Eugenides, Middlesex, and stories of Flannery O’Connor. Requirements: Weekly response papers, role as seminar leader, 3 mid-length papers.

 

ENGL 7340-001—Seminar in British Literature: Victorian Literature and the Secularization Narrative.

W 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

Nearly forty years ago in his influential Literary Theory: An Introduction, Terry Eagleton declared: “If one were asked to provide a single explanation for the growth of English studies in the later nineteenth century, one could do worse than reply: ‘the failure of religion.’” With this observation, Eagleton succinctly invoked a set of ideas about the decline of religion often called the secularization narrative (or thesis). As Eagleton’s remark implies, this narrative undergirds not only histories of literature in English, but also histories of English literature as an academic subject and a profession. Victorian literature and culture generally serve as turning points. Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach,” in which the speaker hears the “melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,” is an iconic text. George Eliot and Thomas Hardy, who famously lost their faith, are iconic authors. So is Charles Darwin (though we will not read him in this seminar).

Yet scholars across the human sciences have begun to challenge, refine, and complicate the secularization narrative. One result is a burgeoning discourse on secularization and the positing of our own moment as “postsecular.” Our seminar will explore these questions in conjunction with relevant Victorian writing in three genres (the novel, poetry, non-fiction prose). We will situate our discussion of these texts in some of the contemporary scholarship about secularization, focusing on it for two or three weeks with short literary texts serving an illustrative function, and then plunging into some major canonical literary texts and a few less canonical ones. We will give some attention to representations of or engagements with non-Western spiritualities, and with efforts to synthesize spirituality and science.

Primary texts to be drawn from the following: Matthew Arnold, Culture and Anarchy andexcerpts from Literature and Dogma; Marie Corelli, A Romance of Two Worlds; George Eliot, Daniel Deronda; Ryder Haggard; She; Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure and, possibly, some poemsA. C. Swinburne (from Poems and Ballads, first series); Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam; Mary Augusta (“Mrs. Humphry”) Ward, Robert Elsmere.

Assignments: 2 papers, including a longer one at the end of the course that builds, ideally (but not necessarily), upon the earlier one, for a total of approximately 20-25 pages of writing; additional short, less formal writing assignments intended as skill-building exercises; 1-2 in-class presentations.

 

ENGL 7340-002—Seminar in British Literature.

T 2:00–4:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel

TTh

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA1
2016: LL

1363

001

The Myth of the
American West

Weisenburger

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 115

2012: CA1, HC1
2016: HC, CA

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-
Carr

M

3:00

3:50

DH 149

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-
Carr

W

3:00

3:50

DH 149

 

2302

001

Business Writing

C. Dickson-
Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

C. Dickson-
Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Bozorth

TTh

9:30

10:50

KCRC 150

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Spencer

TTh

12:30

1:50

CMRC 132

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Atkinson

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Doyle

TTh

2:00

3:20

CMRC 132

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 343

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

10:00

10:50

SHUT 315

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 143

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

11:00

11:50

SHUT 315

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

SHUT 315

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

SHUT 315

 

ENGL/
DISC 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

 

2311

001

Poetry: Image, Form,
Experiences

Holahan

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, OC,
W
2016: LL, OC,
W

2311

002

Poetry: Image, Form,
Experiences

Holahan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 157

2012: CA2, OC,
W
2016: LL, OC,
W

2311

003

Poetry

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2312

001

Fiction: (In)tolerable Heroines

McWilliams

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 142

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2312

002

Fiction: The American Novel, 1960-2020

Weisenburger

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 357

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2312

003

Fiction: Classic Short Stories
and Contemporary Novels

Hill

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 143

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study

Wilson

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study:
Danger: Novel

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2390

001H

Introduction to Creative Writing:
Next Year's Words

Brownderville

T

3:30

6:20

ACSH
153

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Gabbert

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 106

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

3:00

3:50

DH 157

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 105

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches
to Literature

Murfin

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 143

 

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 102

2012: KNOW,
HC2, W
2016: KNOW,
HSBS, W

3318
001 Literature as Data
Wilson
MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 138

2012: W
2016: W, LL, TM

3320

801C

Topics in Medieval Literature:
Heading to Heaven?

Wheeler

Th

11:00

12:20

DH 306

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3320 N20C Topics in Medieval Literature LAB (Must take with 801C)
STAFF
T
11:00
12:20
DH 306

3330

001

Topics in Early Modern Literature:
Identity and English Comedy

Connery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen's Novels: Money, Manners, and Morals

Holahan

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Voice & Form in African American Women’s Writing

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HFA, HD, W

3379

001

Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 106

2012: KNOW,
CA2, W, HD, OC
2016: KNOW,
HFA, W, HD, OC

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop:
Digging Deeper

Smith

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3390 001
Creative Writing Workshop
Kimzey T
3:30
6:20
DH 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I:
Going Native

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 106

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

4369

001

Transatlantic Studies III: LGBTQ+ Writing Before and After Stonewall

Bozorth

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 157

2012: HD, IL, OC
2016: HD, IL, OC

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature:English Renaissance Drama: The Elements of Style

Moss

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary
American Literature

Satz

M

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Newman

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

7340

002

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 105

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

3330

001

Topics in Early Modern Literature: Identity and English Comedy

Connery

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 343

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

10:00

10:50

SHUT 315

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study

Wilson

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches
to Literature

Murfin

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 143

 

3379

001

Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 106

2012: KNOW, CA2, W, HD, OC
2016: KNOW, HFA, W, HD, OC

2311

003

Poetry

Rosendale

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 143

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

11:00

11:50

SHUT 315

 

3318 001 Literature as Data Wilson
MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 138
2012: W
2016: W, LL, TM

ENGL/ DISC 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

SHUT 315

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop:
Digging Deeper

Smith

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

SHUT 315

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

3:00

3:50

DH 157

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature

Satz

M

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-
Carr

M

3:00

3:50

DH 149

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Newman

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-
Carr

W

3:00

3:50

DH 149

 

2312

003

Fiction: Classic Short Stories and Contemporary Novels

Hill

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 143

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2311

001

Poetry: Image, Form, Experiences

Holahan

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Voice & Form in African American Women’s Writing

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HFA, HD, W

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel

TTh

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA1
2016: LL

ENGL/ DISC 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Bozorth

TTh

9:30

10:50

KCRC 150

 

2312

002

Fiction: The American Novel, 1960-2020

Weisenburger

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 357

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Danger: Novels

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 106

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

2302

001

Business Writing

C. Dickson-
Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

2311

002

Poetry: Image, Form, Experiences

Holahan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 157

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 102

2012: KNOW, HC2, W
2016: KNOW, HSBS, W

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: Going Native

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

ENGL/ DISC 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Spencer

TTh

12:30

1:50

CMRC 132

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Atkinson

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

1363

001

The Myth of the American West

Weisenburger

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 115

2012: CA1, HC1
2016: HC, CA

2302

002

Business Writing

C. Dickson-
Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Doyle

TTh

2:00

3:20

CMRC 132

 

2312

001

Fiction: (In)tolerable Heroines

McWilliams

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 142

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen's Novels: Money, Manners, and Morals

Holahan

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

4369

001

Transatlantic Studies III: LGBTQ+ Writing Before and After Stonewall

Bozorth

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 157

2012: HD, IL, OC
2016: HD, IL, OC

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Gabbert

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 106

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

7340

002

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

2390

001H

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

T

3:30

6:20

ACSH 221

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

3390 002 Creative Writing Workshop
Kimzey T 3:30 6:20
DH 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3320

801C

Topics in Medieval Literature

Wheeler

Th

11:00

12:20

DH 306

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3320 N20C Topics in Medieval Literature LAB (Must take with 801C) STAFF
T
11:00
12:20
DH 306

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: English Renaissance Drama: The Elements of Style

Moss

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 137