Current Course Offerings

Fall 2022 Registration Guide

Fall 2022

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 115. Wheeler. 2012: CA1, HC1, OC   2016: HC, LL, OC     CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.

 

ENGL 1330-001—World of Shakespeare

MWF 10:00-10:50. Dedman Life Science 131.  Moss.      2012: CA1   2016: LL   CC: LAI

Time to (re-)introduce yourself to our language’s greatest writer. In this course, you will meet Shakespeare’s princes, tyrants, heroes, villains, saints, sinners, lovers, losers, drunkards, clowns, outcasts, fairies, witches, and monsters. You’ll watch and listen as they love, woo, kiss, charm, hate, curse, mock, fool, sing to, dance with, get drunk with, sleep with, fight with, murder, and haunt each other. You will visit Renaissance England, a place and time as strange, troubled, exciting, delightful, fearful, thoughtful, prejudiced, political, magical, bloody, sexy, and confused as your own. You will read poetry you will never forget.

Our introductory survey will cover 7 plays in all of the major Shakespearean genres: comedy, tragedy, history, and romance (all texts are digital and free, with a print option for students who prefer Shakespeare’s preferred format). Background readings, lectures, and films will contextualize Shakespeare’s achievement within Renaissance society and life (and death), engaging the religious, political, cultural, and economic debates of that glorious but tumultuous age.

Coursework includes frequent short quizzes, written midterm and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. No papers.

ENGL 1330 satisfies the Literary Analysis and Interpretation requirement for the Common Curriculum, and counts toward the English major and minor.

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 306.  Levy.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, literary, and contemporary social perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity. These include: “Nation” “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Critical Race Studies,” “Black Lives Matter,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc.   We examine the ways these categories have been deployed to assert and marginalize identity, seeing identity as both self-selected and imposed, fixed and flexible, located and displaced, secure and situational.  In addition, we examine the status of “minority” literature as a category within the American literary and cultural canon, and critique the ways in which this imposed status has been used historically to diminish the craftsmanship and aesthetic reach of literature written by women, LGBQT authors and peoples of color.

 

ENGL 1365-002—Literature of Minorities

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 102.  González.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Hyer Hall 106.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel. Students will take the Excel Associates Exam for certification by the end of the semester.

 

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Virginia-Snider Hall 203.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Bozorth.             2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Now GLUTEN-FREE: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and Christmas carols. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, teen-age rebellion, God, and Satan, and learn the difference between “cliché” and “cliched.” You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 8:00-9:20.  Dallas Hall 101.  Luttrel.     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

For many, poetry can seem intimidating or prohibitively difficult. In this class, we’ll demystify poetry and explore the ways in which it can enrich your life and your understanding of the world. We will learn about form, sound, and language, as well as how they impact meaning. We will read poems from both canonical and contemporary authors, covering themes that range from romantic love to nature to social justice to notions of God. We’ll write a few poems and analyze many more. By the end of the course, poetry will no longer be intimidating, but rather a way to understand yourself and the world we live in.

 

ENGL 2311-003—Introduction to Poetry

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Caplan.           2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“Poetry is language that sounds better and means more,” the poet Charles Wright once observed. “What's better than that?” This class will train the students to hear the many sounds and meanings that great poems articulate. We will use a number of methods to listen more carefully. In addition to writing critical essays, we will compose formal imitations, write brief analyses of particular elements of the assigned poetry, and perform a poem from memory. We also will have the pleasure of having poets visit our class via Zoom to discuss their work with us. The visitors will include Diane Seuss, whose collection, frank: sonnets, won this year's Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. In short, we will spend the semester considering language that sounds better and means more, and, as the poet put it, what’s better than that?

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 2:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 106.  Hermes. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohsin Hamid, Rattawut Lapcharoensap, and Bapsi Sidwa.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Global Novel

MWF 3:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 106.  Hermes. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course will consider fiction that reflects and responds to the increasing interconnectedness of our globalized world—stories and novels written about, from, and across places outside the U.S. and Britain, including South and Southeast Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and the Caribbean. How do writers of global literature balance precise, local specificity with the imperative to connect to a “universal” audience? What is the work’s relation to a shared cosmopolitan ethos? What do terms like globalization, cosmopolitanism, postcolonialism, and world literature mean in the first place?

With these texts and concepts as our foundation for discussion, we will build a set of tools for analyzing and writing about literature, including close reading, awareness of genre, and familiarity with important elements of fiction. We will think deeply about not just what texts say, but how they say it. Finally, reading these works of fiction will help us see our contemporary world in new ways, and better understand our place in it. Readings may include Jean Rhys, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Mohsin Hamid, Rattawut Lapcharoensap, and Bapsi Sidwa.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Harold Clark Simmons Hall 107.  Urban.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

“Writin’ is fightin’.”

—Ishmael Reed

Of course, we all know the cliché about how the pen is mightier than the sword — but is Ishmael Reed’s statement about writing merely rehashing a stale saying, or trying to express something different? As a Black American writer, Reed contends that oppositional texts necessarily subvert conventions, undermine power structures, and provide counter narratives to dominant epistemologies. Writing, in Reed’s sense, requires strategy, planning, preparation, and training. We proceed from the idea that art — whether it be music, literature, film, virtual performance, etc. — has the potential to expose structural inequities that appear natural and/or inevitable, but which are, as the late anarchist David Graeber notes, ultimately, “something that we make, and could just as easily make differently.” With this sentiment in mind, students will read, analyze, and critique a range of literary texts that counter the status quo. Additionally, students will read “alt-narratives” by writers from a range of backgrounds who, in some sense, rely on fiction to expose how visual and textual representations reinforce dominant, heteronormative ideas about race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Some, but not all, of the texts will include: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and Other Poems, selections from Ed Sanders’s Fuck You/ a magazine of the arts, Ishmael Reed’s Mumbo Jumbo, Darius James’s Negrophobia, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha’s Dictee, Kathy Acker’s Don Quixote, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen. In addition to these primary sources, students will read short articles that attend to a given text’s literary form, genre, and historical context(s). At the end of the semester, students will watch Obscene: A Portrait of Barney Rosset and Grove Press.

 

ENGL 2312-004—Introduction to Fiction: Shipwrecks & Their Spectators

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Atkinson.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

“To see a ship tossed, and threatened every moment by the merciless waves,” says the Roman philosopher Lucretius, “is a spectacle which those that stand safe at shore, cannot but behold with pleasure as well as compassion.” In our class we will put ourselves in the position of both the spectator and the sailor as we explore one of the most ancient and enduring literary subjects: the shipwreck. Our course begins on dry land, where we will ponder why humans are compelled to leave safe harbors for the danger of the high seas. As the semester progresses we will use literary texts as well as true accounts to trace an oceanic voyage culminating in the terror of shipwreck. Finally we will find ourselves on a distant shore, contemplating the physical and psychological transformations produced by disaster – what Shakespeare calls “something rich and strange.” Shipwreck compels us to ask questions about human longing and curiosity, about our relationship with oceans and the divine, and about the miracle of salvation. But equally important, examining the literary history of shipwrecks will allow us to explore the purposes behind storytelling as a human pastime.

 

ENGL 2312-005—Introduction to Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction

MWF 11:00-11:50.  Dallas Hall 357.  Echevarria-Morales.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

The bildungsroman has been one of the most influential genres in the Western literary tradition. These novels usually revolve around a protagonist in the process of becoming, a protagonist who learns, grows, gains maturity and ultimately constructs a personal identity and a sense of self in the world. We will explore how Caribbean writers have appropriated and reconfigured the genre of the bildungsroman to imagine other ways of becoming or unbecoming colonial or postcolonial subjects. Our readings will reveal the richness and variety of the genre as explored by a sample of Caribbean writers. Authors might include George Lamming (Barbados), Jamaica Kincaid (Antigua), Magali García Ramis (Puerto Rico), Merle Hodge (Trinidad), Joseph Zobel (Martinique), Merle Collins (Grenada) and Marlene Nourbese Philip (Tobago/Canada).

 

ENGL 2312-006—Introduction to Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 156.  Echevarria-Morales.  2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

The bildungsroman has been one of the most influential genres in the Western literary tradition. These novels usually revolve around a protagonist in the process of becoming, a protagonist who learns, grows, gains maturity and ultimately constructs a personal identity and a sense of self in the world. We will explore how Caribbean writers have appropriated and reconfigured the genre of the bildungsroman to imagine other ways of becoming or unbecoming colonial or postcolonial subjects. Our readings will reveal the richness and variety of the genre as explored by a sample of Caribbean writers. Authors might include George Lamming (Barbados), Jamaica Kincaid (Antigua), Magali García Ramis (Puerto Rico), Merle Hodge (Trinidad), Joseph Zobel (Martinique), Merle Collins (Grenada) and Marlene Nourbese Philip (Tobago/Canada).

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: Modern Drama and the Reinvented Self

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dallas Hall 120.  Garelick.            2012: CA1, OC, W    2016: LL, OC, W  

Modern drama reshaped our understanding of home and family, bodies and relationships, and what it means to have a personality or be a ‘character.’  This class examines the arc of modern drama, which began in the 19th century and stretched into the 20th, looking at the classic, often startling plays—from several countries—that revolutionized the stage forever, and which continue to be produced the world over. These include: Strindberg’s Miss Julie, a story of a young woman trying to break out of her narrow social world; Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, a re-examination of middle-class marriage; Chekhov’s Three Sisters, about a family undergoing personal and economic crisis; and Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, one of the most famous plays of the twentieth century, about the comforts of friendship; the terrors of solitude; and the profound struggle of daily life.  In addition to reading the plays, you will watch film and video clips of performances, and learn to ‘read’ the rich variety of interpretations and choices made by actors and directors. Possibilities exist for brief, in-class performance for interested students (acting ability NOT required!).

Taught in combined lecture/seminar format. Students will write two short papers plus periodic one-paragraph reading responses. Midterm and take-home essay-form final.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy.         2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there’s something about what it’s doing that you can’t quite put into words. This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text. You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are difficult to pin down. Tentative reading list includes texts by Karen Russell (Swamplandia!), William Shakespeare (King Lear), Leslie Jamison (The Empathy Exams), Gabriel García Márquez (One Hundred Years of Solitude), and Emily Dickinson. Four essays and a final exam.

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Banned Books: Race, Gender, and Identity Politics in Literary Studies

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Annette Caldwell Simmons Hall 225.  Spencer.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W  

CC: CA, CAA, W

Last year, a North Texas public school principal resigned over accusations of teaching “critical race theory.” Meanwhile, a Texas lawmaker pored over high school library collections in other Texas public school districts, developing a list of hundreds of books that he deemed either too “sexually explicit” or causing too much “discomfort” for students to be allowed to read. But what is really in those books that makes people so uncomfortable, and are they really inappropriate for high school students who, after all, have access to the whole internet? If you take this class, you’ll get to find out for yourself and make up your own mind as to whether these books should be banned. Reading novels, short stories, graphic memoirs, plays, and poems that have recently been challenged or removed from school libraries, students will also practice the skills of writing and literary analysis in this introduction to literary studies.

 

ENGL 2315-003— Introduction to Literary Study: Manner, Method, and Meaning

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 102.  Goyne.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

Have you ever read a story or finished a novel or poem and wondered, “Well, what did that mean?”  You had the feeling something was going on that you didn’t quite get?  In this course we will explore a variety of texts—novels, short stories, poems, maybe films—from particular literary points of view that  reveal historical moments and places, and raise cultural questions about gender, economic class, and racial inequality.  By coming to some conclusions about how authors create meaning in their writing, we will gain a better understanding of how literature engages and enthralls us, tickles our fancy, or moves us to action.  Percy Bysshe Shelley claimed, “Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.”  Let’s see how they do it.

 

ENGL 2315-004— Introduction to Literary Study: Bad Mothers

CANCLED

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 351. Condon.   2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

M 2:00-4:50.  Crum Residential Commons 132.  Rubin.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genre of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Hermes.                2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.”

―Anton Chekhov

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in poetry and fiction. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about how great writing gets made. These readings are meant to provide artistic models and stimulate discussion about craft. Together, we’ll identify the “moves” successful pieces of writing make and practice incorporating them in our own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. With engage participation, we will have an opportunity to sharpen both our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 105.  Smith.    2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing short-form stories. Students will read, create, and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: Art of Listening

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 343.  Lama.            2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“Poetry always begins and ends,” remarks W.S. Merwin, “with listening.” In this class, we will learn to listen—to the sky, the earth, the body, the live language, the song in language, the language in song. Through recitations, we will explore the lyre of the lyric in our own throats. In addition to sound, we will practice other fundamentals of poetry such as the line, image, metaphor, and form through creative exercises, workshops, and a final portfolio. We will imitate and emulate the great poets from classical to contemporary with the goal of finding our own voice and music. “The quieter you become,” says Rumi, “the more you hear.” In this class, we will learn to be quiet but also ecstatic.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Shapes of Fiction

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Umphrey Lee 228.  Farhadi.        2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

In this course, we’ll read a variety of fictional genres and styles to analyze the particular decisions writers use to give their stories shape.  While structure will be our entry point, we’ll also focus on the smaller scale choices writers make in order to develop characters, further plot, and stimulate, satisfy, and subvert expectations in the service of providing a compelling read.

Throughout the course we’ll use critical and creative assignments to develop our craft vocabulary.  Students will write their own full-length short stories, which we’ll workshop in the second half of the semester.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

TTh 12:30-1:50.   Dallas Hall 120.  Sudan.

This course fulfills the “Criticism and Theory” requirement for English majors.

This is a gateway course designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches critics have taken to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? And how, in practice, does the interpretation of texts reflect on our psycho-social presence in our culture; for example, how do ideologies of race get reflected in our reading and analysis of texts?

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills.

 

ENGL 3320-001—Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Clements Hall 325.  Amsel. 2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W  CC: LAI, W

Are you ready to explore fact and fiction in the literature of the Middle Ages? How is it that we make history? And, how do we discern truth? Sounds familiar to us because we are still grappling with questions of real truths vs. fake truths in our everyday lives. This course examines real and imagined medieval histories and legends, including stories of King Arthur and Joan of Arc, so we can learn about medieval paradigms still present in contemporary culture.

 

ENGL 3340-001—Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Satz.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W 

We will read with a variety of critical approaches six great novels: Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Jane Eyre, Villette, Mill on the Floss, and Middlemarch. This course is an opportunity to savor some of the monumental works of literature. Requirements: three short papers (4 pp.) and one longer paper (10 pp.); mid-term and final.

 

ENGL 3355-001—Transatlantic Encounters III: Possible Futures: Feminist Theory and Speculative Fiction.

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Boswell.   2012: CA2, GE, W   2016: HFA, GE, W  CC: HD 

Cross-listed with WGST 3370

What do feminist theory and speculative fiction have in common? Both genres engage with our culture through imaginative critique, using the “possible future” to envision the ways our world could change for the better—or the worse. Feminist thought has often turned to fiction to imagine “what if” and to engage with ideas of sex, gender, and sexuality. In this course, we will examine a variety of speculative texts alongside works of feminist theory. By making our world and assumptions strange to us, these speculative fictions offer a kind of testing ground for many ideas in feminist theory. This course will examine the underlying systems that have shaped our concepts of sex, gender, race, and other categories. Students will end the semester by giving a researched oral presentation over a literary work or film of their choosing.

 

ENGL 3360-001—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 152.  Sae-Saue.   2012: CA2, HD, OC, W   2016: HFA, HD, OC, W  CC: LAI, W

This course interrogates and examines violence as the condition of the US West. Of course, violence expresses itself in many fashions, not all of which the course will be able to address. We will begin with the US enterprise of expansion and Native American genocide and move through historical and contemporary social crises, including cultural eradication, police brutality, mass incarceration, local Texas rebellions, the Mexican Revolution, the “zoot suit riots,” social uprisings of the 60s, The American War in Viet Nam (as expressed and experienced by ethnic writers of the West), Asian immigration restrictions, anti-miscegenation laws, and more. Moving through these historical concerns (organized as thematic ones in our course texts), students will examine primarily how Native American and Latinx writers have deployed literary strategies in order to narrate historical correctives to US national (organizing) myths such as manifest destiny (and others) in order to examine how fiction articulates ethnic experiences and social crises, imagines social resolutions, and grapples with paradoxes and impasses of their own representative limits in an era of neo-liberalism.

 

ENGL 3360-002—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Caribbean Theater and Performance

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 152.  Echevarria-Morales.   2012: CA2, HD, OC, W   2016: HFA, HD, OC, W  CC: LAI, W

This course will focus on Caribbean theater and performance in order to examine how the region’s playwrights articulate an incisive critique of oppressive structures and representational systems from a Caribbean perspective. We will explore the “continuum of theatricality” in the Caribbean and read dramatic texts by Derek Walcott (St. Lucia), Aimé Césaire (Martinique), Luis Rafael Sánchez (Puerto Rico), and Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe).  We will also consider the performative elements in poems and testimonies by the Sistren Theater Collective (Jamaica) and Louise Bennet (Jamaica). A selection of critical essays will help us to construct a theoretical framework for our study. Issues to be explored will include questions of audience and interpretative communities, the search for a “Caribbeanized theater,” and the strategic use of theater as a tool of cultural decolonization.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3363-001—Chicana/Chicano Literature

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dedman Life Science 132.  González.      2012: CA2, HD, W     2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: HD, W

 

ENGL 3364-001C—Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales: The Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Veneciano.        2012: CA2, HD, W     2016: HFA, HD, W 

Cross-listed with ARHS 3361

This course reads the femme fatale as a figure of certain powers of provocation, as both threatening and target of threat. We borrow the term from visual media to help us identify and unfold the dualities and duplicities informing seven archetypical figures of Mexican culture (not cinema icons). They are at once mythical and historical: Coatlicue, la Malinche, la Virgen de Guadalupe, Sor Juana Inéz de la Cruz, la Llorona, la Calavera Catrina, and Frida Kahlo.

This course takes the concept of fatales in the sense of fate or destiny and applies it critically to reading the inscription and reception of these seven figures. We will examine the destinies that befell these figures and the alternate destinies they imply. Destiny is understood here as social inscription and therefore patriarchal and discursive. We will weave visual historical, literary critical, postcolonialist, and poststructuralist methodologies in conducting feminist readings of select literature and visual art. Our feminism therefore will be more rhetorical-practical than historical—a form of feminist praxis conducted by critically reading the discursive constructions of culture, gender, and patriarchy.

Readings include Norma Alarcón, Gloria Anzaldúa, Cordelia Candelaria, Hélène Cixous, Rosario Castellanos, Carlos Fuentes, José Limón, Frida Kahlo, Cherrie Moraga, Octavio Paz, Chela Sandoval, Sor Juana Inéz de la Cruz, and the Vanegas Arroyo Press (corridos).

 

ENGL 3379-001—Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Satz.       2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W       2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W   CC: HD, OC, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

TTh 3:30-4:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Condon.   2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

When we read poetry by other people, we consume and internalize not only their ideas but also their methods. In this sense even history’s greatest poets were apprentices all of their lives, constantly learning from the aesthetic choices of other writers. We will continue our own apprenticeship in this advanced workshop by cultivating a daily reading and writing practice. At the center of our practice is the daybook, a large sketchbook that modernist writers often used for their daily musings, doodles, and drafts. We will use our daybooks in much the same way, with the added prompt of transcribing and then imitating a poem by another writer. Such transcription is a physical practice—it works that poet’s linguistic perspective and formal attention into our memory. Our original, imitative draft that follows transcription attunes us to the aesthetic modes we feel most comfortable in and challenges us to write beyond them. You will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.           2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

In this course students will present their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops we will analyze exemplary models of the form and study film clips to understand the ways compelling dialogue is written and satisfying scenes are structured. Readings will include such classics as Casablanca and Chinatown as well as newer scripts like Lady Bird and Get Out. ENGL 2390 is a prerequisite for this course although Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 105.  Smith.      2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing characters. Students will create and critique literary narratives focused on character development, and will learn how to change a flat character into a well-rounded character. By the end of the short semester class, students will complete a portfolio and present a revised story in class. We will read stories, excerpts, and craft references that are heavily focused on character development.

 

ENGL 4321-001—Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Wheeler.             2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W   2016: HSBS,  IL, KNOW, OC, W

Medieval literature is richly populated by fantasy, fable, magic, broad humor and deep spirituality. Even in its earliest poetic forms, English poetry unsettles and challenges readers. We will experience a wide variety of this imaginative literature from the “masterpieces” like Beowulf and Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to odd poems, treatises, and plays found in dark corners of the imagination. Each student will choose a monster to search and a marvel to  share. Weekly comments, in-class presentations, final synthetic paper.

 

ENGL 4343-001—Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender and Sexuality

TTh 11:00-12:20.  Dallas Hall 120.  Newman.         2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

The word “Victorian” has been a synonym for “prudish” for about a hundred years. One historian has asserted that the sexes were regarded as more radically, absolutely different during the nineteenth century than any time before or since. Clearly we’re nothing like them--right?

If that’s the case, why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to many of us about what it means to be a man or woman? And why do some icons of what we now think of as “queer” identity first appear in the latter part of the nineteenth-century? Moreover, in nineteenth-century England prostitution, birth control, what it means to consent to sex and the age when one could do so were all being debated, the term “homosexual” was coined, and gender roles and strict gender difference were first rigidly imposed, and later openly questioned. We will explore these issues through novels, poetry, essays, and contemporary criticism.

Likely Texts: Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre; Charles Dickens, David Copperfield; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; various poems; relevant critical essays.

Assignments: Two short and one longer, multi-source paper or creative project supported by relevant research; various shorter low-stakes writing assignments.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Dickson-Carr, D.          2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

This course focuses on American speculative fiction—comprising science fiction, fantasy, dystopian fiction, and historical fiction—of the 20th and 21st centuries. Speculative fiction, broadly speaking, imagines or reimagines past and future worlds in ways that both depend on and alter reality, or the world we think we perceive and know. In many cases, these works build worlds beyond an Apocalyptic moment, often a cataclysmic shift in the environment, major political upheaval, wars, or—yes—a global pandemic. Although We will pursue several general questions along the way, including—but not limited to—the following: How have American writers (re)imagined American cultures and histories to comment upon the past and predict the future? How might we use their work to track shifting views of humanity’s fate? What, if anything, makes these works distinctly “American,” other than the authors’ origins? What kinds of guidance may be found in these works? How do these works function aesthetically, as literature? How do they exist in or interact with other genres?

Given the vast number of texts that fall in this genre, we will be reading or viewing a relatively small sample consisting of both renowned texts and those less known. These will range from short stories and novels to films and television shows. TENTATIVE List of Authors: Paul Beatty; Ray Bradbury; Octavia Butler; Ta-Nahisi Coates; Samuel R. Delany; Tananarive Due; Percival Everett; William Gibson; Ursula K. LeGuin; Cormac McCarthy; Richard Matheson; Toni Morrison; George S. Schuyler; The Wachowskis. Written and Other Requirements: Short responses; an oral presentation; three major papers, including a paper requiring research.

 

ENGL 4397-001—Distinction Seminar

TTh 2:00-3:20.  Dallas Hall 137.  Newman

Open by invitation. An undergraduate writing project that truly merits distinction in English demands considerable planning, research, and preparatory writing, whether the project is creative or critical. This seminar is devoted to that preparatory work. By the end of the semester you should have most of your research behind you and a fairly detailed writing plan in order, plus some writing under your belt that you can build on over winter break. All of this preparation will position you to complete a viable draft (approximately 25-30 pages) by the end of next spring break, so that you can spend the remainder of the spring semester, probably your final one, revising, honing, and polishing your project into a superior piece of creative or critical work.

Obviously, a distinction project entails a serious commitment of time. That commitment begins, at least in a preliminary way, over the summer. During this time you should think about the work that has excited you the most and write at least one informal proposal of 350-500 words describing the general topic you wish to write about, or the general kind of creative project you wish to write. (Examples furnished upon request, or after registration. Write to bnewman@smu.edu.)

Our syllabus will be partly student-generated, using scholarship and creative writing located by members of the class and relevant to their projects. Writing assignments are conceived as scaffolding for the work to be done in the spring, and some of it will be workshopped in class. Students working on creative writing projects will also work with Dr. Richard Hermes, and should expect to meet with him, whether individually or as part of a group, about eight times during the semester, sometimes in lieu of regular class meetings.

Required textbook: Aaron Ritzenberg and Sue Mendelson, How Scholars Write (Oxford University Press).

Required writing: informal proposal(s), 350-500 words; preliminary bibliography of relevant sources (not annotated); annotated bibliography (12-15 sources for critical writers, fewer for creative writers, in both cases focusing on their relevance to student project); possible draft of poster for Research Day in the spring semester; literature review-style bibliographic essay of relevant work (approx. five pages); final proposal, heuristic outline, and several draft pages of the project itself.

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies

F 12:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 120.  Pergadia    

This course prepares doctoral students for literary studies. We will evaluate various genres of professional writing – the book review, the journal article, the conference paper, the abstract, the fellowship proposal. We will also grapple with some current debates around the methods and objectives of literary study – the archival turn, the digital humanities, postcritique, the environmental humanities. Students will also produce and workshop genres of academic writing, gaining experience in the collegial art of giving and receiving editorial feedback.  

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

T 12:30-3:20.  Dallas Hall 138.  Sae-Saue.   

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  Prothro Hall 200.  Stephens.  

English 6312 (Teaching Practicum) is a year-long course designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. During the fall semester, in addition to all of the texts assigned on the WRTR 1312 syllabus, students will read and write critical responses to composition theory and the classroom. These texts will provide an overview of the history of rhetoric and methods for fostering critical thinking and writing. Students will also critically assess and review contemporary criticism of rhetorical pedagogy.

 

ENGL 6330-001— Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Moss

This course is conceived as a reintroduction to Shakespeare’s dramatic works through constant and sustained comparison to drama by his colleagues, peers, and rivals. It seeks to reinvigorate and ultimately answer the age-old, cliché, tautological, and generally useless question, “What makes Shakespeare Shakespeare?” through careful attention to the elements that constituted his art and informed his process. That is no different, of course, from any well-historicized Shakespeare survey, but here the emphasis shifts from the usual source-study, recovery of political context, and application of modern theoretical models to the simultaneous and cumulative study of analogous texts, especially plays by Marlowe and Jonson, informed throughout by recent trends in early modern theater studies (most often in a materialist mode). Put another way, we will familiarize ourselves with the ways and means of early modern English theater companies—their stages, properties, rhetorics, texts, personnel, audiences, and professional practices—while distinguishing between Shakespeare’s application of those resources and response to their limitations on the one hand, and alternative dramaturgies on the other.

While our emphasis will be on weekly paired plays, each week will feature two or more critical selections to help us feel somewhat at home in the altogether different playmaking and playgoing environment of early modern London. Further context will be provided by the examination of important supplementary primary materials (e.g., the account book of an important playhouse manager, records of court performance, apprenticeship contracts for boy actors). Lest we mistake living theater for dead text, we will further supplement our study with viewings of modern performances, perhaps even a live local performance. Students should expect to contribute copiously both on Canvas and in class, to write both critically and creatively (!), and to present on some key aspect of one of the plays we study.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Th 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Dickson-Carr, D.  

This seminar will focus on critical issues and debates within African American literary and cultural history, with a particular emphasis on satire and African American rhetorical traditions and texts. We will place these works in conversation with African American critical theory from various scholars and critics. Our goal will be to examine how these debates manifested themselves in the literature in both implicit and explicit forms. We will begin in the mid-19th century and end in the present. In the process, we will have an opportunity to read literature of various genres, movements, and perspectives. Requirements: Weekly critical responses; an oral presentation; one article-length paper; regular and vocal participation.

TENTATIVE Texts: Napier (ed.), African American Literary Theory; Gates and Burton, Call and Response (excerpts); Studies in American Humor Fall 2022 issue; selected works by Baker, Baldwin, Beatty, Bell, Bennett, Coates, Douglass, Du Bois, Ellison, Everett, Gates, L. Guerrero, Himes, Hurston, Jacobs, Mat Johnson, Jones, King, Malcolm X, B. Manning, D. Fuentes Morgan, Morrison, Obama, Rankine, Schuyler, Thurman, Patricia Williams, C. Wright, R. Wright, Walker, M. Johnson.

 

ENGL 7372-001—Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

M 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy.

Archives are where people put stories that they want to preserve. They’re also where they bury stories that they hope will be forgotten. What could we learn about the past if we looked at literature alongside diaries, love letters, scrapbooks, and the other textual remains that ordinary people leave behind? This course is a hands-on workshop on the theories, practices, and methods of using archival resources in literary studies. Designed to be useful to students working in any national, period, or genre specialization, this course will survey recent work being done with archives by literary and cultural historians, introduce students to a variety of archival resources, and provide practical training in working with physical and digitized materials. Each student will develop and undertake an archivally driven research project, culminating in a narrative essay that uses archival evidence to understand cultural and literary history anew.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 115

2012: HC1, CA1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 131

2012: CA1 2016: LL

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTh

2:00

3:20

HYER 200

2012: CA1, HD

2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry

Luttrell

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 101

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

3:00

3:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

003

Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

Urban

MWF

9:00

9:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004

Fiction: Shipwrecks & Their Spectators

Atkinson

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W

2016: LL, W

LAI, W

 2312 005
 Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction Echevarria- Morales   

MWF

11:00 11:50
DH 357
2012: CA2, W 2016: W LL
LAI, W
2312
006
 Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction Echevarria- Morales 
 

MWF

12:00
12:50
DH 156
2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W
LAI, W

2313

001

Drama: Modern Drama and the Reinvented Self

Garelick

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 120

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, W

 

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Banned Books

Spencer

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 225

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 102

2012: CA2, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2315 004
 

CANCELED

CANCELED
 
 
 

 

 

 

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

CMRC 132

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

Hermes

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 137

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Lama

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 343

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing

Farhadi

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Sudan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

 

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

Amsel

TTh

9:30

10:50

CLEM 325

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

 

3355

001

Transatlantic Encounters III: Feminist Theory & Spec Fiction

Boswell

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 101

2012: CA2, GE, HD 2016: HFA, GE, HD

HD

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

Sae-Saue

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W

3360
002
Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Caribbean Theater and Performance  Echevarria-Morales  MWF
2:00
2:50
DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W

3362

001

African-American Literature

Pergadia

TTh

2:00

3:20

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

3364

001C

Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales: The Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

Veneciano

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, OC 2016: HFA, HD, OC

 

3379

001

Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 105

2012: CA2, W

2016: HFA, W

W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

Wheeler

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 137

2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W 2016: HSBS, IL, KNOW, OC, W

 

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender & Sexuality

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 120

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 137

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Study

Pergadia

F

12:00

2:50

DH 120

 

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue

T

12:30

3:20

DH 138

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 200

 

 

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

Moss

W

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Dickson-Carr, D.

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

Cassedy

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

2312

003

Fiction: Alt-Narratives in American Literature Since 1945

Urban

MWF

9:00

9:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Banned Books

Spencer

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 225

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Lama

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 343

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3379

001

Literary and Cultural Contexts of Disability

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

1330

001

World of Shakespeare

Moss

MWF

10:00

10:50

DLSB 131

2012: CA1 2016: LL

LAI

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

 

2312
005
Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction  Echevarria-Morales  MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 357

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312 006
Fiction: Growing Pains and Family Ties: The Bildungsroman in Caribbean Fiction  Echevarria-Morales  MWF
12:00
12:50
DH 156

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: The Interpretation of Culture

Cassedy

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315
003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Moves Writers Make

Hermes
MWF  12:00 12:50

DH 137

DH 137

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2311

001

Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: Monsters and Marvels

Wheeler

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 137

2012: HC2, IL, KNOW, W 2016: HSBS, IL, KNOW, OC, W

 

2312

001

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing

Farhadi

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3360
002
Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Caribbean Theater and Performance  Echevarria-Morales  MWF
2:00
2:50
DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W
2312
002

Fiction: The Global Novel

Hermes
 MWF 3:00
3:50
DH 106

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing: Introduction to Fiction Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

CMRC 132

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Literature: Archives Workshop

Cassedy

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Literature: Early Modern English Drama: The Exclusive Backstage Pass

Moss

W

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

HYER 106

 

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Study

Pergadia

F

12:00

2:50

DH 120

 

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00

3:50

PRTH 200

 

 

2311

002

Poetry

Luttrell

TTh

8:00

9:20

DH 101

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

004

Fiction: Shipwreck & Their Spectators

Atkinson

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

003

Introduction to Literary Study: Manner, Method, and Meaning

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 102

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Literature: Paradigms of Truth in Medieval Literature: Real Truths vs. Fake Truths

Amsel

TTh

9:30

10:50

CLEM 325

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

LAI, W

3355

001

Transatlantic Encounters III: Feminist Theory & Spec Fiction

Boswell

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 101

2012: CA2, GE, HD 2016: HFA, GE, HD

HD

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Apocalypse Now and Then: Modern American Speculative Fiction

Dickson-Carr, D.

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 115

2012: HC1, CA1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Short Form

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 105

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and the Politics of Narrative at the US-Mexico Border

Sae-Saue

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HD, HFA, OC, W

LAI, W

4343

001

Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Victorian Gender & Sexuality

Newman

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 120

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

OC

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Sudan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

 

 

3364

001C

Women and the Southwest: Mujeres Fatales: The Fates of Feminism in Mexican America

Veneciano

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, OC 2016: HFA, HD, OC

 

3390

003

Creative Writing Workshop: Character Development

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

HYER 200

2012: CA1, HD 2016: HD, LL

LAI, HD

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

VSNI 203

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

2313

001

Drama: Modern Drama and the Reinvented Self

Garelick

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 120

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, W

 

3362

001

African-American Literature

Pergadia

TTh

2:00

3:20

DLSB 132

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HFA, HD, W

HD, W

4397

001

Distinction Seminar

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 137

 

 

 2315 004  

CANCELED

CANCELED  
 
 

 

 

 

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: You Are What You Read

Condon

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue

T

12:30

3:20

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: African American Critical Modalities: Satire, Humor, Rhetoric, and Theory

Dickson-Carr, D.

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

Summer 2022

MAY & SUMMER SESSION 2022 COURSES

 

Cat #

Sec

Session

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

CC

3367

0011

S1

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

M-F

10:00

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W

2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

HD, OC, W

3379

0011

S1

CANCELED

CANCELED


 

HD, OC, W

3385
0011
S1
Literature of the Holocaust
Mueller
M-F
12:00
1:50
DH 143
2012: CA2, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, OC, W
HD, OC, W

2302

0012

S2

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

M-F

2:00

 

3:50

ULEE 242

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

 2311 0012
S2
Poetry
McConnell
M-F
10:00
1150
DH 149

2012: CA2, W  2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2390

0012

S2

Introduction to Creative Writing: Notice How You Notice

Condon

M-F

2:00

3:50

DH 156

2012: CA1, W

2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W



 

 

 


 

 

 

MAY & SUMMER 2022 SESSION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

ENGL 3367-0011 Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature

M – F  10:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 138. Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White, accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things AreThe Giving TreeAmazing GraceCurious GeorgeBabar; chapter books for young children such as WilderLittle House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3379-0011—Contexts of Disability

M – F  12:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Satz. 2012: CA2, KNOW, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, KNOW, HD, W

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

 

ENGL 3385-0011— Literature of the Holocaust

M – F  12:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 134.  Mueller. 2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, W  CC: HD, OC, W

How can a few pages of a short story or lines of a poem shed light upon something as horrific as the Holocaust? In this course, we will examine how various Holocaust literary genres illuminate our understanding of the atrocities that took place across Europe during the Holocaust. In this course, we will examine how the Holocaust is represented in literature. This course is a writing-based seminar course and will consists of short analytical writing responses, essay, and one final analytical research essay.

 

ENGL 2302-0012 Business Writing

M – F  2:00-3:50. Umphrey Lee 242.  Dickson-Carr, C.     2012: IL, OC W     2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including various writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not count toward the English major requirements and that laptops are required in class. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. The priority goes to Markets & Cultures majors. The second and third priorities are graduating seniors and Dedman students, respectively. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2311-0012Poetry

M – F  10:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 149.  McConnell.     2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W  CC: LAI, W

In 1910, the poet William Henry Davies complained, “What is this life, if full of care, / We have no time to stand and stare.” In the eleventy-two years since then, changes in lifestyle and advances in communication technology—from television to texts to tweets—have nearly destroyed our capacity for standing and staring. Poetry is the antidote to this trend. Poetry yields itself slowly. Poetry demands that we silence distractions and pause in our frantic rushing from place to place. And in so doing, it heals us. In this summer course, we will pursue an immersive, meditative program of standing and staring at a huge range of texts, from medieval Finnish epic to 21st-century Instapoetry. We will read poems carefully and insightfully, so that we can truly understand and appreciate our objects of study. There are precious few opportunities in this hectic life to stand and stare, and this course is one of them. The authors that we will study include William Shakespeare, John Milton, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Countee Cullen, Pablo Neruda, Stevie Smith, and the astoundingly prolific Anonymous (to name but a few).

 

ENGL 2390-0012— Introduction to Creative Writing:
Notice How You Notice

M – F 2:00-3:50. Dallas Hall 156. 2012: CA1, W     2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Writing poetry has the potential to render our attention to the world more acute. This creative writing workshop will teach you to notice how you notice the world as well as the essential craft tools needed to translate your perceptions to the page. To learn these tools, we will read and discuss the work of poets who have mastered them, focusing on how their formal decisions communicate something fundamental about the ways we perceive our world. In-class writing and homework prompts will help you generate your own original poetry. As the semester progresses you will be expected to discuss and analyze your peers’ poems and poetic choices, as well as your own. One characteristic of poetry is its translation of human experience into art that lasts. Often, these experiences raise challenging questions. You should be prepared to read and respond respectfully to poetry that addresses sensitive material. Other requirements include a final portfolio of revised poems with an accompanying introduction to the work. All reading supplied on Canvas.

Spring 2022

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

TTh 11:00-12:20. Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 100. Goyne. 2012: CA1, HC1, OC   2016: HC, LL, OC     CC: LAI

In this course we study the development of chivalric mentalities in the literature, history, and culture of the Middle Ages, from the flowering of chivalry as an ideal and in practice in twelfth-century Western culture to its presence in the current moment.  Readings will include background sources as well as adventure tales of real medieval knights—Rodrigo de Vivar and William Marshal—and those of legend—Lancelot, Yvain, Gawain, and more. Stories from King Arthur provide a looking glass through which we can see chivalric education and variation, chivalric rejection and renewal, and even our own culture reflected. This is a lecture/discussion course; grading criteria: reading commentaries, presentations, final exam.      

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities

MWF 2:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 306.  Satz.                 2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL, HD   CC: LAI, HD

An introduction to the literature of racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants, the disabled, and the LGBTQ community. This course will investigate such common themes as alienation, oppression from the dominant community and oneself, and divergent cultural values. It will also explore such current controversial topics as diversity, inclusion and critical race theory. Literary and theoretical works will be included. Mid-term, final, and two short papers.

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 3:00-3:50. Fondren Science 157 101.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 3:00-3:50. Fondren Science 157.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course is an introduction to Excel 2019 as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate the results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required real-time in the classroom with the latest version of Excel.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 343.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W  CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20. Dallas Hall 343.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.      2012: IL, OC, W     2016: IL, OC, W   CC: W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001— Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

MWF 2:00-2:50. Umphrey Lee 228. Atkinson.        2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

“To see a ship tossed, and threatened every moment by the merciless waves,” says the Roman philosopher Lucretius, “is a spectacle which those that stand safe at shore, cannot but behold with pleasure as well as compassion.” In our class we will put ourselves in the position of both the spectator and the sailor as we explore one of the most ancient and enduring literary subjects: the shipwreck. Our course will begin on dry land, where we will ponder why humans are compelled to leave safe harbors for the danger of the high seas. As the semester progresses we will use literary texts – novels, short stories, and poetry – as well as true accounts, to trace an oceanic voyage culminating in the terror of shipwreck. Finally we will find ourselves on a distant shore, contemplating the physical and psychological transformations produced by disaster – what Shakespeare calls “something rich and strange.” Shipwreck compels us to ask questions about human longing and curiosity, about our relationship with oceans, and about the miracle of salvation. The writings of Homer, Shakespeare, Aphra Behn, Defoe, Poe, and others will guide us as we plunge “full fathom five” into the history of the shipwreck tale.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry

MWF 10:00-10:50.  Clements 334.  Newman.          2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

“I, too, dislike it,” the poet Marianne Moore famously said about poetry; “there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.” She is acknowledging the difficulty many readers have making sense of what is ostensibly written for pleasure and yet requires that we do some kind of intellectual or imaginative work. After all, a poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art, not of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us, and why we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so provides something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works. It can also bring a pleasure that grows on you slowly—or all at once. 

Texts: Helen Vendler’s Poems, Poets, Poetry and others TBD. Assignments: four shorter papers of increasing length, totaling 15-20 pages; 1-2 presentations; frequent discussion board postings; occasional short exercises; midterm and final exams.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Rosendale.         2012: CA2, W     2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Life is better with poetry.  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s supercool and worth caring a lot about. We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning. We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding and then to pleasure. We’ll read lots of great poems, quite a few good ones, and a few terrible ones, from the middle ages to the present day. We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it. We’ll argue sometimes about what a poem means, but it will be okay: that’s part of how thoughtful, interesting reading works.  We’ll become better readers, thinkers, and writers.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

MWF 8:00-9:20. Harold Clark Simmons Hall 107.  Spencer. 2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W   CC: LAI, W

Biologists have been warning us since the 1960s that we are irrevocably changing the natural world around us. In the 1980s scientists started talking about human-caused climate change, and in 2008, geologists formally proposed a name tying the planet’s sixth mass extinction to human activity—the Anthropocene. But while scientists have created models to predict the changing world around us, fiction writers have imagined its impact on individuals and society in varying and creative ways. In this course we will learn common approaches to literary analysis through the work of recent U.S. novelists who have wrestled with this environmental breakdown or prophesied an ecological apocalypse to come. Whether our demise comes about through uncontrollable global warming, nuclear holocaust, a global epidemic, or the slow decay of our bodies due to our own toxic waste, U.S. writers use fiction to reflect on our world by imagining a possible future where greed, blindness, or just sheer stupidity (as Vonnegut would say, “thanks, big brain”) tip our world into destruction. Potential novels to read this semester include Kurt Vonnegut’s Galapagos, Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, and Ana Castillo’s So Far from God. Some of these works are hopeful and some are not, but all of them imagine the moments in which human beings face the inevitable consequences of our own choices as a species.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

TTh 3:30-4:50.  Dallas Hall 153.  Degrasse.            2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

This course is an introduction to fictional American literature from the early 19th to the mid-20th centuries with a particular emphasis on Gothic elements. The American Gothic, according to literary critic Charles L. Crow, is “the imaginative expression of the fears and forbidden desires of Americans… [and] it offers a forum for discussing some of the key issues of American society, including gender and the nation’s continuing drama of race.” This course will cover a variety of fictional texts from the Gothic genre and will interrogate what it is about Gothic themes, elements, and plots that American authors have found so useful in their explorations of central issues in American society. How can seemingly fantastic, supernatural, grotesque, and terrifying stories provide grounds for serious discussions and critiques of life in America three hundred years later? We will think about these and other questions throughout the course of the semester. Possible texts: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, Hangsaman by Shirley Jackson, and short stories by Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Edith Wharton, and Shirley Jackson.

 

ENGL 2312-003—Introduction to Fiction: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This

MWF 9:00-9:50.  Dallas Hall 105.  Hennum.           2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W    CC: LAI, W

Do we want our world to be different? Could it be different? Can fiction help us imagine a different world? Can fiction help us make a different world? What is the difference between fiction and the world, anyways? Where does the one end and the other begin? In this course, we will study these questions by looking at works of fiction that complicate our understanding of this category, as well as fictions that ask us to think critically and creatively about the worlds that produced them and the worlds in which they are read. Along the way, we will think extensively and intensively about our world, our place in it, and fiction’s relationship to both.

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Dallas Hall 115.  Connery.            2012: CA1, OC, W    2016: LL, OC, W  

The drama of Ireland in the twentieth century developed simultaneously with the struggle for independence from Great Britain and with a volatile debate about national identity. Irish theatre subsequently produced playwrights and work that quickly achieved renown throughout the English-speaking world: W.B. Yeats, Lady Augusta Gregory, Sean O’Casey, George Bernard Shaw, Samuel Beckett, Brian Friel, Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, and Martin McDonagh, among others. 

            Throughout this course, we’ll think about how the plays respond to and represent their social and political context, and we’ll practice using our theatrical imagination to think about these scripts in performance, exploring how the essential nature of drama – its immediacy, its public nature, its exchanges between performer and audience, and its calls to judgment – make it a particularly effective vehicle for social and political expression.

            Curiosity is the major course pre-requisite, and a commitment to diligent reading and active participation is the major requirement for the course.  No prior knowledge of Irish history or culture or of drama is expected.  Class meetings will be primarily discussion with some lecture.  Students will share a weekly reading response, take a short factual quiz on each play, and write two take-home tests. 

 

ENGL 2313-002—Introduction to Drama: Acting Like an American

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2314-001H Introduction to Poetry

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Rosendale.     2012: CA2, W    2016: LL, W      CC: LAI, W

Life is better with poetry.  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s supercool and worth caring a lot about. We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning. We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding and then to pleasure. We’ll read lots of great poems, quite a few good ones, and a few terrible ones, from the middle ages to the present day. We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it. We’ll argue sometimes about what a poem means, but it will be okay: that’s part of how thoughtful, interesting reading works.  We’ll become better readers, thinkers, and writers.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 143.  Pergadia.           2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

How does literature represent identity and how does it approach encounters with difference? In this course, we will read literary texts alongside recent criticism in order to develop a vocabulary and skillset for further work in literary studies. We will discuss the relationship between literature and history and between literature and philosophy, attending to questions of race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. One of the main questions we will ask: How do texts address us as readers and how do we respond to their address? As we discern what is at stake in being a reader, we will learn how to unpack the way a text generates its meaning. Tentative reading list includes works by William Shakespeare (The Merchant of Venice), Eliza Haywood (Fantomina), Mary Shelley, (Frankenstein)Nella Larsen (Passing), Toni Morrison (“Recitatif”), and Claudia Rankine (Citizen).

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

TTh 9:30-10:50.  Embrey Engineering 129.  Kiser.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAA, W

This class will introduce you to a variety of genres and how they make meaning in their own unique ways by exploring the class theme “Seeing and Being Seen.” We will move through the semester by asking questions such as: How do we “see” knowledge or meaning in text? How are characters, plots, and tropes made visible? Is what is not visible in a text just as important—or even more so—than what we do see? What are the politics of visibility? And perhaps most importantly, do texts play hide and seek? Our class will progress towards answering these questions, and many more, through fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry, tv, and film. We will draw from works by a variety of authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Ann Petry, Claude McKay, Sherwood Anderson, Elizabeth Bishop, and more. 

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20. Dallas Hall 152. Smith.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

This course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing flash fiction stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing

M 2:00-4:50.  Harold Clark Simmons Hall 318.  Rubin.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of fiction writing. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer’s Toolkit

MW 10:30-11:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Hermes.                   2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

“If you haven’t surprised yourself, you haven’t written.” —Eudora Welty

This course will explore the foundational aspects of creative writing in poetry and fiction. To prepare ourselves to write our own stories and poems, we will begin by reading published work along with craft essays that talk about the writing process. These readings are meant to stimulate discussion about what makes a successful poem or story and to provide models for your own creative work.

During the second half of the course, we will discuss your original creative work in a whole-class review commonly referred to as a workshop. If our workshop conversations are successful, you will learn from each workshopped piece whether you are the writer or the reader, because each story or poem will present particular challenges in writing that all of us face in our work. It is important, therefore, that all students engage in active and respectful participation every class meeting, so that we can all make the most of this opportunity to sharpen our critical and creative skills.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

MWF 12:00-12:50. Dallas Hall 149.  Rivera. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

This course is designed both for beginning writers who have never had the opportunity to study poetry-writing in a classroom setting and for more experienced writers striving to improve the fragile braid that is content, communication, and craft. Students will learn the fundamental elements of poetry, practice literary analysis and critique, improve their creative and critical writing skills, and thoughtfully consider their work as well as that of others via annotated and facilitated dialogue. Students should be willing to hone their poems by testing various techniques, styles, formats, and aesthetics and experimenting with what they have written to develop a small writing portfolio and a better understanding of what being a practicing writer means.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

MWF 2:00-2:50.  Dallas Hall 101.  Rivera.               2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W   CC: CA, CAC, W

Fiction inundates us with a constant fare of death, divorce, destruction, disillusion, dysfunction, and dystopia—and simultaneously offers escape, revelation, return. In this course, we will annotate, read, discuss, argue the merits and failures of the genre in addition to writing short stories that test which components a writer may include or exclude to create plot. As we explore the current limits of the form, we will attempt a radical reimagining of what we consider inexorable rules.  This course familiarizes students with the fears and risks and conflicts and failures inherent to writing any specific narrative of our culture, even as we immerse ourselves in other milieus—real and imagined—trying to impart greater understanding of the human condition. Via writing vignettes and stories, students will learn to incorporate daily observations and consider how these ideas may fit into or shape their narrative vision. When we invest ourselves in either portraying or witnessing life’s exigencies as well as experiencing its conflicts, we commit ourselves to the ongoing work of defining what living might mean.

 

ENGL 2390-006—Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year’s Words

Th 3:30-6:20.  Dallas Hall 137.  Brownderville.       2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

“last year’s words belong to last year’s language 
And next year’s words await another voice.”

                              —T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”

It is sometimes said that literature has always been, and will always be, about love and death. If so many books already engage these great themes, why do we need new writing?  As James Baldwin put it, the human story “has another aspect in every country, and a new depth in every generation.” It must be told again.

This course is a poetry workshop, where timeless themes meet the new words of now. Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communication skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

Next Year’s Words is about the tremendously exciting, and culturally necessary, adventure of the young writer. It’s about singing truth-song in a voice not heard before on earth.

This year can’t write the poems of 2022. Next year’s poetry needs next year’s words.

 

ENGL 2390-007—Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures

MWF 11:00-11:50. Dallas Hall 357.  Rivera. 2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W  CC: CA, CAC, W

Small, intimate, bodily gestures possess the ability to illuminate everything from motives and intentions to physical and psychological states. What is true of the body is also true of the written word: creative writers deploy allusive gestures to the arts, history, regions, academic fields of study, and popular culture — sometimes working with and sometimes against what the text is doing aurally and structurally. Focusing on these figurative nods, this course provides intermediate to advanced practice in the craft of poetry and poetics vis-à-vis the fine balance of playfulness and emotion embedded in the creative process. By exploring literary nods and gestures in the work of contemporary poets of the United States (from the 1960s to present day), we will investigate our own assumptions, biases, and prejudices about who makes up the canon of American letters—especially considering the linguistic diversity of the personal and cultural landscapes from which we all pull.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

MW 9:00-10:20.   Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 223.  Greenspan.

This is a gateway course to the English major designed as an intensive introduction to the study of literary texts. It explores several key questions: What is a text? What are some of the approaches thoughtful critics have taken in recent years to the analysis of texts? How do we as readers make sense both of texts and of their critics? How do paths and pathways to texts change in a digitized, multimediated environment? And how, in practice, does each of us progress from the reading and researching to the written analysis of texts? 

The course consists of five modules in which we explore these questions in relation to a handful of major literary texts of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In each one, we will employ a combination of lecture, discussion group activity, and writing exercises with the goal of refining our critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. 

 

ENGL 3341-001— British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

MWF 1:00-1:50.   Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Hall 100.  Newman.  2012: CA2, HC2, W   2016: HFA, HSBS, W   CC: LAI, W

Officially known as “Wordsworth through Yeats,“ this course familiarizes students with some of the main currents in British literature during the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods--that is, from the “Age of Revolutions” beginning around 1780 to the period between the two World Wars. We begin with the self-conscious turn in the Romantic period to the language of ordinary people and the experiences of ordinary life. But we also consider the continuing attraction of the strange, the unusual, and the visionary that gripped both readers and writers throughout all three historical periods. And we attend to the ways that the literary imagination, beginning with the Romantics, finds the extraordinary in the ordinary and recalibrates its sense of the real and how to represent it. 

We will give significant attention to the social and historical contexts to which writers were responding. Therefore, though we will focus on big-name, canonical British writers (e.g., Blake, Wordsworth, Dickens, Woolf), we will also include some lesser-known Black and women writers. In short, we will trace a story about the canon of British literature, while keeping in mind that there are other ways of telling the story. The writing assignments are designed to help you learn the skills of close reading and improve your written expression. About 15-20 pages of formal paper-writing (3-4 papers, including one with a creative options); three timed exams (one on each of the literary periods); frequent small “low-stakes” homework assignments to practice the skills.

Texts: An anthology, to be determined; Dickens, A Christmas Carol; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway.

 

ENGL 3366-801—American Literary History II: America the Multiple

2012: CA2, HC2, W    2016: HFA, HSBS, W  CC: LAI, W

Lecture: MW 12:00–12:50. Hyer 201. Greenspan.

Enrollment in one discussion section is required:

Discussion section 001: F 12:00–12:50. Umphrey Lee 233. Rhodes.

Discussion section 002: F 12:00–12:50. Dallas Hall 105. Thriffiley.

Our course will explore a wide variety of fictional voices and visions produced in America over the period 1900 to the present. A continuing focus will be on ways that writers interrelate historical and fictional time. This version of the generic "American Literary History II" is specifically offered with an awareness that it comes at a time of extraordinary historical instability, agitation, and activism in the United States. History lives! Readings are chosen to reflect issues of current concern that have roots in our history, such as immigration, racial division, gender authority, control over the writing and interpretation of the past, and the relationship between media and the public sphere. Our intent and goal is to provide means for each of us to arrive at a fuller understanding of our rich cultural heritage (however each of us defines it) and a finer-grained appreciation of the grounding of current issues in earlier times.

Writers to include Abraham Cahan (The Rise of David Levinsky), Willa Cather (My Antonia), Gertrude Stein (Melanctha), Ernest Hemingway (In Our Time), Flannery O'Connor ("Good Country People" and "A Good Man Is Hard to Find"), Toni Morrison (Song of Solomon), Octavia Butler (Kindred), Maxine Hong Kingston (The Woman Warrior), and Richard McGuire (Here).

 

ENGL 3367-001— Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

MWF 1:00-1:50.  Dallas Hall 357.  Satz.       2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W       2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W  CC: HD, OC, W

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural, literary, and philosophical criticism. This course ranges from fairy tales through picture books and young children’s chapter books to young adult fiction. This course will examine literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, and class. Examples of texts: Snow White, accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; books for young adults such as Wonder and Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian. Four short papers and a final.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

T 3:30-6:20. Dallas Hall 137.  Rubin.           2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

Discussing the work of Katherine Porter, the writer Mary Gaitskill names an important advantage the form of the short story has over visual media: "Film, both movies and television," Gaitskill writes, "may accomplish something like this [moment in Porter's work], or try to. But it is precisely the medium's felicity to the seen world that so often makes its attempts to portray the unseen world buffoonish." 

This class will explore the way great fiction evokes the world of the unseen. How is such a thing done? And what can make evocations of this unseen place so thrilling, consoling, and even spooky?  In addition to studying the work of contemporary authors—and the writers who influenced them—students will be asked to read interviews and essays. This class is a fiction-writing workshop with an emphasis on reading and craft.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Creating Fiction

TTh 12:30-1:50. Dallas Hall 152.  Smith.      2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W   CC: W

This workshop-heavy course focuses on the craft, structure, and thematic elements of developing short stories. Students will create and critique short literary narratives focused on the elements of fiction. By the end of the semester, students will complete a portfolio including two short stories.

 

ENGL 3390-003 Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry: Crafting Lyrical Gestures

CANCELED

 

ENGL 4332-001— Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

MWF 12:00-12:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Sudan.            2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

 

ENGL 4339-001— Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

TTh 12:30-1:50.  Dallas Hall 138.  Cassedy. 2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC   CC: OC

Archives are where people put stories that they want to preserve. They’re also where they bury stories that they hope will be forgotten. What could we learn about the past if we looked at literature alongside diaries, love letters, scrapbooks, and the other textual remains that ordinary people leave behind? This course is a hands-on workshop on using archival resources in literary studies. We’ll dig into the lives of obscure and not-so-obscure individuals from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, using both physical and digitized archives. We’ll try to see what the past looks like through their eyes, and we’ll compare that with what it looks like through the eyes of several canonical authors. Each student will undertake an archival research project, culminating in a narrative essay that uses archival evidence to understand cultural and literary history anew.

 

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

W 2:00-4:50.  Dallas Hall 137.  Edwards.     2012: CA2, IL, OC   2016: HFA, IL, OC

What does it mean to have a sexual identity? How does the concept of sexuality change over time? How have people described their desires and expressed their erotic feeling? This course examines a range of American voices that engage in queer desire, identity, and conceptions of the family. Beginning with these questions, the course looks to canonical and non-canonical authors to explore a multitude of perspectives on sexuality. Although the regulation of gender and sexual behavior—and transgression of sex/gender norms—have been central to American culture from its beginnings, this course focuses on texts from the second half of the nineteenth century through the very contemporary. By addressing these concerns, students will come to their own questions of the texts that go beyond finding moments of heightened desire and sexual transgressions. How do moments of quiet contemplation or moments of camp, play, and protest become places for queerness? With help from queer theorists and social historians, we will pay close attention to how discourses shape queer expression, and how queer authors have changed culture. It will thus be important for us to interrogate not only the meaning of “American” and “queer” but what is likewise the consequence of labeling these texts as part of a canon. The course will end, then, with a reflection on what we missed, the potential pitfalls of interdisciplinarity, and the problems that might emerge from an (over)emphasis on sexuality in the practice of queer theory and analysis.

 

ENGL 6330-001— Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

M 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 138.  Sudan

We are all global subjects, or so the saying goes, and even in these restrictive times of the plague, we still turn to other ways to access the “world” from our desks. But what counts as “the” world? “A” world? What sensory evidence do we use to convince ourselves that the world exists as an epistemological phenomenon? Focusing on early modern Europe—a historical period that extends through the eighteenth century--this course will explore the various human and non-human environments that shape our collective understanding of worlds, worlding, and, finally, the world. We will question the myriad assumptions underwriting and informing that innocent yet definitive article and question, as James C. Scott does, the “imposition of a single political authority” upon a variety of ecological settings.

 

ENGL 6360-001— Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

F 12:00-2:50. Dallas Hall 137.  Sae-Saue       

With a focus on the novel, this course will explore regional, national, and international violence in the contexts of ethnic communities of the US West. The texts we will read will address several seismic moments of US history and a range of social crisis, including: expansionism and settler colonialism; The US-Mexico War; The Seditionist Movement of South Texas; ecological destruction; regional mass incarceration, civil-rights uprisings, immigration, poverty, and more.  In particular, students will study how ethnic art negotiates this regional violence as a political culture, including how it resists and may be complicit with forms of regional and ethnic oppression.

 

ENGL 7311-001—Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Th 3:00-5:50.  Dallas Hall 138. Edwards.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to American Studies, beginning by addressing the vexed and recurring question of “What is American Studies?” and continue to explore a variety of themes, theoretical influences, and methodological approaches currently alive in the field, particularly engaging perspectives on globalization and transnationalism, representational and semiotic communication, material and visual evidence, popular and consumer culture, and individual and group identity formations. During the semester, you will have the opportunity to craft an autobiographical statement, lead a class discussion, review and report on a variety of readings, design an American Studies syllabus, and review and assess critical work in the field.

 

ENGL 7370-001—Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

T 3:30-6:20.  Dallas Hall 138.  Pergadia.

Beyond the dyad of black/white American racial politics are encounters, conflicts, and alliances between multiple racial and ethnic minority groups. This course traces the common goals and conflicts between African American, Asian American, Latinx, and the eclipsed Native American presence in the U.S. to ask: How do racial alliances form? What are the political possibilities or pitfalls of racial analogy in either building coalition or erasing difference? We’ll read literature by minority writers alongside efforts in sociology, law, and critical/comparative race/ethnic studies that comprehend or aim to police racial imaginaries in a diverse America. Given the pitfalls of multiculturalism and post-racial discourse, we seek a language, comparative method, and narrative to make sense of America’s myriad minority racial forms. We’ll investigate, for example, the relationship between chattel slavery and Asiatic coolieism, between the Civil Rights Movement and immigration reform. How does literature, film, and art respond to the shifting terrain of U.S. race relations to reimagine multi-racial coalitions?

Primary texts may include: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Dark Princess (1928)Charles Johnson’s Oxherding Tale (1982), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989)Anna Deavere Smith’s Twilight: Los Angeles (1992), Patricia Powell’s The Pagoda (1998), Cristina Garcia’s Monkey Hunting (2003), Toni Morrison’s A Mercy (2008)Shailja Patel’s Migritude (2008), Karen Tei Yamashita’s I Hotel (2010)Ishmael Reed’s Conjugating Hindi (2018), Cathy Park Hong’s Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning (2020)

 

ENGL 7376-001—Seminar: Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

W 2:00-4:50. Dallas Hall 120.  Wheeler.

Why do we (contemporary audiences) find medieval texts and objects deeply seductive at the same time that we recoil from their perceived difference, difficulty, and political deviance? The highly valorized English medieval writers Chaucer and Malory form the core of our common work but we share responsibility for designing our seminar around varieties of genres and authors.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

PRTH 100

2012: CA1, HC1, OC
2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Satz

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 306

2012: CA1, HD
2016: LL, HD

LAI, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

PRTH 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Levy

TTh

11:00

12:20

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Roudabush

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 155

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

Atkinson

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry

Newman

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2311

002

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

Degrasse

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2312 003
Fiction: There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This
Hennum
MWF
9:00
 9:50 DH 105

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

 

LAI, W

2313

001

Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

Connery

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

 

2313

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, OC, W

 

2314

001H

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 143

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

EMBY 129

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes

MW

10:30

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

Rivera

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 149

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

Rivera

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 101

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

Th

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2390
007
Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures
Rivera
MWF  11:00 11:50
DH 357

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Greenspan

MW

9:00

10:20

PRTH 223

 

 

3341

001

British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

1:00

1:50

PRTH 100

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3366

801

American Literary History II: America the Multiple

Greenspan

MW

12:00

12:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3366

N10

American Literary History II

Pollard

F

12:00

12:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3366

N20

American Literary History II

Thriffiley

F

12:00

12:50

DH 105

 

 

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 357

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

T

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Creating Fiction

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

W

3390

003

CANCELED

CANCELED

       


 

4332

001

Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

Sudan

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, IL, OC
2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

Sudan

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

Sae-Saue

F

12:00

2:50

DH 137

 

 

7311

001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Edwards

Th

3:00

5:50

DH 138

 

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

Pergadia

T

3:30

6:20

DH 138

 

 

7376

001

Seminar, Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

Wheeler

W

2:00

4:50

DH 120

 

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Days

Start

End

Room

UC Tags

CC Tags

2312

001

Fiction: Visions of Environmental Destruction

Spencer

MWF

8:00

8:50

HCSH 107

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2312 003
Fiction: There's Gotta Be Something Better Than This
 Hennum MWF 9:00
9:50
DH 105

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2313

002

CANCELED

CANCELED

       

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, OC, W

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

001

Poetry

Newman

MWF

10:00

10:50

CLEM 334

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery

MWF

11:00

11:50

ACSH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Ryberg

MWF

11:00

11:50

PRTH 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390
007
Introduction to Creative Writing: Crafting Lyrical Gestures
Rivera
MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 357

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3390

003

CANCELED

CANCELED

 

 

 

 



ENGL/ WRTR 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

 2390 004
 

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Poetry: A Writer’s Guide

Rivera
MWF
12:00
12:50
DH 149

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

4332

001

Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18C

Sudan

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

3341

001

British Literary History II: The Ordinary, Extraordinary, and "Real"

Newman

MWF

1:00

1:50

PRTH 100

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 115

2012: CA2, HD, KNOW, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, KNOW, OC, W

HD, OC, W

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Satz

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 357

2012: CA1, HD 2016: LL, HD

LAI, HD

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper

MWF

2:00

2:50

VSNI 203

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Shipwrecks and Survival

Atkinson

MWF

2:00

2:50

ULEE 228

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Identity and Difference

Pergadia

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 143

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing: Analyzing and Writing Short Fiction: Life & Death

Rivera

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 101

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3310

001

Research and Critical Writing for Literary Studies

Greenspan

MW

9:00

10:20

PRTH 223

 

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing: The Writer's Toolkit

Hermes

MW

10:30

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

3366

801

American Literary History II: America the Multiple

Greenspan

MW

12:00

12:50

HYER 201

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

LAI, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

M

2:00

4:50

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

6330

001

Early Modern British Literature: Worldmakers

Sudan

M

2:00

4:50

DH 138

 

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

M

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Queer America

Edwards

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, IL, OC 2016: HFA, IL, OC

 

7376

001

Seminar, Special Topics: The Lure of the Middle Ages

Wheeler

W

2:00

4:50

DH 120

 

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

Dickson-Carr, C.

W

3:00

3:50

FOSC 157

 

 

3366

N10

American Literary History II

Pollard

F

12:00

12:50

ULEE 233

 

 

3366

N20

American Literary History II

Thriffiley

F

12:00

12:50

DH 105

 

 

6360

001

Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Violence and its Telling in the US West

Sae-Saue

F

12:00

2:50

DH 137

 

 

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2311

002

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

2313

001

Drama: The Modern Irish Stage

Connery

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 115

2012: CA1, OC, W 2016: LL, OC, W

 

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seeing & Being Seen

Kiser

TTh

9:30

10:50

EMBY 129

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

PRTH 100

2012: CA1, HC1, OC 2016: HC, LL, OC

LAI

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

11:00

12:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Levy

TTh

11:00

12:20

HCSH 318

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing: Intro to Short-Form Creative Writing

Smith

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 152

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W

2302

001

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

12:30

1:50

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Roudabush

TTh

12:30

1:50

FOSC 155

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2314

001H

Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Creatiing Fiction

Smith

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 152

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: The Archives Workshop

Cassedy

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

 

2302

002

Business Writing

Dickson-Carr, C.

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 343

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

W

ENGL/ WRTR 2306

013H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAA, W

2312

002

Fiction: The Dark Side of American Literature

Degrasse

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

LAI, W

 

7311

 001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theories and Methods in American Studies

Edwards
Th
 3:00 5:50
DH 138
   

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

T

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

W

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Literature: Comparative Race and Ethic Relations

Pergadia

T

3:30

6:20

DH 138

 

 

2390

006

Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

Th

3:30

6:20

DH 137

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

CA, CAC, W