2016 Archives

Trump’s acceptance speech sets everything right

July 22, 2016

DALLAS (SMU)SMU experts are available for interview on all things related to the current state of the presidential race. Additional convention experts are available here.

NO PIVOTS FROM TRUMP IN ACCEPTANCE SPEECH 
 

Matthew WilsonMATTHEW WILSON:
jmwilson@smu.edu

Trump kept surprises to a minimum during his acceptance speech, says Wilson, focusing on red meat instead.

“Trump didn’t pivot, he doubled down,” Wilson says. “His most powerful lines were about being a champion for forgotten working people. He is what he is, and the message and tone aren’t changing. We’ll see if it works.”

Wilson added that it was, “Interesting that Trump explicitly reached out to both gays and evangelicals,” but noted most of the speech focused on fear, not hope. 

“Trump is betting that Americans are uneasy and looking for more acknowledgement of their anxieties than soaring, optimistic rhetoric,” Wilson says. “One of the songs playing in the hall after Trump won the nomination was ironic … ‘You can’t always get what you want.’”

Wilson is an SMU associate professor of Political Science. He can discuss:

  • religion and politics
  • political psychology
  • voting behavior of religious voters
  • public opinion and politics 
   
TRUMP DELIVERS SOLID SPEECH, IVANKA CONTINUES TO SHINE 
 

Ben VothBEN VOTH:
bvoth@smu.edu

Voth gave Trump’s final speech good marks.

“The speech was delivered well,” Voth says. “Delivery got more comfortable as he went along. The speech was unusually long. I think the key was, ‘I will be your voice.’”

Ivanka Trump was quite compelling and will continue to be an asset for the campaign in the future, Voth adds.

Voth is SMU’s director of debate and an associate professor of Corporate Communications and Public affairs. He can discuss:

  • debate prep
  • debate strategy
  • comparisons between this debate season and the 2012 election’s debate season
   
TRUMP DOESN’T OFFER MUCH SUBSTANCE, BUT CROWD EATS IT UP 
 

Jeffrey A. EngelJEFFREY ENGEL:
jaengel@mail.smu.edu

For the grand finale, Engel says, Trump provided a speech that was long on promises, but short on details.

“Rarely in human history have so many cheered so little, so much,” Engel says.

Engel is director of the SMU Center for Presidential History. He can discuss:           

  • comparisons to past presidential races
  • foreign policy
  • presidential rhetoric
                         

 

### 

21795-nr-7/21/16-kr