Jan Term 2020 Courses

Students may enroll in one course in Jan Term (regardless of credit hour count).

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Click on a course name to see description, faculty, and syllabus (if available).

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Course Title Time(s) University Curriculum Dates
ADV 1341Marketing Principles of Advertising9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakStudents learn the basic principles of consumer marketing and the role of advertising in the marketing mix. Emphasizes marketing and advertising strategy and planning processes through case studies in which students develop advertising answers to marketing problems and opportunities. Students must earn a B or better in ADV 1341 to be eligible for admission to the strategic brand management program. Prerequisite: ADV 1300.

Faculty: Charles Besio

Syllabus
ADV 1360Creative Production9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakStudents learn the basic principles of advertising design and production in tandem with the use of industry-standard hardware and software programs, including the Adobe Creative Suite.

Faculty: Mark Allen

Syllabus
ADV 5302The Advertising Industry in Dallas9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThe Dallas area is home to one of the top five media markets in the US. Students explore and analyze current media issues within the context of this media center. Instructor permission required. Priority given to advertising majors/minors.

Faculty: Peter Noble
ADV 6301The Advertising Industry in Dallas9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThe Dallas area is home to one of the top five media markets in the US. Students explore and analyze current media issues within the context of this media center. Instructor permission required. Priority given to advertising majors/minors.

Faculty: Peter Noble
ANTH 2302People of the Earth9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  KNW, HC; HDHuman biological and cultural evolution, from the appearance of ancestral humans in Africa, to agricultural origins and the rise of the world’s great civilizations.

Faculty: Mark McCoy

Syllabus
ANTH 2382Human Nature: Who Are We? And How Did We Get This Way?9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  NASIs there such a thing as human nature? And if there is, how would we recognize it when we see it? Human nature takes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding why humans are the way we are.

Faculty: Katherine Horsburgh

Syllabus
ANTH 3306Introduction to Medical Anthropology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HSBS; HD, IL, OCProvides an overview of methods and topics in medical anthropology, an interdisciplinary field that explores health, illness, and systems of healing through holistic and cross–cultural study. Case studies from a diversity of human societies and cultures around the globe are used to challenge assumptions of student understanding. Offers several University Curriculum components, gives students a robust introduction to this specialized sub–field within Anthropology, and addresses many of the foundational concepts on the MCAT.

Faculty: Nia Parson

Syllabus
ANTH 3312Meso-American Archaeology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HSBS; IL, HDExamines development of civilizations from village life to the great empires of Mexico. How civilizations begin, grow, change, and collapse.

Faculty: Alejandro Figueroa

Syllabus
APSM 2340Coaching & Leadership for Performance9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  OCExamines what coaches do, the qualities of expert coaches, strategies for effective and cohesive programs, a sound coaching philosophy, and the art and science of coaching. Serves as the gateway course to the major. Students must complete this course with a C– or better in order to qualify for the sport performance leadership major. Prerequisites WAIVED: for assistance enrolling, contact janterm@smu.edu.

Faculty: David Bertrand

Syllabus
ARHS 1313Pharaohs, Pyramids, and other Wonders of the Nile: Introduction to the Art of Ancient Egypt9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CA, HC; GEExplores the art of ancient Egypt, the Land of the Pharaohs, from the first pyramids (ca. 3500 BCE) through the death of Cleopatra and the Roman conquest (30 BCE). Focuses on major royal monuments, temples, funerary art and mummies, statuary, and luxury arts. Emphasizes an understanding of Egyptian art within its cultural context, in order to better understand both the ancient civilization and the modern fascination with Egypt.

Faculty: Stephanie Langin-Hooper

Syllabus
ASDR 1300Introduction to Drawing9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CADrawing from life objects and concepts. Work in class is supplemented by outside assignments and readings. Emphasis placed on space, materials, analysis of form, and critical judgment.

Faculty: Brian Molanphy

Syllabus
ASSC 1300Introduction to Sculpure9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CAAn introduction to working in three dimensions from a variety of approaches, investigating sculpture’s purposes, materiality, and spatial nature. Students examine historical and contemporary approaches to sculpture to understand how to manipulate form, space, and expressive content in three dimensions.

Faculty: Tamara Johnson

Syllabus
CCPA 2375Communication Research & Data Analytics9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  IL, QRStudents learn how to conduct professional research utilizing primary and secondary data, statistics, and analytic software. Prerequisites: C or better in CCPA 2310 (or CCPA 3300) and CCPA 2327; enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs, B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in corporate communication and public affairs.

Faculty: LaShonda Eaddy

Syllabus
CCPA 3365Organizational Communication9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakEmphasizes the role that communication plays in recruiting and selecting project team members, motivating employees, and making a project team productive. Prerequisites WAIVED: for assistance enrolling, contact janterm@smu.edu.

Faculty: Maria Dixon

Syllabus
CEE 3350Structural Analysis9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakEmphasis on the classical methods of analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structural systems. Also, computation of reactions, shears, moments, and deflections of beams, trusses, and frames. Students use computers as an analytical tool. Prerequisites: ME 2140/CEE 2140, C or better in ME 2340/CEE 2340.

Faculty: Brett Story

Syllabus
CEE 5362Engineering Analysis with Numerical Methods9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakApplications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy

Syllabus
CEE 7362Engineering Analysis with Numerical Methods9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakApplications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy

Syllabus
CHEM 1301Chemistry for Liberal Arts9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  SEDesigned for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.

Faculty: Marissa Tyro Ottenson
CHEM 1303General Chemistry I9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  SE (w/complete lab)Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs.

Faculty: Brian Zoltowski

Syllabus
CHEM 1304General Chemistry II9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  SE (w/complete lab)Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Prerequisite: 1303.

Faculty: David Son

Syllabus
CHIN 1401Beginning ChineseONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Introduction to spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Emphasizes intensive drills in sounds and tones, sentence structure, and a vocabulary of 500 characters. Computer, video, and audio assignments are required. Prerequisites: Reserved for students who have no previous Chinese experience or fewer than two years of Chinese and the appropriate placement exam score. Approval from the WLL adviser is required for enrollment.

Faculty: Xiao Hu

Syllabus
CISB 5397Entrepreneurship: Starting a Business9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  ILCovers planning for a new business. Topics include the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs, profit and cash flow forecasts, sources of information, sales forecasts and the importance of relevant experience, entrepreneurial marketing, financing, and the business plan. For business majors only.

Faculty: Pat Kriska

Syllabus
DANC 1151Dance Production for Non Majors9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  TMIntroduces the technical preparation, production, and running of dance performances. Also, orientation and information for providing support in areas of lighting, sound, costumes, and scenery. Service assignments provide hands-on training in mounting a mainstage production, as well as load-in and strike of dance productions in other venues. Required of all first-year dance majors.

Faculty: Christopher Ham

Syllabus
DSIN 5390Special Topics: Innovation and Design Attitude9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThis course will serve as an environment for students to cultivate a spirit of innovation, practice creative and analytical problem solving, and develop an interdisciplinary and collaborative orientation conducive to succeeding in today’s organizations.

Faculty: Seth Orsborn

Syllabus
DSIN 7390Special Topics: Innovation and Design Attitude9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThis course will serve as an environment for students to cultivate a spirit of innovation, practice creative and analytical problem solving, and develop an interdisciplinary and collaborative orientation conducive to succeeding in today’s organizations.

Faculty: Seth Orsborn

Syllabus
EMIS 2375Cultural and Ethical Implications of Technology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HFA; IL, OCExplores the pervasive use of technology in today’s society, the impact of technology on daily life, and the tie between technology and ethical responsibility. Students learn how their lives are being shaped by technology and how they in turn help shape technology.

Faculty: Gretchen Coleman

Syllabus
ENGL 1365Literature of Minorities9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  LL; HDRepresentative works of African-American, Asian-American, gay, Hispanic-American, and Native American literature, in their immediate cultural context and against the background of the larger American culture.

Faculty: Bruce Levy

Syllabus
FILM 1304Production 19:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CA, TMPractical, comprehensive course in the fundamentals of digital video and audio production, covering cameras, microphones, lighting, shooting, editing, sound design, and outputting. Incorporates hands-on exercises, screenings, lecture, and group and individual video projects. Required of all FILM majors. Prerequisites WAIVED: for assistance enrolling, contact janterm@smu.edu.

Faculty: Mark Kerins

Syllabus
FILM 3310Screen Artists: Alfred Hitchcock9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CAExamines the questions of authorship pertinent to the cinema by focusing on the works of one or more film artists. The specific directors, producers, screenwriters, and other artists treated by the course vary from term to term.

Faculty: Rick Worland

Syllabus
FILM 3351International Film History9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CA, HCOverview of the development of the cinema as a technology, an art form, an industry, and a social institution, beginning with the origins of the medium and tracing its major movements and configurations up to the present. Required of all majors.

Faculty: Kevin Heffernan

Syllabus
FREN 1401Beginning French IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Faculty: James Batchelor

Syllabus
FREN 1402Beginning French IIONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
UC 2016:  SLStresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C– or better in FREN 1401 or the appropriate placement exam score. Students meeting these requirements will be able to enroll. Otherwise, approval from the WLL adviser is required for enrollment.

Faculty: Caroline Grubbs

Syllabus
GERM 1401Beginning German IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing.

Faculty: Stephen Grollman

Syllabus
HIST 2302Artists and the American Revolution: History, Fiction, and Film9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  KNW, HCHistorians, painters, writers, and filmmakers all recover and interpret the past. This course explores the relationship between how historians and such artists have made sense of the American Revolution.

Faculty: Edward Countryman

Syllabus
HIST 2337History of Sport in US9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HC; HDThe social, cultural, and business history of sport in the U.S. Focus on the cultural meaning and ethical components of sports in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Faculty: Alexis McCrossen

Syllabus
HIST 3389Problems in the Middle East: A Modern History of Palestine/Israel9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HC; GEA contemporary topic is treated in historical perspective. Sample topics include the Arab-Israeli conflict, oil and the politics of energy, and Islamic fundamentalism.

Faculty: Sabri Ates

Syllabus
HRTS 3341The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  KNW, HSBS; HDAn introduction to 1994 Rwanda genocide that seeks to understand not only its origins but also its sociological, ethical, and human rights implications.

Faculty: Herve Tchumkam

Syllabus
HRTS 4392Special Topics: Eating, Environment, and Ethics9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThis course considers eating as a complex act that is simultaneously ecological, historical, scientific, cultural, political, symbolic, economic, theological, and social - even as it centers on a simple ethical question: where does food come from, and what does this mean?

Faculty: Bradley Klein

Syllabus
ITAL 1401Beginning Italian IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Offers a communicative and interactive approach and stresses the acquisition of basic listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, idioms, and accurate pronunciation. Students read and listen to authentic materials, prepare written compositions and oral presentations, have conversational practice, and explore various aspects of Italian culture and cross-cultural comparisons between Italy and the United States. This is a 5-week, fully online course in which students meet synchronously virtually on a weekly basis for speaking activities, but complete the majority of the course asynchronously online. Prerequisites: ITAL 1401 is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Italian or for those were placed into 1401 by the Italian placement exam. Students seeking to enroll in ITAL 1401 who have not met the course prerequisites or do not have the appropriate placement exam score should contact the WLL Second Language adviser.

Faculty: Damiano Bonuomo

Syllabus
ITAL 1401Beginning Italian IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Offers a communicative and interactive approach and stresses the acquisition of basic listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, idioms, and accurate pronunciation. Students read and listen to authentic materials, prepare written compositions and oral presentations, have conversational practice, and explore various aspects of Italian culture and cross-cultural comparisons between Italy and the United States. This is a 5-week, fully online course in which students meet synchronously virtually on a weekly basis for speaking activities, but complete the majority of the course asynchronously online. Prerequisites: ITAL 1401 is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Italian or for those were placed into 1401 by the Italian placement exam. Students seeking to enroll in ITAL 1401 who have not met the course prerequisites or do not have the appropriate placement exam score should contact the WLL Second Language adviser.

Faculty: Daniele Forlino

Syllabus
ITAL 1402Beginning Italian IIONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
UC 2016:  SLStudents review and learn fundamental aspects of basic Italian linguistic and grammatical structures (regular and irregular verbs in the present, present perfect, imperfect, future, conditional, and present subjunctive). Students further develop their linguistic and cultural awareness of Italian and build their vocabulary, listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills through communicative, interactive activities and assignments, including written compositions, oral presentations, and conversational practice. This is a 5-week, fully online course in which students meet synchronously virtually on a weekly basis for speaking activities, but complete the majority of the course asynchronously online. Prerequisite: C– or better in ITAL 1401 or the appropriate placement exam score. Students meeting these requirements will be able to enroll. Otherwise, approval from the WLL Second Language adviser is required for enrollment. Students who have not met the course prerequisites for ITAL 1402 or do not have the appropriate placement exam score should contact the WLL Second Language adviser.

Faculty: Aria Cabot

Syllabus
JOUR 5301Topics in Journalism: Research in Fashion Media9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakThis course is a special topics course focused on qualitative research methods for both fashion and journalism studies. The course will introduce students to social science research, including ethics within research and various methods of qualitative inquiry.

Faculty: Myles Lascity

Syllabus
KNW 2315Ethnoviolence: Interdisciplinary Perspectives9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  KNW; HD, IL, OCIntroduces topics and approaches to the study of ethnoviolence, including specific disciplinary approaches such as sociology, communication studies, postcolonial studies, film studies, political science, and human rights. Students meet twice a week, once with the entire class, and once in groups of 20 to take a more sustained disciplinary approach to the question depending on the background of the individual instructor. Some lectures are delivered by guest speakers.

Faculty: Ben Voth

Syllabus
LATN 1402Beginning Latin IIONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Structures of the Latin language: vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Also, introduction to Roman history and culture, and simple readings from Latin authors.

Faculty: Justin Germain

Syllabus
ME 3350Structural Analysis9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakEmphasis on the classical methods of analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structural systems. Also, computation of reactions, shears, moments, and deflections of beams, trusses, and frames. Students use computers as an analytical tool. Prerequisites: ME 2140/CEE 2140, C or better in ME 2340/CEE 2340.

Faculty: Brett Story

Syllabus
ME 5362Engineering Analysis with Numerical Methods9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakApplications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy

Syllabus
ME 7362Engineering Analysis with Numerical Methods9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakApplications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy

Syllabus
MKTG 3310Marketing Concepts9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakCovers the basic principles of consumer marketing and the role of each element of the marketing mix. Emphasizes creating a familiarity with the marketing strategy and planning processes and viewing marketing within a societal context. Required for the minor in business. For non-business majors and business minors only.

Faculty: Charles Besio

Syllabus
MNO 3310Management Fundamentals9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakProvides a broad survey of key issues, theories, and practices that underpin how organizations function, evolve, and perform. Topics include motivation, job design, organizational theory, leadership, organizational culture, competitive strategy, and competitive advantage. Required for the minor in business. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.

Faculty: Pamela Van Dyke

Syllabus
MUHI 1302Music in World Societies9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CA; HDIntroduces students to musics from a diverse range of cultures, in addition to themes and issues in contemporary musical research. The first portion of the course provides a general introduction to case studies of music traditions from around the world, highlighting the contexts of music production in cultural and geographic regions. The final portion of the course applies this cultural knowledge in analytical contexts to broader discussions of indigeneity, nationalism, diaspora, traditions, and globalization.

Faculty: Kristina Nielsen

Syllabus
PERB 5320Orchestral Workshop9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakStudents will learn to be more efficient in preparing for any kind of performance situation, especially auditions. Each participant will gain practical experience at being able to display his or her talents, as players and people, at a consistently high level.

Faculty: Gregory Hustis

Syllabus
PHIL 1317Business Ethics9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  PRIEExamines the moral dimensions of actions and practices in the business world. Students explore ethical theories and standards of evaluation for actions and practices generally, and discuss how these theories and standards apply to a variety of issues in business. Topics vary, but the following are representative: advertising, capitalism vs. socialism, corporate culture, product quality and safety, the responsibilities of corporations to the societies that sustain them, the use of animals in product testing, and working conditions and compensation.

Faculty: Ken Daley

Syllabus
PHYS 1303Introductory Mechanics9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  SE (w/ complete lab); QRFor science and engineering majors. Covers vector kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, rotational motion, special relativity, and structure of matter. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1337.

Faculty: Simon Dalley

Syllabus
PHYS 1304Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  SE (w/ complete lab); QRFor science and engineering majors. Covers electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, and special relativity. Prerequisite: PHYS 1303 or PHYS 1307. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1338 or MATH 1340.

Faculty: Durdana Balakishiyeva

Syllabus
PRW 2112Walking: Urban Fitness9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  PRW 2Walking long distances during class, and diet and nutrition information. Includes selected activities designed to target health-related fitness.

Faculty: Brian Fennig

Syllabus
PSYC 1300Psychology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  IICBroad introduction to psychology as a behavioral science with special emphasis on cognition, development, learning, social, personality, physiological, and clinical psychology (psychopathology and psychotherapy).

Faculty: Michael Lindsey

Syllabus
PSYC 2351Abnormal Psychology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  HDA study of the theories, causes, assessment, and treatment of abnormal behavior, including depression, anxiety, psychosis, personality disorders, and other forms of psychopathology in adults. There is an examination of the continuum of normal and abnormal behavior, with consideration of historical and cultural perspectives, ethical concerns, and research methodologies in understanding psychological disorders.

Faculty: Mary O'Boyle

Syllabus
PSYC 3360Health Psychology9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  OCA basic introduction to the subject. Topics include causes and correlates of health, illness, and dysfunction, as well as the interplay of emotions, cognitions, and behavioral and/or physical factors. Prerequisites WAIVED: for assistance enrolling, contact janterm@smu.edu.

Faculty: Austin Baldwin

Syllabus
RELI 1303Introduction to Asian Religions9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  PRIE, HC; HD, GEAn introductory historical overview of select religious traditions of Asia. The course explores developments in religious and cultural trends expressed in South Asia and East Asia in traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and/or Shintoism.

Faculty: Johan Elverskog

Syllabus
SPAN 1401Beginning Spanish IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Allison Larkin

Syllabus
SPAN 1401Beginning Spanish IONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Lourdes Molina

Syllabus
SPAN 1402Beginning Spanish IIONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
UC 2016:  SLDevelops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish–speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C– or better in SPAN 1401 or the appropriate placement exam score. Students meeting these requirements will be able to enroll. Otherwise, approval from the WLL adviser is required for enrollment.

Faculty: Miroslava Detcheva

Syllabus
SPAN 1402Beginning Spanish IIONLINE
Special dates: Dec. 19 - Jan. 16
UC 2016:  SLDevelops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish–speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C– or better in SPAN 1401 or the appropriate placement exam score. Students meeting these requirements will be able to enroll. Otherwise, approval from the WLL adviser is required for enrollment.

Faculty: Constantin Icleanu

Syllabus
SPAN 2302Intermediate Spanish II9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  GEFor students who are comfortable using Spanish in all timeframes (past, present, future) but who need to improve overall fluency and to fine tune grammatical details. Focuses on the development of oral and written expression and significant vocabulary expansion, and their application to authentic social contexts and cultural situations. Prerequisite: 2401 or placement exam.

Faculty: Joy Saunders

Syllabus
SPAN 2401Intermediate Spanish I9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  LL; GEFor students who are relatively comfortable expressing their personal needs and describing their immediate environment in Spanish. Moves students toward fluency through significant vocabulary expansion and mastery of advanced verbal and sentence structure. To varying degrees, attention is devoted to cultural competence and to the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1402 or equivalent.

Faculty: Susana Fernandez Solera

Syllabus
STAT 2331Introduction to Statistical Methods9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  QFAn introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.

Faculty: Ian Harris

Syllabus
STAT 3300Applied Statistics: Regression9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakEmphasizes the analysis of data using state-of-the art statistical methods and specialized statistical software. Case studies form a major component of the course requirements. Prerequisite: STAT 230, STAT 2331, or ITOM 2305.

Faculty: Stephen Robertson

Syllabus
STAT 3304Introduction to Statistical Computing9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakCovers the basics of SAS programming, a key statistical software package. Students learn about the SAS syntax that is necessary to write SAS code to perform basic statistical inference.

Faculty: Mahesh Fernando

Syllabus
THEA 2311The Art of Acting9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  CA; OCBasic work in acting, voice, and movement for the nonmajor. Relaxation, concentration, imagination, and the actor’s exploration and use of the social world.

Faculty: Jon Hackler

Syllabus
WL 3341The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda9:00am - 4:00pm with lunch breakUC 2016:  KNW, HSBS; HDAn introduction to 1994 Rwanda genocide that seeks to understand not only its origins but also its sociological, ethical, and human rights implications.

Faculty: Herve Tchumkam

Syllabus