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2017 Archives

NIH Director Francis Collins to address SMU students during 102nd Commencement May 20

Symposia

DALLAS (SMU) – The work and contributions of four prestigious leaders in science, theology and the arts will be the focus of public presentations and discussions at SMU in the days leading to their receipt of honorary degrees at the University’s May 20 Commencement ceremony. All the events are free and open to the public.

 

THURSDAY, MAY 18

Francis HalzenFrancis Halzen, a pioneer in the field of astrophysics, will give a public lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 18, in Dallas Hall’s McCord Auditorium.

A reception will precede the lecture at 5 p.m. in the rotunda of Dallas Hall. Organizers are offering a special welcome to students from Adamson High School’s “Living Physicist Program” and area high school teachers and students who participate in the QuarkNet program. Halzen will receive the degree Doctor of Science, honoris causa, at Commencement.

 

FRIDAY, MAY 19

Ed SandersE.P. Sanders, an internationally respected New Testament scholar, will be honored with a symposium examining his work from 10-11:30 a.m. Friday, May 19, in SMU Perkins Chapel. Moderator for “Comparing Early Judaism and Early Christianity: The Scholarship of E. P. Sanders,” will be Mark Chancey, professor of religious studies in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.  Panelists will include:

  • Craig C. Hill, dean and professor of New Testament, Perkins School of Theology, SMU
  • David P. Moessner, Bradford Chair of Religion, Department of Religion, TCU
  • Beverly Gaventa Roberts, Distinguished Professor of New Testament Interpretation, Department of Religion, Baylor University and Helen H.P. Manson Professor of New Testament literature and Exegesis Emerita, Princeton Theological Seminary
  • Sze-kar Wan, Professor of New Testament, Perkins School of Theology, SMU

 

Nancy A NasherA Conversation with Nancy Nasher,” is scheduled for 1-2:30 p.m. Friday, May 19, in Taubman Atrium of the Owen Arts Center.  The attorney, businesswoman and philanthropist whose vision for public engagement with the arts has been transformative in Dallas will receive the degree Doctor of Arts, honoris causa, at Commencement.

 

Francis S. CollinsFrancis S. Collins, the physician-geneticist who led the landmark Human Genome Project before becoming director of the National Institutes of Health, will participate in a symposium focused on his life and work at 3 p.m. Friday, May 19, in Crum Auditorium in the Collins Executive Education Center. Collins also will deliver the Commencement address Saturday, May 20, and will receive the degree Doctor of Science, honoris causa, at the ceremony.

Collins will join these panel members in discussing:

  • Emerging advances in biomedical research, with Dr. Daniel K. Podolsky, president, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Pia Vogel, professor of biological sciences, SMU
  • Innovation and translational science, with Steven C. Currall, provost and vice president for academic affairs, SMU

April 11, 2017

DALLAS (SMU) — Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., the director of the National Institutes of Health who may be best known for leading the Human Genome Project (HGP), will be the featured speaker during SMU’s 102nd all-University Commencement ceremony at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 20, in Moody Coliseum.

Francis S. Collins
Francis S. Collins

Dr. Collins – whose own personal research efforts led to the isolation of the genes responsible for cystic fibrosis, neurofibromatosis, Huntington’s disease and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome – will receive the Doctor of Science degree, honoris causa, from SMU during the ceremony. The entire event, including Collins’ address, will be live streamed at smu.edu/live.

“We are honored to have a pioneering scientist and national leader of Dr. Collins’ stature as featured speaker at Commencement,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “His life is testament to a strong, unwavering commitment to the search for scientific knowledge paired with deep religious faith. He has much to share with us.”

As NIH director, Collins oversees the work of the largest institutional supporter of biomedical research in the world, spanning the spectrum from basic to clinical research. He was appointed by President Obama in 2009 and was asked to remain in the position by President Trump in January 2017. As director, he has helped launch major research initiatives to advance the use of precision medicine for more tailored healthcare, increase our understanding of the neural networks of the brain to improve treatments for brain diseases, and identify areas of cancer research that are most ripe for acceleration to improve cancer prevention and treatment.

While director of NIH’s National Human Genome Research Institute, he oversaw the HGP, a 13-year international effort to map and sequence the 3 billion letters in human DNA. HGP scientists finished the sequence in April 2003, coinciding with the 50th anniversary of James Watson and Francis Crick’s seminal publication describing the double-helix structure of DNA. 

It remains the world’s largest collaborative biological project and one of the most significant scientific undertakings in modern history. 

As an innovative evolutionary geneticist and a devout Christian, Collins also has gained fame for his writings on the integration of logic and belief. His first book, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief, became a New York Times bestseller in 2006. Since then, he has written The Language of Life: DNA and the Revolution in Personalized Medicine (2011) and edited a selection of writings, Belief: Readings on the Reason for Faith (2010).

Born in Staunton, Va., and raised on a small family farm in the Shenandoah Valley, Collins was home schooled until the sixth grade and attended Robert E. Lee High School in his hometown. He earned his Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from the University of Virginia in 1970. 

In 1974, Collins received his Ph.D. degree in physical chemistry from Yale University, where a course in molecular biology triggered a major change in career direction. He enrolled in medical school at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, where he earned his M.D. degree in 1977. From 1978 to 1981, Collins completed a residency and chief residency in internal medicine at North Carolina Memorial Hospital. He then returned to Yale as a Fellow in Human Genetics at the university’s medical school from 1981 to 1984. 

Dr. Collins joined the University of Michigan in 1984 as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, a position that would eventually lead to a Professorship of Internal Medicine and Human Genetics. Collins heightened his reputation as a relentless gene hunter with an approach he named “positional cloning,” which has developed into a powerful component of modern molecular genetics. 

In contrast to previous methods for finding genes, positional cloning enabled scientists to identify disease genes without knowing the functional abnormality underlying the disease in advance. Collins’ team, together with collaborators, applied the new approach in 1989 in their successful quest for the long-sought gene responsible for cystic fibrosis. Other major discoveries soon followed, including isolation of the genes for Huntington’s disease, neurofibromatosis, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, the M4 type of adult acute leukemia, and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.  

In 1993, Collins joined NIH to become director of the National Center for Human Genome Research, which became NHGRI in 1997. As director, he oversaw the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium and many other aspects of what he has called “an adventure that beats going to the moon or splitting the atom.” 

An elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Collins was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in November 2007 from President George W. Bush. He received the National Medal of Science in 2009.

SMU expects to award more than 1,600 degrees at its University-wide Commencement ceremony. The University’s individual schools and departments will host diploma ceremonies throughout the day.   

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