‘Why is Death Bad for You?’

Yale Scholar Shelly Kagan to give lecture at SMU on March 1

 

February 22, 2013

DALLAS (SMU) - The Maguire Ethics Center and the SMU Philosophy Department will host Yale Scholar Shelly Kagan at 3 p.m. Friday, March 1. 

Kagan is the Clark Professor of Philosophy and is considered one of the outstanding moral philosophers of our time, writing extensively on the nature of human well-being and harm. The lecture, “Why is Death Bad for You?,” opens an animated dialogue on why we regard death as a bad thing. The event will be in Room 241 of Umphrey Lee Center, 3300 Dyer St., Dallas, 75205.

For more information, visit smu.edu/ethics or call 214-768-4255.

An advanced workshop on The Philosophy of Well Being will be held Saturday, March 2 in the Hughes-Trigg Forum.  Jennifer Hawkins (Duke University) will be discussing “A New Theory of Well-Being from 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. Steven Campbell (Coe College) will speak on “The Goods & Evils of Death” from 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.  Shelly Kagan will speak on “Ill – Being” from 4 – 6 p.m. 

About Shelly Kagan

Shelly KaganShelly Kagan is Clark Professor of Philosophy at Yale. After receiving his B.A. from Wesleyan University in 1976, and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1982, he taught at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Illinois at Chicago before coming to Yale in 1995. He is the author of the textbook Normative Ethics, which systematically reviews alternative positions concerning the basic rules of morality and their possible foundations, and The Limits of Morality, which challenges two of the most widely shared beliefs about the requirements of morality. He is currently at work on The Geometry of Desert.

About the Maguire Ethics Center

The Cary M. Maguire Center for Ethics & Public Responsibility is a University-wide center supporting student and faculty ethics-related education and activities, as well as community outreach to private and public institutions in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The Maguire Ethics Center serves as a forum for the exploration of issues bearing on the public good. It also seeks to challenge and encourage the development of ethical discernment, imagination and action. It brings together those who confront issues of social importance with resources and opportunities for ethical reflection. For more information, visit smu.edu/ethics

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