Faculty

Page Header 4
A Fiorillo

Anthony Fiorillo

Adjunct Faculty
Research Professor II
Curator of Paleontology, Dallas Museum of Natural History
Paleoecology

Ph.D., Pennsylvania
214-756-5725

  • Vertebrate Taphonomy
  • Paleoecology

Research Statement

Tony Fiorillo's research interests are in vertebrate taphonomy and particularly its role in understanding dinosaur paleoecology, the evolution of Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, and the distribution of Mesozoic vertebrates in western North America. He is also interested in the application of paleontological research to federal land management issues. His field program extends from the Alaskan Arctic to west Texas.

Selected Publications

Fiorillo, A.R., Padian, K., and Musikasinthorn, C. 2000. Taphonomy and depositional setting of the Placerias Quarry (Chinle Formation: Late Triassic, Arizona). PALAIOS 15:373-386.

Fiorillo, A.R. 2000. The ancient environment of the Beartooth Butte Formation (Devonian) in Wyoming and Montana: combining paleontological inquiry with federal management needs. in: Cole, David N. and McCool, Stephen F. eds. Proceedings: Wilderness Science in a Time of Change. Proc. RMRS-P-000. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. v. 3, p. 160-167.

Fiorillo, A.R., and Gangloff, R.A. 2000. Theropod teeth from the Prince Creek Formation (Cretaceous) of northern Alaska, with speculations on arctic dinosaur paleoecology. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 20:675-682.

Fiorillo, A.R., Santucci, V.L., Gangloff, R.A., Armato, P.J., and Kucinski, R. 2001. Establishing paleontological baseline data for research and management needs: lessons learned from the NPS Alaska Region. in: Santucci, V.L. and McClelland, L. eds. Proceedings of the 6th Conference on Fossil Resources on Public Lands. Geological Resources Division Technical Report NPS/NRGRD/GRDTR-01/01, p. 123-129.

Fiorillo, A.R., and Gangloff, R.A. in press. The caribou migration model for Arctic hadrosaurs (Ornithischia: Dinosauria): a reassessment. Historical Biology.