Enrollment for ALL SMU students opens April 10!

Summer Courses on the Dallas Campus



For MayTerm, students enroll in ONE course.  Most classes meet 4 hours a day. 
Students may enroll in up to 18 credit hours in the June-July term. Most classes meet 2 hours a day.

Session Dates

  • 2018 MayTerm: May 17 – June 1
  • 2018 Sum 1 (June): June 4 – July 3
  • 2018 Sum 2 (July): July 5 – August 3
  • 2018 Sum 3 (Combined): June 4 – August 7

Course Listings (subject to change)

Reset filters

Click on a course name to see description, faculty, and syllabus (if available).

Course Title Time(s) UC 2016 UC 2012 Session Description
ACCT 2301 Introduction to Financial Accounting M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am June Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Seema Bhushan
ACCT 2301 Introduction to Financial Accounting M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Heath Michael
ACCT 2301 Introduction to Financial Accounting M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am July Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Seema Bhushan
ACCT 2301 Introduction to Financial Accounting M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Seema Bhushan
ACCT 2302 Introduction to Managerial Accounting MTW 12:00 pm - 3:30 pm July Introduces the use of accounting information for management purposes, including decision-making, planning, and control of operations. Students learn to integrate topics in cost determination, economic analysis, budgeting, and management and financial control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.

Faculty: Liliana Hickman-Riggs
ACCT 2310 Accounting Concepts MTW 8:30 am - 12:00 pm June Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Liliana Hickman-Riggs
ACCT 3311 Intermediate Accounting I MTW 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm June An overview of financial statements and revenue recognition that focuses on the left-hand side (assets) of the balance sheet. Provides the necessary foundation for comprehension by users and preparers of the information in financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: William Browning
ACCT 3312 Intermediate Accounting II M-F 11:00 am - 12:50 pm July Continuation of ACCT 3311. Focuses on items on the right-hand side (liabilities and stockholders' equity) of the balance sheet. Prerequisite: ACCT 3311. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: Gregory Sommers
ACCT 4315 Federal Income Tax I TWTH 9:00 am - 12:30 pm June Covers the conceptual basis and structure for the determination of income taxes, including the tax research methods used in preparing tax returns, solving problems, and planning business decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: Wendy Wilson
ADV 1360 Creative Production M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm May Students learn the basic principles of advertising design and production in tandem with the use of industry-standard hardware and software programs, including the Adobe Creative Suite.

Faculty: Cheryl Mendenhall

 Syllabus
ADV 2302 Advertising Society & Ethics M-F 9:30 am - 1:30 pm UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 May Broad overview of the interaction of advertising with society. Examines economic, social, and ethical issues as well as legal and regulatory constraints. Prerequisites: ADV 1300 and ADV 1321, 1331, or 1341. Restricted to advertising majors and minors.

Faculty: Carrie La Ferle

 Syllabus
ADV 1300 Survey of Advertising M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 June Introductory course for majors and nonmajors that surveys the field of advertising and explores how it fits into society. Topics include history, law, ethics, social dynamics, economic implications, and the advertising campaign planning process. Examines the process of advertising from the perspectives of art, business, and science. Required for all majors and minors.

Faculty: John Hall
ADV 2302 Advertising Society & Ethics M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 July Broad overview of the interaction of advertising with society. Examines economic, social, and ethical issues as well as legal and regulatory constraints. Prerequisites: ADV 1300 and ADV 1321, 1331, or 1341. Restricted to advertising majors and minors.

Faculty: Sidharth Muralidharan
ADV 5301 Special Topics: The Advertising Industry in New York Special Dates: May 15 -23 May This is an intensive course during which there are multiple daily class sessions at leading advertising agencies, client companies, and media organizations in New York. Enrollment is by application, with a priority deadline of March 9. Please contact mayterm@smu.edu for application.

Faculty: Alice Kendrick

 Syllabus
ANTH 3301 Health, Healing, and Ethics M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: HFA, HSBS; HD UC 2012: PRIE 2, IIC 2; HD May A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and organization of medical systems, economic development and the global exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global disparities in health.

Faculty: Nia Parson

 Syllabus
ANTH 3306 Introduction to Medical Anthropology M-F 8:30 am - 12:30 pm UC 2016: HSBS; HD, OC, IL UC 2012: IIC 2; HD, OC, IL May Provides an overview of methods and topics in medical anthropology, an interdisciplinary field that explores health, illness, and systems of healing through holistic and cross–cultural study. Case studies from a diversity of human societies and cultures around the globe are used to challenge assumptions of student understanding. Offers several University Curriculum components, gives students a robust introduction to this specialized sub–field within Anthropology, and addresses many of the foundational concepts on the MCAT.

Faculty: Carolyn Smith-Morris

 Syllabus
ANTH 3307 Introduction to Biological Anthropology M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: NAS UC 2012: PAS 2 May Introduction to the origin, evolution, and diversity of the species Homo sapiens. Students examine interactions among biology, culture and behavior, human variation and adaptation, and evidence for human evolution.

Faculty: Ann Horsburgh

 Syllabus
ANTH 3310 Gender and Sex Roles: A global Perspective M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: HSBS, KNW; GE, IL, HD UC 2012: IIC 2, KNW; GE, IL, HD July Cross-cultural and historical comparison of the life experiences of women and men in the areas of family, marriage and kinship, economic and political participation, sexuality, reproduction, ritual, and religion.

Faculty: Jessica Lott
ANTH 3313 South American Indians: Past and Present M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: HSBS UC 2012: IIC 2, HC 2 June A survey of the archaeology and ethnology of indigenous South Americans, from c. 13,000 years ago to recent times, focusing on environments, subsistence, and related levels of sociopolitical integration from Tierra del Fuego to the Amazon basin and the Andes.

Faculty: Amanda Aland
APSM 2310 Contemporary Issues M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Explores the functional areas of business, management principles, contemporary issues, and future considerations for organizations within the fitness and sports industries. Gateway course for sport management concentration majors; successful completion is mandatory to be invited into the program. Recommended corequisite: APSM 3322, 3332, OR 3340. Reserved for students with fewer than 90 credit hours.

Faculty: Susan Holland
APSM 2340 Coaching and Leadership for Performance M-F 9:30 am - 11:30 am
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
UC 2016: OC UC 2012: OC May Examines what coaches do, the qualities of expert coaches, strategies for effective and cohesive programs, a sound coaching philosophy, and the art and science of coaching. Serves as the gateway course to the major. Students must complete this course with a C– or better in order to qualify for the sport performance leadership major. Prerequisites: waived. For help with any enrollment issues contact mayterm@smu.edu.

Faculty: David Bertrand

 Syllabus
APSM 3315 Communication in Sport M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Facilitates the improvement of communication skills for coaches through the introduction of various communication styles and techniques and furthers an understanding of conflict resolution and negotiation.

Faculty: David Zelman
APSM 3322 Functional Biomechanics M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July Introduces the scientific basis of support and motion in humans and other vertebrate animals, drawing equally on musculoskeletal biology and Newtonian mechanics. Prerequisite: APSM 2310 or 2340.

Faculty: Laura Robinson-Doyle
APSM 3340 Applied Management Skills M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm June An extensive study of organizational functions, methods of operation, and types of ownership. Also, the role of organizations in contemporary society as they relate to fitness and sport enterprises today. Prerequisite: APSM 2310 or 2441.

Faculty: Mary O'Conner
APSM 3372 Advanced PR in Sport M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: W UC 2012: W July Examines the role of public relations specific to the industry of sport, focusing on the conceptual, strategic, and technical understanding of the operation and business of public relations in sport communication. Prerequisite: APSM 2310.

Faculty: Susan Holland
APSM 4310 Psychology of Sport M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: HSBS UC 2012: IIC 2 July Explores various psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior.

Faculty: TBD
APSM 5300 Senior Project M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: IL, OC UC 2012: IL, OC June Teaches the process of formal inquiry to plan, execute, and report results regarding a scientific question of interest. Prerequisite: STAT 2301 or STAT 2331. Reserved for APSM majors. Senior standing only (at least 90 credit hours required).

Faculty: Gashaw Abeza
ARHS 3310 War, Looting, and Collecting of Art in/of Ancient World M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HFA, HSBS; GE UC 2012: HC 2, PRIE 2; GE May Examines the effects of war, looting, and collecting practices on the visual culture of the ancient world. Looks at the ways ancient wars and looting caused art objects to be destroyed or relocated, but also inspired the creative repurposed, collecting, and even creation of other arts. Investigates the devastating effects of modern wars and looting on archaeological sites, and analyzes how contemporary collecting practices both contribute to and raise awareness against cultural heritage destruction.

Faculty: Stephanie Langin-Hooper

 Syllabus
ASDR 1300 Introduction to Drawing M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 May Drawing from life objects and concepts. Work in class is supplemented by outside assignments and readings. Emphasis placed on space, materials, analysis of form, and critical judgment.

Faculty: Philip Van Keuren

 Syllabus
ASL 1401 American Sign Language I M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am June An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.

Faculty: TBD
ASL 1401 American Sign Language I M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm June An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.

Faculty: TBD
ASL 1401 American Sign Language I M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm June An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.

Faculty: TBD
ASL 1402 American Sign Language II M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.

Faculty: TBD
ASL 1402 American Sign Language II M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.

Faculty: TBD
ASL 1402 American Sign Language II M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.

Faculty: TBD
ASPT 1300 Introduction to Studio Painting M-F 10:00 am - 2:00 pm UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 May A first course in painting from life, objects, and concepts. Emphasis is placed on space, materials, color, analysis of form, and critical judgment.

Faculty: Michael Corris

 Syllabus
BIOL 1101 Introductory Biology Lab TTH 1:00 pm - 5:20 pm UC 2016: SE w/complete lecture UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lecture June Laboratory to complement lecture of BIOL 1301.

Faculty: Carolyn Harrod
BIOL 1102 Introductory Biology Lab TTH 1:00 pm - 5:20 pm UC 2016: SE w/complete lecture UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lecture July Laboratory to complement lecture of BIOL 1302.

Faculty: Carolyn Harrod
BIOL 1301 Introductory Biology I M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: SE w/complete lab UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lab June Introduction to the study of living organisms: ecology, evolution, diversity, and physiology. BIOL 1301, 1302 are prerequisites for all advanced courses in biological sciences.

Faculty: Terry Strecker
BIOL 1302 Introductory Biology II M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: SE w/complete lab UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lab July Introduction to the study of living organisms: ecology, evolution, diversity, and physiology. BIOL 1301, 1302 are prerequisites for all advanced courses in biological sciences.

Faculty: Alex D'Brot
BIOL 3304 Genetics M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June An introduction to the structure, function, and transmission of the hereditary material. Prerequisites: BIOL 1401 and CHEM 1304.

Faculty: Bill Orr
BIOL 3350 Cell Biology M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July The structure and function of cells. Prerequisites: BIOL 1401, 1402. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1304.

Faculty: Bianca Batista
BL 3335 Business Law MTW 9:00 am - 12:30 pm UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 June Emphasizes the nature, formation, and application of law with a macro view; also public law and regulation of business. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; MATH 1309 or 1337; and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: Catherine Weber
BUSE 3310 Markets and Freedom M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm May Discusses the indicators of economic freedom and the benefits of globalization. Explores how markets raise living standards, including the roles that technology, globalization, public policy, and economic growth play in a functioning market economy. This course can count as free elective credit for Cox majors; however, students cannot receive credit for both BUSE 3310 and STRA/FINA 4355.

Faculty: Meg Tuszynski

 Syllabus
BUSE 3310 Markets and Freedom TTH 2:00 pm - 7:00 pm July Discusses the indicators of economic freedom and the benefits of globalization. Explores how markets raise living standards, including the roles that technology, globalization, public policy, and economic growth play in a functioning market economy. This course can count as free elective credit for Cox majors; however, students cannot receive credit for both BUSE 3310 and STRA/FINA 4355.

Faculty: William Cox
CCPA 2300 Public Speaking in Context M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Introduces the theory and practice of public speaking, including rhetorical principles, evidence, nonverbal communication, and visual aids. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs, B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in law and legal reasoning program.

Faculty: Benjamin Voth
CCPA 2308 Intro to Newswriting for PR M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Introduces basic media writing, research, and interviewing skills, as well as AP style for news, features, and press releases. Reserved for students who have not earned credit for DISC 1313 (topic: Introduction to Newswriting). Prerequisites: C or better in CCPA 2310 (or CCPA 3300) and CCPA 2327; enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs, B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in corporate communication and public affairs.

Faculty: Christina Coats
CCPA 2375 Communication Research and Data Analytics M-F 8:30 am - 12:30 pm UC 2016: IL, QR UC 2012: IL, QR May Students learn how to conduct professional research utilizing primary and secondary data, statistics, and analytic software. Prerequisites: STAT 2301, 2331, or equivalent; C or better in CCPA 2310 (or CCPA 3300) and CCPA 2327; enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs, B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in corporate communication and public affairs.

Faculty: Sandra Duhe

 Syllabus
CEE 2310 Statics M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm June Equilibrium of force systems, computations of reactions and internal forces, determinations of centroids and moments of inertia, and introduction to vector mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 1337 or equivalent.

Faculty: Yildirim Hurmuzlu
CEE 2320 Dynamics M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm June Introduction to kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; Newton’s laws; kinetic and potential energy; linear and angular momentum; and work, impulse, and inertia properties. Prerequisite: C or better in CEE 2310/ME 2310.

Faculty: Yildirim Hurmuzlu
CEE 2331 Fundamentals of Thermal Science (Thermodynamics) M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm July The first and second laws of thermodynamics and thermodynamic properties of ideal gases, pure substances, and gaseous mixtures are applied to power production and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisites: MATH 3302, CHEM 1303, PHYS 1303, and C or better in CEE 2310/ME 2310.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
CEE 5323/7323 Project Management M 5:00 pm - 9:30 pm Combined Covers the role of the project officer, and the systems and techniques for planning, scheduling, monitoring, reporting, and completing environmental projects. Also, total quality management, project team management and development of winning proposals, and contract management and logistics. Includes case study application of project management to all environmental media and programs, community relations, risk communication, crisis management, consensus building, media, and public policy.

Faculty: Patricia Taylor
CEE 5362/7362 Engineering Analysis with Numerical Methods M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm June Applications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy
CHEM 1113 General Chemistry I Lab MWF 9:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: SE w/complete lecture UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lecture June Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1303. Withdrawal from CHEM 1113 requires withdrawal from CHEM 1303.

Faculty: Jennifer O'Brien
CHEM 1114 General Chemistry II Lab MWF 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: SE w/complete lecture UC 2012: PAS 1 w/complete lecture July Prerequisite: CHEM 1113. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1304.

Faculty: Andrea Adams
CHEM 1301 Chemistry for the Liberal Arts M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: SE UC 2012: PAS 1 May Designed for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.

Faculty: Michael Lattman

 Syllabus
CHEM 1301 Chemistry for the Liberal Arts M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: SE UC 2012: PAS 1 June Designed for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.

Faculty: Helen Babbili
CHEM 1301 Chemistry for the Liberal Arts M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: SE UC 2012: PAS 1 July Designed for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.

Faculty: Mark Schell
CHEM 1303 General Chemistry I M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: SE, after lab completed UC 2012: PAS 1, after lab completed May Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs.

Faculty: Brian Zoltowski, Nicholay Tsarevsky

 Syllabus
CHEM 1303 General Chemistry I M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/complete lab) UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/complete lab) June Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs.

Faculty: Werner Horsthemke
CHEM 1304 General Chemistry II M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: SE, after lab completed UC 2012: PAS 1, after lab completed May Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, 1113.

Faculty: David Son

 Syllabus
CHEM 1304 General Chemistry II M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: SE (w/complete lab) UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/complete lab) July Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, 1113.

Faculty: Patty Wisian-Neilson, Brian Zoltowski
CHEM 3117 Organic Chemistry I Lab MWF 3:00 pm - 5:50 pm June Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3371.

Faculty: Alan Humanson, Chinwon Rim
CHEM 3118 Organic Chemistry II Lab MWF 12:30 pm - 3:20 pm UC 2016: TM July Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3372. Prerequisite: CHEM 3117.

Faculty: Alan Humason
CHEM 3118 Organic Chemistry II Lab MWF 9:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: TM July Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3372. Prerequisite: CHEM 3117.

Faculty: Alan Humason
CHEM 3371 Organic Chemistry I M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm June Designed to satisfy the requirements of the chemistry major and health-related professions student. The first term deals primarily with aliphatic chemistry, with special emphasis on stereochemistry. The second term emphasizes aromatic substances and the chemistry of biologically relevant molecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, 1304, 1113, 1114.

Faculty: Alan Humason
CHEM 3372 Organic Chemistry II M-F 3:30 pm - 5:20 pm July For chemistry majors and students interested in health-related professions. Emphasizes spectroscopy and the chemistry of functional groups. Prerequisites: C- or higher in CHEM 3371, 3117. Corequisite: CHEM 3118.

Faculty: Alex Lippert
CISB 2388 Entrepreneurship Concepts M-F 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm May Students are introduced to concepts at each stage of the entrepreneurial process, including opportunity identification, opportunity evaluation, acquiring resources, launching and managing the new venture, and exit strategies. Students also play the role of investors and learn to pitch to investors. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it. Reserved for non-Cox majors and business minors only.

Faculty: Simon Mak

 Syllabus
CSE 1341 Principles of Computer Science M-F 7:20 pm - 9:30 pm UC 2012: CA 1 June Introduces the fundamental concepts of computer science and object-oriented design of reusable modules. Covers basic object-oriented concepts of composition, inheritance, polymorphism, and containers. First course for computer science and computer engineering majors and minors.

Faculty: Isaac Chow
CSE 1342 Programming Concepts M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm UC 2016: LL UC 2012: LL July Introduces the constructs provided in the C/C++ programming language for procedural and object-oriented programming. Computation, input and output, flow of control, functions, arrays and pointers, linked structures, use of dynamic storage, and implementation of abstract data types. Prerequisite: C- or better in CSE 1341 or equivalent, a grade of at least 4 on the AP Computer Science A Exam, or departmental consent.

Faculty: Mark Fontenot
CSE 4340 Probability and Statistics for Engineers M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: TM May Basic concepts of probability and statistics useful in the solution of engineering and applied science problems. Topics include probability, probability distributions, data analysis, sampling distributions, estimation, and simple tests of hypothesis. Prerequisites: C- or better in MATH 1337, MATH 1338.

Faculty: Ian Harris

 Syllabus
CSE 5343/7343 Operating Systems and System Software TH 5:00 pm - 9:30 pm Combined Introduces the fundamental concepts of computer science and object-oriented design of reusable modules. Covers basic object-oriented concepts of composition, inheritance, polymorphism, and containers. First course for computer science and computer engineering majors and minors.

Faculty: Hakki Cankaya
DANC 1303 Beginning Modern Dance M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA1 June Introduction to basic movement skills, experiences, and concepts of modern dance. Not for credit in the dance major.

Faculty: Christopher Dolder
DANC 1303 Beginning Modern Dance M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA1 July Introduction to basic movement skills, experiences, and concepts of modern dance. Not for credit in the dance major.

Faculty: Christopher Dolder
DANC 1303 Beginning Modern Dance M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA1 July Introduction to basic movement skills, experiences, and concepts of modern dance. Not for credit in the dance major.

Faculty: Anne Westwick
DANC 3374 Evolution Amer Musical Theater M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: KNW, CA UC 2012: KNW, CA 1 June Examines the evolution of American musical theatre, from its roots in minstrelsy, burlesque, and vaudeville, to its adolescence in comic opera, operetta, and musical comedy, to its codification as musical theatre. Includes the early forms of popular entertainment, the integration of dance, music, and drama into the form known as musical theatre, and the figures of the 20th century who refined this integration on Broadway and in Hollywood.

Faculty: Patricia Delaney
DANC 3376 Dance in Contemporary Society ONLINE UC 2016: CA; W, OC, IL UC 2012: CA 1; W, OC, IL Combined Exploration of dance as a significant element of the socio-cultural structures that form modern society. An examination of the historical context of seminal periods in the development of contemporary theatrical and social dance as a framework for developing an understanding of dance aesthetics. Students discover aesthetics by exploring the intersection of historical context and personal sensori-emotional values. They develop skills for critical analysis based in observation and research, and demonstrate their understanding of dance aesthetics through writing and discussion.

Faculty: Christie Nelson
DISC 1312 Introduction to Academic Discourse M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: DD UC 2012: DD June This course introduces students to a variety of discipline-based modes of inquiry and expression. The texts students read and create employ and exemplify the principles of academic discernment and discourse. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: DISC 1311 or one of the following test scores: 500 on the SAT Critical Reading or 21 on the ACT English section.

Faculty: Susan Norman
DISC 1312 Introduction to Academic Discourse M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: DD UC 2012: DD July This course introduces students to a variety of discipline-based modes of inquiry and expression. The texts students read and create employ and exemplify the principles of academic discernment and discourse. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: DISC 1311 or one of the following test scores: 500 on the SAT Critical Reading or 21 on the ACT English section.

Faculty: Kristen Polster
DISC 1313 Inquiry Seminar. The Daily Grind: An Examination of the World of Work M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: DD UC 2012: DD May This course is a topic-based seminar through which students continue to develop their critical reading and writing skills, employing analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and/or integration, while learning to employ research protocols for the various discipline or disciplines represented in the course. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: C- or better in DISC 1312 or ENGL 1301.

Faculty: Diana Blackman

 Syllabus
DISC 1313 Inquiry Seminar M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: DD UC 2012: DD June This course is a topic-based seminar through which students continue to develop their critical reading and writing skills, employing analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and/or integration, while learning to employ research protocols for the various discipline or disciplines represented in the course. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: C- or better in DISC 1312 or ENGL 1301.

Faculty: Mary Mueller
DISC 1313 Inquiry Seminar M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: DD UC 2012: DD July This course is a topic-based seminar through which students continue to develop their critical reading and writing skills, employing analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and/or integration, while learning to employ research protocols for the various discipline or disciplines represented in the course. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: C- or better in DISC 1312 or ENGL 1301.

Faculty: Marta Krogh
ECO 1311 Principles of Microeconomics M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: QR UC 2012: IIC 1; QR June Explains tools of economic analysis and focuses on the individual participants in the economy: producers, workers, employers, and consumers.

Faculty: Raj Deb
ECO 1312 Principles of Macroeconomics M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July Covers inflation, unemployment, and growth from both national and global perspectives. Tools of economic analysis include models of open economies. Prerequisite: C- or better in ECO 1311.

Faculty: Nathan Balke

 Syllabus
ECO 1312 Principles of Macroeconomics M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Covers inflation, unemployment, and growth from both national and global perspectives. Tools of economic analysis include models of open economies. Prerequisite: C- or better in ECO 1311.

Faculty: Nathan Balke

 Syllabus
ECO 3301 Price Theory (Intermediate Microeconomics) M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: HSBS; TM UC 2012: IIC 2 June Building on topics covered in ECO 1311, this course considers problems of microeconomics that are more advanced, with a focus on understanding how consumers behave, firms make pricing and output decisions, and market structure impacts the behavior of firms and consumers. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Raj Deb
ECO 3302 Intermediate Macroeconomics M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Investigates the factors that influence the level of aggregate income in an economy and the decision-making that ultimately results in the determination of levels of consumption, investment, or employment. Students analyze the impact of various government fiscal policies (using general equilibrium models) and the behavior of business cycles and patterns across various countries. Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312, 3301 and MATH 1309 or 1337.

Faculty: Priyanka Chakraborty
ECO 3355 Money and Banking M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm June Analyzes central and commercial banking. A student may not receive credit for both ECO 3355 and FINA 3330. Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 1311, 1312. Reserved for economics majors and markets and cultures majors only.

Faculty: Saltuk Ozerturk
ECO 4340 Cultural Economics MW 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sat 9 am - 12:30 pm
June Introduces the field of cultural economics, with a focus on welfare valuations, valuation of nonmarket goods, and intellectual property. Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 3301; STAT 2301, STAT 2331, or STAT 4340.

Faculty: Helen Reynolds
ECO 4345 Ethics in Economics TTH 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sat 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm
UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 June An explanation of historical and current perspectives of how societies and economies function. Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 3301; STAT 2301, STAT 2331, or STAT 4340.

Faculty: Helen Reynolds
ECO 4351 Labor Economics M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm June An overview of labor supply and labor demand models, with extensions to models of taxes and tax credits, welfare, and Social Security. Also, models of wage determination and extensions such as the effects of minimum wage, performance-based pay, unions, and discrimination. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.

Faculty: Dann Millimet
ECO 4351 Labor Economics M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July An overview of labor supply and labor demand models, with extensions to models of taxes and tax credits, welfare, and Social Security. Also, models of wage determination and extensions such as the effects of minimum wage, performance-based pay, unions, and discrimination. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.

Faculty: Dann Millimet
ECO 4357 International Trade M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm June The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of international trade in goods and services among countries and to develop a framework for analyzing trade policy issues. Major topics covered include the determinants of trade; the gains from trade; the relation between trade and foreign direct investment; trade and labor migration; the effects of trade restrictions such as import tariffs or export subsidies; and the analysis of regional economic integration such as the European Union or NAFTA. The course covers only the real effects of trade; international financial issues will not be treated.

Faculty: Thomas Osang
ECO 4378 Financial Economics and Investment Behavior M-F 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm June Gives a theoretical basis for financial analysis within the context of the total process of investment decision-making, and develops the theoretical foundations for analysis of equities, bonds, and portfolio performance. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, or ECO 4368 or FINA 3320 and C- or better in ECO 3301 and in ITOM 2305 or STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340. Reserved for economics majors and minors. (ECO 4378 cannot be taken if the student has taken FINA 4320 or 4326).

Faculty: Saltuk Ozerturk
ECO 5353 Law and Economics MW 6:00 pm - 9:50 pm
Sat 9:00 am - 12:20 pm
July Examines economic theories that explain the development of common law and constitutional law and the economic implications of contracts, antitrust laws, and liability rules. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or C- or better in the follow-ing: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.

Faculty: Helen Reynolds
ECO 5360 Economic Development: Macroeconomic Perspectives MW 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm
Sat 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
June A macroeconomic examination of the economic issues faced by developing countries. Topics include population growth, national savings, capital accumulation, human capital formation, government institutions, and international integration. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or C- or better in the following: ECO 3302 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.

Faculty: Thomas Osang
ECO 5375 Economic and Business Forecasting TTH 6:00 pm - 9:50 pm
Sat 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
July Presentation of methods used by economists to forecast economic and business trends and ways of evaluating the usefulness of these methods. Students may not receive credit for this course and STAT 4375. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: STAT 2301, STAT 2331; or STAT 4340; or ITOM 2305 and ECO 5350.

Faculty: Indro Dasgupta
EE 2350 Circuit Analysis I M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am June Analysis of resistive electrical circuits, basic theorems governing electrical circuits, power consideration, analysis of circuits with energy storage elements, and transient and sinusoidal steady–state analysis of circuits with inductors and capacitors. Corequisites: MATH 3313, PHYS 1304.

Faculty: Behrouz Peikari
EE 3330 Electromagnetic Fields & Waves M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July Vector analysis applied to static electric and magnetic fields, development of Maxwell’s equations, elementary boundary-value problems, and determination of capacity and inductance. Introduction to time-varying fields, plane waves, and transmission lines. Prerequisites: EE 2350, MATH 3302.

Faculty: Choon Lee
EMIS 2375 Cultural and Ethical Implications of Technology M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HFA, TM; IL, OC UC 2012: PRIE 2; IL, OC May Explores the pervasive use of technology in today’s society, the impact of technology on daily life, and the tie between technology and ethical responsibility. Students learn how their lives are being shaped by technology and how they in turn help shape technology.

Faculty: Gretchen Coleman

 Syllabus
EMIS 3340 Probability and Statistics for Engineers M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: TM May Basic concepts of probability and statistics useful in the solution of engineering and applied science problems. Topics include probability, probability distributions, data analysis, sampling distributions, estimations, and simple tests of hypothesis. Credit is not allowed for both EMIS 3340/STAT 4340/CSE 4340 and EMIS 5370. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 1338 or equivalent.

Faculty: Ian Harris

 Syllabus
ENGL 2302 Business Writing M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm July Introduction to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. Prerequisite: DISC 1312 or DISC 2305.

Faculty: Carol Dickson-Carr
ENGL 2312 Fiction: 20th Century & Contemporary M-F 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm UC 2016: LL; W UC 2012: CA 2; W May Analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of fiction, with attention to terms and issues relevant to the genre. Prerequisite or corequisite: ADV 1300.

Faculty: Beth Newman

 Syllabus
ENGL 3367 Ethical Implications of Children's Literature M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: KNW, HFA; HD, OC, W UC 2012: KNW, CA 2; HD, OC, W June Examination of children’s literature with emphasis on notions of morality and evil, including issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class.

Faculty: Martha Satz
ENGL 3379 Literature and Contexts of Disability: Gender, Care, and Justice M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: KNW, HFA; HD, OC, W UC 2012: KNW, CA 2; HD, OC, W June An examination of disability as a cultural construct, with attention to how literary, ethical, and political representations bear upon it, and in relation to gender, race, and class issues.

Faculty: Martha Satz
FILM 2362 Diversity and American Film M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: HC; HD UC 2012: HC 1; HD May Historical survey of representations of race, ethnicity, class structure, gender, and sexual orientation in American cinema. Also, the opportunities for minorities within the industry.

Faculty: Sean Griffin

 Syllabus
FILM 3300 Film and Television Genres M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 July Examines questions of genre pertinent to film and television by focusing on various generic forms and their history. Specific genres for consideration vary from term to term.

Faculty: Kevin Heffernan
FILM 3351 International Film History M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: CA, HC UC 2012: CA1, HC 1 June Overview of the development of the cinema as a technology, an art form, an industry, and a social institution, beginning with the origins of the medium and tracing its major movements and configurations up to the present. Required of all majors.

Faculty: Kevin Heffernan
FILM 3352 American Film History M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: CA 2 July An overview of U.S. film history from the silent period to the present day. Emphasis on the genres, directors, cinematic techniques, and industrial factors that advanced the art of Hollywood and independent filmmakers.

Faculty: Eric Worland
FINA 3310 Finance Concepts MWF 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm June Survey of concepts, practices, and problems surrounding financial markets, securities, and decision-making. Includes time value of money, market efficiency, evaluation of securities, and capital budgeting. Required for the minor in business. Students may not receive credit for this course and FINA 3320. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.

Faculty: Mukunthan Santhanakrishnan
FINA 3320 Financial Management MTW 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm June Survey of concepts, practices, and problems surrounding financial markets, securities, and decision-making. Includes time value of money, market efficiency, evaluation of securities, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; MATH 1309 or 1337; STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors and minors in business administration. Students will not receive credit for this course and ECO 4368.

Faculty: Brian Young
FREN 1401 Beginning French I ONLINE ONLINE. Special Dates: May 17 - June 15 May Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Faculty: Gwen Aaron

 Syllabus
FREN 1401 Beginning French I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Faculty: Caroline Grubbs
FREN 1401 Beginning French I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of French.

Faculty: Janet Dodd
FREN 1402 Beginning French II ONLINE ONLINE. Special Dates: May 17 - June 15 UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL May Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in FREN 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU French placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Janet Dodd

 Syllabus
FREN 1402 Beginning French II ONLINE ONLINE. Special Dates: May 17 - June 15 UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL May Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in FREN 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU French placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Thierry Tirado

 Syllabus
FREN 1402 Beginning French II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in FREN 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU French placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Janet Dodd
FREN 1402 Beginning French II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in FREN 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU French placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Janet Dodd
GERM 1401 Beginning German I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing.

Faculty: Stephen Grollman
GERM 1401 Beginning German I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing.

Faculty: Stephen Grollman
GERM 1402 Beginning German II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in GERM 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU German placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Stephen Grollman
GERM 1402 Beginning German II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in GERM 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU German placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Stephen Grollman
HDEV 1401 American Sign Language I M-F 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
May An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.

Faculty: Vijay Advani

 Syllabus
HDEV 1401 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1401 changes to ASL 1401 Please see ASL 1401 June Please see ASL 1401

Faculty: TBD
HDEV 1401 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1401 changes to ASL 1402 Please see ASL 1401 June Please see ASL 1401

Faculty: TBD
HDEV 1401 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1401 changes to ASL 1403 Please see ASL 1401 June Please see ASL 1401

Faculty: TBD
HDEV 1402 American Sign Language II M-F 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
May Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.

Faculty: Susan Pochop

 Syllabus
HDEV 1402 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1402 changes to ASL 1401 Please see ASL 1402 July Please see ASL 1402

Faculty: TBD
HDEV 1402 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1402 changes to ASL 1402 Please see ASL 1402 July Please see ASL 1402

Faculty: TBD
HDEV 1402 PLEASE NOTE: as of June-July 2018, HDEV 1402 changes to ASL 1403 Please see ASL 1402 July Please see ASL 1402

Faculty: TBD
HIST 2302 Artists and the American Revolution: History, Fiction, and Film M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
UC 2016: KNW, HC UC 2012: KNW, HC 1 May Historians, painters, writers, and filmmakers all recover and interpret the past. This course explores the relationship between how historians and such artists have made sense of the American Revolution.

Faculty: Edward Countryman

 Syllabus
HIST 2390 Civilization of India MTWTH 4:00 pm - 6:20 pm UC 2016: HC; HD UC 2012: HC 1; HD June Introduction to the history, society, and cultural features of South Asia from the third millennium B.C.E. to the modern day.

Faculty: Rachel Ball-Phillips
HIST 3319 Texas History M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HC; HD UC 2012: HC 2, IIC 2; HD May Texas as a crossroad of cultures from the 16th century to the present.

Faculty: Joel Zapata

 Syllabus
HIST 3348 Changing American Families M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: KNW, HC; HD UC 2012: KNW, HC 1; HD June Explores changes in American family life from the Colonial period to the present. Seeks to understand how family ideals, structures, and roles have shaped and have been shaped by social and historical change.

Faculty: Crista DeLuzio
HRTS 3320 War, Looting, and Collecting of Art in/of Ancient World M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HFA, HSBS; GE UC 2012: HC 2, PRIE 2; GE May Examines the ways war, looting, and collecting affect ancient art. Students analyze case studies of ancient and modern warfare, focusing on resultant destruction, relocation, and repurposing of artworks.

Faculty: Stephanie Langin-Hooper

 Syllabus
HRTS 3341 The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HFA, HSBS; GE UC 2012: HC 2, PRIE 2; GE May An introduction to the 1994 Rwanda genocide that seeks to understand not only its origins but also its sociological, ethical, and human rights implications.

Faculty: Herve Tchumkam

 Syllabus
ITAL 1401 Beginning Italian I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of Italian.

Faculty: Daniele Forlino
ITAL 1401 Beginning Italian I ONLINE ONLINE June Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of Italian.

Faculty: Daniele Forlino
ITAL 1402 Beginning Italian II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in ITAL 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU Italian placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Aria Cabot
ITAL 1402 Beginning Italian II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in ITAL 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU Italian placement exam, or permission of area chair.

Faculty: Aria Cabot
ITOM 3306 Operations Management TWTH 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm UC 2016: TM June Introduces several common business analytics models and their applications in solving operational business problems. Topics include optimization (particularly linear programming), decision analysis, computer simulation, and project scheduling. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; ITOM 2308; MATH 1309 or 1337; and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors and minors in business administration.

Faculty: Angelika Leskovskaya
ITOM 3306 Operations Management MTW 6:30 pm - 10:00 pm UC 2016: TM June Introduces several common business analytics models and their applications in solving operational business problems. Topics include optimization (particularly linear programming), decision analysis, computer simulation, and project scheduling. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; ITOM 2308; MATH 1309 or 1337; and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors and minors in business administration.

Faculty: Paul Ferguson
JOUR 2302 Ethics of Convergent Media M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: IIC, PRIE UC 2012: IIC 1, PRIE 1 July Explores the ethical issues (e.g., free speech, privacy, and government regulation and censorship) that provide the foundation for all communication fields and have become more complex as media and industries have converged.

Faculty: Tony Pederson
JOUR 2304 Basic Video & Audio M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
W 12:30 pm - 1:50 pm
UC 2016: TM July Offers practical training in the fundamentals of broadcast communication. Students learn the basic techniques, including field production and editing, and control room and studio editing. Includes lecture and lab. Prerequisite: JOUR 2103 or 2303.

Faculty: Pam Hackett
JOUR 2312 News Reporting M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: IL, W UC 2012: IL, W June Rigorous foundation writing and reporting course needed to complete the major. Students gain fundamental skills (e.g., gathering, documenting, organizing, and writing news) that are essential to accurate, fair, clear, and concise journalism. Includes lecture and lab. Restricted to journalism majors and minors or fashion media majors and minors. Prerequisites: JOUR 2103 (or 2303) and 2302.

Faculty: Valerie Evans
JOUR 4360 Women&Minorities in the Media MF 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: HSBS; HD UC 2012: IIC 2; HD June Examines the impact and representation of women and minorities in the mass media from historical and critical perspectives. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Restricted to fashion media and journalism majors and minors only.

Faculty: Karen Thomas
JOUR 4398 Digital Journalism M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: HFA; OC, IL UC 2012: CA 2; OC, IL June Students explore the use of new communication technologies for multimedia storytelling; work with social media as a tool for newsgathering, community building, and the fostering of audience engagement; learn about Web metrics and search engine optimization techniques; and update and perfect their personal portfolio websites and social media presence. Prerequisites: JOUR 2103 (or 2303), 2302, 2304, 2312; junior or senior standing. Restricted to majors and minors.

Faculty: Michele Houston
LATN 1401 Beginning Latin I ONLINE ONLINE June Structures of the Latin language: vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Also, introduction to Roman history and culture, and simple readings from Latin authors.

Faculty: Justin Germain
LATN 1402 Beginning Latin II M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 pm UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Structures of the Latin language: vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Also, introduction to Roman history and culture, and simple readings from Latin authors. Prerequisite: C- or better in 1401.

Faculty: Justin Germain
MATH 1309 Introduction to Calculus for Business and Social Science M-F 9:00 am - 11:00 am
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF May Derivatives and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications to the time value of money, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, and computation of areas. Applications to business and economics. (Natural science and engineering students must take MATH 1337. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1303 or a C- or higher in MATH 1303.

Faculty: Carol Seets

 Syllabus
MATH 1309 Introduction to Calculus for Business and Social Science M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF June Derivatives and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications to the time value of money, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, and computation of areas. Applications to business and economics. (Natural science and engineering students must take MATH 1337. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1303 or a C- or higher in MATH 1303.

Faculty: Judy Newell
MATH 1309 Introduction to Calculus for Business and Social Science M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF July Derivatives and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications to the time value of money, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, and computation of areas. Applications to business and economics. (Natural science and engineering students must take MATH 1337. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1303 or a C- or higher in MATH 1303.

Faculty: Adrian Aceves
MATH 1337 Calculus I M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF June Differential and integral calculus for algebraic, trigonometric functions, and other transcendental functions, with applications to curve sketching, velocity, maximum-minimum problems, area and volume. (Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1304 or a C- or higher in MATH 1304.

Faculty: Adrian Aceves
MATH 1337 Calculus I M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF July Differential and integral calculus for algebraic, trigonometric functions, and other transcendental functions, with applications to curve sketching, velocity, maximum-minimum problems, area and volume. (Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1304 or a C- or higher in MATH 1304.

Faculty: Judy Newell
MATH 1338 Calculus II M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June A continuation of MATH 1337 through differential and integral calculus, areas, techniques of integration, improper integrals, and infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1337 (or MATH 1309 and departmental permission).

Faculty: Vladimir Ajaev
MATH 1338 Calculus II M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July A continuation of MATH 1337 through differential and integral calculus, areas, techniques of integration, improper integrals, and infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1337 (or MATH 1309 and departmental permission).

Faculty: Carol Seets
MATH 3302 Calculus III M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July Partial differentiation, multiple integrals, parametrization, line and surface integrals. Vector Calculus, including vector fields, divergence, curl, and the divergence and Stokes’ theorems. Prerequisites: C– or higher in MATH 1338 or MATH 1340.

Faculty: Yunkai Zhou
MATH 3304 Introduction to Linear Algebra M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: TM July Matrices and linear equations, Gaussian elimination, determinants, rank, geometrical notions, eigenvalue problems, coordinate transformations, norms, inner products, orthogonal projections, and Gram–Schmidt and least squares. Includes computational exercises related to these topics. Prerequisites: C– or higher in MATH 1338 or MATH 1340.

Faculty: Sheng Xu
MATH 3313 Ordinary Differential Equations M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am June First– and second–order linear equations, including applications to physical and biological sciences. Solution methods including integrating factors, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, and Laplace transforms. Computational methods and exercises. Prerequisites: C– or higher in MATH 1338 or MATH 1340.

Faculty: Thomas Carr
ME 2131 Thermodynamics Lab W 3:00 pm - 5:50 pm July One 3–hour laboratory session per week. Basic thermal–property and power–device measurements to complement lecture material of ME 2331. Corequisite: ME 2331.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
ME 2142 Fluid Mechanics Lab T 3:00 pm - 5:50 pm July Experiments in fluid friction, pumps, boundary layers, and other flow devices to complement lecture material of ME 2342. Prerequisite or corequisite: ME/CEE 2342.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
ME 2310 Statics M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm June Equilibrium of force systems, computations of reactions and internal forces, and determinations of centroids and moments of inertia. Also, introduction to vector mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 1337. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 1303.

Faculty: Yildirim Hurmuzlu
ME 2320 Dynamics M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm June Introduction to kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Also, Newton’s laws, kinetic and potential energy, linear and angular momentum, work, impulse, and inertia properties. Prerequisite: C or better in ME 2310/CEE 2310.

Faculty: Yildirim Hurmuzlu
ME 2331 Thermodynamics M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm July The first and second laws of thermodynamics and thermodynamic properties of ideal gases, pure substances, and gaseous mixtures are applied to power production and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisites: MATH 1338 or 1340, and a C or better in ME /CEE 2310. Corequisite: ME 2131.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
ME 2342 Fluid Mechanics M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July Fluid statics, fluid control volume, and applications; irrotational flow; Bernoulli's and Euler's equations; similitude and dimensional analysis; differential analysis of fluid flow; incompressible viscous flow; and boundary layer theory. Prerequi-sites: MATH 2339, PHYS 1303 and C or better in CEE/ME 2310. Corequisite: MATH 2343. ME/CEE 2320 is recommended but not required.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
ME 3132 Heat Transfer Laboratory TH 3:00 pm - 5:50 pm July One 3–hour laboratory session per week. Experiments in conduction, convection, and radiation to complement lecture material of ME 3332. Corequisite: ME 3332.

Faculty: Sheila Williams
ME 3340 Engineering Materials M-F 10:00 am - 12:50 pm July A study of the fundamental factors influencing the structure and properties of structural materials, including metals, polymers, and ceramic. Covers phase diagrams, heat treatment, metallography, mechanical behavior, atomic bonding, and corrosion. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303 and a C or better in ME 2310 and ME 2340.

Faculty: Dona Mularkey
ME 4340 Elements of Mechanical Engineering Measurements M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: LL July Introduces basic engineering experimentation and measurements, including techniques for measurement and experimentation; data acquisition; signal processing; and analysis, interpretation, and reporting of results. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum 30 credits in ME.

Faculty: Wei Tong
ME 5362 Engineering Analysis With Numerical Methods M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm June Application of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and surveying problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Faculty: Usama El Shamy
ME 5365 Fluid Power Systems M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
May Principles of operations; design criteria; and performance characteristics of fluid power systems’ components such as pumps, motors, valves, and cylinders. Also, goals–oriented circuit design and analysis, industrial standards, and circuit representation and maintenance. Includes practical and/or demo lectures, a design project based on specialized software, industry speakers, and site visits. Prerequisites: ME 2342 and ME 2320.

Faculty: Edmond Richer

 Syllabus
ME 5374 Advanced CAD M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Focuses on advanced modeling techniques, structural analysis and optimization, kinematical and dynamical analysis, mechanism design and virtual prototyping, and thermal analysis and flow simulation. Emphasis on hands-on use of state-of-the-art CAD/CAE systems. Prerequisite: ME 2372 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ME 4152.

Faculty: Edmond Richer
ME 5374 Advanced CAD M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Focuses on advanced modeling techniques, structural analysis and optimization, kinematical and dynamical analysis, mechanism design and virtual prototyping, and thermal analysis and flow simulation. Emphasis on hands-on use of state-of-the-art CAD/CAE systems. Prerequisite: ME 2372 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: ME 4152.

Faculty: Adam Cox
MKTG 3310 Marketing Concepts MTW 8:30 am - 12:00 pm July Survey of concepts, practices, and problems surrounding financial markets, securities, and decision-making. Includes time value of money, market efficiency, evaluation of securities, and capital budgeting. Required for the minor in business. Students may not receive credit for this course and FINA 3320. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.

Faculty: Charles Besio
MKTG 3340 Fundamentals of Marketing WTHF 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm July Examines the nature of marketing decisions; the environment in which these decisions are made; and the relationship of these decisions to the firm, business, and society. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ECO 1311 and 1312, MATH 1309 or 1337, and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340, EMIS 3340, ITOM 2305, STAT 2331, STAT 4340. Reserved for Cox majors, minors in business administration, or management science majors. Students may not receive credit for both MKTG 3340 and ADV 1341.

Faculty: Charles Besio
MNO 3310 Management Concepts MTW 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm June Provides a broad survey of key issues, theories, and practices that underpin how organizations function, evolve, and perform. Topics include motivation, job design, organizational theory, leadership, organizational culture, competitive strategy, and competitive advantage. Required for the minor in business. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.

Faculty: David Lei
MUHI 3339 Music for Ccontemporary Audiences MTWTH 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm UC 2016: CA; HD UC 2012: CA 1; HD June An examination of the interaction of the various forms of popular musical expression (folk, blues, soul, rock, Muzak, and film music) and their impact upon American culture.

Faculty: Kim Corbet
MUHI 3340 Jazz: Tradition and Transformation MTWTH 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 July Offers practical training in the fundamentals of broadcast communication. Students learn the basic techniques, including field production and editing, and control room and studio editing. Includes lecture and lab. Prerequisite: JOUR 2103 or 2303.

Faculty: Kim Corbet
PERB 5122 Music Theater Acting and Performance M-F 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Those in Lyric Stage "Guys and Dolls": 6:30 pm - 10:00 pm
May Fundamentals of acting in musical theatre: script analysis, blocking, character development, and scene study. Introduces musical theatre movement and audition techniques. Culminates with a series of performed musical scenes. Enrollment by audition. Auditions to be held April 5. Contact mayterm@smu.edu for more information.

Faculty: Virginia Dupuy, Sara Romersburger

 Syllabus
PHIL 1301 Elementary Logic M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: PRIE; QR UC 2012: PRIE 1; QR June An introductory course in symbolic logic. Logic provides a means for determining whether the purported conclusion of an argument really does follow from the premises. In symbolic logic, mechanical procedures are developed for determining whether a given argument is valid. The techniques and skills acquired through logic have important applications not only within other academic areas such as the sciences and humanities, but may be of use within various professional areas, including law.

Faculty: Matthew Lockard
PHIL 1305 Introduction to Philosophy M-F 10:00 am - 2:30 pm UC 2016: PRIE UC 2012: PRIE 1 May A general introduction to the central questions of philosophy. We will discuss topics from such areas as the theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy. Typical questions might include: Can we know the world outside our minds? Is it rational to believe in a God who allows evil to exist? Do the laws of physics allow for human freedom? Is morality more than a matter of opinion? Can there be unequal wealth in a just society? Readings will include classical authors such as Plato, Descartes, Locke, Hume, and Mill, as well as contemporary philosophers. The focus of the course will be on arguments for and against proposed solutions to key problems of philosophy.

Faculty: Matthew Lockard

 Syllabus
PHIL 1317 Business Ethics M-F 10:00 am - 2:00 pm UC 2016: PRIE UC 2012: PRIE 1 May Examines the moral dimensions of actions and practices in the business world. Students explore ethical theories and standards of evaluation for actions and practices generally, and discuss how these theories and standards apply to a variety of issues in business. Topics vary, but the following are representative: advertising, capitalism vs. socialism, corporate culture, product quality and safety, the responsibilities of corporations to the societies that sustain them, the use of animals in product testing, and working conditions and compensation.

Faculty: Ken Daley

 Syllabus
PHIL 1318 Contemporary Moral Problems M-F 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm UC 2016: PRIE UC 2012: PRIE 1 May An introduction to philosophical ethics focusing on questions in applied ethics. Students begin by exploring ethical theories and philosophical methods. The majority of the course is devoted to applying those theories and methods to some of the most controversial and pressing issues confronting contemporary society. Topics vary, but the following are representative: abortion, animal rights, affirmative action, capital punishment, economic justice, euthanasia, sexuality, war and terrorism, and world hunger. Class discussion is an important component of the course, as is reading and (in some sections) writing argumentative essays about these issues.

Faculty: Kirsten Egerstrom

 Syllabus
PHIL 1319 Technology, Society, and Value TWTH 2:45 pm - 6:10 pm UC 2016: PRIE, TM UC 2012: PRIE 1 July Advances in technology are raising many ethical issues that require serious considerations. We will discuss issues surrounding such technologies and how they affect the views of warfare, privacy, human enhancement, and artificial intelligence.

Faculty: Ken Daley
PHIL 3351 History of Western Philosophy (Ancient) M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 pm UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 June A study of the major philosophers from Thales to Plotinus, including Plato and Aristotle.

Faculty: Robert Howell
PHIL 3352 History of Western Philosophy (Modern) M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: HFA, HSBS UC 2012: HC 2, PRIE 2 July Survey course in the history of modern philosophy covering the modern period, from Descartes to Hume, including Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, and Berkeley. Examines many seminal writings in philosophy on such key issues as rationalism and empiricism, the nature of external reality and one’s knowledge of it, the existence and nature of God, the relation between mind and body, causation, induction, and the nature of morality and moral action. Satisfies one part of the history requirement for philosophy majors; may be used to satisfy the history requirement for philosophy minors. Please note: this course is not offered in the Fall term.

Faculty: Stephen Hiltz
PHIL 3364 Philosophy of Biology MTWTH 3:00 pm - 5:40 pm UC 2016: HFA UC 2012: PRIE 2 July A survey of topics in the philosophy of biology, including evolution versus creationism, fitness, units of selection, adaptationism, biological taxonomy, evolution in humans, cultural evolution, and niche construction.

Faculty: Justin Fisher
PHYS 1105 Mechnics Laboratory MWF 11:00 am - 1:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/lecture); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/lecture);QR June Taken as a complement to PHYS 1303, 1307.

Faculty: Richard Guarino
PHYS 1105 Mechnics Laboratory MWF 2:00 pm - 4:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/lecture); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/lecture);QR June Taken as a complement to PHYS 1303, 1307.

Faculty: Richard Guarino
PHYS 1106 Electricity and Magnetism Laboratory MWF 11:00 am - 1:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/lecture); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/lecture);QR July Taken as a complement to PHYS 1304, 1308. Prerequisite: PHYS 1105 or self-test.

Faculty: Richard Guarino, Eric Godat
PHYS 1106 Electricity and Magnetism Laboratory MWF 2:00 pm - 4:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/lecture); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/lecture);QR July Taken as a complement to PHYS 1304, 1308. Prerequisite: PHYS 1105 or self-test.

Faculty: Richard Guarino, Eric Godat
PHYS 1303 Introductory Mechanics M-F 11:00 am - 12:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/ complete lab); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/ complete lab); QR June For science and engineering majors. Covers vector kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, rotational motion, special relativity, and structure of matter. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1337.

Faculty: Durdana Balakishiyeva
PHYS 1304 Introductory Electricity and Magnetism M-F 11:00 am - 12:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/ complete lab); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/ complete lab); QR July For science and engineering majors. Covers electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, and special relativity. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1338.

Faculty: Randall Scalise
PHYS 1307 General Physics I (For Life Sciences) M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/ complete lab); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/ complete lab); QR June For life sciences majors. Covers vector kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, rotational motion, vibrations, waves, and fluids. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1337.

Faculty: Simon Dalley
PHYS 1308 General Physics II (For Life Sciences) M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 pm UC 2016: SE (w/ complete lab); QR UC 2012: PAS 1 (w/ complete lab); QR July For life sciences majors. Covers electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, and geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1303 or 1307.

Faculty: Durdana Balakishiyeva
PLSC 4350 Game Theory for Political Science M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
May Politics is about conflict. When there is conflict, there will be strategy. This course examines the complicated strategic interactions within the framework of game theory.

Faculty: Hiroki Takeuchi

 Syllabus
PRW 1101 PRW1: Concepts of Wellness M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: PRW 1 UC 2012: PRW 1 July The course introduces students to the University and explores three sets of issues: 1) the role of personal responsibility in coping with college and life's other transitional periods; 2) challenges and opportunities such as managing time and stress, benefiting from diversity and autonomy, dealing with pitfalls related to alcohol and drugs, and exploring resources and activities on campus; and 3) personal finance decisions while at SMU and later in life, including managing money, using credit cards, and making major purchases. Also, introduces the e-portfolio that students use to record and reflect upon their activities. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fall term restricted to first-year standing only).

Faculty: Donna Gober
PRW 2110 PRW2: Individual Fitness M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: PRW 2 UC 2012: PRW 2 July Students develop a personal exercise program, and they test and evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses in terms of health and fitness. Accommodates all levels of fitness. Activities aim to improve cardio-vascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility.

Faculty: Mark Rudich
PRW 2112 PRW2: Walking /Urban Fitness M-F 8:00 am - 12:00 pm UC 2016: PRW 2 UC 2012: PRW 2 May Walking long distances during class, and diet and nutrition information. Includes selected activities designed to target health-related fitness.

Faculty: Brian Fennig

 Syllabus
PRW 2130 PRW2: Power Yoga M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: PRW 2 UC 2012: PRW 2 June Focuses on three main areas of yoga practice: deep breathing, exercise (postures), and meditation. Includes selected activities designed to target health-related fitness.

Faculty: Donna Gober
PSYC 1300 Introduction to Psychology M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 May Broad introduction to psychology as a behavioral science with special emphasis on cognition, development, learning, social, personality, physiological, and clinical psychology (psychopathology and psychotherapy).

Faculty: Michael Lindsey

 Syllabus
PSYC 1300 Introduction to Psychology M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 July Broad introduction to psychology as a behavioral science with special emphasis on cognition, development, learning, social, personality, physiological, and clinical psychology (psychopathology and psychotherapy).

Faculty: Michael Lindsey
PSYC 2332 Developmental Psychology M-F 9:00 am - 11:00 am
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 May A survey of the processes and variables that influence the development of the fetus, infant, child, and adolescent. Emphasis is on theories and research in such areas as perceptual, cognitive, language, social/emotional, and moral development.

Faculty: Chrystyna Kouros

 Syllabus
PSYC 2332 Developmental Psychology M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 June A survey of the processes and variables that influence the development of the fetus, infant, child, and adolescent. Emphasis is on theories and research in such areas as perceptual, cognitive, language, social/emotional, and moral development.

Faculty: Michael Lindsey
PSYC 2351 Abnormal Psychology M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm June A study of the theories, causes, assessment, and treatment of abnormal behavior, including depression, anxiety, psychosis, personality disorders, and other forms of psychopathology in adults. There is an examination of the continuum of normal and abnormal behavior, with consideration of historical and cultural perspectives, ethical concerns, and research methodologies in understanding psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 1300 or instructor approval.

Faculty: Michael Lindsey
PSYC 3341 Social Psychology M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: IIC; HD UC 2012: IIC 1; HD June Addresses the question of how an individual’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by his/her social environment; includes topics such as attitude change, conformity, attraction, aggression, and small-group behavior.

Faculty: Christopher Logan
PSYC 3360 Health Psychology M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July A basic introduction to the subject. Topics include causes and correlates of health, illness, and dysfunction, as well as the interplay of emotions, cognitions, and behavioral and/or physical factors. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300 and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.

Faculty: Michael Lindsey
PSYC 3364 Forensic Psychology MTWTH 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm June Examination of the interface between psychology and the legal system, focusing in particular on the role of mental health experts in criminal trials and civil disputes. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300 and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.

Faculty: Jill Johansson-Love
PSYC 3366 Positive Psychology M-F 9:30 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
UC 2016: HSBS; OC, CE UC 2012: OC, CE May This advanced Psychology course will introduce you to the Positive Psychology movement which is an area of emphasis in many subfields of psychology. The focus of positive psychology is on strength rather than weakness, flourishing rather than struggling. We will address research in many areas of psychology but the focus will primarily be on positive perspectives within social psychology.

Faculty: Chris Logan

 Syllabus
PSYC 4363 Psychology of Conflict Resolution M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am July Covers research and theory in the psychology of interpersonal conflict, as well as mechanisms for resolving, managing, or avoiding conflict. Emphasized domains are alternative dispute resolution, close relationships, and workplace and international conflict. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300, PSYC 3301, and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.

Faculty: Christopher Logan
RELI 1303 Introduction to Asian Religions M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: PRIE, HC; HD, GE UC 2012: PRIE 1, HC 1; HD, GE May An introductory historical overview of select religious traditions of Asia. The course explores developments in religious and cultural trends expressed in South Asia and East Asia in traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and/or Shintoism.

Faculty: Steven Lindquist

 Syllabus
RELI 3319 Old Testament M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: HFA, HC; W UC 2012: PRIE 2, HC 1; W June An introduction to the Old Testament and to the religion and history of ancient Israel. Special emphasis is given to the ancient Near Eastern roots of biblical religion and to the modern interpretation of biblical myth, epic, and prophecy.

Faculty: Serge Frolov
RELI 3321 Religion and the Holocaust M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: HFA, HC; W UC 2012: PRIE 2, HC 1; W June A study of responses to the Holocaust by Jews and Christians. Includes an overview of the history of the Holocaust as it affected the Jewish communities of Central and Eastern Europe. Students read personal memoirs of survivors of ghettos, concentration camps, and Nazi Germany. Postwar responses include questions of faith after the Holocaust, Christian responsibility for modern anti-Semitism, the impact of the Holocaust on the creation of the State of Israel and Middle East politics today, and postwar relations between Jews and Germans.

Faculty: Serge Frolov
SOCI 1300 Introduction to Sociology M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am UC 2016: IIC UC 2012: IIC 1 June This course presents the sociological approach to understanding human behavior. Sociology considers how particular life experiences, attitudes, and values are shaped by membership in ascribed and achieved social categories such as social class, race/ethnicity, sex, sexuality, and nationality.

Faculty: Leslie DeArman
SOCI 3301 Health, Healing, and Ethics M-F 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: HFA, HSBS; HD UC 2012: PRIE 2, IIC 2; HD May A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and organization of medical systems, economic development and the global exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global disparities in health.

Faculty: Nia Parson

 Syllabus
SOCI 3312 Database Methods M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: QR, IL, W UC 2012: QR, IL, W June Focuses on data analysis of existing data commonly used for economic and social scientific purposes (e.g., U.S. Census, General Social Survey, World Bank) and the construction of new data from multiple sources. Reviews basic quantitative research methodology, descriptive and inferential statistics, data reduction and management techniques, and the interpretation of statistics in applied social research. Students become adept at using multiple database programs (e.g., Excel, SPSS, SAS). This is the second course in the research methods sequence. Prerequisite: C- or better in SOCI 3311.

Faculty: Leslie DeArman
SOCI 3340 Global Society M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: HSBS; GE UC 2012: IIC 2; GE June Provides students with a sociological orientation to the evolving interconnectedness among societies, nation-states, cultures, economies, and individuals around the globe.

Faculty: Nancy Campbell-Jeffrey
SOCI 4399 Special Topics: Sociology Seminar M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Seminar on selected sociological areas. May be repeated for credit if topics differ.

Faculty: Nancy Campbell-Jeffrey
SPAN 1401 Beginning Spanish I ONLINE ONLINE. Special Dates: May 17 - June 15 May Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Lourdes Molina

 Syllabus
SPAN 1401 Beginning Spanish I ONLINE ONLINE June Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Ana Maria Melgarejo
SPAN 1401 Beginning Spanish I ONLINE ONLINE June Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Constantin Icleanu
SPAN 1401 Beginning Spanish I M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm June Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Miroslava Detcheva
SPAN 1402 Beginning Spanish II ONLINE ONLINE. Special Dates: May 17 - June 15 UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL May Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Allison Larkin, Constantin Icleanu

 Syllabus
SPAN 1402 Beginning Spanish II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Constantin Icleanu
SPAN 1402 Beginning Spanish II ONLINE ONLINE UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Allison Larkin
SPAN 1402 Beginning Spanish II M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: SL UC 2012: SL July Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.

Faculty: Joy Saunders
SPAN 2401 Intermediate Spanish I M-F 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm UC 2016: LL June For students who are relatively comfortable expressing their personal needs and describing their immediate environment in Spanish. Moves students toward fluency through significant vocabulary expansion and mastery of advanced verbal and sentence structure. To varying degrees, attention is devoted to cultural competence and to the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1402 or equivalent.

Faculty: Sarah Bogard
SPAN 3374 Spanish-American Civilization M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm July A topical exploration of Spanish-American culture and societies, with particular emphasis on artistic and sociological aspects. The topic explored varies by instructor. Prerequisite: SPAN 4358 (or can be taken concurrently) or C- or better in SPAN 3358.

Faculty: Ruben Sanchez-Godoy
STAT 2331 Introduction to Statistical Methods M-F 9:00 am - 11:00 am
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF May An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.

Faculty: Stephen Robertson

 Syllabus
STAT 2331 Introduction to Statistical Methods M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF June An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.

Faculty: Steve Robertson
STAT 2331 Introduction to Statistical Methods M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF July An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.

Faculty: Lochana Palayangoda
STAT 2331 Introduction to Statistical Methods M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: QF UC 2012: QF July An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.

Faculty: Mahesh Fernando
STAT 3300 Applied Statistics: Regression M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am June Emphasizes the analysis of data using state-of-the art statistical methods and specialized statistical software. Case studies form a major component of the course requirements. Prerequisite: STAT 2301, STAT 2331, or ITOM 2305.

Faculty: Bivin Sadler
STAT 3304 Introduction to Statistical Computing M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm May Intended for undergraduate statistics majors and minors, and students from other disciplines who are interested in statistical computing. R and SAS, two widely used statistical languages for research and industry, are used throughout the course. Enables students to do essential computations and statistical analysis with commonly used statistical software. Prerequisite: STAT 2301, STAT 2331 or equivalent.

Faculty: Mahesh Fernando

 Syllabus
STAT 4340 Probability and Statistics for Engineers M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: TM May Basic concepts of probability and statistics useful in the solution of engineering and applied science problems. Covers probability, probability distributions, data analysis, sampling distributions, estimation, and simple tests of hypothesis. Prerequisites: MATH 1337, MATH 1338.

Faculty: Ian Harris

 Syllabus
STRA 5370 Strategic Management in a Global Economy M-F 8:00 am - 12:00 pm May Analyzes the processes of building competitive advantage and strategy execution in single- and multi-business firms, with emphasis on industry evolution, the boundaries of the firm, and global competition. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and 2302; FINA 3320; MKTG 3340 and/or ADV 3362; MNO 3370; ITOM 3306; and ITOM 2305 or one from the following: CSE 4340, EMIS 3340, STAT 2301/2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: David Lei

 Syllabus
STRA 5370 Strategic Management in a Global Economy MTW 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm June Analyzes the processes of building competitive advantage and strategy execution in single- and multi-business firms, with emphasis on industry evolution, the boundaries of the firm, and global competition. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and 2302; FINA 3320; MKTG 3340 and/or ADV 3362; MNO 3370; ITOM 3306; and ITOM 2305 or one from the following: CSE 4340, EMIS 3340, STAT 2301/2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors.

Faculty: TBD
THEA 2309 Theatre Movement for Non-Majors M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 June Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.

Faculty: Sara Romersberger
THEA 2309 Theatre Movement for Non-Majors M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA UC 2012: CA 1 July Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.

Faculty: Bill Lengfelder
THEA 2321 Spectacle of Performance M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA; IL, OC UC 2012: CA 1; IL, OC June Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.

Faculty: Steve Woods
THEA 2321 Spectacle of Performance M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: CA; IL, OC UC 2012: CA 1; IL, OC July Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.

Faculty: Steve Woods
THEA 2321 Spectacle of Performance M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: CA; IL, OC UC 2012: CA 1; IL, OC July Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.

Faculty: Steve Woods
WGST 2322 Gender: Images and Perspectives M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am UC 2016: KNW, IIC; HD UC 2012: KNW, IIC 1; HD June An interdisciplinary examination of the ways femininity and masculinity have been represented in the past and present, with attention to what is constant and what changes.

Faculty: Katherine Boswell
WGST 3380 Human Sexuality M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm UC 2016: KNW, IIC; HD UC 2012: KNW, IIC 1; HD June This course explores the biosocial aspects of human sexuality and sex behaviors. A multidisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective will be used to address a wide range of theoretical and pragmatic sexual issues.

Faculty: Josephine Ryan
WL 3308 Introduction to General Linguistics M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm UC 2016: LL June This course is an introduction to the field of linguistics, which is concerned with the study of human language in the broadest sense.

Faculty: Gabriela Vokic
WL 3309 French Cinema: 1945 to the Present MWF 12:00 pm - 3:20 pm UC 2016: KNW, HC; W, GE, IL, OC UC 2012: KNW, HC 1; W, GE, IL, OC June Uses cultural studies theory to explore the evolution of the French national identity from the end of the Nazi occupation of France in 1945 to the present day.

Faculty: Dayna Oscherwitz
WL 3341 The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: HSBS, KNW; HD UC 2012: HC 2, KNW; HD May An introduction to the 1994 Rwanda genocide that seeks to understand not only its origins but also its sociological, ethical, and human rights implications.

Faculty: Herve Tchumkam

 Syllabus
WL 3382 Texas-Mexico Borderlands: A social, political, cultural and economic story M-F 9:00 am - 1:00 pm UC 2016: KNW; HD UC 2012: KNW; HD May Focuses on the relationship between Mexico and the US, and US-Mexico borderlands as historical, political, and cultural space. Special focus on Mexico and Texas.

Faculty: Elizabeth Russ

 Syllabus