Economic Education

Teaching Free Enterprise Module List

Paradox of Progress
The paradox of progress is that creative destruction is everywhere; once a new, better technology or process arrives there is market disruption in labor, processes, etc. This unit analyzes the forces that participate in this, with historical examples of disruptions. The student will understand that change is inevitable, and we must be willing to be lifelong learners in order to keep up with economic and technological change.
Author: W. Michael Cox, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 60 minutes (shortened version)

Trade
Trade makes us richer and happier. This unit goes into economic experiments to explain how subjective value and opportunity cost are major drivers of human progress that span large geographic areas, go across oceans and make us more peaceful, richer and happier societies.
Author: Robert A. Lawson, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Time Well Spent
While economic analysis in general focuses on inflation as an indicator of an overall economy’s health, we explain recent human progress and poverty reduction in absolute terms. The reality of recent economic history is we work less and obtain more. Long gone are the days in which enormous amounts of laborers participated in the least productive sectors of the economy. Productivity has made us wealthier and more comfortable. This unit explains the historical trends of productivity and wealth creation in modern economies, and how these changes are transforming lesser developed economies.
Author: W. Michael Cox, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 60 minutes (shortened version)

Economic Freedom of the World
Measuring economic freedom has become a driving force to understand and forecast success in economies. The more economically free societies are, the wealthier, healthier and more successful they become. This unit explains how institutions, economics, geography and the rule of law play major roles in well-being and dignified human flourishing. Author: Robert A. Lawson, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Taxation and Public Finance
Taxes are everywhere, this unit analyses the reason why taxes occur and how the public treasury is financed by overt and hidden taxes. This unit also looks at the effect of taxes in entrepreneur’s decisions and how this has an effect in the economy.
Authors: Dean Stansel & Meg Tuszynski, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Morality of Markets
Voluntary exchange makes us behave morally. How many times do you go back to a business establishment (if you have the choice) if you’ve been cheated on by the business? This unit takes a good look at how business, entrepreneurship, and voluntary exchange rewards “good” and moral behavior, this ultimately makes us more trusting and rich as societies.
Author: Derek Yonai, Emporia State University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Labor Market Economics
There is a market for everyone’s labor. What happens when we introduce barriers, price fixing and more generally, mess through policy with what people are willing to work for and employers willing to pay for? We get all sorts of unintended consequences and distortions that unfortunately have effects in the people that need it most, those that are unemployed.
Author: Vance Ginn, Texas Public Policy Foundation
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Macroeconomics (Short-Run Macro)
What is money? What effects do policy, governments, supply, demand have on a nation’s money supply? What role do banks and banking policy have on what our money is worth? This unit examines monetary cycles and what lessons we can have about inflation and markets regarding money.
Author: Alex Salter, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

International Development Economics
Why are some countries richer than others? Students and teachers take a deep look at what the history of economies has been, and how industrialization, entrepreneurship, free markets and strong institutions have made the biggest difference in the prosperity and well-being of populations.
Author: Adam Martin, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Are Sweatshops Good or Bad? (Opportunity Cost)
What is the real cost of our cheap clothes? What can we do to improve the lives of the workers around the world? Why is it that no matter what we campaign for, there will always be another very poor country opening to the textile/garment industry? Why don’t we have these shops in the US? We look at these questions to examine the role of opportunity cost in our everyday decisions and how our choices influence the livelihoods of people on the other side of the world.
Author: Ben Powell, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Health Economics
Why don’t we ever see prices in doctor’s offices? Is healthcare a product or a service? We look at these and other questions on how supply, demand and regulation have unexpected consequences on utility measurement in our world of health.
Authors: Dima Shamoun, University of Texas-Austin, with Theo Shamoun
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Culture and Trade
There are long lasting effects in societies as they trade, the questions that for long-time economists have asked are: Is there an optimal amount? Do we run the risk of all becoming the same and losing the regional uniqueness?
Author: Derek Yonai, Emporia State University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Economics of Happiness
We have all heard the phrase: Don’t promise when you’re happy or angry. We take a lookout the effects that our happiness has on the economy and how economics well-being has life altering effects on our happiness.
Author: Boris Nikolaev, Baylor University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Public Choice I (Analogies and Deviations of (Markets and Governments)
The topic of Public Choice is so pertinent to the study of economics that it is split in two sections. This first unit uses the tools of economics to make sense of political activity. Students compare and contrast markets and governments to better understand the economics and choices of the political realm.
Author: Meg Tuszynski , SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Public Choice II (Political Process)
In this second unit, students better understand economics as a social science. This unit explores the interactions between voters, elected officials and bureaucrats. The importance of voting by an informed electorate is reinforced.
Author: Meg Tuszynski , SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Sport Economics
What role do sports play in a Free Enterprise economy? See a focused look at the dynamic effect of sports on wages, employment, growth, supply & demand, opportunity costs and more.
Author: Richard Alm, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Economics of Risk
Where does uncertainty fit into how a Free Enterprise economy functions? Embracing the economic concepts of business cycles, opportunity costs, tradeoffs, scarcity, market structures, business organizations and more this module is designed to reveal avenues of teaching students complex economics topics in an understandable format.
Authors: Dima Shamoun, University of Texas-Austin, with Theo Shamoun
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Economic Freedom of North America
Leveraging the very successful Economic Freedom of the World research this module will cover multiple social studies subjects. This is a comprehensive approach that will employ data, maps, and graphics that are sure to engage students. Measuring economic freedom has become a driving force to understand and forecast success in economies. The more economically free societies are, the wealthier, healthier and more successful they become. This unit explains how institutions, economics, geography and the rule of law play major roles in well-being and dignified human flourishing.
Author: Dean Stansel, SMU
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Game Theory
How can games demonstrate the principles of economics to learners? Be prepared to experience how your students’ attention will be captured with this module that delivers concepts in a unique and engaging approach.
Author: Brandon Seitzler, Criswell College
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 100 minutes

International Monetary System
So if money talks what will it say to students to help them better understand trade and exchange? What are the rules, conventions and institutions that are crucial to a high functioning global economy and competitive operations? This unit will inspire students to trust liquidity in fluctuating markets and see how wealth is created by embracing free enterprise economic practices.
Author: Brandon Seitzler, Criswell College
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Economics of the American West
The history of North America’s West is replete with stories of economic success and failure. What lessons can students learn from these experiences and see the future through that lens? From the vantage point of microeconomic study students will see the principles of how scarce resources are allocated among competing ends. The economic factors of agriculture, industry, water, land, labor, capital and entrepreneurship will leverage this learning experience.
Author: Adam Martin, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Regional Development Economics (Microeconomics)
What does the study of economics reveal when we look below the national level? How do local economies contribute or deter to the economic ripples created by the choices individuals and groups make in response trade-offs, inflation, employment and scarcity? Concepts approached will be fiscal and monetary policy, state and local regulations and regional prices. 
Author: Jamie Pavlik, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Economics of Immigration
Increasingly the world is a mobile place with people moving in and out of nations and migrating within those countries too. What does this flow of humanity look like in the Free Enterprise system? This module looks at factors of production with an emphasis on labor and human capital. What strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats are economically realized as we move from location to location? Sectors examined will be energy, transportation and more with a focus on trade, policy, technology, innovation and risk.
Author: Ben Powell, Texas Tech
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: 90 minutes

Personal Financial Literacy I
Budgets, Saving and Retirement
What is a budget and why are they important? How are saving and retirement linked? Money is a difficult subject to talk about, yet money management is an important component of life. One of the ways that people have control over their money, and their life, is to create a budget and hold themselves accountable to ensure they do not spend more than the money they bring in. This module explores these topics for the uninitiated so the future will look even brighter.
Author: Danielle Zanzalari, Seton Hall University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: not yet available

Personal Financial Literacy II
Investing, Insurance, Real Estate and Loans
What can I do with the money I have? How can I protect my investments? Can I afford to buy a home or go to college? These are the gateway questions to adulthood that we all face. Making good sound decision in this aspect of life is crucial to future happiness and satisfaction. This unit provides key points toward understanding the pathways to a prosperous life.
Author: Danielle Zanzalari, Seton Hall University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: not yet available

Environmental Economics
Are free markets and environmental preservation friends or foes? Often, we hear that we need a strong system of taxation and/or regulation to curb environmental degradation and the overuse of our Earth’s natural resources. In this unit, we will explore how the principles of economics can actually help us understand how best to preserve the environment and conserve resources for the future. Indeed, prices, property rights, and the profit and loss mechanism can all give us key insights into how we can achieve a greener future without heavy handed government involvement in the process.
Author: Meg Tuszynski, Southern Methodist University
Availability:
Live:
by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: not yet available

Economics of Entrepreneurship
Entrepreneurs are widely regarded as the heroes of the modern economy. They are often praised and glorified in TV shows, books, movies, magazines, and social media. In this module students will learn what exactly is entrepreneurship; what are some of the myths and realities surrounding it; what is the role of entrepreneurship in the market economy, and, finally, what are the he institutional factors that are most likely to drive and support entrepreneurial activity.
Author: Boris Nikolaev, Baylor University
Availability:
Live: by request and availability Lesson time: 75-90 minutes
Virtual – Synchronously: by request and availability. Lesson time: 45 to 75 minutes
Virtual – Asynchronously: by request. Lesson time: not yet available