Udofa A, Clark K, Ryan L, Weyand P.  Running ground reaction forces across footwear conditions are predicted by the motion of two body mass components. Journal of Applied Physiology, 2019, 126(5): 1316-1325.

Ludlow L, Weyand P. Walking economy is predictably determined by speed, grade and gravitational load. Journal of Applied Physiology, 123,1288-1302, 2017.

Clark K, Ryan L, Weyand P.  A general relationship links gait mechanics and running ground reaction forces. Journal of Experimental Biology220, 2: 247-258, 2017.

Clark K, Weyand P.  Are sprint running speeds maximized with simple-spring stance mechanics? Journal of Applied Physiology117:604-615, 2014.

Clark K, Ryan L, Weyand P.  Foot speed, foot-strike and footwear: linking gait mechanics and running ground reaction forces. The Journal of Experimental Biology, 217: 2037-2040, 2014.

Weyand P, Smith B, Schultz N, Ludlow L, Puyau M, Butte N. Predicting metabolic rate across walking speed: one fit for all body sizes? Journal of Applied Physiology,115: 1332-1342, 2013.

Bundle M and Weyand P. Sprint Exercise Performance: Does Metabolic Power Matter? Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 40: 174-182, 2012. ESSR website: www.acsm-essr.org

Weyand P, Smith B, Puyau M, and Butte N. The mass-specific energy cost of human walking is set by stature. Journal of Experimental Biology, 213: 3972-3979, 2010.

Weyand P, Sandell R, Prime D, and Bundle M. The biological limits to running speed are imposed from the ground up. Journal of Applied Physiology, 108: 950-961, 2010.

Weyand P and Bundle M. Point: Artificial limbs do make artificially fast running speeds possible. Journal of Applied Physiology, 108: 1011-1012, 2010.

Weyand P, Smith B, and Sandell R. Assessing the metabolic cost of walking: the influence of baseline subtractions. Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc, 1: 6878-81, 2009.

Weyand P, Bundle M, McGowan C, Grabowski A, Brown M, Kram R, and Herr H. The fastest runner on artificial legs: different limbs, similar function? Journal of Applied Physiology, 107: 903-911, 2009.

Weyand P, Lin J, and Bundle M. Sprint performance-duration relationships are set by the fractional duration of external force application. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 290: R758-R765, 2006.

Bundle M, Ernst C, Bellizzi M, Wright S, and Weyand P. A metabolic basis for impaired muscle force production and neuromuscular compensation during sprint cycling. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 291: R1457-R1464, 2006.

Alexander R. Sprinting and endurance for cyclists and runners.  American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 290: R757, 2006.

Weyand P and Bundle M. Energetics of high-speed running: integrating classical theory and contemporary observations. American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 288: R956-R965, 2005. 

Weyand P and Davis J. Running performance has a structural basis. Journal of Experimental Biology, 208: 2625-2631, 2005.

Friedl K. Bioenergetics of Animal Locomotion: Lessons for Expedient Monitoring in Human Fitness and Weight Management. Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, Volume 6, Number 1, 2004. 

Hoyt R, Buller M, Santee W, Yokota M, Weyand P, and Delany J. Total Energy Expenditure Estimated Using Foot-Ground Contact Pedometry. Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, Volume 6, Number 1, 2004.

Bundle M, Hoyt R, and Weyand P. High-speed running performance: a new approach to assessment and prediction. Journal of Applied Physiology, 95: 1955-1962, 2003.

Kerdok A, Biewener A, McMahon T, Weyand, P, and Herr H. Energetics and mechanics of running on surfaces of different stiffnesses. Journal of Applied Physiology, 92: 469-478, 2002.

Weyand P, Kelly M, Blackadar T, Darley J, Oliver S, Ohlenbusch N, Joffe S, and Hoyt, R. Ambulatory estimates of maximal aerobic power from foot-ground contact times and heart rates in running humans. Journal of Applied Physiology, 91: 451-458, 2001.

Wright S and Weyand P. The application of ground force explains the energetic cost of running backward and forward. Journal of Experimental Biology, 204: 1805-1815, 2001.

Weyand P, Sternlight D, Bellizzi M, and Wright S. Faster top running speeds are achieved with greater ground forces not more rapid leg movements. Journal of Applied Physiology, 89: 1991-2000, 2000. 

Bundle M, Hoppeler H, Vock R, Tester J, and Weyand P. High metabolic rates in running birds. Nature, 397: 31-32, 1999.

Weyand P, Lee C, Martinez-Ruiz R, Bundle M, Wright S, Bellizzi M, and Wright S. High-speed running performance is largely unaffected by hypoxic reductions in aerobic power. Journal of Applied Physiology, 86: 2059-2064, 1999.

Bellizzi M, King K, Cushman S, and Weyand P.Does the application of ground force set the energetic cost of cross-country skiing? Journal of Applied Physiology, 85: 1736 - 1743, 1998.

Weyand P, Cureton K, Conley D, Sloniger M, and Liu Y. Peak oxygen deficit predicts sprint and middle-distance track performance. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. 26(5):S120, 1174-1180, 1994.