SPECIAL NOTE: Classes, dates, and times are subject to cancellation/change based on enrollment.Spring 2021 Course Schedule downloadable pdf.

Monday Classes 6:30 - 9:20 P.M.

 

Psychology of Sport (HUM), (ORG) SMUFLEX

BHSC 7330, 701
Class# 7023
3 Credit Hours
Mondays

Explores psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior in the context of motivation, team building and leadership, psychological skills training, and current issues and trends in sport psychology. Students learn how the application of sport psychology can improve human performance. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities; organizational dynamics.

Instructor: Michael Lindsey  

 

The Human Experience (INTRO), (REQ) VIRTUAL

HUMN 6316, 701
Class# 5213
3 Credit Hours
Mondays

Introductory course for the M.L.S. program that is required of all degree-seeking M.L.S. students. Examines issues of human existence using interdisciplinary perspectives, primary readings, large-group presentations, and discussion groups. Students learn the various disciplines of human thought and problems, and they contribute to the overall knowledge of the many ways in which humans try to understand themselves and the world around them. Also, what it means to be human, including a consideration of the nature of products of human activity and the world in which humans find themselves. Includes a close look at the human condition and human creations such as social institutions, art, literature, and science.

Instructor: Edward Countryman

 

Intercultural Communication (ORG), (CMT), (HUM) SMUFLEX

HUMN 7357, 701
Class# 5215
3 Credit Hours
Mondays

An overview of how differing worldviews, values, attitudes, and behaviors can affect the professional communication process as well as individual and organizational success. Students gain the skills (practical knowledge) and understanding (theoretical knowledge) needed to succeed in an increasingly international environment. Through a series of readings, reading responses, activities, class discussion, and formal papers, students experiment with and apply different concepts related to the intercultural communication process. This course may be applied to the following curricular field concentration: communication, media, and technology. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: organizational dynamics; communication, media, and technology; humanities.

Instructor: Anthony Picchioni

 

The Struggle for Human Rights (HRJ), (GLO), (GEN), (HUM), (AMS) VIRTUAL

SOSC 6309, 701
Class# 5216
3 Credit Hours
Mondays

Examines the roots of anti-Semitism in Europe, Nazi (racial) policies, the origins and implementation of the Final Solution, actions of perpetrators, collaborators and bystanders, horrific crimes across Europe, and the ongoing attempts at justice through trials, memorialization, and legal restitution throughout the postwar years to the present day. This course may be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities; human rights and social justice; global studies; gender studies; American studies.

Instructor: Rick Halperin

 

Special Topics: Africa Meets Europe: Colonization and Immigration (HRJ), (GLO-NW), (HUM) SMUFLEX

SOSC 7350, 701
Class# 5217
3 Credit Hours
Mondays

This course is an introduction to the encounter between Europe and Africa at the time of colonization, and its enduring legacy in our times; it explores the history and impact of European colonization on in Africa and the Caribbean, with a heavy emphasis on Francophone Africa (Sub-Sahara and the Maghreb). The course also examines the relationship between each of these regions and metropolitan France. Students will study a number of historical and critical texts, films and other cultural forms including music, photographs and art in order to engage the question of how Europe’s “civilizing mission” – the belief that Europe  was the bearer of a superior culture to the world—shaped the project of empire and the colonial era. We will also explore the legacy of empire in the form of immigration from European’s former colonies to Europe, the various attitudes towards Europe and Europeans in formerly colonized regions, and European attitudes towards formerly colonized peoples. Students will gain insight into the historical progression of European influence in the world and an appreciation of the impact that (post)colonial immigration has had, and continues to have, on contemporary Europe. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: human rights and social justice; global studies (non-Western); humanities.

Instructor: Herve Tchumkam

 

Tuesday Classes 6:30 - 9:20 P.M.

Coaching for Educational and Organizational Leaders (WI) OR (ORG), (CMT), (HUM) VIRTUAL

BHSC 7341, 701
Class# 5239
3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays

Through the performance of understanding and “acting, applying and adapting”, students will develop and deepen—through lots of practice and feedback—the important mindset, skillset, models, tools and research of coaching.  They will make their learning public through collective exploration of problems of practice. In fact, practice and implementation of coaching and its contemporaneous adaptation and innovation will be the through-line for the class, around which they will wrap research and reflection. Finally, they will continue to study the theoretical underpinnings of coaching from the perspectives of psychology and adult development, as well as organizational change and development.  They will investigate the theoretical bases of coaching, the intellectual frame for our practice. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: organizational dynamics; communication, media, and technology; humanities.

Instructor: Jennifer Parvin

 

Creating Nonfiction: From Long-Form Article to Flash Lyric Hybrid and Everything In-Between (CRW), (ACT), (HUM) SMUFLEX

FNAR 7321, 701
Class# 5208
3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays

Explores the wide variety of forms available to nonfiction writers in order to construct nonfiction pieces. Goals are twofold: map the broad spectrum of formal approaches to nonfiction writing and work to identify and hone the stylistic techniques that best complement each form. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities; creative writing; arts and cultural traditions.

Instructor: Mag Gabbert 

 

NEW: The World in the Twenty-First Century (HUM), (HRJ), (GLO), (GEN) SMUFLEX

SOSC 7353, 701
Class# 6412
3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays

The course begins with several of the more important trends in contemporary life in order to imaginatively extrapolate their possible impacts on human society in the near future: the possibility that we have entered a new “Anthropocene” geological age; the nature of climate change, and possible responses to climate change; the decline of traditional forms of civil society, accelerating demographic sorting, and the role of social media in amplifying or moderating these developments; the implications of “big data” and new surveillance technologies for privacy rights and personal identity; the potential impacts of artificial intelligence and developments in robotics for human work and human flourishing; and, the transformation of culture in the digital age and how this transformation may reshape the “search for meaning”. These trends were selected in order to have a baseline from which we can begin: members of the class are invited to offer suggestions about topics and readings, and, with the consensus of the class, both may be altered to make the class better serve its students interests and needs. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities; global studies; American studies.

May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: human rights and social justice; gender studies; American studies; global studies; humanities.

Instructor: Charles Sullivan

 

Ethics and Human Rights (HUM), (HRJ), (GEN), (GLO) VIRTUAL

SOSC 7379, 701
Class# 5220
3 Credit Hours
Tuesdays

Portrays the intersection of ethics and human rights as a balance point for the creation and continuation of just and healthy relationships. Specifically, the five types of relationships are explored: relationships with self, community, other, place, and career. Special emphasis is placed on the cultural perspectives of historically oppressed groups across the globe. Irrespective of the students’ vocational paths, this course challenges them to recognize their inherited ethical biases in order to become more personally aware, contextually sensitive, and socially critical in the pursuit of human rights. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities, human rights and social justice, global studies, gender studies.

Instructor: Brad Klein

 

Wednesday Classes 6:30 - 9:20 P.M.

 

NEW: Critical Thinking: Immigration, Race, and Human Rights (HRJ), (HUM), (AMS) VIRTUAL

SOSC 7390, 701
Class# 6411
3 Credit Hours
Wednesdays

This course provides a critical thinking overview of present-day issues facing today's immigrants vis-a-vis Human Rights in the United States (U.S.). Students will be introduced to the laws, regulations, practices and policies governing the ability of non-U.S. citizens to enter and remain in the US either temporarily (as non-immigrants) or permanently (as immigrants). We will examine the current debates within the U.S. Congress and under International Human Rights' conventions and treaties. We will take a look at the law and history of immigration and race in the U.S. and emerging issues created by the presidential election and its divisive impact on American society. In addition, we will explore what it means to be an American, historically, presently and what it means for the role of immigrants in the future of the U.S. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: human rights and social justice; humanities; American studies.

Instructor: John Vernon

 

Special Topics: Education and Human Rights Reimagining: Tools for Impact and Action (HRJ), (GEN), (GLO), (AMS), (HUM) VIRTUAL

SOSC 7350, 703
Class# 5223
3 Credit Hours
Wednesdays

May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: human rights and social justice, gender studies, American studies, and global studies; humanities.

Instructor: Candice Bledsoe

 

Thursday Classes 6:30 - 9:20 P.M.

  

Special Topics: Individuals and Societies: Many Ways of Being Human (HUM), (ORG) SMUFLEX

BHSC 7350, 702
Class#  5237
3 Credit Hours
Thursdays

This course introduces the student to the perspective and methods of anthropology as they can influence a broad array of careers from psychology to business administration to agriculture. Through survey texts, ethnographic works, and peer-reviewed and narrative literatures, we explore how different societies meet universal human needs in culturally distinctive ways. A key problem we address is the tension between Individuals and the Societies that give shape and meaning to their lives. Ultimately, our goal is to challenge our own ethnocentrisms and biases, to learn and experiment with anthropological methods, and to consider the vast array of cultural practices and expressions diffused across a globalized planet of humans. May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: humanities; organizational dynamics.

Instructor: Carolyn Smith-Morris

 

Adolescent Psychology (HUM) SMUFLEX

BHSC 7366, 701
Class# 5225
3 Credit Hours
Thursdays

Explores adolescent growth and development as a period of self-discovery. Students reflect back and develop a new understanding of their past and present selves. Fosters critical and incisive thinking about issues that have a significant impact on adolescent development in the 21st century. Provides perspectives on adolescents and what they think about the world around them by examining how different experiences shape adolescent growth across diverse cultures. Examines the modern transitional stage of emerging adulthood, where the end of adolescence and the preparation for adult roles are postponed. May be applied to the following curricular field concentration: humanities.

Instructor: Michael Lindsey  

 

Civil Rights Movement (HRJ), (HUM), (GEN), (AMS) SMUFLEX

SOSC 6397, 701
Class# 3676
3 Credit Hours
Thursdays

True to interdisciplinarity, this class will focus on the many ways and claims of knowing the phenomena of the American Civil Rights Movement (i.e. historical, sociocultural, and philosophical in addition to political). More specifically, this course will engage students in examining 1) the socioeconomic and political dimensions that helped to maintain the system of American apartheid known as Jim Crow, 2) the events that lead to its end, 3) the lasting legacies of said system and 4) grassroots organizing lessons garnered from The Movement. Each student, both graduate and undergraduate, is invited to participate in the Spring Break civil rights pilgrimage (leaving Friday morning, March 13, and returning Friday evening, March 20). May be applied to the following curricular field concentrations: human rights and social justice; humanities; gender studies; American studies.

Instructor: Ray Jordan

 

Contact Us

Email: mls@smu.edu | Request Information
Phone: 214-768-4273
Fax: 214-768-2104
Postal Mail: Master of Liberal Studies, Southern Methodist University, P.O. Box 750253, Dallas, TX 75275-0253