Theatre

Apply Now MSA Visit

Undergraduate Classes

Please note that not all courses are offered every semester. This listing is not considered authoritative. Please visit Access.SMU for authoritative course offerings including meeting times, professor, and more.

View the Theatre section of the SMU Meadows Course Catalog.

THEA 1303 (3). DRAMATIC ARTS TODAY.
An introduction to theatre and performance for entering theatre majors. Considers basic artistic concepts, disciplines, and vocabulary common to this program, providing an elementary foundation in theatre with an emphasis on acting.

THEA 1304 (3). DRAMATIC ARTS TODAY.
An introduction to theatre and performance for entering theatre majors. Considers basic artistic concepts, disciplines, and vocabulary common to this program, providing an elementary foundation in theatre with an emphasis on acting.

THEA 2101 (1). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 2140 (1). LIGHT RUNNING/CONSTRUCTION CREW.
Practical application of skills and knowledge studied in THEA 2240 to the mounting and running of a theatrical production; involves either serving on the running crew of a division production or completing 65 hours of work mounting a production. Theatre majors should complete this course by the end of the junior year. Division approval required for nonmajors. Must be taken concurrently with or subsequent to completion of THEA 2240.

THEA 2141 (1). SCENE RUNNING/CONSTRUCTION CREW.
Practical application of skills and knowledge studied in THEA 2241 to the mounting and running of a theatrical production; involves either serving on the running crew of a division production or completing 65 hours of work mounting a production. Theatre majors should complete this course by the end of the junior year. Division approval required for nonmajors. Must be taken concurrently with or subsequent to completion of THEA 2241.

THEA 2142 (1). COSTUME RUNNING/CONSTRUCTION CREW.
Practical application of skills and knowledge studied in THEA 2242 to the mounting and running of a theatrical production; involves either serving on the running crew of a division production or completing 65 hours of work mounting a production. Theatre majors should complete this course by the end of the junior year. Division approval required for nonmajors. Must be taken concurrently with or subsequent to completion of THEA 2242.

THEA 2201 (2). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 2240 (2). LIGHTING PRACTICUM.
An introduction to the backstage crafts of theatrical lighting intended to give the student a broad understanding of the basic principles and technical procedures used in the design of lighting. Requires a 50-hour lab. Division approval required for nonmajors.

THEA 2241 (2). SCENERY PRACTICUM.
An introduction to the backstage crafts of theatrical scenery intended to give the student a broad understanding of the basic principles and technical procedures used in the design of scenery. Requires a 50-hour lab. Division approval required for nonmajors.

THEA 2242 (2). COSTUME PRACTICUM.
An introduction to the backstage crafts of theatrical costume intended to give the student a broad understanding of the basic principles and technical procedures used in the design of costumes. Requires a 50-hour lab. Division approval required for nonmajors.

THEA 2271 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2272 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2273 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2274 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2275 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2276 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construc- tion, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2277 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2278 (2). TECHNICAL THEATRE LABORATORY.
Various workshops structured to introduce a broad range of technical experience. May include properties design and construction, audio design for performing arts, advanced electrics, costume construction, and scenic construction for film and television.

THEA 2301 (3). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 2303 (3). ACTING 1.
Exploration of the actor's imagination and the nature of acting, embracing training concepts of ease, honesty, sense memory, and concentration.

THEA 2304 (3). ACTING 2.
Beginning script work, in which the actor learns to analyze a scene for its events and to particularize these events in a series of expressive action tasks. Sophomore course. Prerequisite: THEA 2303.

THEA 2305 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 1.
Employing body awareness, modified yoga positions, and a variety of isolated physical actions, students deepen their experience of breath, impulse, and vibration. This process of freeing the vocal mechanism allows students to practice ease and efficiency of vocal release and to begin to make acting choices that are self-revealing. Addresses general patterns of self-editing and an initial expansion of the actor's range and flexibility in performance.

THEA 2306 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 2.
Students continue to practice ease and efficiency of vocal release and deepen their ability to make acting choices that are self-revealing. Vocal power, flexibility, and efficiency are enhanced and refined. Includes an introduction to phonetic information and execution of detailed speech actions.

THEA 2307 (3). MOVEMENT 1.
Teaches students to individuate internal energies of the body, to use these energies in movement and creation of precise statuary mime for the stage, and to begin to synthesize physical listening skills for ensemble acting. Skills taught include juggling, hatha yoga, corporal mime, illusionistic pantomime, t'ai chi ch'uan, and improvisation of mime pieces.

THEA 2308 (3). MOVEMENT 2.
Increases students' physical listening skills and practices these in unarmed stage combat. Skills taught include t'ui shou, chi sao, foil fencing (left and right), French sabre, kung fu animals, and conventions of unarmed stage combat. Prerequisite: THEA 2307.

THEA 2309 (3). THEATRE MOVEMENT FOR NONMAJORS.
Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.

THEA 2311 (3). THE ART OF ACTING.
Basic work in acting, voice, and movement for the nonmajor. Relaxation, concentration, imagination, and the actor's exploration and use of the social world.

THEA 2319 (3). FASHION HISTORY AND CULTURE.
Explores how and why people tell others who they are by what they wear. Also, the role of clothing in and reflection of various historical cultures, including the relationship between fashion, art, architecture, and the decorative arts of selected time periods. For majors and nonmajors.

THEA 2321 (3). SPECTACLE OF PERFORMANCE.
Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.

THEA 2322 (3). TEXT ANALYSIS.
Aids the first-year student in the skills necessary to read a play as an actor, a director, a playwright, a designer, and a student of drama; as such, it is an essential foundation step in the major. Explores key styles and genres of dramatic literature and important texts in the development of theatre. Includes lecture and discussion, and assignments include reading, written papers, and text-based exercises. Guest lecturers from the faculty will provide perspective on different areas of theatre production.

THEA 2333 (3). TECHNICAL DRAWING FOR THE THEATRE.
Principles and practice in the techniques of drafting traditional/nontraditional types of stage scenery. Students learn how to prepare and present construction and detail drawings for use in a scene, prop, or electric shop.

THEA 2361 (3). INTRODUCTION TO STAGE MANAGEMENT.
An exploration of the methods and techniques of theatrical stage management, including preproduction planning, scheduling, and conducting rehearsals and performances. Assignments are both theoretical and practical. Permission of instructor required for nonmajors and first-year students.

THEA 2371 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 1: LIGHTING MECHANICS.
Introduces basic principles of stage lighting design, including the mechanics and optics of lighting instruments, electrical theory and practices, control systems, basic design concepts, and color theory. Controllable qualities of light are investigated and demonstrated through the student's participation on a lighting crew for a production. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 2372 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 2: COSTUME CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES.
Introduces basic costume patterning and construction methods. Covers draping, drafting, flatpatterning, terminology, equipment usage, and the skills necessary to the entire costuming process. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 2373 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 3: STAGECRAFT.
Introduces the organization of the scene shop, tool maintenance and usage, construction techniques, technical drawing development, computer applications, rigging, and time and material budgeting. Includes class projects and work on Meadows stage productions. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 2374 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 4: INTRODUCTION TO THEATRICAL SOUND.
Introduces the organization of the sound studio, maintenance and usage of equipment, recording techniques, and computer applications. Includes class projects and work on Meadows stage productions. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 3201 (2). THEATRE PRACTICUM.
Independent work with theatre faculty on a specific topic chosen by the student.

THEA 3207 (2). MOVEMENT 3.
Teaches extension of energy and physical listening skills. Skills taught include quarterstaff, rapier and dagger, court sword, and broad sword. Prerequisite: THEA 2308.

THEA 3208 (2). MOVEMENT 4.
Allows the student to process personal experience into the movement and sound of a character. Skills taught include clowning, Lecoq figures, and neutral mask. Prerequisite: THEA 3207.

THEA 3301 (3). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 3302 (3). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 3303 (3). ACTING 3.
A synthesis of first- and second-year work to the end of an individual system by which actors approach the presentation of characters through their ability to present themselves effectively. Prerequisite: THEA 2302.

THEA 3304 (3). ACTING 4.
Continuation and extension of THEA 3303, consisting of special projects in characterization studies. Prerequisite: THEA 3303.

THEA 3305 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 3.
Students refine their ability to execute detailed speech actions and identify specific phonetic changes using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Vocal power, flexibility, and malleability are enhanced. The application of voice and speech actions to heightened language and stakes in a scene is practiced and refined.

THEA 3306 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 4.
Vocal power, flexibility, and expressive capability are practiced in a variety of space configurations. Students refine their ability to execute detailed speech actions and identify specific phonetic changes using the phonetic alphabet. The application of voice and speech actions to accents and dialects is practiced and refined.

THEA 3307 (3). TOPICS IN THEATRE: PLAYWRITING.
Conducted in a workshop structure. Led by a distinguished guest artist, each student playwright develops and refines a short play. Student actors conduct a daily reading of each play, led by a director, and take part in discussion with the playwrights and director intended to assist the playwright in the development of his/her play. Culminates with a public reading of the student-written plays.

THEA 3310 (3). SPECIAL TOPICS IN THEATRE.
Focuses on specific topics pertinent to theatre performance. Subjects vary from term to term, and may include acting, voice, and movement.

THEA 3311 (3). ACTING FOR SINGERS AND DANCERS.
Advanced work in acting, voice, and movement built upon the foundational performance and presentation skills required for singing and dancing. Focus is on scene study intended to reinforce the actor's development of a method of text analysis as an entry to a tactical approach (objective, obstacle, action) to acting and to facilitate the integration of text analysis and self-use as a process to create an emotionally honest, powerful, and effective moment of dramatic action on the stage. For dance majors and music vocal performance majors only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THEA 3312 (3). SCENE STUDY FOR NONMAJORS.
Facilitates each actor's exploration of his/her full range and complexity of imaginative, intellectual, emotional, and experiential life, as well as each actor's access to these elements of self as useful tools of creative expression. Reinforces the actor's development of a method of text analysis as an entry to a tactical approach (objective, obstacle, action) to acting. Also, the integration of text analysis and self-use as a process to create an emotionally honest, powerful, and effective moment of dramatic action on the stage. Prerequisite: THEA 2311 or instructor permission.

THEA 3313 (3). INTRODUCTION TO DESIGN FOR THE THEATRE.
An analytical study of stage design, including an introduction to the basic history, principles, and languages of stage design. Includes text analysis, elements and principles of design, and critical discussion of current theatre productions. For majors and nonmajors.

THEA 3314 (3). LIGHTING DESIGN: THEATRE, FILM, AND TELEVISION.
Introduces the practice of lighting design. Students study techniques, complete projects, and make presentations in the discipline.

THEA 3316 (3). SCENE DESIGN: THEATRE, FILM, AND TELEVISION.
Introduces the practice of scenic design. Students study techniques, complete projects, and make presentations in the discipline.

THEA 3318 (3). COSTUME DESIGN: THEATRE, FILM, AND TELEVISION.
Introduces the practice of costume design. Students study techniques, complete projects, and make presentations in the discipline.

THEA 3319 (3). HISTORY OF DESIGN: FASHION, ARCHITECTURE, AND INTERIORS.
A historical survey of fashion, interior design, and architecture, and the ways they relate to designing costumes and scenery for theatre, film, and television.

THEA 3321 (3). TOPICS IN DESIGN 1: LIGHTING.
Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for the student to solve, with attention given to color, composition, cueing, and production through presentations and discussions in class. Includes participation in productions as assistant designers and electricians. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 3322 (3). TOPICS IN DESIGN 2: DIRECTOR-DESIGNER RELATIONSHIP.
Covers design metaphors, ground plans, and terminology. Explores the relationship between a director and designer, and the elements of design as they relate to theatrical space. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 3323 (3). TOPICS IN DESIGN 3: COSTUME.
Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of costume design used to create statements about a play and its characters. Lectures and class discussions prepare students to confront specific problems in design projects. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 3324 (3). TOPICS IN DESIGN 4: SOUND.
Introduces the basic principles of theatrical sound design and the practices and skills required to develop a production's sound design and supportive technical documentation. Also, system layout, effects development, source researching, and organization. The combined hands-on presentations and class assignments allow students to develop a working knowledge of the sound designer's responsibilities and skills. Students are expected to provide appropriate materials as needed.

THEA 3331 (3). PLAYWRITING 1.
Creative exploration in the development of performance scripts with emphasis on structural vocabularies of story, plot, character development, and dramatic action.

THEA 3332 (3). PLAYWRITING 2.
Intermediate techniques of playwriting with emphasis on developing individual style and voice; writing one-act plays. Prerequisite: THEA 3331.

THEA 3341 (3). DIRECTING 1.
Students research the relationship between a designer and director, and create and conceptualize various approaches to texts to gain a working vocabulary in the collaborative language among theatre artists. Culminates in a director and designer presentation or performance.

THEA 3342 (3). DIRECTING 2.
Production styles and methodologies evidenced in the art of major modern directorial innovators. Directing projects required. Prerequisites: THEA 3341 and permission of instructor.

THEA 3351 (3). TEXTILES.
Explores various fabrics and materials used in costume construction, millinery, and crafts for theatre and film. Includes skills such as dyeing, distressing, fabric painting, and various methods of fabrication. The course attempts to complete training for the designer beyond the sketch.

THEA 3357 (3). DESIGNING WITH COMPUTERS, STAGE PROJECTION.
Explores tools for computer image creation (e.g., AutoCAD, MiniCAD, Adobe Photoshop) and their application.

THEA 3361 (3). STAGE MANAGEMENT 1.
Fuller explanation of the methods and techniques of theatrical stage management. Prerequisite: THEA 2361.

THEA 3362 (3). STAGE MANAGEMENT 1.
Fuller explanation of the methods and techniques of theatrical stage management. Prerequisite:THEA 2361.

THEA 3371 (3). AUTOMATED LIGHTING 2.
Students work with Vari-Lite, Robe, and Martin automated lighting fixtures while learning advanced programming skills.

THEA 3373 (3). DRAPING I.
A study of pattern making that utilizes the three-dimensional approach of draping fabric on a dress form and the approach of drafting patterns by formula. Students learn to drape a basic bodice, skirt, and collars, to create a basic sleeve pattern by formula, and to manipulate these patterns to achieve a variety of shapes.

THEA 3374 (3). DRAPING II.
Exploration of period dress from a draping point of view.

THEA 3375 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 5: LIGHTING AUTOMATION.
Advanced study in the field of automated lighting and control systems.

THEA 3376 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 6: ADVANCED COSTUME CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES.
A continuation in the study of costume construction.

THEA 3377 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 7: ADVANCED STAGECRAFT.
A continuation of stagecraft that explores advanced construction techniques, rigging, metal work, and the use of automation in scenery.

THEA 3378 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 8: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN SOUND.
The use of sound to create an environment for a theatrical event will be explored. Students will complete a studio project and/or Meadows event.

THEA 3379 (3). COMPUTER-ASSISTED DESIGN I.
Students learn the fundamentals of computer-assisted design, using VectorWorks and Spotlight, in application for the theatre. Emphasizes 2-D work and includes 3-D work. Drafting, as such, is not taught. Prerequisite: Knowledge of mechanical drawing and its conventions.

THEA 3380 (3). COMPUTER-ASSISTED DESIGN II.
Uses VectorWorks as the primary drafting software, with a focus on modeling scenic and lighting designs, organization of the drawing layouts, rendering techniques, and lighting-specific CAD tools.

THEA 3381 (3). THEATRE AND DRAMA HISTORY 1.
Examines key moments in the history of Western theatre and drama. Focuses on selected dramatic texts and their social and cultural contexts, and to the dynamic interactions and changing relationships among performance, audience, and society as influenced by the advent of actors, playwrights, designers, and directors, and by changes in theatre architecture and the social definition of space.

THEA 3382 (3). THEATRE AND DRAMA HISTORY 2.
Examines key moments in the history of Western theatre and drama. Focuses on selected dramatic texts and their social and cultural contexts, and to the dynamic interactions and changing relationships among performance, audience, and society as influenced by the advent of actors, playwrights, designers, and directors, and by changes in theatre architecture and the social definition of space.

THEA 4101 (1). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 4105 (1). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 5.
A continuation of the voice curriculum to further enrich the actor's technique and address any outstanding issues in the work. The vocal workout keeps the actor in tune with his/her instrument while preparing to enter the profession. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THEA 4106 (1). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 6.
A continuation of the voice curriculum, including the study of the International Phonetic Alphabet, dialect and accent work, and the addition of specific skills for a variety of media. Addresses cold-reading skills, studio time and use of microphones, and commercial work for radio and television spots. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THEA 4201 (2). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 4207 (2). MOVEMENT 5.
Explores historical movement and dance, including selected dances, movements, and manners during the 16th-20th centuries, focusing on the embodiment of the style of those periods. Emphasis is placed on the dress, movement, and manners of the Renaissance and Classic Baroque periods. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THEA 4208 (2). MOVEMENT 6.
Explores physical self-study through mask work, including neutral mask, the masks of the commedia dell'arte, the character mask, and the European clown. Also, finding a physical neutral, playing the stock masked commedia characters and their counterparts in plays by Shakespeare and Moliere, and finding one's own personal clown. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

THEA 4301 (3). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 4303 (3). ACTING 5.
An actor's approach to classic texts through scene study, monologues, and lecture and demonstration, with a focus on Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

THEA 4304 (3). ACTING 6.
An actor's approach to classic texts through scene study, monologues, and lecture and demonstration, with a focus on Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

THEA 4305 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 5.
Vocal power, flexibility, and transformation are practiced with a variety of textual demands. Actors work in character voice in scene work and presentations. Students refine their ability to execute detailed speech actions and identify specific phonetic changes using close phonetic transcription.

THEA 4306 (3). VOICE FOR THE STAGE 6.
Vocal power, flexibility, and transformation are practiced with a variety of textual, character, and space demands. Students refine their ability to execute detailed speech actions and identify specific phonetic changes using close phonetic transcription. Students prepare a solo performance employing the skills they have learned in the entire sequence of training.

THEA 4309 (3). BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL ASPECTS OF THEATRE.
A preparation for graduating actors that includes compiling résumés, photographs, cold readings, monologues, and scene work with a variety of scripts for repertory or summer theatre casting.

THEA 4321 (3). ADVANCED SCENE STUDY.
Designed for junior, senior, and graduate theatre majors. Team taught by senior faculty. Includes intensive exploration of modern and contemporary dramatic literature. Reinforces the actor's development of a method of text analysis as an entry to a tactical approach to acting. Uses improvisational techniques and other exercises to facilitate each actor's exploration of his/her full range and complexity of imaginative, intellectual, emotional, and experiential life, as well as each actor's access to these elements of self as useful tools of creative expression. Also, the integration of text analysis and self-use as a process to create an emotionally honest, powerful, and effective moment of dramatic action on the stage.

THEA 4331 (3). PLAYWRITING 3.
Advanced work in the development of performance scripts for the stage with emphasis on full-length works. Prerequisite: THEA 3332.

THEA 4332 (3). PLAYWRITING IV.
Advanced techniques of writing for the stage, including rehearsal and performance or produced theatrical event. Focuses on professional aspects of playwriting. Prerequisite: THEA 4331.

THEA 4341 (3). DIRECTING 3.
Advanced project studies in stage direction with emphasis on the interplay between director and other artistic collaborators (playwrights and/or designers). Prerequisites: THEA 3342 and permission of instructor.

THEA 4342 (3). DIRECTING 4.
Advanced techniques in the interpretation of established dramatic literature and/or creation of original work for the stage. Emphasis on collaboration between director and playwright. This course is for the student seriously considering directing as a career. Time will be spent on exploring professional career choices for the young director. Prerequisites: THEA 4341 and permission of instructor.

THEA 4357 (3). DESIGNING WITH COMPUTERS: STAGE PROJECTION.
Working with the tools necessary to create projected scenery, students learn the fundamentals of creating projected images for the stage.

THEA 4361 (3). STAGE MANAGEMENT 2.
Fuller explanation of the methods and techniques of theatrical stage management. Prerequisites: THEA 3361, 3362.

THEA 4362 (3). STAGE MANAGEMENT 2.
Fuller explanation of the methods and techniques of theatrical stage management. Prerequisites: THEA 3361, 3362.

THEA 4363 (3). PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT.
Introduces the role of the production manager for live entertainment, including budgeting, scheduling, and business aspects.

THEA 4376 (3). LIGHTING AUTOMATION I.
Presents approaches to lighting design and poses specific design problems for the students to solve, with attention given to color composition, cueing, and production values. Focuses on Vari-Lite, Robe, and Martin experimentation.

THEA 4381 (3). STUDIES IN THEATRE, DRAMA, AND PERFORMANCE.
An examination of selected topics in theatre, drama, and performance. Texts, topics, and critical approaches vary.

THEA 4382 (3). STUDIES IN THEATRE, DRAMA, AND PERFORMANCE.
An examination of selected topics in theatre, drama, and performance. Texts, topics, and critical approaches vary.

THEA 4383 (3). STUDIES IN THEATRE, DRAMA, AND PERFORMANCE.
An examination of selected topics in theatre, drama, and performance. Texts, topics, and critical approaches vary.

THEA 4384 (3). STUDIES IN THEATRE, DRAMA, AND PERFORMANCE.
An examination of selected topics in theatre, drama, and performance. Texts, topics, and critical approaches vary.

THEA 4385 (3). STUDIES IN THEATRE, DRAMA, AND PERFORMANCE.
A senior-level, interdisciplinary seminar that examines cultural production through the media of art, architecture, dramaturgy, festival, and theatre.

THEA 4386 (3). EUROPEAN THEATRE, 1879-1953.
A survey of major figures and movements in European theatre, beginning with the premiere of Ibsen's “A Doll's House” and culminating with the premiere of Beckett's “Waiting for Godot.”

THEA 4387 (3). ART AND DRAMA IN CLASSICAL ATHENS.
Intensive reading and discussion seminar focused on the relationships between the visual arts and dramatic performances as seen against the historical background of golden-age Athens during the fifth century B.C.

THEA 4491 (4). SPECIAL PROJECT 1.
Provides meaningful and challenging hands-on leadership experience in the design or technical area, bringing together 3 years of the student's classwork, shop and studio experience, and growth.

THEA 4492 (4). SPECIAL PROJECT 2.
Provides meaningful and challenging hands-on leadership experience in the design or technical area, bringing together 3 years of the student's classwork, shop and studio experience, and growth.

THEA 4493 (4). SUMMER THEATRE WORKSHOP 1.
Students may engage in summer theatre work and gain credit toward degree completion. Enrollment and class credit must be obtained from the chair of the Division of Theatre and the program head.

THEA 4494 (4). SUMMER THEATRE WORKSHOP 2.
Students may engage in summer theatre work and gain credit toward degree completion. Enrollment and class credit must be obtained from the chair of the Division of Theatre and the program head.

THEA 5001 (0). DESIGN LABORATORY I.
Exploration of techniques in advanced design.

THEA 5002 (0). DESIGN LABORATORY II.
More exploration of advanced designtechniques.

THEA 5003 (0). DESIGN LABORATORY III.
Continuing exploration of the techniques in advanced design.

THEA 5004 (0). DESIGN LABORATORY IV.
More exploration of advanced designtechniques.

THEA 5101 (1). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 5103 (1). PROJECTS I.
Performance/production workshops for first-year graduate acting students, directed by faculty.

THEA 5104 (1). PROJECTS II.
Performance/production workshops for first-year graduate acting students, directed by faculty.

THEA 5106 (1). SINGING FOR ACTORS.
Provides fundamental techniques for the embodiment and exploration of melody, rhythm, sustaining sound, shaping lyrics, etc.

THEA 5201 (2). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 5204 (2). ACTING II.
Furthering the embodiment of a fundamental acting process through exercise, discussion, reading, improvisation, and scene study. Dramaturgical materials are drawn primarily from the works of Chekhov, Ibsen, and early modern American realism.

THEA 5205 (2). MOVEMENT I.
Exploration of the actor's self through immersion in physical skills for the theatre, including t'ai chi ch'uan, corporal mime, improvisation, juggling, hatha yoga, unarmed stage combat, animal-style wu shu, and foil fencing.

THEA 5206 (2). MOVEMENT 2.
Exploration of the actor's self through immersion in physical skills for the theatre, including t'ai chi ch'uan, corporal mime, improvisation, juggling, hatha yoga, unarmed stage combat, animal-style wu shu, and foil fencing.

THEA 5207 (2). VOICE FOR THE STAGE I.
Introduces basic principles of physical, vocal, and imaginative freedom through a series of progressive exercises and experiences. Encourages the removal of psychophysical barriers to sound production and develops the voice's sensitivity to impulse, power, flexibility, and range. Includes organic exploration of sounds of speech, using IPA pillows and sound and movement improvisations. Students develop self-scripted solo pieces, explore poetry and song, and apply voice work to modern dramatic texts.

THEA 5208 (2). VOICE FOR THE STAGE II.
Introduces basic principles of physical, vocal, and imaginative freedom through a series of progressive exercises and experiences. Encourages the removal of psychophysical barriers to sound production and develops the voice's sensitivity to impulse, power, flexibility, and range. Includes organic exploration of sounds of speech, using IPA pillows and sound and movement improvisations. Students develop self-scripted solo pieces, explore poetry and song, and apply voice work to modern dramatic texts.

THEA 5209 (2). APPLIED MOVEMENT I.
Bodywork as it pertains to economy of movement, alignment, proper use, kinesthetic awareness, strength, flexibility, and freeing the physical instrument. Includes acrobatics, the Lecoq 20 movements, neutral mask, the physicalization of text, improvisation, and ensemble projects employing the physical work investigated throughout the term.

THEA 5210 (2). APPLIED MOVEMENT II.
Continuation of bodywork as it pertains to economy of movement, alignment, proper use, kinesthetic awareness, strength, flexibility, and freeing the physical instrument. Includes acrobatics, the Lecoq 20 movements, neutral mask, the physicalization of text, improvisation, and ensemble projects employing the physical work investigated throughout the term.

THEA 5215 (2). TEXT ANALYSIS FOR ACTORS I.
Fundamentals of decoding play texts, from reading and comprehension to personalized embodiment, in order to facilitate and render efficiently imaginative the move of the actor. Dramaturgical focus falls on realism texts from the 19th and 20th centuries.

THEA 5216 (2). TEXT ANALYSIS FOR ACTORS II.
Decoding and embodying the texts of Shakespeare.

THEA 5221 (2). SCENE DESIGN I.
An introductory course for designers focusing on the communication skills (visual and verbal) necessary for collaborating with the director and the other artists in the theatre. Includes a design seminar that explores the text relative to its literary, musical, social, and historical influences.

THEA 5222 (2). SCENE DESIGN II.
An introductory course for designers focusing on the communication skills (visual and verbal) necessary for collaborating with the director and the other artists in the theatre. Includes a design seminar that explores the text relative to its literary, musical, social, and historical influences.

THEA 5223 (2). COSTUME DESIGN I.
An introductory course for designers with emphasis on the application of design principles and the use of research materials.

THEA 5224 (2). COSTUME DESIGN II.
An introductory course for designers with emphasis on the application of design principles and the use of research materials.

THEA 5225 (2). LIGHTING DESIGN I.
The fundamentals of learning how to see, exploring the mind's eye, and painting with light. Includes translating theatrical moments and music into lighting sketches, storyboards, and atmospheres, and developing points of view and approaches. Also, the fundamentals of the tools of the lighting designer and assistant skills and techniques.

THEA 5226 (2). LIGHTING DESIGN II.
The fundamentals of learning how to see, exploring the mind's eye, and painting with light. Includes translating theatrical moments and music into lighting sketches, storyboards, and atmospheres, and developing points of view and approaches. Also, the fundamentals of the tools of the lighting designer and assistant skills and techniques.

THEA 5241 (2). COLLABORATION: DIRECTORS AND DESIGNERS.
Team taught by directing and design faculty, this course emphasizes the building of a collaborative process among theatre artists. Students research historical collaborative relationships, create and conceptualize approaches to various texts, and familiarize themselves with the approaches of artists currently working in the theatre.

THEA 5258 (2). PHOTOSHOP.
A continuation of the exploration of tools for computer image creation (e.g., AutoCAD, MiniCAD, and Adobe Photoshop) and their applications.

THEA 5259 (2). ADVANCED DESIGN SKILLS.
Students learn advanced skills in theatrical design practice, including hand drafting, theatrical model-making, set sketching, and digital tablet drawing. Also, fashion illustration and an introduction to textiles.

THEA 5301 (3). DIRECTED STUDY.
Directed study courses are not required and are taken only as needed; form and content are not predetermined. The student and the adviser decide what kind of activity or learning experience should occur. Before the end of the add-drop period, the student must arrange the course content and grading basis with the supervising faculty. Numbers are assigned to the student's year status rather than by the subject matter.

THEA 5303 (3). ACTING I.
Focuses on defining a fundamental acting process, identifying behavioral blocks, channeling impulses into uncluttered and organic psychophysical connections, and using the text as a blueprint for action. Combines a mix of exercise, improvisation, and scene study with materials drawn from modern American realism and the early modernist plays of Ibsen, Strindberg, and Chekhov.

THEA 5304 (3). ACTING II.
Focuses on defining a fundamental acting process, identifying behavioral blocks, channeling impulses into uncluttered and organic psychophysical connections, and using the text as a blueprint for action. Combines a mix of exercise, improvisation, and scene study with materials drawn from modern American realism and the early modernist plays of Ibsen, Strindberg, and Chekhov.

THEA 5319 (3). HISTORY OF DESIGN.
How and why do elements of design describe a culture? Students study design elements and their role in various historical cultures, including the relationships among fashion, art, architecture, and the decorative arts of selected time periods. For majors and nonmajors.

THEA 5321 (3). TOPICS IN DESIGN I: LIGHTING.
Approaches to lighting design and specific design problems for students to solve, with attention given to color composition, cueing, and production values. Focuses on Vari-Lite, Robe, and Martin experimentation.

THEA 5351 (3). SCENE DESIGN III.
A continuation of the study of scene design incorporating individual class projects with the intensive study of style and genre.

THEA 5352 (3). SCENE DESIGN IV.
A continuation of the study of scene design incorporating individual class projects with the intensive study of style and genre.

THEA 5353 (3). COSTUME DESIGN III.
An intermediate course with emphasis on play analysis, character relationships, and techniques of presentation.

THEA 5354 (3). COSTUME DESIGN IV.
Intermediate course with emphasis on play analysis, character relationships, and techniques of presentation.

THEA 5355 (3). LIGHTING DESIGN III.
Continued study in the art of lighting design. Explores advanced atmosphere creation, professional techniques, and specialized approaches. Professional assistantships are assigned to selected students.

THEA 5356 (3). LIGHTING DESIGN IV.
Continued study in the art of lighting design. Advanced atmosphere creation, professional techniques, and specialized approaches are explored. Professional assistantships are assigned to select students.

THEA 5357 (3). DESIGNING WITH COMPUTERS: STAGE PHOTOGRAPHY.
Explores computer image creation tools (e.g., AutoCAD, MiniCAD, Adobe Photoshop) and their applications.

THEA 5371 (3). AUTOMATED LIGHTING 2.
Students work with Vari-Lite, Robe, and Martin automated lighting fixtures while learning advanced programming skills.

THEA 5373 (3). DRAPING I.
A study of pattern making that utilizes the three-dimensional approach of draping fabric on a dress form and the approach of drafting patterns by formula. Students learn to drape a basic bodice, skirt, and collars, to create a basic sleeve pattern by formula, and to manipulate these patterns to achieve a variety of shapes.

THEA 5374 (3). DRAPING II.
Exploration of period dress from a draping point of view.

THEA 5375 (3). THEATRE TECHNOLOGY 5: LIGHTING AUTOMATION.
Advanced studies in the field of automated lighting and control systems. Students explore top brands of intelligent lighting equipment, learning to program and provide simple repair and upkeep of equipment.

THEA 5379 (3). COMPUTER-ASSISTED DESIGN I.
Fundamentals of computer-assisted design, using VectorWorks and Spotlight, in application for the theatre. Emphasizes 2-D work and includes 3-D work. Prerequisite: Knowledge of mechanical drawing and its conventions.

THEA 5380 (3). COMPUTER-ASSISTED DESIGN II.
Uses VectorWorks as the primary drafting software, with a focus on modeling scenic and lighting designs, organization of the drawing layouts, rendering techniques, and lighting-specific CAD tools.

THEA 5398 (3). PRODUCTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT I.
Script analysis, background research, and performance design for actors, designers, and directors.

THEA 5399 (3). PRODUCTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT II.
Script analysis, background research, and performance design for actors, designers, and directors.

Areas of Study

Advertising

Art

Art History

Arts Management and Arts Entrepreneurship

Corporate Communication and Public Affairs

Creative Computation

Dance

Film and Media Arts

Journalism

Music

Theatre

Undergraduate Studies

Graduate Studies

Classes

Undergraduate Classes

Theatre Classes Open to All University Students

Graduate Acting Classes

Graduate General Theatre Topics Classes

Graduate Stage Design Classes

Facilities

Faculty and Staff

Opportunities for Non-Theatre Majors

Student Internships & Collaborations

Alumni

Our Season

Partnerships

Actor Showcases

MFA Design Showcase