The Collection

The Collection

Whether you are a post-doc looking for rare research materials, a practicing architect in need of inspiration, or a student writing a midterm, The Pratt Collection at SMU/Hunt Institute offers resources that can be found nowhere else.
 
The collection includes over 900 books once housed in the library of Pratt, Box, Henderson, and Partners, coupled with Mr. Pratt’s personal collection of books. These volumes span many subjects, from landscape architecture and philosophy to history and botany. While the majority are in English, a fair number are in foreign languages, including French, Italian, Finnish, and Japanese.
 
Small museum bulletins and architectural magazines that Mr. Pratt subscribed to over the years are also included in this collection. Some boxes contain business correspondences, archives, designs, and proposals from a lifetime of architectural and design practice. You’ll also find notebooks containing schoolwork from Mr. Pratt’s days as a student at The University of Texas. Major projects addressed in these files include Fair Park, the Trinity River Corridor, and several initiatives begun during Mr. Pratt’s years with S.O.S. (Save Open Space). A separate section features publications specific to Dallas, including plans, proposals, and studies of highway systems, ecosystems, and geographic viability forurban development.
 
The Pratt Collection is a reference library and materials must be used within the Hunt Institute during regular business hours.
 
James Pratt’s career and family are also the subjects of other collections housed in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.
 
At the Dallas Public Library, materials related to architecture and Goals for Dallas are in repose with the Texas/Dallas History & Archives, Dallas Public Library, 1515 Young Street, Dallas, Texas, 75201.
 
This collection is a combination of materials from the architectural firm of Pratt, Box, Henderson and Partners of Dallas, as well as personal activities of J. Harold Box and James Pratt in civic and professional organizations. A major section contains proceedings and reports related to Goals for Dallas, a city planning committee in the late 1960s. Many of the goals and objectives of this organization are directly related to the development of Dallas in the 1970s. The largest group of materials concerns the American Institute of Architecture and the involvement of Mr. Pratt and Mr. Box in various aspects of this organization between the years 1964-1969.