English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Spring 2017

ENGL 1360-001 (5316):  The American Heroine

12:30-1:50 TTh.  306 DH, Schwartz

Works of American literature as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19th Century to the contemporary period. Novels will be supplemented by other readings. Several short writing assignments; midterm and final examinations; some quizzes. Texts: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Erdrich, Tracks; other short novels and short stories TBA. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY


ENGL 1363-001 (3565): The Myth of the American West

2–3:20 TTh.  115 DH, Weisenburger

In this course we study how the realities of conquest in the nineteenth century American West were transformed into twentieth century legend and myth.  Our case studies include Texas emigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche, as presented in factual, fictional, and cinematic versions; the late-19th phenomenon of Buffalo Bill Cody’s worldwide celebrity; the romance of horse culture and gunfighters in mid-20th century novels and films; and late-20th century revisions to that tradition.  Readings will include biographical and historical sources, representative novels, and a selection of classic Western films from the Silent Era to the present.  Course requirements: evening viewing of 3 feature films, several brief response papers, a mid-term and final exam. 

 

ENGL 2302-001 (2856): Business Writing

12:30-1:50 TTh.  351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2302-002 (2857): Business Writing

2–3:20 TTh.  351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2310-001 (5720):  Imagination and Interpretation: Fantasies Over State. 

8-8:50 MWF.  106 DH,  McKelvey, R. 

Literature has long fantasized alternatives to the political realities surrounding it. Focusing on recent American iterations of this tradition, this course will explore the ways writers have tried to imagine other, better ways of coordinating human relationships and interactions. In particular, we will look at the ways the state has taken hold of literary imagination as the dominant mode of political and social organization, crowding out the very kinds of alternatives literature fantasizes on the page. Towards these ends, we’ll read radical and contemporary poets with utopian visions, including Lawrence Ferlinghetti, John Cage, Amiri Baraka, Nathaniel Mackey, and Stephen Collis, as well as speculative fictions, ranging from science fiction to magical realism, including works by Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Stephen King, and Karen Tei Yamashita. We’ll also explore these issues in related media, including comics, film and digital narratives.

 

ENGL 2310-002 (5728):  Imagination and Interpretation:  Transatlantic Gothic Fiction 

11-11:50 MWF.  107 Hyer, Miskin.

From Twilight to American Horror Story, the gothic tradition continues to haunt the Western imagination. Throughout the semester, we will read literature across history and genre, following Gothic heroes and heroines through labyrinthine spaces of decaying castles and ancestral mansions as well as their own psyches. We will think about the ways that the gothic has been used to explore broader cultural anxieties and desires related to gender, sexuality, race, imperialism, the uncanny, and the pathological. And we will ask such questions as: What can spooky tales of vampires, ghosts, and madwomen tell us about the societies in which they were written? How has the gothic sparked debates about the distinctions between high art and popular entertainment? How do American writers repurpose the gothic to suit their particular aims, creating subgenres like the female gothic, the Southern gothic, and the African American gothic? And finally – why do gothic themes and subjects continue to enthrall readers while other literary traditions lie long dead in their graves?

Possible texts include: Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, Sheridan Le Fanu’s Carmilla, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, and short stories by Edgar Allen Poe, Flannery O’Conner, Iris Murdoch, Anne Rice, and Stephen King. 

 

ENGL 2310-003 (6501):  Imagination and Interpretation:  Digital Humanities

2-4:50 W.  138 DH, Stampone

Can modern technology help us excavate meanings buried in Romantic-period (1750-1867) literature? Do toolboxes from the “digital humanities” allow us to reach wider audiences beyond the classroom and discover how history, editorial processes, and reading strategies shape the ways we understand a text? This class will combine traditional modes of literary analyses with digital humanities tools to help us present our research on British and American Romantic literature in new and meaningful ways and explore some of the many exciting avenues open for literary studies.

 

 

ENGL 2311-001 (2685): Introduction to Poetry

9:30–10:50 TTh.  137 DH, Holahan

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-002 (3566): Introduction to Poetry

3–4:20 MW.  156 DH, Newman

A poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art instead of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us—and we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so will provide you with something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works, which will help you as a reader and writer in whatever you do.  And it will also provide you with a pleasure that may grow on you slowly—or all at once.

Text: Helen Vender, Poems, Poets, Poetry, third edition.  Probably another book related to writing, TBA.

Requirements: frequent short papers (building from 500 words up to 5–6 pages at most); occasional exercises both in class and as homework; 1–2 presentations.

 

ENGL 2312-001 (3367): Introduction to Fiction: The Real Fake

2–3:20 TTh.  157 DH, Cassedy

A typical American spends about 1,000 hours a year reading and watching made-up stories in books, TV, and movies.  Why do we spend so much time with fake stories instead of true facts?  This has never been an easy question to answer, and there have always been some people who think that fiction is bad, because it’s a lie.  Yet we keep consuming it.  Is fiction necessary because it’s pleasurable?  Because it’s educational?  Because it tells the truth? — a truer, darker, or broader truth than nonfiction will allow?  In this class we’ll read fictional stories that tackle the “why fiction?” question.  We’ll study what these stories have to say about the purpose of fiction, and how they exemplify (or fail to exemplify) their own theories of storytelling. Texts will include some or all of the following: Boccaccio, The Decameron; Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides; Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude; Susanna Rowson, Charlotte Temple; Horatio Alger, Ragged Dick; short stories by Karen Russell; Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

 

ENGL 2312-002 (6560):  Introduction to Fiction:  Genre Boundaries

9:30-10:50 TTh.  120 DH, Schwartz

In this class, we’ll read several stories and novels that challenge the boundaries of literary conventions in various ways through detective noir, science fiction, non-traditional narrators, and a little magical realism. Such challenges will require us to define those conventions in order to see their disruptions. Short essays, quizzes, and a final exam.

Texts: Butler, Parable of the Sower; Cortazar, Stories; Haddon, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Mina, Garnethill; Moseley, Devil in a Blue Dress.

 

ENGL 2312-003 (5318): Introduction to Fiction

11–12:20 TTh.  137 DH, Weisenburger

Human beings use story-telling to compose and express understandings of ourselves, others, and our world. While giving us pleasure, narrative also structures memory and is thus foundational to critical and historical thinking and knowledge-making in general. This class aims to build analytical, critical, and writing skills through guided studies of and writings about the short story, novella, novel, and narrative film. We ask what individual fictions do, how they do what they do, where and why these doings are unique to narrative art, and how some stories work to conserve storytelling traditions while others work disrupt conventions. Developing such critical sensitivities to the designs of literary narratives will sharpen our sense of how narrative operates in other fields. This is an introductory course using discussion and lecture, close-reading, and short critical essays. Texts: a fiction anthology, Raymond Chandler’s classic detective novel, The Big Sleep (1939), and Toni Morrison’s historical novel, A Mercy (2009).

 

ENGL 2312-004 (5722): Introduction to Fiction:  Myth and Legend

3-3:50, MWF.  106 DH, McKelvey, C.

How are myths and legends made? This introduction to fiction focuses on narrative constructions of myths and legends. Our objectives will be to define, understand, and then deconstruct the distinctions between myth and legend within the broader category of fiction. We will also consider how myths and legends can be a source of social and political empowerment as well as cultural confusion. We will read a variety of fictional myths as well as the fact/fiction blend of legends, including Malory, Shakespeare, Milton, Keats, Hardy, and Woolf, among others. Most class time will be discussion-based, with an emphasis on critical thinking and class participation. Class assignments will include two essays, a midterm, a final, and quizzes.


ENGL 2314-001 Honors (2716): Doing Things With Poems

11-12:20, TTh.  138 DH, Bozorth

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Assignments: shorter and longer papers approximately 20 pages total; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3rd ed.).

 

ENGL 2315-001 (2686): Introduction to Literary Study

2–3:20 TTh.  116 DH, Neel

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to read imaginative literature in all its forms, from drama to fiction, creative non-fiction to poetry, digital print to film.  The course is historically oriented, beginning with major texts from the Classical Period in Ancient Greece and from both canonized and apocryphal biblical texts, passing through numerous major literary texts from the Early Modern to Modern eras, and culminating with the very contemporary poetry of Rita Dove and the recent films of Alejandro Iñárritu, each of whom is very aware of and quite self-consciously works within the long tradition of Western literature. Two out-of-class papers, each completely rewritten after submission and critique; one comprehensive in-class essay; five reading quizzes; required class attendance.  Some, but not all, of the authors we will look at include: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristotle, John Milton, Mary Wroth, Charlotte Turner Smith, Virginia Woolf, Kurt Vonnegut, William Shakespeare, and William Wordsworth.

 

ENGL 2315-002 (3553): Introduction to Literary Study: Imagining “America” in Narrative

12–12:50 MWF.  153 DH, Ards

In this course, you will learn to interpret literature through close attention to literary form, genre, and historical context.  This critical project is grounded in the thematic approach of exploring the idea of “America” in texts that have been central to the definition of American national identity during crucial periods of national transformation. Sample texts include William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Henry James, Daisy Miller; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; James Weldon Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird; NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names.

 

ENGL 2390-001 (3095): Introduction to Creative Writing

10–10:50 MWF.  106 DH, Haynes

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: Janet Burroway, Imagining Fiction, 4th edition (Pearson, 2014).

 

ENGL 2390-002 (3555): Introduction to Creative Writing

2–2:50 MWF.  137 DH, Haynes

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: Janet Burroway, Imagining Fiction, 4th edition (Pearson, 2014).


ENGL 2390-003 (3567): Introduction to Creative Writing

12:30-1:50 TTh.  138DH, Rubin

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and helpfully discussing their classmates'.


ENGL 2390-004 (3743): Introduction to Creative Writing

11–11:50 MWF.  138 DH, Smith

In this class students will write and revise stories, essays, and poems; respond to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 3310-002 (2436):  Contemporary Approaches to Literature

9-9:50am MWF. 156 DH, Foster

What is literature?  How do we read it, and why?  How can students make sense of and use literary criticism?  This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them.  Writing assignments: Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts (possible): Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today:  A User-Friendly Guide (second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Scribner); James Joyce, The Dead(Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare, The Tempest (Bedford Case Studies ed.); additional selected readings.

 

CLAS 3312-001: Classical Rhetoric

11–12:20 TTh. 152 DH, Neel

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world's first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE.  Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and the study of philosophy emerged into history.  Two out-of-class papers (each rewritten after critique), one comprehensive in-class paper, and five reading quizzes.  Class attendance required.  Counts toward graduation in the Classical Studies Program and as an elective in both the English major and the English minor.

 

ENGL 3320-001 (5319):  Topics in Medieval Literature:  King Arthur

9:30-10:50 TTh.  156 DH, Wheeler

King Arthur is the most popular and most frequently revived Western hero from the Middle Ages to the current moment. This course examines the Arthurian story—Camelot, the knights of the Round Table, chivalry, and the Holy Grail—from its roots in the Middle Ages to its flourishing in literature and movies today.

 

ENGL 3382-001 (5320):  Heroic Visions:  The Epic Poetry of Homer and Virgil

12:30-1:50 TTh.  102 Hyer, Holahan

This course studies the traditions of heroic representation that come down to Western literature from the epic poetry of Greece and Rome.  Attention also goes to the influence of Middle-Eastern and North-African traditions of heroic or passionate story as these cultural elements are embedded in Homer and Vergil.  The story of the hero raises issues that bear upon gender identity and the warrior’s psychology as well as the relation between myth and history.  Battle and quest are the primary narrative shapes, although the elusive figure of the poet can be made out at important moments of conquest and discovery.  Throughout an attempt will be made to consider the idea of a classic and whether or not that idea can ever be separated from controversies over vision. 

Texts

Homer The Iliad, tr. Lattimore Chicago paperback

Homer, The Odyssey, tr Fitzgerald, Noonday paperback

Vergil, The Aeneid, tr. Mandelbaum, Bantam Classics

 

ENGL 3384-001 (3440):  Literature and Medicine

11-11:50 MWF.  115 DH, Foster

UC components:               UC 2012: CA2, PRE2, W, HD; UC 2016: HFA2, W, HD

What can Hemingway teach us about surgery and pain? Susanna Kaysen about being diagnosed with a personality disorder? Atul Gawande about the uncertain path of medicine? Through literature, we can begin to imagine experience of medicine for both doctors and patients. The sick and injured live in a complex relationship not only with doctors and hospitals, but with friends and family, law and government, insurance and big pharma. The ill take on a new identity as the patient, and can find themselves swept up into the narratives of a healthcare system whose goals sometimes seem at odds with those of the patient. Doctors must tend to the bodies and minds of patients, but also handle family, colleagues, medical institutions and the accidents of nature. This course will help us to understand the roles each of us play as patients and healers. We will have to think, for example, about the stories, both horrific and heroic, that arise in response to the maladies that afflict us individually and collectively (as Ebola  or Zika have transformed the health narrative world-wide). We’ll consider the birth of the modern clinic in an enlightenment world; the role of the mentally ill as sanity’s shadow; and the stories doctors tell to help them endure the hardships of medicine. We will explore the ethical dilemmas that arise in this age of medical marvels when we must decide who will live, for how long, under what conditions, at what expense, at whose choice. We will read a wide variety of literature, history, biography, philosophy, and science to help us understand the ways in which illness and medicine talk together. 

Readings may include: Michele Foucault: The Birth of the Clinic; Atul Gawande: Complications; Tony Hope: Medical Ethics: A very short introduction; Susanna Kaysen: Girl Interrupted; Tracy Kidder: Mountains Beyond Mountains


ENGL 3385-001 (3771):  Literature of the Holocaust

10-10:50 MWF.  120 DH, Satz

This course explores both the literature of the Holocaust and issues surrounding  the possibility of aesthetic  portrayal  of this horrific event.    It considers   both Holocaust literature and post-Holocaust literature.  It will consider both literary and ethical questions swirling around this horrific event.   Examples of texts: Bassanni, Garden of the Finzi-Continis,  Wiesel, Night; Speigelman, Maus; Borowski, This Way for the Gas;  Ladies and Gentlemen; Schlink, The Reader; Roth, The Ghostwriter; Holocaust poetry.  Course requirements:  four papers of various lengths; mid-term and final. 


ENGL 3390-001 (3125): Studies in Creative Writing:  Poetry Workshop

12:30–1:50 TTh.  102 DH, Brownderville

In this workshop-intensive course, students will write, revise, and analyze poetry. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. Students will write five-page belletristic articles about published poetry, including work by Rigoberto Paredes, Evie Shockley, Eduardo Corral, and Nicole Sealey. In addition, toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own poems. Successful students will begin to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary poetry.

 

ENGL 3390-002 (3126): Studies in Creative Writing - Short Story Masterpieces

3:30-4:50 TTh.  153 DH, Rubin

This workshop will give students an opportunity to work on their own short stories while reading foundational masterpieces of the short story form, including work by Kafka, Chekhov, Melville, Welty, Baldwin, and Oates.

 

ENGL 3390-003 (3642): Studies in Creative Writing

1–1:50 MWF.  115 DH, Smith

In this class students will write, revise, and analyze imaginative prose. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing. 

 

ENGL 4339-001 (5322): Transatlantic Studies I: Going Native

11–12:20 TTh.  357 DH, Cassedy

This course is about two related narratives in Anglo-American culture: the narrative of being taken captive, and the narrative of going native.  Captivity narratives took a number of different forms in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, including stories of whites being carried off by Indians, women being imprisoned by nefarious men with sexual designs on them, and sailors being stranded in strange lands and waters.  Some of those captives resisted captivity.  Others embraced it, “going native” and finding that their solitude or captivity allowed them to access parts of themselves that their home societies did not.  Texts: Robinson Crusoe; Gulliver’s Travels; The Female American; Mary Rowlandson’s Captivity; The Noble SlavesCaptivity of Mrs. Maria MartinWalden; Huckleberry FinnAvatar.

 

ENGL 4343-001 (5323):  British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Austen, Bronte, Eliot

11-11:50 MWF.  120 DH, Satz. 

A consideration of the works of three major nineteenth century novelists against the background of history, gender constraints, and philosophical considerations.  Assignments: four papers of varying lengths, mid-term and final. Texts: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Austen, Emma; Bronte, Jane Eyre; Bronte, Villette; Eliot, Middlemarch; and Eliot, Mill on the Floss.

 

ENGL 4360-001 (5325):  Studies in Modern American Literature: Beyoncé’s New South Aesthetics

2-2:50 MWF.  153DH, Ards

Beyoncé Knowles’ 2016 audiovisual project, Lemonade, conjures a black southern experience from multiple places and modes—from memories and sounds of New Orleans pre- and post Hurricane Katrina, to the ancestral wisdom of grandmothers passed down through the generations. The course explores how Lemonade flips familiar cultural markers of black southern identity into a meditation and manifesto about what it means to be black and southern now. We will ground our readings and discussions with question such as these: What type of South is Lemonade trying to get us to see and hear? What are the feminist frameworks, from Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and Gloria Naylors' Mama Day to filmmaker Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust, that animate Lemonade’s vision? And what exactly does it mean to “get in formation”? What are the theories of change embedded in this groundbreaking cultural work? 

Sample Texts 

Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

In Love and Trouble, Alice Walker

Mama Day, Gloria Naylor

Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth, Warsan Sire

The Fire This TimeA New Generation Speaks about Race, ed. Jesmyn Ward

Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity, Shana Redmond

Sister Citizen, Melissa Harris-Perry

Grading Scale

Reading Responses              20%

Reading Quizzes                   10%

Final Research Project           25%

Final Exam                            25%

Class Leadership                    20%

 

ENGL 4360-002 (5324):  Studies in Modern American Literature: Literature at the US-Mexico Borderlands

9:30–10:50 TTh.  Hyer 110, Sae-Saue

This course will explore how novels, plays, and poems produced during and after the US annexation of northern Mexico (now the US Southwest) have communicated social, political, and economic dilemmas of nation making, including matters of race, class, gender, and citizenship. This means that we will also attend to important texts that deal with Texas in particular. 

Primarily, we will look at texts produced by Mexican Americans, Chicana/os, and Native Americans in order to examine an ethnic perspective of American life in the region. We will begin by looking at texts written in the 19th century and conclude having examined contemporary works in order to explore their various formal qualities, and the competing  ethnic, political, and national ideologies they articulate. 

Tentative reading list:

Caballero, The Squatter and The Don, Who Would Have Thought it?, George Washington Gomez, Ceremony, Los Vendidos, various Corridos, and more.


 

ENGL 6330-001 (5326):  Early Modern British Literature:  Sex and the City in the 18th Century

3-5:50 M.  137 DH, Sudan

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many labors of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. The aims of this course are twofold. We will examine the ways in which gendered identities develop as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. But we will also examine the materials of empire-building in relation to the reconstruction of this English city, and in so doing, uncover other genealogies and histories that shape the emergence of British imperialism.

 

ENGL 6340-001 (5327) – British Literature Age of Revolutions:  Victorian Fiction

3-5:50pm W.  137 DH, Murfin

A reading-intensive survey of works by Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, Geroge Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy.  The recurring theme of the course will be representation--within the novel, of the novel and its role, of a changing political reality by the novel, and of history via narrative strategies and techniques that are unavailable to historians.  The goal of the course is to ensure that every student taking it emerges from our Ph.D. program with a mastery of--and hence the ability to teach--six or seven works generally deemed to represent the best of Victorian fiction.  Because a significant amount of reading will be required, writing assignments will be limited to one short and one medium-length paper.  Each student will also make an oral presentation and take an essay final.

 

ENGL 7370-001 (5328):  Seminar in Minority Literature:  History, Form and Genre at the Borderlands

12:30–3:20 Th.  00G1 Hyer, Sae-Saue

This course will explore the relationship between historical contingencies at the US-Mexico border and the formal and generic responses within the Chicana/o literary imagination. We will begin by examining texts produced at the moment of the US annexation of Northern Mexico in the 19th century and continue through the present day to explore how writers have borrowed, deployed, and innovated forms of literary representation in order to articulate matters of history, race, identity, gender, and class from an ethnic perspective.

To help theorize the modes of representation that have characterized borderlands art (and the concept of the “borderlands” proper) we will read theories of Gloria Anzaluda, Rafa Perez-Torres, Ramon Saldivar, Jose Limon and others in conjunction with broader works on the theory of form and genre, including those by M.M. Bahktin, G. Lukacs, F. Jameson, and more. Other theoretical and critical material will come from Frantz Fanon, Anne Cheng, Dorris Sommer, and Ann Kaplan, among others.

Primary works by: Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Luis Valdez, Virginia Grise, Americo Paredes, Rudolfo Anaya, and the Hernandez Brothers. 

 

ENGL 7372-001 (6523):  Seminar in Transatlantic Literature:  Historical Consciousness and LGBT Literature

3:30-6:20 T.  120 DH, Bozorth

Major work by LGBT writers from Oscar Wilde to the present.  The advent of the sexual revolution and gay liberation in the 1970s brought about a vast increase in US and UK literature by and about LGBT people.  Nonetheless, a striking amount of this writing has shown a preoccupation with the past, and in this it shares a great deal with pre-Stonewall queer writing.  This course will survey major works by LGBT writers, with a focus on how and why this historical concerns have shaped their work following what Foucault called the “invention” of homosexuality, in the 19th century, and up through contemporary fiction and film.  We will consider which eras from the past LGBT writers have turned to, and what this says about sexual politics in their present.  We will examine the sexual-political tension between seeking authority for modern queer desire in past eras (e.g. the ancient world), and the impulse to be liberated from an oppressive history.  We will consider how ideas about history and disease have shaped responses to AIDS in the 1980s and 90s.  And we will try to figure out why pre-Stonewall tales of LGBT experience have so shaped contemporary cinematic representations.  

Possible texts from the following:  Oscar Wilde, Salome and The Portrait of Mr. W. H.; E. M. Forster, Maurice; poetry by HD, W. H. Auden, Allen Ginsberg, Adrienne Rich, and others; Virginia Woolf, Orlando; Gore Vidal, The City and the Pillar; Rita Mae Brown, Rubyfruit Jungle; Andrew Holleran, Dancer From the Dance; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit; Alan Hollinghurst,The Swimming-Pool Library; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Tony Kushner, Angels In America; Annie Proulx/Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain; Christopher Isherwood/Tom Ford, A Single Man

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1360

001

American Heroine

Schwartz, Nina

TTh

12:30

1:50

306 DH

CA, HD

1363

001

Myth of the American West

Weisenburger, Steven

TTh

2:00

3:20

115 DH

HC, CA

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

12:30

1:50

351 DH

IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

2:00

3:20

351 DH

IL, OC, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

001H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Goyne, Jo

TTh

9:30

10:50

KCRC 0150

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

002H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Goyne, Jo

TTh

11:00

12:20

KCRC 0150

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

003H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

10:00

10:50

VSNI 0303

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

004H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

11:00

11:50

VSNI 0303

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

005H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 0303

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

006H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hinton, Anna

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 0135

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

007H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Forrester, Andrew

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 0135

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

008H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Amsel, Stephanie

TTh

11:00

12:20

CMRC 0132

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

009H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Rosendale, Timothy

TTh

12:30

1:50

120 DH

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

010H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Arbery, Joan

MWF

9:00

9:50

106 DH

CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

011H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Arbery, Joan

MWF

10:00

10:50

343 DH

CA, W

2310

001

Imagination & Interpretation: Fantasies Over State

McKelvey, Seth

MWF

8:00

8:50

106DH

CA2, CA, W

2310

002

Imagination & Interpretation: Transatlantic Gothic Fiction

Miskin, Lauren

MWF

11:00

11:50

107 Hyer

CA2, CA, W

2310 003
Imagination & Interpretation:  Digital Humanities Stampone, Christopher  W 2:00
4:50 138 DH
CA2, CA, W

2311

001

Intro to Poetry

Holahan, Michael

TTh

9:30

10:50

137 DH

CA2, LL, W

2311

002

Intro to Poetry

Newman, Beth

MW

3:00

4:20

156 DH

CA2, LL, W

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: The Real Fake

Cassedy, Tim

TTh

2:00

3:20

157 DH

CA2, LL, W, OC

2312 002
Intro to Fiction: Genre Boundaries Schwartz, Nina TTh 9:30 10:50 120 DH
CA2, LL, W, OC

2312

003

Intro to Fiction

Weisenburger, Steven

TTh

11:00

12:20

137 DH

CA2, LL, W, OC

2312

004

Intro to Fiction: Myth & Legend

McKelvey, Chelsea

MWF

3:00

3:50

106 DH

CA2, LL, W, OC

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems

Bozorth, Richard

TTh

11:00

12:20

138 DH

CA2, LL, W

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study

Neel, Jasper

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

CA2, CA, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: Imagining “America” in Narrative

Ards, Angela

MWF

12:00

12:50

153 DH

CA2, CA, W

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes, David

MWF

10:00

10:50

106 DH

CA, W

2390

002

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes, David

MWF

2:00

2:50

137 DH

CA, W

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

Rubin, Jacob

TTh

12:30

1:50

138 DH

CA, W

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith, Sanderia

MWF

11:00

11:50

138 DH

CA, W

3310

002

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Foster, Dennis

MWF

9:00

9:50

156 DH

 

(CLAS) 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel, Jasper

TTh

11:00

12:20

152 DH

W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Lit: King Arthur

Wheeler, Bonnie

TTh

9:30

10:50

156 DH

CA2

3382

001

Heroic Visions: The Epic Poetry of Homer and Virgil

Holahan, Michael

TTh

12:30

1:50

102 HYER

 

3384

001

Literature and Medicine

Foster, Dennis

MWF

11:00

11:50

115 DH

UC 2012: CA2,, PRE2, W, HD

UC 2016: HFA2, HD, W

3385

001

Lit of the Holocaust

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00

10:50

120 DH

HFA, HD, OC, W, CA2

3390

001

Studies in Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

12:30

1:50

102 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

3390

002

Studies in Creative Writing

Rubin, Jacob

TTh

3:30

4:50

153 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

3390

003

Studies in Creative Writing

Smith, Sanderia

MWF

1:00

1:50

115 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: Going Native

Cassedy, Tim

TTh

11:00

12:20

357 DH

IL, OC

4343

001

Studies in Brit Lit in the Age of Revs: Austin, Bronte, Eliot

Satz, Martha

MWF

11:00

11:50

120 DH

IL, OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern American Lit.: Beyoncé’s New South Aesthetics

Ards, Angela

MWF

2:00

2:50

153 DH

CA2, HFA

4360

002

Studies in Modern American Lit.: Literature at the US-Mexico Borderlands

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30

10:50

110 HYER

CA2, HFA

6330

001

Early Modern British Lit: Sex & the City in the 18th Century

Sudan, Rajani

M

3:00

5:50

DH 137

 

6340

001

British Lit Age of Rev: Victorian Fiction

Murfin, Ross

W

3:00

5:50

DH 137

 

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Lit: History, Form & Genre at the Borderlands

Sae-Saue, Jayson

Th

12:30

3:20

HYER00G1

 

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Lit: Historical Consciousness and LGBT Literature

 

Bozorth, Richard

T

3:30

6:20

DH120

 

Cat#

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

2310

001

Imagination & Interpretation: Fantasies Over State

McKelvey, Seth

MWF

8:00

8:50

106 DH

CA2, CA, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

010H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Arbery, Joan

MWF

9:00

9:50

106 DH

 

3310

002

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Foster, Dennis

MWF

9:00

9:50

156 DH

 

DISC & ENGL 2306

003H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

10:00

10:50

VSNI 0303

 

DISC & ENGL 2306

011H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Arbery, Joan

MWF

10:00

10:50

343 DH

 

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes, David

MWF

10:00

10:50

106 DH

CA, W

3385

001

Lit of the Holocaust

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00

10:50

120 DH

HFA, HD, OC, W, CA2

DISC & ENGL 2306

004H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MFW

11:00

11:50

VSNI 0303

 

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith, Sanderia

MWF

11:00

11:50

138 DH

CA, W

2310

002

Imagination & Interpretation: Transatlantic Gothic Fiction

Miskin, Lauren

MWF

11:00

11:50

107 Hyer

CA2, CA, W

3384

001

Literature and Medicine

Foster, Dennis

MWF

11:00

11:50

115 DH

HFA, HD, W

4343

001

Studies in Brit Lit in the Age of Revs: Austin, Bronte, Eliot

Satz, Martha

MWF

11:00

11:50

120 DH

IL, OC

DISC & ENGL 2306

005H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 0303

 

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: Imagining “America” in Narrative

Ards, Angela

MWF

12:00

12:50

153 DH

CA2, CA, W

3390

003

Studies in Creative Writing

Smith, Sanderia

MWF

1:00

1:50

115 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

2390

002

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes, David

MWF

2:00

2:50

137 DH

CA, W

4360

001

Studies in Modern American Lit.: Beyoncé’s New South Aesthetics

Ards, Angela

MWF

2:00

2:50

153 DH

CA2, HFA

2312

004

Intro to Fiction: Myth & Legend

McKelvey, Chelsea

MWF

3:00

3:50

106 DH

LL, W, OC

2311

002

Intro to Poetry

Newman, Beth

MW

3:00

4:20

156 DH

CA2, LL, W

6330

001

Early Modern British Lit: Sex & the City in the 18th Century

Sudan, Rajani

M

3:00

5:50

DH 137

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7372

001

Seminar in Transatlantic Lit: Historical Consciousness and LGBT Literature

 

Bozorth, Richard

T

3:30

6:20

DH120

 

2310 003 Imagination & Interpretation:  Digital Humanities
Stampone, Christoper
W 2:00 4:50
138 DH
 CA2,CA, W

6340

001

British Lit Age of Rev: Victorian Fiction

Murfin, Ross

W

3:00

5:50

137 DH

 

DISC & ENGL 2306

001H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Goyne, Jo

TTh

9:30

10:50

KCRC 0150

 

DISC & ENGL 2306

006H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Hinton, Anna

TTh

9:30

10:50

MCEL 0135

 

2311

001

Intro to Poetry

Holahan, Michael

TTh

9:30

10:50

137 DH

CA2, LL, W

2312 002 Intro to Fiction: Genre Boundaries Schwartz, Nina
TTh 9:30 10:50 120 DH
CA2, LL, OC, W

3320

001

Topics in Medieval Lit: King Arthur

Wheeler, Bonnie

TTh

9:30

10:50

156 DH

CA2

4360

002

Studies in Modern American Lit.: Literature at the US-Mexico Borderlands

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30

10:50

110 HYER

CA2, HFA

1363

001

Myth of the American West

Weisenburger, Steven

TTh

2:00

3:20

115 DH

HC, CA

DISC & ENGL 2306

002H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Goyne, Jo

TTh

11:00

12:20

KCRC 0150

 

DISC & ENGL 2306

008H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Amsel, Stephanie

TTh

11:00

12:20

CMRC 0132

 

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems

Bozorth, Richard

TTh

11:00

12:20

138 DH

LL, W

(CLAS) 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel, Jasper

TTh

11:00

12:20

152 DH

W

4339

001

Transatlantic Studies I: Going Native

Cassedy, Tim

TTh

11:00

12:20

357 DH

IL, OC

1360

001

American Heroine

Schwartz, Nina

TTh

12:30

1:50

306 DH

CA, HD

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

12:30

1:50

351 DH

IL, OC, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

009H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Rosendale, Timothy

TTh

12:30

1:50

120 DH

 

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

Rubin, Jacob

TTh

12:30

1:50

138 DH

CA, W

3382

001

Heroic Visions: The Epic Poetry of Homer & Virgil

Holahan, Michael

TTh

12:30

1:50

102 HYER

 

3390

001

Studies in Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

12:30

1:50

102 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

2:00

3:20

351 DH

IL, OC, W

DISC & ENGL 2306

007H

Hon. Hum. Sem. II

Forrester, Andrew

TTh

2:00

3:20

MCEL 0135

 

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: The Real Fake

Cassedy, Tim

TTh

2:00

3:20

157 DH

LL, W, OC

2312

003

Intro to Fiction

Weisenburger, Steven

TTh

11:00

12:20

137 DH

LL, W, OC

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study

Neel, Jasper

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

CA2, CA, W

3390

002

Studies in Creative Writing

Rubin, Jacob

TTh

3:30

4:50

153 DH

CA, CA2, W, HFA

7370

001

Seminar in Minority Lit: History, Form & Genre at the Borderlands

Sae-Saue, Jayson

Th

12:30

3:20

HYER00G1