English Courses

Course Descriptions, Spring 2013

ENGL 1360-001 (3386). THE AMERICAN HEROINE. 12:30 TTH 306 Dallas Hall. Schwartz.

Works of American literature as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19th Century to the contemporary period. Novels will be supplemented by other readings. Several short writing assignments; midterm and final examinations; some quizzes. Texts: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Erdrich, Tracks; other short novels and short stories TBA. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY

ENGL 1365-001 (3407). LITERATURE OF MINORITIES. 12 MWF. 115 Dallas Hall. Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as both local and global. Writing assignments: two essays, mid-term, final examination.Enrollment limited to Hilltop Scholars. Texts: Bechdel, Fun Home; Larson, Passing, Tomine, Shortcomings, Roth, Goodbye, Columbus; Hegedorn, Charlie Chan is Dead; and selected short stories distributed throughout the term. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY, PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1

ENGL 1385 (3207). Power, Passion, and Protest in Brit. Lit. 11 MWF. 115 Dallas Hall. Rosendale.

A high-speed, one-semester introductory overview of British literature, from its medieval beginnings to (almost) the present day, with attention to literature’s capacities to pursue desire and to exercise (and resist) various kinds of power. As we survey this history, and trace the story of one of the world’s great cultural treasures, we will consider literature in relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written, as well as its relevance to our own time. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wroth, Donne, Milton, Behn, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Beckett. Method of instruction: lecture and discussion. Methods of evaluation: midterm and final exams, quizzes, short essays, participation. Texts: TBA. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PILLARS/HISTORICAL CONTEXTS LEVEL 1.

ENGL 2302-001 (3427). BUSINESS WRITING. 12:30 TTh. 351 Dallas Hall. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2302-002 (3428). BUSINESS WRITING. 2 TTh. 351 Dallas Hall. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2310-001 (5954). IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION. 10 MWF. 106 Dallas Hall. Anderson.

The legend of King Arthur has fascinated and engaged readers for nearly a thousand years. This class will examine the major texts of Arthurian literature, concentrating heavily on its medieval roots. We will also consider later iterations of the legend, including 19th and 20th century representations. Along the way, we will ask (and perhaps begin to answer) who writes about King Arthur? Why do they do so, and what do we gain from exploring this material? Why does the legend continue to have such a grasp on our collective imagination? Weekly responses to the reading, quizzes, three short papers, a midterm and a final exam will be required. Possible Texts: Geoffrey of Monmouth – The History of the Kings of Britain; Anon. – Culhwch and Olwen; Chrétien de Troyes – Yvain; Anon. - Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Sir Thomas Malory – Morte Darthur; Mark Twain – A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; excerpts from Gildas, Nennius, Chaucer, and a selection of medieval romances. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2311-001 (2983). POETRY. 11 MWF. DALLAS HALL 137. Moss.

An introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers, and attending to the form, history, analysis, and interpretation of poetry. Special attention to writing about literature. Evaluation: brief response exercises, 15-20 pages of writing, midterm and final exams, class participation. Texts: Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (third edition). GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2311-002 (2875). POETRY. 12 MWF. 138 Dallas Hall. Swann.

What, exactly, is “poetry”? Why, over the centuries, have the most brilliant and creative writers in the English language turned to poetry to express themselves? What skills and knowledge does a contemporary reader need to understand and enjoy the extraordinary richness of English poetry written over the past five hundred years? And how can we use these skills and knowledge to appreciate the place of poetry in our own lives in twenty-first-century America? This course requires students to analyze a wide variety of poems written in English. Each student will develop an understanding of poetry and specific poems, learn about the principal conventions and techniques of poetry, and gain an appreciation of the cultural importance of poetry from the sixteenth century through to the present day. Course requirements include daily quizzes, four essays, an oral presentation, and a comprehensive final exam. Required Texts: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard. Recommended Text: Jane E. Aaron, The Little, Brown Essential Handbook, 7th ed. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2311-003 (3779). POETRY. 3 MW. 116 Dallas Hall. Bozorth.

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to spot exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3d ed.); Andrea Lunsford, EasyWriter (4th ed.). GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2312-003 (2709). FICTION. 9 MWF. 156 Dallas Hall. Booker.

An introduction to the genre of fiction with an emphasis on the Gothic novel. The course will combine primary texts with short secondary texts. Writers include Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Emily Bronte, Wilkie Collins, and Bram Stoker. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, one longer essay. Texts: TBA. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2312-002H (2928). FICTION. 12:30 TTh. 102 Dallas Hall. Sae-Saue.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet how does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? How does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation. Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, you will be able to: identify several formal elements in a work of literature. Write an analysis of an interpretive problem in a work of literature. Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2312 (5962). Fiction. 2:00 TTH. 157 Dallas Hall. Weisenburger.

Human beings use story-telling to compose and express understandings of ourselves, others, and our world. While giving us pleasure, narrative also structures memory and is thus foundational to critical and historical thinking and knowledge-making in general. This class aims to build analytical, critical, and writing skills through guided studies of and writings about the short story, novella, novel, and narrative film. We ask what individual fictions do, how they do what they do, where and why these doings are unique to narrative art, and how some stories work to conserve storytelling traditions while others work disrupt conventions. Developing such critical sensitivities to the designs of literary narratives will sharpen our sense of how narrative operates in other fields. This is an introductory course using discussion and lecture, close-reading, and short critical essays. Texts: a fiction anthology, Raymond Chandler’s classic detective novel, The Big Sleep (1939), & Toni Morrison’s historical novel, A Mercy (2009). GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2313 (3127). DRAMA. 9 MWF. 102 Dallas Hall. CRUSIUS.

Introduction to the study of drama as both literary and theatrical experience. Students will examine dramatic texts and attend live productions or see film versions of some of the plays. Writing assignments: four short essays, mid-term, final examination. Texts: Aeschylus, Agamemnon; Sophocles, Antigone; Euripides, The Bacchae; Shakespeare, Othello; Ibsen, Hedda Gabler; Williams, Streetcar Named Desire; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Wilson, Fences; and selected other texts. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2314 (3051). Doing things with poems. 1 MWF. 120 Dallas Hall. Rosendale.

In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, how to do things with it, and why it’s worth caring quite a lot about. We will attend to sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning. We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding and then to pleasure. We’ll read lots of great English and American poems, quite a few good ones, and a few lousy ones, from the middle ages to the present day. We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it. We’ll argue sometimes about what a poem means, but it will be okay: that’s part of how thoughtful, interesting reading works. By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it. Evaluation: 15-20 pages of short papers; midterm & final exams; in-class presentation; attendance and participation. Texts: TBD GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2315-003 (2984). Introduction to Literary Study. 2 MWF. 116 Dallas Hall. Neel.

An introduction to the professional study of literature from the perspectives of genre and history. The course will comprise a wide array of readings as a way to understand how the conventions of genre and traditions of history shape, govern, and sometimes even inhibit interpretation. The course will include several poems (with the focal text being Samson Agonistes), some prose fiction (with the focal text being Tristram Shandy), some drama (with the focal text being Hamlet), and some prose non-fiction (with the focal texts being Tale of a Tub and Culture and Anarchy). Weekly quizzes; four medium-length, out-of-class papers; one comprehensive, written final exam. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING. ENGL 2315-002 (2985). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 12:30 TTH. 138 Dallas Hall. Cassedy. Introduction to the discipline of literary study, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Assignments: four essays; midterm; final exam. Texts: The Iliad; King Lear; Hawthorne; Poe; Dickinson; Moby-Dick. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2315-003 (3780). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 3:30 TTH. 142 Dallas Hall. Ards.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of fields, genres, and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination. Texts: Shakespeare, The Tempest; Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass; Henry James, Daisy Miller; James Weldon Johnson, The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man; Eugene O'Neil, A Long Day's Journey Into Night; Zadie Smith, On Beauty; Jhumpa Lahiri, Unaccustomed Earth. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2390-001 (5969). INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. 3:30 TTh. 156 Dallas Hall. Haynes.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Text: Geraldine Brooks, ed. BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 2011. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2390-002 (5970). INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. 3:30 TTh. 157 Dallas Hall. Brownderville.

The purpose of this course is to study fundamentals of craft in three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students produce their own work, critique their peers’, and analyze published texts. Toward the end of the semester, each student is required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Text: The Vintage Book of Contemporary American Poetry, McClatchy, rev. exp. edition. ISBN: 1400030935 UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 2390-003 (5971). INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. 3:30 TTh. 102 Dallas Hall. Diaconoff.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: John D'Agata. ed. THE NEXT AMERICAN ESSAY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3310-001 (2494). CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. 11 MWF. 101 Dallas Hall. Crusius.

An introduction to contemporary methods of interpreting literature and to the theoretical assumptions--about language, culture, gender, politics, sexuality, and psychology--informing these methods. Writing assignments: four short essays, final examination. Texts: Stephen Lynn, Texts and Contexts; Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds., The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; course packet of readings.

ENGL 3310-002 (2495). Contemporary Approaches to Literature 3 MW. 357 Dallas Hall. Murfin.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination. Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism.

ENGL 3320-001 (5982). TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 12 MWF. 153 Dallas Hall. Anderson.

This course will explore the development of courtly love from its origins in Ovid to its medieval articulation in Andreas Capellanus’ De Amore. We will consider courtly love as a guiding principle for medieval society, as a component of ideal knighthood, and as a trope to be prodded, mocked, and challenged by Chaucer. Possible texts include: Ovid – The Art of Love, Andreas Capellanus – De Amore, Chrétien de Troyes – The Knight of the Cart, Béroul – Tristan, Geoffrey Chaucer – Troilus and Criseyde, The Parliament of Fowls, The Knight’s Tale. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3340 (3242). STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 5:30 M. 102 Hyer Hall. MURFIN.

A reading-intensive survey of four or five long, major works by some of the following Victorian novelists: Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy. This course will be very loosely linked with a doctoral seminar in which graduate students will be reading six or seven novels by these same authors and occasionally participating, as individuals, in our discussions. Because the course will require a significant amount of reading, writing will be limited to an 8-10 page paper, due at the end of the term, plus four or five in-class writing assignments. These will be used to identify significant writing problems before the paper is due, but grades given will mainly reflect the extent to which students are caught up with the reading. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3344-001 (5984). VICTORIAN GENDER. 1 MWF. DALLAS Hall 115. Newman.

Why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to us about what it means to be a man or woman, despite the differences between us and the Victorians? We will explore the way fiction, poetry, and other writing from the period constructs, reflects, questions, and protests the gender distinctions that Victorians understood as the foundation of the social world. Writing assignments: three papers (4-5 pages); mid-term and final examinations; reading quizzes; possible short, informal postings to discussion board or group discussion-planning. Texts: C. Brontë, Jane Eyre; Dickens, Great Expectations, Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; selected nineteenth-century poems and cultural documents posted to Blackboard. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY, PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3346-001 (5987) [3307]. AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I. 11 TTH. 107 Hyer Hall. Greenspan.

This course will explore literary responses of major American writers from 1775-1900 to questions and problems of individual, group, and national identity emerging in the wake of American political and cultural independence. Central issues will include nationalism as political and cultural phenomenon, history of authorship, race and slavery, minority identity, the Civil War, and immigration. Main text: Norton Anthology of American Literature, 8th edition, vols. A, B, and C, with supplementary postings. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, HC2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3348-701C (5988). HISTORY OF THE BOOK IN AMERICA. 5:30 W. DALLAS HALL 157. Greenspan.

This course will offer a survey of the history of written communications in the U.S. from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital culture. In doing so, it will introduce students to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book and analyze major questions that attend the specific manifestations of scribal, print, and digital culture in the U.S. Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and ethnicity; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism, censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy, and the history of archives, including libraries with and without walls. Texts: "Perspectives on American Book History," to be supplemented by a wide array of scholarly and general interest readings and 3-4 works of literature. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: CULTURAL FORMATIONS.

ENGL 3362-001 (3787). AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 12:30 TTH. 102 Hyer Hall. Ards.

This course traces the evolution of African American literature from the oral traditions of the spirituals and folk tales to late twentieth century narratives. We will explore works by canonical writers, as well as lesser-known pioneers, paying close attention to the way authors build on, or depart from, earlier styles and conventions. We will move constantly between identifying the significance of these texts within the literary history and interpreting writers’ narrative choices as they engage in critical debates about the aesthetics and role of African American literature. Requirements: Weekly writing exercises; two short papers (5-7pp and 6-8pp), midterm exam, and a final. Texts: Works by writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Henry Box Brown, Charles Chesnutt, WEB Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, August Wilson and Toni Morrison. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY, PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3376-001 (5990). LITERATURE OF THE SOUTHWEST. 9:30 TTH. 106 HYER Hall. Sae-Saue.

Through analyses of some of the most important and influential texts of the region, we will investigate how literatures of the southwest generate competing visions of cultural identity and constitute a transnational sense of regional spaces. Students will conclude the course having achieved three important goals: one, they will learn to recognize how local narratives structure perceptions of life in the southwest; two, they will understand the aesthetic and cultural interventions these narratives make within a broad social-historical perspective; and three, they will comprehend these literary forms within a transnational and inter-ethnic framework. Texts: Américo Paredes: George Washington Gomez; Tomás Rivera: And the Earth Did Not Devour Him; Leslie Marmon Silko: Ceremony; A.A. Carr: Eye Killers; Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange; Jimmy Baca: A Place to Stand; Cormac McCarthy: Blood Meridian; N. Scott Momaday: House Made of Dawn. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM:PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

ENGL 3377-001 (5991). LITERATURE AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF HOMOSEXUALITY. 11 MWF. 107 Hyer Hall. Bozorth.

Normal, perverted, evil, heavenly, unhealthy, beautiful, backward, queer: all ways to label same-sex desire and love for thousands of years. The course will focus on some of the most important literature by and about LGBT people since the modern "invention" of homosexuality. It will also set this writing in historical context, considering the ongoing influence of ancient Greek, Judaic, and Christian views of sex. Finally, it will examine how race, ethnicity, the Stonewall Rebellion, and HIV/ AIDS have shaped contemporary LGBT culture. Writing assignments: weekly response papers and longer essays, totaling twenty pages; final examination. Texts: Plato, Symposium; selections from the Bible and the writings of St. Augustine; Shakespeare, Sonnets; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Portrait of Mr. W.H., Salome; Merlis, An Arrow's Flight; Bechdel, Fun Home; selected poetry by Homer, medieval monks, Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, Christina Rossetti, Walt Whitman, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, and others. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY, PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING

ENGL 3382 (5992). Heroic Visions: Epic Poetry of Homer and Vergil. 2 TTH. 116 Dallas Hall. Holahan.

The literature of classical heroism in works by Homer and Vergil that influenced the epic traditions of English literature. Students will read Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey and become familiar with the hallmarks of the oral epic tradition. They will then study the shift that occurs in Vergil’s written version of heroic action. Attention will be given to influences upon English literature from Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton to Joyce. Three essays and a final exam. Texts: Homer, Iliad, tr. Lattimore; Homer, Odyssey, tr. Fitzgerald; and Vergil, Aeneid, tr. Mandelbaum. ENGL 3390-001 (TBA). Thematic Studies in Creative Writing: Speculative Fiction 5 MW. 120 Dallas Hall. Haynes. This class, geared to writers and readers interested in science fiction, fantasy, horror and other fictions regarded as outside the bounds of “realism. " Students will read and respond to fiction by writers working in speculative forms, create online resources that document their own preferred genres and create their own genre fiction. Text: McSweeney’s Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales, Michael Chabon editor. Vintage. ISBN: 978-1400033393 Parable of the Sower, Octavia E. Butler. Grand Central Publishing. ISBN: 978-0446675505 Prerequisite: English 2390 or Permission of the Instructor

ENGL 3390-001 (TBA). EXPERIENTIAL STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING. 2:00 TTH. 115 Dallas Hall. Brownderville.

The purpose of this course is to study the interplay between poetry and folklore. In addition to analyzing several kinds of lore (including oral tales, foodways, outsider art, and folk music) and reading published poems that are informed by such materials, students conduct their own folklore fieldwork and write poems that draw on the lore they document. Texts: Cane, by Jean Toomer. ISBN: 0871402106 ENGL 3390-003 (TBA). CRAFT STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING. 9:30 TTH. 120 Dallas Hall. Diaconoff. This course introduces students to the creative possibilities of writing for blogs, social media, and e-publishing outlets, inviting theoretical reflection as well as offering practical experience in such writing. Texts: Italo Calvino, SIX MEMOS FOR THE NEXT MILLENNIUM Christopher Johnson, MICROSTYLE

ENGL 4321-001 (5996). STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 1 MWF. 106 Hyer Hall. Keene.

This course studies writings by and about medieval holy women – from the historical to the hysterical – of England, Scotland, Wales, and Ireland from the seventh through the fifteenth centuries including, for example, St Aethelthryth, St Edith, St Margaret of Scotland, St Christina of Markyate, St Modwenna, Julian of Norwich, Chaucer’s Prioress, and Margery Kempe. The unique and relatively untapped perspective in these texts provides insight into changing expressions of female piety, the relationship between the saint and her hagiographer, and political uses of female saints’ cults. Assignments: class participation, short presentations, midterm, research paper. Texts: On-line Reader; The Life of Christine of Markyate (trans. C.H. Talbot); Julian of Norwich, Revelations of Divine Love (trans. Elizabeth Spearing); The Book of Margery Kempe (trans. Lynn Staley); others TBD. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4333-001 (6019). SHAKESPEARE: Shakespeare Recycled. 3 MW. 153 Dallas Hall. Swann.

William Shakespeare is the definitive dead, white, male writer, and yet he remains a cultural icon. In non-Western cultures as well as in England and the United States, Shakespeare continues to fascinate writers, actors, film directors, and the general public. Why? During our semester together, we’ll explore how Shakespeare has been “recycled” in different historical periods and in diverse cultures. We’ll assess the ways in which Shakespeare has been—and continues to be—rewritten and recreated from the 18th to the 21st centuries. We’ll investigate such topics as Shakespeare in America; the “authorship question”; colonial and postcolonial Shakespeare; non-Western Shakespeare; queer Shakespeare; Shakespeare and women writers; and digital Shakespeare. We’ll also examine how Shakespeare has been recycled in popular culture, including films, cartoons, children’s books, and souvenirs. In addition, each student will have the opportunity to develop his or her own independent research project. Don’t worry if you haven’t done much research before: as a group, we’ll talk about strategies for devising research topics, as well as finding and using sources. Course assessment: regular attendance; active participation in discussions; regular quizzes; short research essay (6-8 pages); exam; oral presentation; annotated bibliography; capstone research project (15 pages). Texts: standard edition of the complete works of Shakespeare (preferably The Norton Shakespeare); 10 Things I Hate About You and Scotland, PA (films); Aimé Césaire, A Tempest; Margaret Laurence, The Diviners; Gloria Naylor, Mama Day; additional readings on Blackboard. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4339 (6020). Transatlantic Studies I: The American Reading Nation in the Atlantic World, 1700-1850. 2 TTH. 143 Dallas Hall. Cassedy.

The vast majority of books sold and read in North America in the 18th and 19th centuries were texts of foreign (mostly British) origin. What should it mean, then, to study "American literature" of that period? Rather than focusing on the texts that Americans wrote, this class is organized around texts that Americans read. The class will engage questions such as: In what ways was American literature embedded within larger Atlantic and transatlantic cultures of reading? What can we learn about how American readers made use of the texts they read? What happens if we organize literary history around a history of readers rather than of writers? How should the physical forms in which texts circulated shape our understanding of their meanings? Hands-on engagement with actual textual-material objects (books, periodicals) from the period will be encouraged; research using historical databases of early American texts will be essential. Students will learn to think and write about early American literature in terms of the interpretive strategies of book history, print culture studies, material culture studies, and transatlantic and Atlantic studies. Authors to include: Aphra Behn, John Bunyan, Alexander Pope, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Richardson, Mary Wollstonecraft, Susannah Rowson, Olaudah Equiano. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4343 (3803). Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions. 11 TTH. 116 Dallas Hall. HOLAHAN.

A study of Jane Austen’s major novels: Northanger Abbey; Sense and Sensibility; Pride and Prejudice; Mansfield Park; Emma; and Persuasion. Emphasis on variations of plot and character, the handling of dialogue and narrative distance, scenic design, and themes of manners and judgment. Three essays and a final exam. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4356-001 (6021). MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN WRITERS: HURSTON, WALKER, MORRISON. 10:00 MWF. 120 Dallas Hall. Satz.

The study of three important figures in twentieth century literature—Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison--with attention to the interrelationships among the writers and their works as well as to the relation of the works to important events and movements in American history, such as slavery, segregation, and the Civil Rights movement. Various critical approaches to the works. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM Diversity credit by petition. Writing assignments: four essays, mid-term, final examination. Texts: Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, selected short stories; Walker, Meridian, The Color Purple, Possessing the Secret of Joy; Morrison, The Bluest Eye, Sula, Beloved, Jazz; essays by Hurston and Walker. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4360-001 (3069). STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE: AMERICAN POETRY FROM 1900-1945. 11 MWF. DALLAS HALL 138. SIRAGANIAN.

Do modern poems have meaning, and if so, how do we value them? How do readers relate to poems, and how do poems relate to a transforming world? This intensive study of American poetry from the first half of the twentieth century examines these questions, paying special attention to the fascinating – and contested – concept of modernism in the age of modernity. We will study poetry (and, occasionally, some short prose) in relation to the philosophical, political and cultural transformations of this exciting and tumultuous period, a time that included the Jazz Age, the Great Depression and two world wars. We will also analyze some of the major debates – both old and new – that critics make about these poems. Authors studied include Eliot, Pound, Loy, Frost, Stein, Williams, Stevens, Toomer, Grimké, Moore, and Hughes. Writing assignments: 4 brief writing exercises, 3 longer essays, final examination. Texts: The New Anthology of American Poetry, Vol. 2: Modernisms 1900-1950, ed. Axelrod, Roman and Travisano, handouts, and short texts downloaded from Blackboard. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/ORAL COMMUNICATION, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/INFORMATION LITERACY, CAPSTONE

ENGL 4398-001 (2498). Advanced Fiction Writing. 12:30 TTh. 120 Dallas Hall. Diaconoff.

This is an upper-level creative writing course designed to increase students’ experience in working with the various forms of fiction. The course assumes significant previous experience in writing and critiquing fiction. Texts: Banks, Russell. Trailerpark. Harper Perennial, 1996. Bell, Madison Smartt. Narrative Design. Norton, 1997. Gardner, John. The Art of Fiction. Vintage, 1991 (orig. pub. 1984). Lahiri, Jhumpa. Interpreter of Maladies. Houghton-Mifflin, 1999.