English Courses

Course Descriptions, Spring 2012

Class Numbers are included in parentheses following the course number and are followed, when applicable, by the previous course catalogue number.

ENGL 1360-001#+ (3410).  THE AMERICAN HEROINE.  1 MWF.  306 Dallas Hall.  Schwartz.

Works of American literature as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19th Century to the contemporary period.  Novels will be supplemented by other readings.  Several short writing assignments; midterm and final examinations; some quizzes.

Texts: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Erdrich, Tracks; other short novels and short stories TBA.

 

ENGL 1362-001+ (5572).  CRAFTY WORLDS.  2 TTH.  115 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas.  Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D.  Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination.
Texts: James, The Spoils of Poynton; Hemingway, In Our Time; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider; Ellison, Invisible Man; Heller, Catch 22; DeLillo, Libra; McEwan,Saturday.

 

ENGL 1365-001#+ (3464).  LITERATURE OF MINORITIES.  3 MW.  116 Dallas Hall.  Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that  simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity.  Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as both local and global.  Writing assignments: two essays, mid-term, final examination.

Enrollment limited to Hilltop Scholars.
Texts:  ; Bechdel, Fun Home; Larson, Passing, Tomine, Shortcomings, Roth, Goodbye, Columbus; Hegedorn,Charlie Chan is Dead; and selected short stories distributed throughout the term.

 

ENGL 1385-001+ (3144).  POWER, PASSION, AND PROTEST IN BRITISH LITERATURE.  11 MWF.  306 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.

A one-semester introductory overview of British literature, from its medieval beginnings to (almost) the present day, with attention to literature’s capacities to pursue desire and to exercise (and resist) various kinds of power.  As we survey this history, and trace the story of one of the world’s great cultural treasures, we will consider literature in relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written.  Authors covered will include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wroth, Donne, Milton, Behn, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Beckett.  Method of instruction: lecture and discussion.  Methods of evaluation: midterm and final exams, quizzes, two short essays, participation. 

Texts: TBA.

 

ENGL 2302-001 (3507).  BUSINESS WRITING.  12:30 TTh.  351 Dallas Hall.  Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture.  The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite.  The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major.  Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, Concise 3rd ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

 

ENGL 2302-002 (3508).  BUSINESS WRITING.  2 TTh.  351 Dallas Hall.  Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture.  The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite.  The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major.  Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, Concise 3rd ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

 

2311-001+ (2870).  POETRY.  9:30 TTh.  156 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

An introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers.  Special attention to writing about literature.  Writing assignments: several short papers, two four-page essays, one or two short in-class presentations, memorization exercise, mid-term, final examination.

Texts:  Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry; Abrams, A Glossary of Literary Terms; Lunsford and Connors, EasyWriter.

 

ENGL 2311-002+ (2754).  POETRY.  12 MWF.  153 Dallas Hall.  Swann.

What, exactly, is “poetry”?  Why, over the centuries, have the most brilliant and creative writers in the English language turned to poetry to express themselves?  What skills and knowledge does a contemporary reader need to understand and enjoy the extraordinary richness of English poetry written over the past five hundred years?  And how can we use these skills and knowledge to appreciate the place of poetry in our own lives in twenty-first-century America?  This course requires students to analyze a wide variety of poems written in English.  Each student will develop an understanding of poetry and specific poems, learn about the principal conventions and techniques of poetry, and gain an appreciation of the cultural importance of poetry from the sixteenth century through to the present day.  Course requirements include regular quizzes, four essays, an oral presentation, and a comprehensive final exam.

TextsThe Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard.

 

ENGL 2311-003+ (5573).  POETRY.  12:30 TTh.  115 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop.   You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes.  You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday.  You will learn to spot exotic species like villanelles and sestinas.  You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know.  You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs.  You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter.  You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education.  Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation.

Texts:  Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3d ed);  Andrea Lunsford, EasyWriter (4th ed.).

 

ENGL 2312-001+ (2583).  FICTION.  9 MWF.  106 Hyer Hall.  Cassedy.

While every era in Western history has produced elaborate fictional texts, the idea that storytelling is wrong, because it is a lie, has also always been a part of the history of ideas.  It has never been easy to answer the question: why tell made-up stories instead of true facts?  This is a class about texts that address that question — stories about storytelling, stories that suggest why storytelling might be necessary.  Is fiction necessary because it gives pleasure?  Because it tells the truth? — a truer, darker, or broader truth than nonfiction will admit?  We will evaluate how these texts posit answers to these questions, and how these stories exemplify (or fail to exemplify) their own theories of storytelling.

Texts: Boccaccio, The Decameron; Wollstonecraft, Maria; Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides; Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude; and other shorter texts.

 

ENGL 2312-002+ (2809).  FICTION.  11 TTh.  357 Dallas Hall.  Sae-Saue.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels.  The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet how does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? How does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.
Learning Outcomes:  By the end of this course, you will be able to: identify several formal elements in a work of literature. Write an analysis of an interpretive problem in a work of literature.
Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway.

 

ENGL 2313-001+ (3037).  DRAMA.  11 MWF.  107 Hyer Hall.  Crusius.

Introduction to the study of drama as both literary and theatrical experience.  Students will examine dramatic texts and attend live productions or see film versions of some of the plays. Writing assignments:  four short essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Aeschylus, Agamemnon; Sophocles, Antigone; Euripides, The Bacchae; Shakespeare, Othello; Ibsen, Hedda Gabler; Williams, Streetcar Named Desire; Miller, Death of a Salesman; Wilson, Fences; and selected other texts.

 

ENGL 2314-001H+ (2948).  DOING THINGS WITH POEMS.  11 TTH.  138 Dallas Hall.  Spiegelman.

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers.  Some attention to matters of literary history.  Writing assignments: approximately five short essays, daily paragraphs, final examination if necessary.  Students will memorize 100 lines of poetry.

Texts: Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry; Hollander, Rhyme’s Reason.

 

ENGL 2315-001+ (2871).  INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.  12 MWF.  120 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.

Introduction to the discipline of literary study, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods.  Assignments: four essays; midterm; final exam.

Texts: Dickinson; Poe; Hawthorne; Nabokov, Lolita; Shakespeare, King Lear; Freud, Dora.

 

ENGL 2315-002+ (2872).  INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.  12:30 TTh.  105 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.

This course serves as an introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors. We will cover methods of literary analysis in selected texts that span a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: weekly exercises, two essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms, Pope, The Rape of the Lock, Wycherley, The Country Wife, Orwell, Burmese Days, Joyce, Dubliners, Roy, The God of Small Things.

 

ENGL 2315-003+ (5574).  INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.  2 TTh.  157 Dallas Hall 105.  Neel.

An introduction to the professional study of literature from the perspectives of genre and history.  The course will comprise a wide array of readings as a way to understand how the conventions of genre and traditions of history shape, govern, and sometimes even inhibit interpretation.  The course will include several poems (with the focal text being Samson Agonistes), some prose fiction (with the focal text being Tristram Shandy), some drama (with the focal text being Hamlet), and some prose non-fiction (with the focal texts being Tale of a Tub and Culture and Anarchy).  Weekly quizzes; four medium-length, out-of-class papers; one comprehensive, written final exam.

 

ENGL 2391-001 (2764).  INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING.  12:30 TTh.  138 Dallas Hall.  Otremba.

A workshop in which student poetry, directed exercises in basic elements of craft, and reading sample poems form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts: TBA


ENGL 2391-002 (5598).  INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING.  3:30 TTh.  102 Dallas Hall.  Otremba.

A workshop in which student poetry, directed exercises in basic elements of craft, and reading sample poems form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts: TBA

 

ENGL 2392-001 (2573).  INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING.  3:30 TTh.  142 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction.  Writing assignments:  class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.
Texts: TBA.

 

ENGL 2392-002 (2873).  INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING.  3:30 TTh.  156 Dallas Hall.  D. Smith

A beginning workshop in the theory and practice of fiction writing.  Assignments include in-class and at-home exercises, writing and revising short stories, as well as written responses to published stories.

Texts: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Edition) by Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, and Ned Stuckey-French, The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter 7th Edition, Richard Bausch (editor) and R.V. Cassill (editor).

 

ENGL 3310-001 (2360).  CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE.  9 MWF.  156 Dallas Hall.  Crusius.

An introduction to contemporary methods of interpreting literature and to the theoretical assumptions--about language, culture, gender, politics, sexuality, and psychology--informing these methods.  Writing assignments: four short essays, final examination.
Texts:  Stephen Lynn, Texts and Contexts; Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds., The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; course packet of readings.

 

ENGL 3310-002 (2361).  CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE.  10 MWF. 

106 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

What is literature?  How do we read it, and why?  How can students make sense of and use literary criticism?  This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them.  Writing assignments: Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts (tentative): Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today:  A User-Friendly Guide (second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Scribner); James Joyce, The Dead(Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare, The Tempest (Bedford Case Studies ed.); additional selected readings.

 

ENGL 3340-001+ (3188). TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 

11 TTh.  116 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

A study of Jane Austen’s major novels: Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.  Emphasis on variations of plot and character, the handling of dialogue, scenic design, and themes of manners and judgment. Three essays and a final exam.

 

ENGL 3362-001#+ (5611).  AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE.  11 MWF.  101 Dallas Hall. 

Satz.

An historical examination of African American Literature from Slave Narratives through the Harlem Renaissance to contemporary fiction and poetry.

Texts: Frederick Douglass,  Narrative of the Life of an American Slave; Harriet Jacobs,  Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Nella Larsen,  Passing; Charles Chestnutt, "The Wife of His Youth";

Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God; Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man; Toni Morrison,  Sula 

Four papers of various lengths, mid-term and final.

 

ENGL 3366-001+ (3434).  AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY II.  12 MWF.  115 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.

A course of readings in major writers and works in American literature from the end of the Civil War in 1865 through the Civil Rights Era, in 1970.  A time of increasing centralization, urbanization, and industrialization, of global wars and social upheaval, alienation and artistic experimentation; and a time, finally, when the realities of alienation and modernity trouble shared ideals of individualism and opportunity all as seen through classic texts by ten major U.S. writers of poetry, fiction, and drama:  Walt Whitman, William Dean Howells, Stephen Crane, Robert Frost, T.S. Eliot, Nella Larsen, Nathaniel West, Allen Ginsberg, Thomas Pynchon, and August Wilson.  Requirements: several short papers, a mid-term and a final exam.

 

ENGL 3367-001C (3195).  ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE.  10 MWF. 

115 Dallas Hall.  Satz.

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism.  Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class.  Writing assignments: four essays, final examination.

Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle,Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Yang, American Born Chinese ;and one adult book,  Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3371-001C (5649).  JOAN OF ARC.  12:30 TTh.  306 Dallas Hall.  Wheeler.

What can we know about the extraordinary peasant girl, Joan of Arc (1412–30 May 1431), who in two years of public life before she was burned at the stake when she was only 19 helped to change the course of European history? She is an infamous as well as richly documented historical figure.  In this course (celebrating the 600thanniversary of Joan’s birth) on biography and myth-making, we will consider the life and later reception of Joan of Arc through her own trial records and contemporary reports, then through her representation in later literature, art, film, historical writing, and propaganda. Assignments: two papers, in-class debates, final examination. 
Texts: OLR (On-Line Reader); Daniel Hobbins, The Trial of Joan of Arc (2005); Régine Pernoud, Joan of Arc, Herstory (1999); Craig Taylor, Joan of Arc: La Pucelle (2006), Bonnie Wheeler and Charles T. Wood, eds., Fresh Verdicts on Joan of Arc (1996).
Note: As ENGL 3371, this course counts toward majors’ medieval credit. Furthermore, with extra research and formal analytical writing, ENGL 3371 can satisfy the 4000-level department requirement for ENGL majors’ medieval credit.

 

ENGL 3391-001C (3464).  INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING.  9:30 TTh.  137 Dallas Hall.  Otremba

This is a theme-based poetry workshop that is focused on contemporary documentary poetics. Students will read professional examples of poems that adapt techniques and the spirit of journalism and documentary films.  Students will work to produce a sequence of documentary poems through a combination of poem exercises, research, conventional workshops, individual meetings, group work, and online interaction. This course builds off of the content of ENGL 2391. Prerequisite: ENGL 2391.

 

ENGL 3392-001 (2362).  INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING.  12:30 TTh.  102 Hyer Hall.  D. Smith.

An intermediate workshop in the craft and practice of fiction writing. Assignments include in-class and at-home writing exercises, writing and revising short stories, as well as analysis of published works.

Texts: Deepening Fiction, A Practical Guide for Intermediate and Advanced Writers, by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren (Pearson Longman); The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter 7th Edition, Richard Bausch (editor) and R.V. Cassill (editor).

 

ENGL 4330-001 (5653).  RENAISSANCE WRITERS: DONNE, HERBERT.  1 MWF.  120 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.

John Donne and George Herbert were two seventeenth-century Anglican clergymen—the latter a quiet country parson, the former a brilliantly urbane (and often scandalous) social climber and eroticist—who also happened to be remarkable poets, the best-known writers of what has retrospectively become known as “metaphysical poetry.”  Donne in particular is a fascinating figure, a writer of both magnificent devotional works and astoundingly dirty poems, and a famous preacher who both loved and resented God in deeply complex ways.  This course will intensively study the writings of these two figures, attending primarily to their knotty, challenging, conflicted, and deeply rewarding poetry, which has a peculiar power to make us better readers and thinkers.  Grading: participation, presentations, two mid-length writing assignments, final exam.

Texts: Many and various poems and prose works; selected criticism

 

ENGL 4332-001 (5654).  STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE.  9:30 TTh. 

120 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

 

CANCELLED
ENGL 4343-001 (3450).  STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 

12:30 TTh.  120 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

During the final decade of the nineteenth century, writers and ordinary people alike openly questioned, criticized, and rejected the settled gender ideology and conservative sexual mores that had been distinctive features of Victorian life.  The “New Woman,” who desired independence and rejected marriage as her only vocation, arrived on the scene; the male aesthete, who preferred the beautiful to the useful, challenged Victorian ideals of manliness; the term “homosexual” appeared; and public scandals and new discourses, such as the trials of Oscar Wilde and the emergence of psychology and psychoanalysis, called attention to the pervasiveness of desires outside the prescribed norm.  These developments helped create new identities, sometimes termed “decadent” or even “degenerate.” We will explore these developments through the literary figures, texts, and institutions that shaped and were shaped by them, seeking to understand a decade that is currently being re-evaluated by a new generation of literary scholars.  We will read both canonical and recently recovered “minor” literature, seeking to put the canonical in the context of what has more usually been forgotten.

Texts:  Dixon, The Story of a Modern Woman; Freud, Dora; Haggard, She; Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Rodensky, ed., Decadent Poetry; Wilde, Salome; other short works of poetry and non-fiction prose.   Reading quizzes and/or short writings; two 5-page papers and one longer essay with secondary sources (8-10 pages).

 

ENGL 4343-701 (5678).  STUDIES IN BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 

5:30 M.  156 Dallas Hall.  Murfin.

A reading-intensive survey of four or five long, major works by some of the following Victorian novelists:  Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy.  This course will be very loosely linked with a doctoral seminar in which graduate students will be reading six or seven novels by these same authors and occasionally participating, as individuals, in our discussions.  Because the course will require a significant amount of reading, writing will be limited to an 8-10 page paper, due at the end of the term, plus four or five in-class writing assignments.  These will be used to identify significant writing problems before the paper is due, but grades given will mainly reflect the extent to which students are caught up with the reading.

 

ENGL 4360-001 (2972).  STUDIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE: HISTORY, VIOLENCE, AND MEMORY.  10 MWF.  120 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.

This is a course of readings in American modern and postmodern fiction, drama, and poetry.  Our writers, like numerous other twentieth century artists, imaginatively explore the violently troubled relations between public history and private memory.  They ask what counts as History, and try to reckon the psychological and social costs of what History discounts.   Each of them is concerned with trauma in a broad sense:  not only as violent assault on the person but also as institutionalized oppression and forgetting as well as symbolic branding and psychic wounding.  They are concerned finally with the tolls that trauma exacts on persons as well as communities, thus on the ongoing experiment named “America.”  Our texts:  Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!; Wright, Black Boy; Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Momaday, House Made of Dawn; McCarthy, Blood Meridian; Morrison, Beloved; Alexie, Indian Killer; and Trethewey, Native Guard.  Our plan:  several short papers, class activities, and a concluding research paper.

 

ENGL 4369-001 (5679).  Trans-Atlantic Studies III:  Contemporary LGBT Writing.  2 TTh. 143 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.

The Stonewall Rebellion of 1969 marked the birth of the modern gay rights movement in the public eye, and the decades since then have seen the “coming out” of lesbian, gay, and transgender literature as well.  We’ll be reading some of the most influential novels, plays, and poetry by queer writers from roughly 1970 to the present, considering the aesthetic, psychological, social, political and other functions of their work.  Among the issues we’ll explore:  the ongoing fascination of stories about growing up, coming out, and sexual discovery; the importance of vampires and the search for a gay/lesbian/queer ancestry; the spiritual meanings of queer sexuality, love, and relationships; drag, disco, and sequins; the tensions (and harmonies) between sexual identity and race, ethnicity, and gender; the personal and political challenges posed by HIV/AIDS.  We’ll consider how writers adapt literary form to grapple with these issues, whether in a sequence of lyric poems, a coming-of-age story, a graphic novel, or a stage play.  If this class were a movie, it would get an NC-17 rating:  a thoughtful approach to these texts requires that willingness to think, talk, and write about sex.  We will use a Discussion Board to post question and topics for class consideration, and students will collaborate on leading one class discussion for each text, reflecting their interests and research outside of class.  Writing assignments:  shorter and longer analytical assignments, including a final research-based paper, totalling 25 pages.
Texts:  Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Jewelle Gomez, The Gilda Stories; Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming-Pool Library; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Cherrie Moraga, Hungry Women; Adrienne Rich, Twenty-One Love Poems; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.

 

ENGL 4391-001C (3472).  ADVANCED POETRY WRITING.  9:30 TTh.  137 Dallas Hall.  Otremba.

This is a theme-based poetry workshop that is focused on contemporary documentary poetics. Students will read professional examples of poems that adapt techniques and the spirit of journalism and documentary films.  Students will work to produce a sequence of documentary poems through a combination of poem exercises, research, conventional workshops, individual meetings, group work, and online interaction. This course builds off of the content of ENGL 2391. Prerequisite: ENGL 2391.

 

ENGL 4392-001 (2364).  ADVANCED FICTION WRITING.  9 MW.  153 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.

Advanced workshop for students seriously interested in writing the short story or novel. Each student is required to have a new story or chapter ready to workshop at the beginning of the semester. Writing assignments: At least four works of original fiction created during the semester.  Prerequisites: ENGL 3392 and permission of the instructor.
Texts: TBA.

 

ENGL 4398-701 (3461).  CRAFT OF FICTION.  5:30 W.  157 Dallas Hall.  D. Smith.

This course is an introduction to the literature and film of Australia. It will involve reading seminal Australian fiction and some poetry as well as watching important films to come out of that country.  The course will also provide a brief cultural and historical context for understanding the emergence of Australian "creative life."

Texts: The Literature of Australia: An Anthology (College Edition), W. W. Norton & Company, General editor Nicholas Jose; My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin; The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith by Thomas Keneally; Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey; Cloudstreet by Tim Winton; The Songlines by Bruce Chatwin.