English Courses

Course Description, Spring 2010

Class Numbers are included in parentheses following the course number and are followed, when applicable, by the previous course catalogue number.

1362-001+ (3160). NOVELS IN OUR TIME.

10:00 MWF.
115 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Holahan.

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: James,The Spoils of Poynton; Hemingway,In Our Time; Fitzgerald,The Great Gatsby; Faulkner,As I Lay Dying; Porter,Pale Horse, Pale Rider; Ellison,Invisible Man; Heller,Catch 22; DeLillo,Libra;McEwan,Saturday.

1365-001# (3098). LITERATURE OF MINORITIES.

2:00 MWF.
103 Perkins.
Prof. Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed,as both fixed andflexible, as both local and global. Writing assignments: twoessays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Ayala,American Chica; Bechdel,Fun Home; Tomine,Shortcomings,Urrea,Devil's Highway;Roth,Goodbye, Columbus;Hegedorn,Charlie Chan is Dead; Ulen,Crystelle Morning, and selected short stories distributed throughout the term.

1385-001+ (5678). HISTORY OF BRITISH LITERATURE.

11:00 MWF.
306 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Rosendale.

The literature of Britain is one of the great achievements in the history of human culture. This course is a one-semester introductory overview of British literature, from its medieval beginnings to (almost) the present day. As we survey this history, we will consider not just literature, but also its relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Langland, Shakespeare, Sidney, Wroth, Donne, Milton, Behn, Swift, Johnson, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Beckett. Method of instruction: lecture and discussion. Methods of evaluation: midterm and final exams, quizzes, two short essays, participation.

Texts: TBA.

2302-001 (3325). BUSINESS WRITING.

12:30 TTh.
G18 Clements Hall.
Prof. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

2302-002 (3326). BUSINESS WRITING.

2:00 TTh.
G18 Clements Hall.
Prof. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

2311-001+ (3488) [2305]. POETRY.

11:00 TTH.
357 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Moss.

An introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers, and attending to the form, history, analysis, and interpretation of poetry. Special attention to writing about literature. Evaluation: brief response exercises; 15-20 pages of writing; midterm and final exams; class participation.

Texts: TBA

2311-002+ (3250) [2305]. POETRY.

3:30 TTh.
156 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Neel.

Introduces students to poetry as an art form. Though not strictly historical in organization, the course emphasizes the long tradition of poetry written in English. Although most aspects of English poetry receive consideration, the course pays particular attention to verse form, poetic technique, thematic implication, and, to a limited degree, prosody. Five short papers (500 words); one medium paper (1,500 words), which will grow out of one or more of the short papers; ten quizzes; one oral recitation; and a written final examination are required; one optional extra credit project will be available.

2312-001H+ (2956) [2306]. FICTION.

2:00 MWF.
149 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Foster.

This introduction to narrative fiction takes as its premise the idea that narratives provide a way of understanding the world, other people, and ourselves. The theme of the course is “cover stories,” a title suggesting that we come to know the world better not by stripping away the covers, but by learning to read the stories the world tells. Fiction's representations enable us to see what otherwise remains cloaked in the ordinariness of daily life. Like history, law, psychology, and biology, fiction questions and analyzes the appearances of things, revealing connections, motives, and patterns in the seeming chaos of the world, while it also reveals mysteries where the world seems all too immediately comprehensible. The course is intended to sensitize you to the designs of narrative literature so that you will see its effect in other literature and in other aspects of your life. Writing assignments: four short papers and a final exam.

Possible Texts: Julio Cortazar,Blow Up and Other Stories,Sigmund Freud,Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria,Kazuo Ishiguro,Remains of the Day, Henry James,"The Turn of the Screw" and other short Novels,Susanna Kaysen,Girl, Interrupted, Nabokov, Lolita, Vintage, and Toni Morrison,The Bluest Eye.

2312-002+ (3390) [2306]. FICTION.

2:00 TTh.
102 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Sudan.

An introduction to the genre of fiction with an emphasis on the Gothic novel. The course will combine primary texts with short secondary texts. Writers include Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Emily Bronte, Wilkie Collins, and Bram Stoker. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, one longer essay.

Texts: TBA.

2313-001+ (3925) [2307]. DRAMA.

10:00 MWF.
120 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Crusius.

Introduction to the study of drama as both literary and theatrical experience. Students will examine dramatic texts and study available video or film versions of the works. Writing assignments: four short essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts:Duck Soup; Shakespeare,Othello; Ibsen,A Doll’s House; Williams,The Glass Menagerie; Miller,Death of a Salesman; Wilson,Fences; Ives,Sure Thing; Wasserstein,The Heidi Chronicles; selected other texts.

2314-001H+ (3640) [2308]. DOING THINGS WITH POEMS.

11:00 MWF.
106 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Newman.

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers. Writing assignments: several short essays totaling about 15 pages, distributed evenly across the semester; frequent short exercises; two short in-class presentations, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Vendler,Poems, Poets, Poetry; Hollander,Rhyme’s Reason; M.H. Abrams,A Glossary of Literary Terms(optional).

2315-001+ (3489). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.

10:00 MWF.
138 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Householder.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, final examination.

Texts: Murfin and Ray,The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms; Shakespeare,Twelfth Night; O’Neill,Long Day’s Journey into Night; Morrison,Sula; selected poetry and short stories.

2315-002+ (3490). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.

9:30 TTh.
106 Hyer Hall.
Prof. Dumitrescu.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination.
Texts: Murfin and Ray, The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Webster, The Duchess of Malfi; Pope, The Rape of the Lock; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio; selected poems.

2315-003+ (3491). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY.

11:00 TTh.
351 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Ards.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of fields, genres, and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Shakespeare,The Tempest;Charlotte Bronte,Jane Eyre;Harriet Jacobs,Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; T. S. Eliot,The Wasteland;Virginia Woolf,A Room of One's Own;Jean Rhys,Wide Sargosso Sea; selected poems, stories, and criticism.

2391-001 (3272). INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING.

11:00 TTh.
120 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Key.

The coursework for Introduction to Poetry Writing includes reading assignments, directed exercises in poetic craft and polished drafts of poems. This class is open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry.

Text: The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry, Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux.

2392-001 (2942). INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING.

9:30 TTh.
120 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Haynes.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.

Texts: TBA.

2392-002 (3492). INTRODUCTION TO FICTION WRITING.

11:00 TTh.
137 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Smith.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and writing of fiction. Writing assignments: various class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.

Texts:The Contemporary American Short Story, ed by Shreve and Nguyen.

3310-001 (2697) [3304]. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE.

11:00 MWF.
101 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Foster.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism? This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them.Writing assignments:Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts(tentative): Lois Tyson,Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide(second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald,The Great Gatsby(Scribner); James Joyce,The Dead(Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare,The Tempest(Bedford Case Studies ed.); additionalselected readings.

3310-002 (2698) [3304]. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE.

12:30 TTh.
153 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Schwartz.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism? This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them.Writing assignments:Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts: Lois Tyson,Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide(second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald,The Great Gatsby(Scribner); James Joyce,The Dead(Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare,The Tempest(Bedford Case Studies ed.); additionalselected readings.

3320-001+ (5837). TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE: OLD ENGLISH.

2:00 TTh.
155 Fondren Science.
Prof. Dumitrescu.

In this course, we will read of ancient warriors and speaking crosses, exotic monsters and monastic students, and we’ll do so in the original Old English. Students will learn the language spoken and written in England over a thousand years ago, and gain an introduction to the multifaceted culture of the Anglo-Saxons.

Texts: Hasenfratz and Jambeck, Reading Old English; Fulk and Pope, Eight Old English Poems.

3335-001+ (5838). TRANSATLANTIC ENCOUNTERS I.

12:00 MWF.
115 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Householder.

This course surveys literary responses to the European colonization of North America. Although many of our readings will focus on English ventures and texts, and on familiar figures and events (e.g., the “lost colony” of Roanoke, John Smith and Pocahontas, the Pilgrims’ first Thanksgiving), we will also read less familiar texts, including some by writers who were not English, or who never traveled to the Americas, to help understand the origins and significance of these cultural icons. Writing assignments: two essays, midterm, final examination.

Texts: Diaz,The True History of the Conquest of New Spain; More,Utopia; Dryden,The Indian Emperour; Harriot,A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia; Smith,The General History of Virginia; Shakespeare,The Tempest; Bradford,Of Plymouth Plantation; Cabeza de Vaca,The Relation; Behn,Oroonoko; Rowlandson,The Sovereignty and Goodness of God; Defoe,Robinson Crusoe.

3340-001+ (5839). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: AUSTEN.

9 MWF.
156 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Holahan.

A study of Jane Austen’s major novels: Sense and Sensibility, Northanger Abbey, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. Emphasis on variations of plot and character, the handling of dialogue, scenic design, and themes of manners and judgment. Three essays and a final exam.

3346-001+ (2699). AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I.

2:00 TTh.
115 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Weisenburger.

A course of readings concentrating on eight classic tests from the literature of colonial North America and the Early Republic. Our main effort will be to read closely and to think critically about how American writers imagined New World wilderness and frontier environments, as well as the non-European peoples—Indians and enslaved Africans—with whom they shared that land. What were the relations between places and peoples? How did those conceptions shape “American” ways of imagining and building a “nation”? By those lights, whatare“American” writers? And what is their literary history? Supplementing our work with short texts available on Blackboard, we will read in sequence: Mary Rowlandson,The Sovereignty and Goodness of God(1682); Hector St. John de Crevecoeur,Letters from an American Farmer(1782); Charles Brockden Brown,Edgar Huntley(1799); James Fennimore Cooper,The Last of the Mohicans(1826); Ralph Waldo Emerson,Essays and Poems(1836-60); Frederick Douglass,Narrative of the Life of an American Slave(1845); Herman Melville,Benito Cereno(1855); and Walt WhitmanLeaves of Grass (1855). Requirements: several shorter papers, a mid-term and a final.

3367-001 (5860). ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE.

12:30 TTh.
115 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Satz.

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism.Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination.

Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such asWhere theWild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar;chapter books for young children such asWilder, Little Houseon the Prairie; White,Charlotte’s Web;Erdrich,Game of Silence;booksfor young adults such asL’Engle,Wrinkle in Time;Johnson,Toning the Sweep;Kadohata,Weedflower;and one adult book, Morrison,The Bluest Eye.

3370-701H (5792). BACK IN THE DAY: AMERICAN ACTIVISMS 1960-1980.

5:30 W.
134 Clements Hall.
Prof. Wheeler.

Study of a sequence of unfolding and overlapping student activist and human rights movements usually collectively called ‘The Sixties’ as we note the 40th anniversary of the Kent State University Massacre and its transforming effect on American student ‘protest culture.’ The course moves from the assassination of President Kennedy through civil rights movements to anti-war movements to feminist movements to lesbian/gay rights liberation. These four primary social activist movements--the Black Liberation Movements (civil rights), the Women's Liberation Movements, the Anti-Vietnam War Movement, and the Gay & Lesbian Liberation Movements—singly and together—changed American society in major ways. Basic texts include literary and film materials.Texts: Karen Manners Smith and Tim Koster,Time It Was: American Stories from the Sixties(2008); Sohnya Sayers, Anders Stephenson, Stanley Aronowitz and Frederick Jameson,The 60's Without Apology.Several events with 60s activists, including (required)19 March 2010 afternoon/evening with Gloria Steinem and others at Women’s Museum (Fair Park).Assessment: Four in-class formal debates, with subsequent brief revised papers of five pages each; Comprehensive Final Examination.

3392-001 (2700) [3392]. INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING.

3:30 TTh.
106 Hyer Hall.
Prof. Smith.

An intermediate workshop in fiction writing, building on craft techniques taught in ENGL 2392. Writing assignments: various class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories. Prerequisite: ENGL 2392.

Texts:The Contemporary American Short Story, ed by Shreve and Nguyen;

4323-701 (3674). CHAUCER’S CANTERBURY TALES.

5:30 M.
156 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Wheeler.

Readings of Chaucer'sCanterbury Talesfrom perspectives of medieval thought and contemporary criticism. Open to majors and non-majors. Writing assignments: short essays, commentaries, final examination.

Text: Benson, ed.,The Riverside Chaucer.

4332-001 (3675). STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE.

12:30 TTh.
105 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Sudan.

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the "city" became the major project of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners faced was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval one worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical concept of urban life in England. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century. Readings include poems, plays, novels, and prose by Wycherly, Pope, Swift, Defoe, Cleland, Burney, and Lewis. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, and one longer essay.

4333-001 (3676). SHAKESPEARE.

12:00 MWF.
153 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Holahan.

Close reading of the major tragedies along with representative later comedies, problem plays, and romances. Reading will be supplemented by the viewing of videotaped performances. Writing assignments: three essays, quizzes, mid-term, final examination.

Text: Greenblatt, ed.,The Norton Shakespeare.

4341-001 (5868). VICTORIAN WRITERS: THE BRONTES AND GEORGE ELIOT.

9:30 TTh.
351 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Satz.

A consideration of the works of four major nineteenth century novelists against the background of history, cultural and gender constraints, and philosophical considerations. Assignments: four papers of varying lengths, mid-term and final.

Texts: ;Bronte, C.Jane Eyre;Bronte, C,Villette; Bronte,E, Wuthering Heights; Bronte, A,
Tenant of Wildfell Hall Eliot
,Middlemarch;and Eliot,Mill on the Floss.

4360-001 (3677). MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE:SIX AMERICAN POETS, 1945 TO THE PRESENT.

3:00 MW.
343 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Spiegelman.

John Ashbery, "Selected Poems"

Elizabeth Bishop, "Complete Poems,” Jorie Graham, "The Dream of the Unified Field," Robert Lowell, "Selected Poems," J. D. McClatchy, "The Viking Book of Contemporary American Poetry," James Merrill, "Selected Poems," and Adrienne Rich, "Selected Poetry and Proe" (Norton Critical: ed., Gelpi).

4360-002 (5869). MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE:GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND THE AFRICAN AMERICAN NOVEL.

2:00 TTh.
105 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Ards.

This course pairs post-Harlem Renaissance novels by African American authors with readings in gender, queer, and literary theory. To the extent that issues of gender and sexuality often play an uneasy second to issues of race when considering works of African American literature, this course offers students an opportunity to consider the interplay among race, sexuality, and gender in canon formation. We will begin with Richard Wright’s groundbreaking work,Native Son,to understand how the creation of his controversial character, Bigger Thomas, influenced the shape and concerns of the African American novel for subsequent generations of writers. We will also explore how contemporary novels not only revise Wright’s literary theories but also speak to contemporary cultural formation through their exploration of family, especially gender-based dynamics between parents and children, and the role of communities in setting, maintaining and/or transforming sex and gender roles.

Texts:Native Son,Richard Wright;The Street, Anne Petry;Maud Martha,Gwendolyn Brooks;Another Country,James Baldwin;Zami: A New Spelling of My Name,Audre Lorde;Mama Day,Gloria Naylor;Song of Solomon,Toni Morrison;A Lesson Before Dying, Ernest Gaines

4392-001 (2702) [4392]. ADVANCED FICTION WRITING.

12:30 TTh.
138 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Haynes.

Advanced workshop for students seriously interested in writing the short story or novel. Each student is required to have a new story or chapter ready to workshop at the beginning of the semester. Writing assignments: At least four works of original fiction created during the semester. Prerequisites: ENGL 3392 and permission of the instructor.

Texts: TBA.

4397-001 (3943). CRAFT OF POETRY.

12:30 TTh.
120 Dallas Hall.
Prof. Key.

In this class we will investigate various elements of poetic craft. To this end, we will consider the "anatomy" of a poem and its various components, such as the line, meter, rhyme, music, imagery, and style. Special emphasis will be placed on the study of poetic forms, from blank verse and sonnets to villanelles and sestinas. Our primary focus is the construction of poems including prosody and other techniques of craft. Coursework will consist of writing exercises, reading assignments, short response papers, and recitations. Prerequisite: ENGL 2391 or Instructor Permission

Text: A Poet's Guide to Poetry, Mary Kinzie.