English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Fall 2017

ENGL 1330-001 (2895)—THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE

MWF 10-10:50.  100 Hyer Hall.  Neel.

Introductory study of eight major plays, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics.  Five tests, written mid-term and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity.  Play texts from the free Folger Shakespeare Library Digital archive; lecture templates posted electronically on Canvas.  Theme for the semester: Shakespeare’s use of and interrogation of the concept “comedy.”  Satisfies UC 2016 Breadth: Language and Literature; counts as an elective in both the English major and the English minor.

ENGL 1362-001 (2962)—CRAFTY WORLDS

MWF 11-11:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination. Texts: TBD

ENGL 1365-001 (2834)—LITERATURE OF MINORITIES

TTh 2-3:20.  110 Hyer Hall.  Levy.

Literature of Minorities investigates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity.  Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as both local and global.  Among the authors covered are Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, Nella Larson, Phillip Roth, Bharati Mukherjee and Yuri Herrera.  

ENGL 2102-001 (6329)—SPREADSHEET LIT:  EXCEL

Th 3:30-4:20.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose.

ENGL 2302-001 (2725)—BUSINESS WRITING

TTh 12:30-1:50.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed 

ENGL 2302-002 (2726)—BUSINESS WRITING

TTh 2-3:20.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

ENGL 2310-001 (5412)—IMAGINATION AND INTERPRETATION: WHAT WAS THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE?

MWF 10-10:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Kiser.

The Harlem Renaissance can be broadly defined as a cultural, social, and artistic movement that spanned the 1920’s and 1930’s, a time when African American writers, artists, and musicians attempted to be represented within American culture with their work. This course will explore why such a movement burgeoned around the end of WWI, what this group of intellectuals hoped to gain from their movement, and why they turned to the arts to reach their political, cultural, and social goals. We will ask questions such as, is art always political or can it exist for art’s sake? If art is truly the best way for such a movement to reach its aims, then what forms of expression are best? Progressing towards answering, “What was the Harlem Renaissance?” we will explore the above questions through poems, novels, and short stories written by W.E.B. Du Bois, Claude McKay, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Jessie Fauset, and others.

ENGL 2310-002 (5414)—IMAGINATION AND INTERPRETATION: THE (R)EVOLUTION OF GOTHIC LITERATURE: LITERAL AND LITERARY HORRORS IN POETRY AND PROSE

MWF 9-9:50.  101 Dallas Hall.  Stampone.

Horace Walpole began a literary revolution in 1764 with the publication of his still famous Gothic tale, The Castle of Otranto. Haunting tales of ghosts and monsters quickly flooded literary markets in both the United Kingdom and America, as artists on both sides of the Atlantic employed, repurposed, and distorted tropes (i.e. erasing the distinction between “horror” and “terror”) from the growing corpus of Gothic Literature to write stories that darken their respective historical moments and deal with insidious problems such as race, gender, and national identity. Intertextuality thus attaches itself to Gothic stories like an ever-present shadow that curiously stalks an author’s text. This course introduces students to various modes of Gothic literature published during the Romantic Century and closely examines the mechanics and—more important—their thematic purpose and historical moment.

MWF 9-9:50.  101 Dallas Hall.  Stampone.

TBD 

ENGL 2311-001 (2632)—INTRODUCTION TO POETRY: SERIOUS WORD GAMES

TTh 11-12:20.  105 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop! You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, perform, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to spot exotic species like villanelles and aubades. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, garden-tool dependency, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. 

ENGL 2311-002 (3800)—INTRODUCTION TO POETRY

MW 3-4:20.  101 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

ENGL 2312-001 (3549)—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION

TTh 11-12:20.  102 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

Good stories entertain, provoke, and amuse us.  They move us to laugh, cry, or think.  They introduce us to odd, interesting, loveable, and detestable people; to strange, absurd, comic, and tragic situations; and to the meaning in the ordinariness and the everyday.  By reading a variety of short stories and some novellas, traditional and contemporary, we’ll consider the different ways that imaginative writers turn the stuff of life into plot, imagine character, play with language, and tell us things about our world and ourselves in the medium of prose fiction.  We will also work on writing and analytical skills.   

Written work: Daily or almost-daily short writing, some of which will be built upon for 4 more formal short papers (3-4 pages).  Fiction anthology: Charters, The Story and its Writer (ninth edition, compact); Rebecca Lee, Bobcat and Other Stories; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Leila Aboulelah, Minaret; Joseph M. Williams and Joseph Bizerup, Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. 

ENGL 2312-002 (3040)—INTRODUCTION TO FICTION: ETHNIC LITERARY IMAGINATIONS

TTh 12:30-1:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Sae-Saue.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goals of the class are for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to understand how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships while also imagining particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. How does a text construct a cultural and social landscape? How does fiction organize ways human consciousness makes sense of determinate historical events? How does fiction articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.

ENGL 2312-003H (3627)—FICTION: STORIES OUT OF PLACE

TTh 12:30-1:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

In ordinary language—in the speech of everyday life, in memos and news, in text books and manuals—we expect a homey discourse, one where we feel at ease with the meaning and intentions. Literary language, by contrast, tends to make us uncomfortable even as it delights us, shifting us off center so we can see what the ordinary ignores or conceals. This class will look at works of fiction in which someone or something is out of place, looking awry at the ordinary world, principally because characters have left home. We will read, for example, Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, whose characters have left and returned to the Dominican Republic, and Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things, whose characters leave and return to India. But we will also read Allison Bechdel’s Fun Home in which she looks back on a childhood in a funeral home could not understand at the time. That is, we will take displacement as a narrative technique and a theme. Expect to write four short papers and to talk a lot. Other texts:  Julio Cortazar, Blow-Up and Other Stories; Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day; Don DeLillo, White Noise.

ENGL 2313-001 (5419)—INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA

MWF 11-11:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Moss.

An historical introduction to drama divided into five acts. We open in ancient Greece and trace the origins of tragedy and comedy. In Act Two, we take in the pageantry of medieval England, where regular citizens brought the Bible to life and anonymous playwrights built ingenious allegories of virtue and vice. Shakespeare dominates Act Three (with cameos by Marlowe and Jonson), as we applaud the rise and triumph of professional theater in Renaissance England. We relax in Act Four to the racy songs and naughty wit of Restoration comedy and early musicals. Act Five begins in the twentieth century, and we watch as modern playwrights and filmmakers from across the English-speaking world revisit the very classics we read earlier in the semester, wrestling with the dark legacies of imperialism, capitalist excess, racial and sexual oppression, and urban violence. Course requirements: two short papers, one longer paper, regular posts to an online discussion board, brief presentation or performance, final exam. Course texts include Sophocles’ Antigone, Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, selections from the York Mystery Cycle, Everyman, Shakespeare’s Hamlet and The Tempest, Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera, Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Fugard’s The Island, Césaire’s A Tempest, and Spike Lee’s film Chi-Raq. 

ENGL 2314-001H (5422): Doing Things with Poems: A Poet-Guided Tour

MWF 9-9:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Moss.

In this course, the poets themselves guide us through the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry. During the first half of the semester, each week will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focusing on a representative poet in each case. We will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg. The second half explores perennial themes: poets addressing and questioning God; poets protesting social injustice; poets in love; poets struggling with age and loss; poets pondering nature, art, and poetry itself. Guest speakers include John Donne, Ben Jonson, John Keats, Robert Frost, William Butler Yeats, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Seamus Heaney, and many more. Who knew there were so many poets? Come meet them. Course requirements: two short papers, one research paper, regular posts to an online discussion board, midterm exam, final exam. Course text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th edition.

ENGL 2315-001 (3573)—INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY: KNIGHTS, DRAMA QUEENS, AND WORKING WOMEN

TTh 11-12:20.  127 Fondren Science.  Schwartz.

This course prepares students to read imaginative literature in many of its forms: from drama to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and perhaps film.  The course begins with Oedipus, an ancient Greek play, and includes numerous literary texts from the Medieval, Early Modern, Modern eras, and culminates with contemporary literature. Two out-of-class papers; one in-class essay; five reading quizzes; required class attendance.

Texts: Sophocles, Oedipus; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Shakespeare, As You Like It; Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Woolf, Three Guineas; Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad; selected poetry.

ENGL 2315-002 (2898)—INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY

TTh 2-3:20.  101 Dallas Hall.  Siraganian.

Introduction to the discipline of literary study, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Assignments: short writing, essays, final exam.

Texts: Short fiction and essays by Edgar Allan Poe and Leslie Marmon Silko; poetry by William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, Gwendolyn Brooks; short play by Samuel Beckett; novels by Jane Austen and Mark Twain; film by Heckerling (Clueless). 

 

ENGL 2315-003 (5428): INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES

MWF 1-1:50.  Dallas Hall 149.  Weisenburger.

As an introductory course ENGL 2315 develops skills in the close reading of English language literature, in using various approaches to the study of fiction, drama and poetry, and in developing critical writing skills. There are no prerequisites. We presume only that students have enrolled in this class to sharpen their skills as critical readers and effective writers. So we ask what literature is and does, as a particular kind of writing. We study literary forms, styles, and strategies; and consider also the historical contexts in which particular texts were created. Discussions and occasional lectures concentrate on the what, how, where, when and why of critical reading, an essential discipline for any career. We do these things while studying with exceptional care and patience several fictions, plays, and books of poetry by major British and American writers:  William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, Robert Frost, Nella Larsen, Sylvia Plath, and August Wilson.

ENGL 2390-001 (2966)—INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

TTh 11-12:20. 120 Dallas Hall. Brownderville.

The subject of this course is powerful language. How do writers craft language so as to enhance the reader’s experience of imagery, voice, metaphor, scene, character, and plot? To begin answering this question, students will write and revise their own pieces; respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary. 

ENGL 2390-002 (2967)—INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

TTh 12:30-1:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA 

ENGL 2390-003 (2968)—INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

TTh 3:30-4:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA

ENGL 2390-004 (5435)—INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

MWF 10-10:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Rubin.

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and helpfully discussing that of their classmates.

ENGL 3310-001 (2449)—CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE  

TTh 11-12:20.   156 Dallas Hall.  Murfin.

What is literature?  How do we read it, and why?  What counts as “literature”?  How can students make sense—and use—of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them.  Writing assignments:  weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final exam.

Texts:  Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’:  A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’:  A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’:  A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein’:  A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism. 

ENGL 3310-002 (3358)—CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE

TTh 2-3:20. 149 Dallas Hall.  Schwartz.

Why does one English professor see sex in every text and another sees colonialism? Why does one teacher say, “follow the money” and another seem to care more about gender? Why do some classes focus largely on books about books, but others mainly on books about women who commit suicide? This course will help students address the questions above by making sense of some important contemporary trends in literary criticism and theory. Along the way, we’ll read some primary texts in structuralism and semiotics; feminism and gender studies; Marxism and cultural studies; psychoanalysis; new historicism; queer theory; and ethnic studies. We will consider what counts as “literature” from one age to the next; and we’ll read literature and some contemporary criticism of it while we practice writing our own. Writing assignments: Seven 2-page Application Exercises; a final exam.

Texts TBD, but possibilities include: poetry by Blake, Shakespeare and others; fiction by Austen, Faulkner, Morrison and others. Theory by Woolf; Freud; Saussure; Derrida; Foucault; Silverman; Belsey and Moore; Gates; and others. Selected poetry.

CLAS 3312-001 (3372)—CLASSICAL RHETORIC

MWF 2-2:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Neel.

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world's first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE.  Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and the study of philosophy emerged into history.  Two out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and five reading quizzes.  Satisfies three UC 2016 requirements: Writing Proficiency; Ways of Knowing; and Depth: History, Social, and Behavioral.  Satisfies one course requirement for the Classical Studies program and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.

ENGL 3320-001 (5812)TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE: FABULOUS FICTIONS:   MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE IN CONTEXT

TTh 12:30-1:50. 127 Fondren Science. Keene.

Fabulous fictions can reveal troublesome truths. This course studies medieval English literature in context, from the Saxon invasions to the Wars of the Roses, examining what dragons, the knights of Camelot, and wonder-working saints can tell us about the anxieties, challenges, and criticisms of society. Texts considered include epic poems, riddles, elegies, saints’ lives, and romances -- from Beowulf to Chaucer.     

ENGL 3341-001 (5460)—BRITISH LITERARY HISTORY II:  NATURE, EMPIRE, APOCALYPSE

TTh 2-3:20.  357 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.

British society, culture, and politics changed radically over the last two centuries, with the Industrial Revolution and urbanization and rapidly evolving modern technology; with Britain's rise (and decline) as a world power; with the democratization of government and staggering shifts in people's views on gender, sexuality, and the family; with the unsettling scientific ideas from Darwin to Freud to Einstein that threw into crisis people's beliefs about themselves, about God, and about the environment around them.  We'll see how writers revolutionized poetry, drama, and fiction, as they sought to respond to all this, as well as to the cataclysms of the French Revolution and two world wars.  We'll look at key writers from these periods—poets like Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Yeats, Eliot, Owen, and Auden; novels by writers like Emily Bronte and Virginia Woolf; and drama by Oscar Wilde.  We'll read things that readers and writers have come back to again and again to this day.

ENGL 3346-001 (5461)—AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I       

MWF 10-10:50.  152 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.

An introduction to American literature from European contact to the Civil War.  The course will trace three centuries of ideas about what it means to be American, through well-known texts from the American literary canon as well as less familiar texts.  Readings will include fiction by Susanna Rowson, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, and Harriet Beecher Stowe; autobiographical texts by Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Douglass, Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, and Harriet Jacobs; and poetry by Phillis Wheatley, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson.

ENGL 3365-001 (5462)—JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE

TTh 12:30-1:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Greenspan.

This course will provide a survey of modern Jewish American literature and culture (including film, comics, popular humor) running from the period of mass immigration of Jews from eastern Europe in the late 19th century through the present. It will sample leading works by a wide array of major Jewish writers, including Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Babel, Lamed Shapiro, Anzia Yezierska, Abe Cahan, Delmore Schwartz, Tillie Olsen, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Allen Ginsberg, Philip Roth, and Miriam Israel Moses; the humor of Lenny Bruce, Jerry Seinfield, Susan Silverman, and Larry David; and the work of comic book artist-writers Art Spiegelman and Roz Chast. Formal assignments: several papers, midterm, and final.

ENGL 3367-001 (3465)—ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

MWF 11-11:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Satz.

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Yang, American Born Chinese; and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

ENGL 3376-001 (5463)LITERATURES OF THE SOUTHWEST: IMAGINING A TRANSNATIONAL CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

TTh 9:30-10:50.  107 Hyer Hall.  Sae-Saue.

 This course will examine how key southwestern texts challenge their common categorization as a “regional literature.” We will examine how local writers map cognitively the U.S. Southwest as a transnational geography which is interconnected to non-U.S. territories through complex social, economic, and cultural networks.  Through analyses of some of the most important and influential texts of the region, we will investigate how literatures of the southwest generate competing visions of cultural identity and how they constitute a transnational sense of space while engaging issues of historical memory, race, citizenship, gender, and globalization.

Objectives: students will learn to understand how U.S. ethnic writers have imagined the Southwest. Students will conclude the course having achieved three important goals: one, they will learn to recognize how local narratives structure ethnic perceptions of life in the region; two, they will understand the aesthetic and cultural interventions these narratives make within a broad social-historical perspective; and three, they will comprehend these literary forms within a transnational and inter-ethnic framework.  

ENGL 3379-001 (3050)—CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY

MWF 10-10:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Satz.

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Kupfer, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Poster Chil ; Jamison, An Unquiet Mind; Lessing, The Fifth Child; Sarton, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

ENGL 3383-001 (3118)—LITERARY EXECUTIONS: IMAGINATION AND CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

MWF 1-1:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination. Texts: TBA.

ENGL 3390-001 (3574)—STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: PLAYING WITH FORMS

TTh 2-3:20. 102 Dallas Hall. Brownderville.

In this poetry workshop, students will experiment with a wide variety of forms, writing and revising their own ghazals, sestinas, villanelles, accentual-syllabic poems, accentual-alliterative poems, sonnets, and haiku. Throughout the semester students will investigate the fascinating relationship between form and content. Organizing questions include the following: How has a particular form been used in the past? What are the resulting associations and expectations? How might a contemporary poet fulfill these expectations or subvert them for effect? In addition to reading and discussing published texts provided by the instructor, students will explore the exciting world of contemporary poetry journals, find work that appeals to their imaginations, and bring it to the class for group discussion.

ENGL 3390-002 (3117)STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: WRITING ABOUT THE REAL WORLD

MWF 12-12:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Rubin.

An advanced workshop devoted to the craft of creative nonfiction, this class will apply the tenets of fiction writing to the construction of the personal essay. In addition to participating in regular workshops, students will study nonfiction masterpieces by such authors as Virginia Woolf and James Baldwin along with the work of brilliant contemporary essayists currently expanding the form.

ENGL 4323-001 (3223)—CHAUCER

TTh 9:30-10:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Wheeler.

Study of Chaucer’s dream poems as well as his great love-and-war poem Troilus and Criseyde, along with a sprinkling of staggeringly long classics. ReadingThe Wadsworth Chaucer and background texts. Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations, short and longer paper.

ENGL 4332-001 (5465)—STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE

MWF 12-12:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

ENGLISH 4343-001 (5466)— BRITISH LITERATURE IN AN AGE OF REVOLUTIONS:  ROMANTIC POETRY AND FICTION

TTh 2-3:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Murfin.             

This course will cover poems by three major Romantic poets—William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and George Gordon, Lord Byron—and three novels.  One of the novels was written during the Romantic period (Frankenstein, which Mary Shelley composed while she and her husband were vacationing with Byron), the other two were products of the subsequent, Victorian era (Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights and George Eliot’s Adam Bede) but were powerfully influenced by Romantic poetry.  We will note and discuss the persistence of various themes, motifs, and genres across the period beginning in 1798 (the publication date of Wordsworth’s Lyrical Ballads) and ending in 1859 (the year in which Adam Bede was published) but also consider the various ways in which these evolve over time. (Thus, Shelley’s poetry will be seen to revise Wordsworth’s; Brontë’s Heathcliff  is a type of Byronic Hero; the landscapes found in Frankenstein and Adam Bede are often darkened versions of ones found in Romantic poetry, and so forth.)  Two papers will be required:  one short (due around mid-term), one long (due toward the end of the semester.  The longer paper will cover several of the works we have read and must make use of secondary sources. 

ENGL 4360-001 (3551)—STUDIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE

MWF 11-11:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.

Our focus in this course is American literature of the Cold War period (1945 – 1990), the period that is the hinge from Modern to Contemporary (or postmodern) art. We will take up fictions, poetry, plays and essays in which American writers responded to and made literary art during a remarkable epoch:  of the Civil Rights Movement, of undeclared wars (in Korea, Vietnam, Iraq) and a vigorous anti-war movement, assassinations, countercultural agitation, and the Reagan Eighties—all of it running nonstop on The Tube.  Some of our writers resisted censorship of their work; most were active politically, all sought ways to challenge conventions of literary expression, for example in new modes of humor and satire. Our writers: Allen Ginsberg, Loraine Hansberry, Kurt Vonnegut, Sylvia Plath, Thomas Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, August Wilson, and Joan Didion; supplemented by non-fictional essays and criticism. Expect to write several short essays in response to particular works, a mid-term, and a research paper due at semester’s end.

ENGL 4369-001 (5468)—TRANSATLANTIC STUDIES III: DISPLACEMENT, MIGRATION, FLIGHT

TTh 3:30-4:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

This course will be about how writers have imagined the movement of people around in the world, mostly in the period since the war in Vietnam.  What forms have they found to represent the encounters with their new worlds and how these encounters knit and fracture relationships among cultures and peoples. We’ll read works from Vietnam, to the middle east, Africa and the Caribbean. I invite students who are enrolling this spring to talk to me about the class as I develop the syllabus. You should expect to write several short papers and a longer research paper.
Texts:
Jhumpa Lahiri,
The Namesake; Graham Greene, The Quiet American; Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Sympathizer; Or: Viet Thanh Nguyen, The Refugees; Mohsin Hamid, Exit West; Or: Mohsin Hamid, The Reluctant Fundamentalist; E. M. Forester, A Passage to India; Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Americanah.

ENGL 5310-001 (3582)—DISTINCTION SEMINAR: POSTSECULARISM AND LITERARY STUDIES

TTh 3:30-4:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

In the late 1980s some intellectuals began to use the term postsecular to challenge widely accepted ideas about the place of religion in modern societies. They sought to revise what has been called the secularization narrative or thesis—that is, the idea that the separation of religion and state that began in the eighteenth century will eventually become a global norm, and that individual religiosity is destined to decline or even wither away.  (Put more imaginatively: the world has become “disenchanted.”)  World events at the beginning of the twentieth century gave new urgency to claims that the death of God—or of the practices and beliefs we call “religion”--had been announced prematurely.  The same events also confirmed arguments made by some scholars that the secularization thesis, when applied globally, was a Western imposition.  Not surprisingly, these developments have affected the way some literary scholars interpret texts and think about the canon and the history of literary study as discipline.  Also not surprisingly, others reject the whole concept and the discourse surrounding it.  

We will read selectively in some of the scholarship on secularization and the postsecular, but we will emphasize imaginative writing that has been read as exemplars of secularization, as well as authors who are being read or reread under the banner of postsecularism.  (Sometimes these are the same writers.)  Along the way, we will encounter literary expressions of faith, doubt, and unbelief, and alternative understandings of the spiritual. 

Assignments: one or two short papers; one prospectus and provisional bibliography for a longer final paper; a final paper of about twenty pages, linked to a preliminary draft and an oral presentation.

Primary texts are still under consideration, but will be drawn from the following: poetry by William Wordsworth, Emily Brontë (possibly along with Wuthering Heights), Swinburne, Thomas Hardy, Emily Dickinson, and/or Walt Whitman; Charles Dickens, Hard Times; Mary (“Mrs. Humphry”) Ward, Robert Elsmere; James Joyce, Dubliners; Henry Roth, Call It Sleep; Marilynne Robinson, Gilead; Lila Aboulelah, Minaret; Naomi Alderman, Disobedience, Tom Perotta, The Abstinence Teacher; Martin Scorcese (dir.), Silence (the film) and/or the novel by Shūsako Endō. 

ENGL 6310-001 (3119)—ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES

W 3-5:50.          137 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.       

This course is a professionalization workshop: it’s a course about how to be a professional literary scholar.  It’s not about any particular literary-historical period or problem; rather, it’s about how professional literary scholars do their work.  What types of questions do literary scholars ask, and how have the directions of those questions changed over time?  How do they go about answering them, and how have their strategies for doing so changed over time?  What kinds of objects count as objects of literary study, and what types of things constitute evidence in a literary argument?  The course has essentially two goals.  One is to develop a detailed understanding of the questions asked and investigated by literary scholars — in the past, and especially in the present and near future.  The other is to practice certain highly specific tasks that are crucial parts of being a professional literary scholar, such as preparing a journal article, a fellowship proposal, or a conference paper.

ENGL 6311-001 (3128)—SURVEY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY

TTh 11-12:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Siraganian.

A survey of literary criticism and theory from some of the ancient roots of critical thought to contemporary literary practice, from Aristotle to Moretti.  The purpose of the course is to provide the theoretical background necessary to understand the discipline of literary study. The course will require regular multiple essays analyzing both critical and literary texts. Writers studied include Freud, Levi-Strauss, Saussure, Althusser, Derrida, DeMan, Foucault, Bourdieu, Wittig, MacKinnon, Fish, Sedgwick.

ENGL 6312-001 (3156)—TEACHING PRACTICUM

Th 8-10:50.  Clements Hall 112.  Stephens.

English 6312 serves as an introductory support structure for PhD candidates who are teaching their first composition (Discernment & Discourse) classes at SMU. The course helps PhD students write syllabi for and plan their classes for the fall term; it also offers an ongoing conversation about grading, conferences, classroom management, etc.  In addition, all students read pedagogical books on composition courses, the history of rhetoric, and critical thinking in the classroom. 
Texts: TBA.
 

ENGL 6370-001 (5469): AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE: CRITICISM, DISSENT, WIT, AND SATIRE

M 3-5:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Darryl

This proseminar takes as its premise that argument, opposition, dissent, and an ironic, satirical spirit are the foundation of African American literature and literary study. Dispensing with the myth of a homogeneous African American community, we will focus upon critical issues and debates within African American literary and cultural history. Our goal will be to examine how these debates manifested themselves in the literature, whether implicit and explicit forms. We will begin in antebellum times and end in the contemporary era. In the process, we will read and analyze a corpus comprising various genres, movements, and perspectives.

The African American literary tradition has always been fully intertwined with and informed by historical events and critical perspectives defining the subjectivity and ensuring the survival of individuals and groups alike. Although certain perspectives tend to dominate each era, dissenting voices and robust debate remain essential to this outcome. We hear far less about radical solutions than those normalizing African Americans’ lives and concerns, or more conservative views of social and political issues. More to this course’s point, literature that pushes generic, stylistic, and technical boundaries tends not to be assigned or read. The same might be said for popular debates about literary aesthetics and art’s functions. This course helps to correct these tendencies by focusing upon dissent, iconoclasm, contrarianism, wit, and satire.

Our course has an equally important pedagogical raison d’être.  An equally significant course goal is to provide the foundation from which each participant could organize and teach an undergraduate course in African American literature. Our readings comprise a substantial portion of the background material that an instructor would need to know and to be prepared to discuss with her students.

Although we will read a number of landmark works of fiction and poetry throughout the term, each participant will be responsible for reading independently and reporting on a work not assigned for the course. That report may be the foundation of one or both of the course’s two major papers if the participant wishes, but it should demonstrate an ability to work with the diverse materials at hand. Most of the work for this course, however, shall consist of reading and weekly responses to the reading.

Two short papers, weekly written responses, an oral presentation, and a final examination shall be required. Textbooks: Most readings will come from Gates and Burton’s Call and Response anthology. We will also read poetry, essays, stories and novels by Baraka, Beatty, Cullen, Ellison, Everett, Garvey, Hughes, Hurston, Malcolm X, McKay, Morrison, Naylor, Nugent, Schuyler, Thurman, David Walker, and others.

ENGL 7340-001 (5470)—SEMINAR IN BRITISH LITERATURE: MILTON

Th 3:30-6:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.

Few (and arguably no) writers in English cast a longer, more varied, and more controversial shadow than John Milton.  Milton the Divorcer.  Milton the Regicide.  Milton the Heretic.  Milton the blind bard, the polemicist, the libertarian patriot, the heroic and Oedipal father to future poets, the fulfiller and destroyer of literary forms, the guy who announced in his first shot at epic that it would be the greatest one ever and may have been right—and who expressed his deep desire to “leave something so written to after-times, as they should not willingly let it die.”  This course will offer an overview of Milton’s work, including some of his prose and most of his poetry and drama, and consider what aftertimes (including subsequent writers, literary critics, and we ourselves) have made of this colossal, contentious genius.

ENGL 7350-001 (3554)—SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE: TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY STUDIES IN CLASSIC AMERICAN LITERATURE

T 3:30-6:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Greenspan.

This seminar will apply 21st-century terms and methodologies to the study of classic 19th-century American writing. Writers: Cooper, Apess, Hawthorne, Whitman, Melville, Stowe, Wells Brown, Rollin Ridge, Dickinson, and Dreiser. Students will explore these writers using the latest evidential discoveries, research tools, and interdisciplinary and digital humanities resources the seminar can devise. Each student will be working toward the semester-end production of a major written or digital humanities research project. 

Cat #

Sec #

Course Title

Room

Instructor

Day

Start

End

UC


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


1330

001

THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE

HYER0100

Neel, Jasper

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: LL


1362

001

CRAFTY WORLDS

DALL0116

Holahan, Michael

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

 


1365

001

LITERATURE OF MINORITIES

HYER0110

Levy, Bruce

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA1; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: HD


2102

001

SPREADSHEET LIT: EXCEL (LAB)

DALL0351

Dickson-Carr, Carol

R

3:30pm

4:20pm

 


2302

001

BUSINESS WRITING

DALL0351

Dickson-Carr, Carol

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012 & 2016: IL, OC, W


2302

002

BUSINESS WRITING

DALL0351

Dickson-Carr, Carol

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012& 2016: IL, OC, W


2305

001H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

KCRC0150

Goyne, Jo

TR

9:30am

10:50am

 


2305

002H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

KCRC0150

Goyne, Jo

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 


2305

003H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

 


2305

004H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

 


2305

005H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

 


2305

006H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Duke, Elizabeth

TR

9:30am

10:50am

 


2305

007H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Evans, Kelly

TR

2:00pm

3:30pm

 


2305

008H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Rosendale, Timothy

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

 


2305

009H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

CMRC0132

Amsel, Stephanie

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 


2305

010H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

DALL0343

Arbery, Joan

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

 


2305

011H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

DALL0343

Arbery, Joan

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

 


2310

001

IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION: WHAT WAS THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE?

DALL0116

Kiser, Kelsey

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


2310

002

IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION:The (R)evolution of Gothic Lit: Literal & Literary Horrors in Poetry & Prose

DALL0101

Stampone, Christopher

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W




2311

001

INTRO TO POETRY: SERIOUS WORD GAMES

DALL0105

Bozorth, Richard

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W


2311

002

INTRO TO POETRY

DALL0101

Holahan, Michael

MW

3:00pm

4:20pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W


2312

001

INTRO TO FICTION

DALL0102

Newman, Beth

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W


2312

002

INTRO TO FICTION: ETHNIC LITERARY IMAGINATIONS

DALL0156

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W


2312

003H

HONORS FICTION: STORIES OUT OF PLACE

DALL0157

Foster, Dennis

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W


2313

001

INTRO TO DRAMA

DALL0120

Moss, Dan

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W, OC


2314

001H

DOING THINGS WITH POEMS: A POET-GUIDED TOUR

DALL0137

Moss, Dan

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W, OC


2315

001

INTRO TO LIT STUDY: KNIGHTS, DRAMA QUEENS, & WORKING WOMEN

FOSC127

Schwartz, Nina

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

CA, CA2, W


2315

002

INTRO TO LIT STUDY

DALL0101

Siraganian, Lisa

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

CA, CA2, W


2315

003

INTRO TO LIT STUDY

DALL0149

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


2390

001

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0120

Brownderville, Greg

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


2390

002

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0138

Haynes, David

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


2390

003

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0156

Haynes, David

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


2390

004

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0120

Rubin, Jacob

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W


3310

001

CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LIT

DALL0156

Murfin, Ross

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 


3310

002

CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LIT

DALL0149

Schwartz, Nina

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

 


3312

001

CLASSICAL RHETORIC

DALL0137

Neel, Jasper

MWF

2:00pm

2:50pm

2012: HC2; 2016: HSBS; 2012 & 2016: KNOW, W


3320

001

TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE, FABULOUS FICTIONS: MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE IN CONTEXT

FOSC127

Keene, Catherine

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W


3341

001

BRITISH LITERARY HISTORY II: NATURE, EMPIRE, APOCALYPSE

DALL0357

Bozorth, Richard

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA2, HC2; 2016: HFA, HSBS; 2012 & 2016: W


3346

001

AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I

DALL0152

Cassedy, Tim

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA2, HC2; 2016: HFA, HSBS; 2012 & 2016: W


3365

001

JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE & CULTURE

DALL0116

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA


3367

001

ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS-CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

DALL0102

Satz, Martha

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W, HD, KNOW


3376

001

LITERATURE OF THE SOUTHWEST: IMAGINING A TRANSNATIONAL CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

HYER0107

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TR

9:30am

10:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W, HD


3379

001

CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY

DALL0102

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00am

10:50AM

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: KNOW, W, HD, OC


3383

001

IMAGINATION/CAPTL PUNISHMENT

DALL0102

Holahan, Michael

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

 


3390

001

STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: PLAYING WITH FORMS

DALL0102

Brownderville, Greg

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA1, CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W


3390

002

STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: WRITING ABOUT THE REAL WORLD

DALL0138

Rubin, Jacob

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

2012: CA1, CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W


4323

001

CHAUCER

DALL0156

Wheeler, Bonnie

TR

9:30am

10:50am

2012 & 2016: OR, IL


4332

001

STUDIES EARLY MODERN BRITISH LIT

DALL0137

Sudan, Rajani

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL


4343

001

BRITISH LIT AGE OF REV: ROMANTIC POETRY AND FICTION

DALL0137

Murfin, Ross

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL


4360

001

STUDIES IN MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LIT

DALL0138

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA


4369

001

TRANSATLANTIC STUDIES III: DISPLACEMENT, MIGRATION, FLIGHT

DALL0106

Foster, Dennis

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL, HD


5310

001

SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY. DISTINCTION SEMINAR: POSTSECULARISM AND LITERARY STUDIES

DALL0116

Newman, Beth

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

 


6310

001

ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES

DALL0137

Cassedy, Tim

W

3:00pm

5:50pm

 


6311

001

SURVEY OF LITERARY CRITICISM & THEORY

DALL0137

Siraganian, Lisa

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 


6312

001

TEACHING PRACTICUM

CLEM112

Stephens, Lori Ann

Th

8:00am

10:50am

 


6370

001

AFRICAN-AMERICAN LIT: CRITICISM, DISSENT, WIT, AND SATIRE

DALL0138

Dickson-Carr, Darryl

M

3:00pm

5:50pm

 


7340

001

SEMINAR IN BRITISH LIT: MILTON

DALL0137

Rosendale, Timothy

R

3:30pm

6:20pm

 


7350

001

SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LIT: TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY STUDIES IN CLASSIC AMERICAN LITERATURE

DALL0137

Greenspan, Ezra

T

3:30pm

6:20pm

 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

 

Cat#

Sec#

Course Title

Room

Instructor

Day

Start

End

UC

2305

010H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

DALL0343

Arbery, Joan

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

 

2310

002

IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION: The (R)evolution of Gothic Lit: Literal & Literary Horrors in Poetry & Prose

DALL0101

Stampone, Christopher

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

2314

001H

DOING THINGS WITH POEMS: A POET-GUIDED TOUR

DALL0137

Moss, Dan

MWF

9:00am

9:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W, OC

1330

001

THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE

HYER0100

Neel, Jasper

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: LL

2305

011H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

DALL0343

Arbery, Joan

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

 

2310

001

IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION: WHAT WAS THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE?

DALL0116

Kiser, Kelsey

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

2390

004

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0120

Rubin, Jacob

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

3346

001

AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I

DALL0152

Cassedy, Tim

MWF

10:00am

10:50am

2012: CA2, HC2; 2016: HFA, HSBS; 2012 & 2016: W

3379

001

CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY

DALL0102

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00am

10:50AM

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: KNOW, W, HD, OC

1362

001

CRAFTY WORLDS

DALL0116

Holahan, Michael

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

 

2305

003H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

 

2313

001

INTRO TO DRAMA

DALL0120

Moss, Dan

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA1; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W, OC

3367

001

ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS-CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

DALL0102

Satz, Martha

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W, HD, KNOW

4360

001

STUDIES IN MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LIT

DALL0138

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

11:00am

11:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA

2305

004H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

 

3390

002

STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: WRITING ABOUT THE REAL WORLD

DALL0138

Rubin, Jacob

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

2012: CA1, CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W

4332

001

STUDIES EARLY MODERN BRITISH LIT

DALL0137

Sudan, Rajani

MWF

12:00pm

12:50pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL

2305

005H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

VSNI0303

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

 

2315

003

INTRO TO LIT STUDY

DALL0149

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

 

3383

001

IMAGINATION/CAPTL PUNISHMENT

DALL0102

Holahan, Michael

MWF

1:00pm

1:50pm

 

3312

001

CLASSICAL RHETORIC

DALL0137

Neel, Jasper

MWF

2:00pm

2:50pm

2012: HC2; 2016: HSBS; 2012 & 2016: KNOW, W

2311

002

INTRO TO POETRY

DALL0101

Holahan, Michael

MW

3:00pm

4:20pm

 

6370

001

AFRICAN-AMERICAN LIT: CRITICISM, DISSENT, WIT, AND SATIRE

DALL0138

Dickson-Carr, Darryl

M

3:00pm

5:50pm

 

6310

001

ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES

DALL0137

Cassedy, Tim

W

3:00pm

5:50pm

 

2305

001H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

KCRC0150

Goyne, Jo

TR

9:30am

10:50am

 

2305

006H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Duke, Elizabeth

TR

9:30am

10:50am

 

3376

001

LITERATURE OF THE SOUTHWEST: IMAGINING A TRANSNATIONAL CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY

HYER0107

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TR

9:30am

10:50am

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W, HD

4323

001

CHAUCER

DALL0156

Wheeler, Bonnie

TR

9:30am

10:50am

2012 & 2016: OR, IL

2305

002H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

KCRC0150

Goyne, Jo

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 

2305

009H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

CMRC0132

Amsel, Stephanie

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 

2311

001

INTRO TO POETRY: SERIOUS WORD GAMES

DALL0105

Bozorth, Richard

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W

2312

001

INTRO TO FICTION

DALL0102

Newman, Beth

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W

2315

001

INTRO TO LIT STUDY: KNIGHTS, DRAMA QUEENS, & WORKING WOMEN

FOSC127

Schwartz, Nina

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

CA, CA2, W

2390

001

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0120

Brownderville, Greg

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

3310

001

CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LIT

DALL0156

Murfin, Ross

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 

6311

001

SURVEY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY

DALL0137

Siraganian, Lisa

TR

11:00am

12:20pm

 

2302

001

BUSINESS WRITING

DALL0351

Dickson-Carr, Carol

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012 & 2016: IL, OC, W

2305

008H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Rosendale, Timothy

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

 

2312

002

INTRO TO FICTION: ETHNIC LITERARY IMAGINATIONS

DALL0156

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W

2312

003H

HONORS FICTION: STORIES OUT OF PLACE

DALL0157

Foster, Dennis

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: W

2390

002

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0138

Haynes, David

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

3320

001

TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE, FABULOUS FICTIONS: MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE IN CONTEXT

FOSC127

Keene, Catherine

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W

3365

001

JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE & CULTURE

DALL0116

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

12:30pm

1:50pm

2012: CA2; 2016: HFA

1365

001

LITERATURE OF MINORITIES

HYER0110

Levy, Bruce

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA1; 2016: LL; 2012 & 2016: HD

2302

002

BUSINESS WRITING

DALL0351

Dickson-Carr, Carol

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012& 2016: IL, OC, W

2305

007H

HONORS HUMANITIES SEMINAR I

MCEL0135

Evans, Kelly

TR

2:00pm

3:30pm

 

2315

002

INTRO TO LIT STUDY

DALL0101

Siraganian, Lisa

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

CA, CA2, W

3310

002

CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LIT

DALL0149

Schwartz, Nina

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

 

3341

001

BRITISH LITERARY HISTORY II: NATURE, EMPIRE, APOCALYPSE

DALL0357

Bozorth, Richard

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA2, HC2; 2016: HFA, HSBS; 2012 & 2016: W

3390

001

STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: PLAYING WITH FORMS

DALL0102

Brownderville, Greg

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012: CA1, CA2; 2016: HFA; 2012 & 2016: W

4343

001

BRITISH LIT AGE OF REV: ROMANTIC POETRY AND FICTION

DALL0137

Murfin, Ross

TR

2:00pm

3:20pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL

2390

003

INTRO CREATIVE WRITING

DALL0156

Haynes, David

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

2012: CA1; 2016: CA; 2012 & 2016: W

4369

001

TRANSATLANTIC STUDIES III: DISPLACEMENT, MIGRATION, FLIGHT

DALL0106

Foster, Dennis

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

2012 & 2016: OR, IL, HD

5310

001

SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY. DISTINCTION SEMINAR: POSTSECULARISM AND LITERARY STUDIES

DALL0116

Newman, Beth

TR

3:30pm

4:50pm

 

7350

001

SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LIT: TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY STUDIES IN CLASSIC AMERICAN LITERATURE

DALL0137

Greenspan, Ezra

T

3:30pm

6:20pm

 

6312

001

TEACHING PRACTICUM

CLEM112

Stephens, Lori Ann

Th

8:00am

10:50am

 

 2102 001 SPREADSHEET LIT:  EXCEL (LAB)
DALL0351 Dickson-Carr, Carol
R
3:30pm 4:20pm  

7340

001

SEMINAR IN BRITISH LIT: MILTON

DALL0137

Rosendale, Timothy

Th

3:30pm

6:20pm