English Courses

Course Descriptions, Fall 2013

ENGL 1330 (3500). The World of Shakespeare. 10 MWF.  100 HYER.  Neel.

Introductory study of eight or nine major plays, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics.  Ten unannounced quizzes, written mid-term and final exams, and one short, out-of-class paper. Texts: Royal Shakespeare Company’s William Shakespeare: Complete Works, 2007 & Arp’s Synopses of the Plays.

GEC: P; UC: CA1

ENGL 1362 (3737). Crafty Worlds. 12 MWF.  101 DH.  Holahan.

TBD

GEC: P

ENGL 1365 (3321). Literature of Minorities. 3:30 TTH.  107 HYER.  Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as both local and global.

GEC: PD; UC: HD, CA1

ENGL 2302-001 (3020). Business Writing. 12:30 TTH.  351 DH.  Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2302-002 (3021). Business Writing. 2 TTH.  351 DH.  Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2310-001 (3118). Imagination & Interpretation. 3:30 TTH.  106 HYER.  TBA.

TBD

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2310-002 (5864). Imagination & Interpretation. 11 TTH.  156 DH.  TBA.

TBD

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2310-003 (5865). Imagination & Interpretation. 11 MWF.  138 DH.  Wuest.

Pending

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2311-001 or 2847 (2847). Poetry. 9 MWF.  357 DH.  Holahan.

TBD

GEC: P; UC: CA2, W

ENGL 2311-002 (3022). Poetry. 12 MWF.  138 DH.  Swann.

What, exactly, is “poetry”?  Why, over the centuries, have the most brilliant and creative writers in the English language turned to poetry to express themselves?  What skills and knowledge does a contemporary reader need to understand and enjoy the extraordinary richness of English poetry written over the past five hundred years?  And how can we use these skills and knowledge to appreciate the place of poetry in our own lives in twenty-first-century America?   This course requires students to analyze a wide variety of poems written in English.  Each student will develop an understanding of poetry and specific poems, learn about the principal conventions and techniques of poetry, and gain an appreciation of the cultural importance of poetry from the sixteenth century through to the present day. Requirements: daily quizzes; four essays; oral presentation; participation in discussions; comprehensive final exam. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed.; Little, Brown Essential Handbook.

GEC: P; UC: CA2, W

ENGL 2311-003 (3345). Poetry. 2 MWF.  156 DH.  Neel.

Introduces students to poetry as an art form.  Though not strictly historical in organization, the course emphasizes the long tradition of poetry written in English.  Although most aspects of English poetry receive consideration, the course pays particular attention to verse form, poetic technique, thematic implication, and, to a limited degree, prosody.  Three short papers (1,000 words); one medium paper (1,500 words); ten quizzes; one oral recitation; a written comprehensive final examination; and regular class attendance are required.   Texts: Norton Anthology of Poetry, fifth edition; Rita Dove’s Mother Love and Sonata Mulattica (both Norton).

GEC: P;  UC: CA2, W

ENGL 2312-001 (2505). Fiction. 8 MWF.  102 DH.  Crusius.

An introduction to the art of fiction. Emphasis on recent novels and short stories. Special concern with satire, comedy, and humor. Writing assignments: quizzes, three essays, final examination. Texts: Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Delillo, White Noise; Alexie, Reservation Blues; Proulx, Close Range.

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2312-002 Honors (3023). Fiction. 9 MWF.  157 DH.  Weisenburger.

Human beings use story-telling to compose and express understandings of ourselves, others, and our world. While giving us pleasure, narrative also structures memory and is thus foundational to critical and historical thinking and knowledge-making in general. This course builds analytical, critical, and writing skills through guided studies in forms such as the short story, novella, novel, and narrative film; and in narrative modes such as the detective story and the thriller. We ask what individual fictions do, how they do what they do, where and why these doings are unique to narrative art, and how some stories work to conserve storytelling traditions while others seek to disrupt them. Developing critical sensitivities to the designs of literary narratives will sharpen one’s sense of the ways narrative operates in our lives, thus ways to know and to use narration.  Expect discussion and lecture, close-reading, short critical essays, a mid-term and a final.  Readings: a short fiction anthology, James Joyce’s 1914 story collection, Dubliners; Raymond Chandler’s The Big Sleep (1939), and Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men (2006).

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2312-003 (3964). Fiction. 2 TTH.  102 DH.  Murfin.

This course will investigate narrative fiction as a genre by looking at three of its sub-genres:  the short story, the novel, and the novella.  We will begin with nineteenth-century texts, studying some of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s best known short stories; Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein; and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a novella that, like Shelley’s novel, features multiple (potentially unreliable) narrators and an achronological plot.  In the second half of the course, we will analyze and discuss Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, Ford Madox Ford’s The Good Soldier, and Ian McEwen’s Saturday, twentieth and twenty-first century novellas and novels that not only further the experiments with narrative form undertaken by Shelley, Conrad, and James but that also develop a theme introduced by Hawthorne:  the human monster.  In addition to writing several short papers, students will take pop quizzes, a mid-term, and an essay final. 

GEC: P;  UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2314 (3092). Doing Things with Poems. 2 TTH.  357 DH.  Newman.

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers. Writing assignments: several short essays totaling about 15 pages, distributed evenly across the semester; frequent short exercises; 1-2 in-class presentations, one recitation of a memorized poem; mid-term, final examination. Text:  Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry.

GEC: P;  UC: CA2, W

ENGL 2315-001 (2969). Introduction to Literary Study. 10 MWF.  102 DH.  Dickson-Carr.

ENGL 2315 is an introduction to the pleasing art of literary study and to the English major. We will read, contemplate, and discuss poetry, short stories, essays, and novels from different nations and literary traditions to enjoy their many rich complexities. We will begin with different ways of defining literature, then proceed to examine how and why we read various genres and the roles that literature may play in our world. In addition, we will discover and discuss a few of the more prominent issues in contemporary literary studies. By the end of the course, the student should be able to read and write critically about literary works. This skill will serve each student well in other courses in English and elsewhere. Regular writings (in class and at home), three papers, and five short benchmark exams will be required.  Texts: Handbook to Literature, William Harmon and Hugh Holman. Other texts TBD.

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2315-002 (3521). Introduction to Literary Study. 1 MWF.  149 DH.  Ards.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of fields, genres, and historical periods. This critical project is grounded in the thematic approach of exploring the idea of “America” or the New World in texts that have been central to the definition of American national identity during crucial periods of national transformation. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination. Sample texts include The Tempest by William Shakespeare; The Works of Anne Bradstreet; Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe; Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman; Daisy Miller by Henry James; The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man by James Weldon Johnson; Slouching Toward Bethlehem by Joan Didion; The Middleman and Other Stories by Bharati Mukherjee

GEC: P; UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2315-003 (3749). Introduction to Literary Study. 9:30 TTH.  156 DH.  Moss.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, two short papers, one longer paper, midterm, final examination. Texts: Shakespeare, Hamlet; Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead; Blake, Songs of Innocence and of Experience; Eliot, The Waste Land; Montagu, Turkish Embassy Letters; Brontë, Jane Eyre; Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; Murfin and Ray, The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms.

GEC: P;  UC: CA1, W

ENGL 2390-001 (3755). Intro Creative Writing. 12 MWF.  137 DH.  Diaconoff.

Introduction to Creative Writing. This course introduces students to the practice of writing poems, short stories, and creative essays. Class time is devoted to the study of published pieces, workshop discussion of students' pieces, and in-class writing exercises. Texts: Richard Hugo, THE TRIGGERING TOWN, and Heather Sellers, THE PRACTICE OF CREATIVE WRITING.

UC: CA1,

ENGL 2390-002 (3756). Intro Creative Writing. 12:30 TTH.  149 DH.  Diaconoff.

Introduction to Creative Writing. This course introduces students to the practice of writing poems, short stories, and creative essays. Class time is devoted to the study of published pieces, workshop discussion of students' pieces, and in-class writing exercises. Texts: Richard Hugo, THE TRIGGERING TOWN, and Heather Sellers, THE PRACTICE OF CREATIVE WRITING. This course is team taught with Profs. Brownderville and Haynes.

UC: CA1

ENGL 2390-003 (3757). Intro Creative Writing. 12:30  TTH.  101 DH.  Brownderville.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. This course is team taught with  Haynes and Dicaonoff.

UC: CA1

ENGL 2390-004 (5948). Intro Creative Writing. 12:30  TTH.  156 DH.  Haynes.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. This course is team taught with Brownderville and Dicaonoff.

UC: CA1

ENGL 3310-001 (2506). CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND CULTURE. 10 MWF.  120 DH.  Crusius.

An introduction to contemporary methods of interpreting literature and to the theoretical assumptions--about language, culture, gender, politics, sexuality, and psychology--informing these methods. Writing assignments: four short essays, final examination. Texts: Stephen Lynn, Texts and Contexts; Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds., The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; course packet of readings.

ENGL 3310-002 (3091). CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE, LANGUAGE, AND CULTURE. 3:30 TTH.  156 DH.  Siraganian.

What is literature?  How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism?  This course introduces linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse and applies a variety of contemporary critical approaches to a few literary texts. Writing assignments: bi-weekly short essays, final essay, final examination. Texts: Tyson, Critical Theory Today, Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Joyce, “The Dead”, Shakespeare, The Tempest, plus additional essays and poems.

ENGL 3331 (5953). BRITISH LITERARY HISTORY I: CHAUCER TO POPE. 10 MWF.  357 DH.  Swann.

Love, sex, and power: these topics captured the imaginations of the early British writers we'll read throughout the semester.  We'll discuss works by medieval, Renaissance, and eighteenth-century authors (both men and women) and explore how these fascinating literary texts were shaped by--and sought to shape--the historical moments in which they were written.  Our reading will be richly diverse: we'll examine both comic texts and some of the most profound and disturbing works ever written in the English language; and in the process, we'll analyze many different literary genres, including narrative poetry, drama, prose, and lyric verse.  This wide-ranging course will be especially valuable to anyone who wants to gain a broad background knowledge of British literature. Requirements: participation in class discussions; daily quizzes; two essays (one short paper of five pages, one longer essay eight pages in length); comprehensive final exam. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th edition, vol. 1; Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, ed. A. Kent Hieatt and Constance Hieatt.

GEC: P; UC: CA2

ENGL 3346 (3768). AMerican Literary History I. 12 MWF.  102 HYER.  Cassedy.

An introduction to American literature from European contact to the Civil War.  The course will survey well-known texts from the American literary canon as well as less familiar texts.  Major themes and topics will include: the shifting meanings of "American" identity; the conflicting demands of radical individualism and social cohesion, especially as they intersect with gender, race, slavery, and abolition; and the relationship between literacy and citizenship.  Readings will include autobiographical texts by Mary Rowlandson, Benjamin Franklin, Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, and Henry David Thoreau; sermons by John Winthrop, Jonathan Edwards, and others; fiction by Susanna Rowson, Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Herman Melville; and poetry by Phillis Wheatley, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson.

GEC: P; UC: CA2, HC2, W

ENGL 3355, CF3349 (5980). Transatlantic Encounters III: Literature and Culture of the African Diaspora. 11 MWF.  116 DH.  Ards.

From Jamaican poet Claude McKay’s Banjo to Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Adichie’s Half a Yellow Sun, Black literature has played an important role in challenging European colonial order and its neocolonial legacy.  Indeed, twentieth-century African independence struggles have had their roots in literary and cultural awakenings throughout the Diaspora: Marcus Garvey’s Pan Africanism; the Harlem Renaissance and Black Arts Movement in the United States; Négritude in Paris, the Caribbean, and West Africa; African Humanism and Black Consciousness movements from Algiers to Soweto.  Drawing on an interdisciplinary framework that includes history, film, and cultural criticism, the course will examine the links between literature and social movements, with a focus on how these creative expressions shaped evolving notions of African diasporic identity. Sample texts include: David Levering Lewis, The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader; Claude McKay, Banjo; Aimé Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land; Frantz Fanon, Wretched of the Earth; Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Chimananda Adichie, Half a Yellow; Zakes Mda, Ways of Dying: A Novel; in addition to short stories, poetry, and essays by writers such as Jean-Paul Sartre, James Baldwin, Léopold Senghor, Sonia Sanchez and Paulette Nardal.

GEC: PD; UC: CA2, HD, GE

ENGL 3365, CF3398 (5981). JEWISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. 10 MWF.  101 DH.  Greenspan.

This course will provide a survey of Jewish American literature and culture running from the period of mass immigration in the late 19th century through the present. It will sample leading works by a wide array of major Jewish writers, including Sholem Aleichem, Emma Lazarus, Abe Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Henry Roth, Tillie Olsen, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Philip Roth, Art Spiegelman, Michael Chabon, and Dara Horn.

ENGL 3370 (5982). Special Topics: Wit, Irony, and Satire. 1 MWF.  102 HYER.  Dickson-Carr.

In ENGL 3370, we will explore major and minor texts in the history of literary wit and satire, with occasional forays into film, television, the internet, and other media. We will study classic examples of wit and satire from ancient cultures as a foundation, then make our way slowly towards the present, where we will look at poems, short stories, essays, novels, The Onion, televised satire, and such films as Bamboozled, Bob Roberts, This is Spinal Tap, among others. Our primary goal will be to discover how wit and satire work; a secondary goal will be to discuss the functions they fulfill in our culture. Regular writings (in class and at home), three papers, and five short benchmark exams will be required. Primary Texts (tentative): Beatty, Paul. The White Boy Shuffle; DeLillo, Don. White Noise; Erasmus. The Praise of Folly (excerpts); Everett, Percival. Erasure; Horatio. Selected writings; Juvenal. Selected writings; Reed, Ishmael. Japanese by Spring; Schuyler, George. Black No More; Swift, Jonathan. The Writings of Jonathan Swift; Twain, Mark. Pudd’nhead Wilson; Voltaire, Jean-Marie Arouet de. Candide, or Optimism.

ENGL 3379, CFA3379 (4035). Literature & Disability. 11 MWF.  101 DH.  Satz.

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination. Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, MarkCurious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child ; Jamison,Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind;Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton,May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.  

ENGL 3383 (5991). LITERARY EXECUTIONS: IMAGINATION AND CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. 10 MWF.  116 DH.  Holahan.

TBD

ENGL 3390-001 (5988). Intermediate Creative Writing. 9:30 TTH.  149 DH.  Diaconoff.

Writing the Great American Essay. This course is an intermediate-level workshop in the possibilities figured by the term "creative essay." In addition to workshop discussion of students' pieces, we'll read canonical and contemporary examples of essays in a variety of modes, from narrative to lyrical to postmodern, including a memoir in graphic (comic-book) form. Texts: Joyce Carol Oates, ed., THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS OF THE CENTURY (or the anthology ESSAYING THE ESSAY), John D'Agata and Jim Fingal, THE LIFESPAN OF A FACT, and Alison Bechdel, FUN HOME.

UC: CA1

ENGL 3390-002 (5989). Intermediate Creative Writing. 3:30 TTH.  106 DH.  Brownderville.

Outlaw Poetry: Poets are avid rule breakers. Of course, since outlaws can’t break laws that don’t exist, poets are also avid rule makers, creating patterns to interrupt for effect. These patterns might be tonal, rhythmic, stanzaic, syntactic, imagistic, philosophical, or otherwise. In this course student writers will analyze an array of published poems that demonstrate effective outlawry, in both dominant senses of the word. Composing original poems for the class to workshop, students will make and break their own rules. Also, students will consider—from two perspectives, those of author and publisher—the rather formidable challenge of editing poetry.

UC: CA1

ENGL 3390-701 (5986). THEMATIC STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING: Speculative Fiction II/Publishing and Editing. 3 MW.  149 DH.  Haynes.

This class, geared to writers and readers interested in science fiction, fantasy, horror and other fictions regarded as outside the bounds of “realism,” will engage students in the literary side of these genres.  Students will read and respond to fiction by contemporary literary writers working in speculative forms.  Students will create their own fiction and also edit and publish an SMU anthology of student speculative work.   You do not have to have taken part one to enroll in this class. Texts include: Cormac McCarthy The Road; Alan Moore, Watchmen; McSweeney’s Chamber of Astonishing Stories

UC: CA1

ENGL 33xx. 11 TTH. 102 DH.  TBA.

TBD

ENGL 33xx. 8 TTH. 120 DH.  TBA.

TBD

ENGL 4321 (3536). Studies in Medieval Literature. 9:30 TTH.  102 DH.  TBA.

TBD

UC: OC, IL, C

ENGL 4333 (2742). Shakespeare and the Boys. 12:30  TTH.  138 DH.  Moss.

Even when reminded that all of Shakespeare’s female roles were originally played by boy actors, we tend to picture Juliet as a teenaged girl, Rosalind as Juliet disguised as a boy, Cleopatra as an aging diva, and so on. Especially as readers of Shakespeare’s plays, we must continually work to imagine such memorable female roles as written for an all-male stage. For early modern English audiences, however, the casting of boys for women’s parts was not at all surprising; for them, the revolutionary aspect of Shakespeare’s use of boy actors was the new prominence he gave them at center-stage. In this course, we will revisit many of Shakespeare’s best-loved plays with a constant eye on these rising stars of the theater, considering how boys were employed by professional acting companies, how they rehearsed and performed, and how they were received by audiences. We will go behind the scenes, as well, exploring the economic and cultural conditions in which these extraordinary boy actors grew into queens, mothers, heroines, villainesses, and lovers. Texts: Beaumont, The Knight of the Burning Pestle; Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona; The Taming of the Shrew; Sonnets; Romeo and Juliet; Much Ado About Nothing; The Merchant of Venice; As You Like It; Macbeth; Antony and Cleopatra; Cymbeline; The Winter’s Tale

UC: OC, IL, C

ENGL 4343-001 (3154). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: GENDER AT THE FIN DE SIÈCLE. 11 TTH.  137 DH.  Newman.

During the final decade of the nineteenth century, writers and ordinary people alike openly questioned, criticized, and rejected the settled gender ideology and conservative sexual mores that had been distinctive features of Victorian life.  Writers introduced the “New Woman,” who desired independence and rejected marriage as her only vocation, along with the male aesthete, who preferred the beautiful to the useful, and challenged Victorian ideals of manliness.  Public scandals and new discourses, such as the trials of Oscar Wilde and the emergence of psychology and psychoanalysis, called attention to desires outside the prescribed norm.  These developments helped create new identities, which critics sometimes termed “degenerate” or “decadent.”  Indeed, the term “The Decadence” is often used as a synonym for late nineteenth-century literature and art.  We will explore these developments through both canonical and recently recovered “minor” literature, putting the mainstream in the context of what has more usually been forgotten. Texts: Schaffer, ed., Literature and Culture at the Fin de Siècle (anthology); Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Ryder Haggard, She; anthology readings to include Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; poems and essays by “decadent” writers; short fiction and essays by “New Woman” writers.  1-2 short critical/analytical papers (4-5 pp); bibliographical project with annotations; quizzes; research project (approx. 10 pages); final exam.

 UC:OC, IL, C

ENGL 4343-002 (5993). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Eliot. 9 MWF.  137 DH.  Satz.

A consideration of the works of three major nineteenth century novelists against the background of history, gender constraints, and philosophical considerations.  Assignments: four papers of varying lengths, mid-term and final. Texts: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Austen, Emma; Bronte, Jane Eyre; Bronte, Villette; Eliot, Middlemarch; and Eliot, Mill on the Floss.

UC: OC, IL, C

ENGL 4360 (5994). STUDIES IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARYAMERICAN LITERATURE. 11 MWF.  120 DH.  Weisenburger.

American Literature in the Cold War Decades.  This course will focus on how a Cold War geopolitics, from roughly 1945 – 1990, related to the period’s poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fictional prose.  We will study how American writers responded to nuclear weapons, to the spreading military-industrial economy, and to the surveillance state the Cold War seemed to require.  How did those governmental realities relate to social movements for ending racial segregation, for securing women’s rights, and for advancing Counterculture goals?  In what ways did the general contest between that National Security State and those modes of resistance sponsor new uses of language, especially in writers’ presentations of sex and violence that sometimes got them and/or their books hauled into court?  How, then, did the tumult of militarism and activism alter aesthetic values?  As a period for interdisciplinary study the Cold War is stunningly and richly problematic.  It was the cradle that rocked your grandparents and parents into adulthood, while scenes of nuclear winter, endless undeclared wars (Korea, Vietnam), and other spectacles of violence—riots, assassinations—unfolded on the Tube and in Time magazine, media that also displayed alternate prospects, or dreams, for a just, peaceful, and sustainable world—or landing men on the moon.  It’s the precursor to post-9/11 America—your cradle.  Our studies of this period will be through the writings of (among others) Arthur Miller, Allen Ginsberg, Loraine Hansberry, Kurt Vonnegut, James Baldwin, Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Joan Didion, Thomas Pynchon, and Robert Coover.  Required work:  two short papers, a term paper, and a take-home final exam. 

UC: OC, IL, C

ENGL 4369. Transatlantic Studies III: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY BRITISH WRITERS: Contemporary LGBT Writing. 2 TTH.  101 DH.  Bozorth.

The Stonewall Rebellion of June 1969 marked the birth of the modern gay rights movement, and the decades since have seen the “coming out” of lesbian, gay, and transgender literature as well.  We’ll be reading some of the most influential novels, plays, and memoirs by British and US queer writers from the 1960s to the present, considering the aesthetic, psychological, social, political and other elements of their work.  Among issues we’ll explore:  the ongoing fascination of stories about growing up, coming out, and sexual discovery; the search for a queer ancestry and the creation of personal and collective histories in textual forms; the spiritual meanings of queer sexuality, love, drag, disco, and sequins; the tensions (and harmonies) between sexual identity and race, ethnicity, and gender; the personal and political challenges posed by HIV/AIDS.  We’ll consider how artists adapt aesthetic forms to grapple with such things, whether in a coming-of-age novel, a memoir, film, or a stage play.  If this class were a movie, it would get an NC-17 rating:  this course requires an adult capacity to think, talk, and write explicitly about sex and the body in an intellectual context.  We will use a Discussion Board to post question and topics for class consideration, and students will collaborate on leading class discussions for each text, reflecting their interests and research outside of class.  Writing assignments:  shorter and longer analytical papers, including a final research-based paper, totalling 25 pages. Texts:  Alison Bechdel, Fun-Home; Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming-Pool Library; Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.

UC: OC, IL, C

ENGL 5310 (2507). SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY. 11 TTH.  149 DH.  Schwartz.

An introduction to some of the philosophical and theoretical writings necessary to understand current critical practice.  We shall examine assumptions underlying traditional critical methods and then work toward some of the critical modes that have come into practice in the last half of the 20thC and the first decade of the 21stC, including deconstructive, psychoanalytic, feminist, New Historical, queer, ethnic, and cultural approaches to literature.  The emphasis throughout the course will be on the ways in which a non-foundationalist “semiotic” linguistics has provided ways of understanding literary works and other systems that constitute our culture.  In addition to the texts listed below, we shall read essays by Foucault, Saussure, Derrida, Barthes, Gates, Hall, Sedgwick, Silverman, and Badiou, among others.  Writing assignments: several short papers and one seminar essay. Enrollment limit: By invitation only. Texts: Brontë, Jane Eyre; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents; Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; James,Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato, Phaedrus. Silverman, The Subject of Semiotics. Badiou,  The Foundation of Universalism

ENGL 6310 (5995). Advanced Literature Studies. 2 T. 137 DH.  Sudan.

TBD

ENGL 6311 (3044). SURVEY OF LITERARY CRITICISM. 11 TTH.  120 DH.  Foster.

A survey of literary criticism and theory from some of the ancient roots of critical thought to contemporary literary practice: from Heraclitus to Badiou.  The purpose of the course is to provide the theoretical background necessary to understand the discipline of literary study. The course will require regular critical responses and several essays analyzing both critical and literary texts. Enrollment limit: Graduate Students only. Texts:  Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life; Alain Badiou, Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism; Ian Bogost, Unit Operations; Don DeLillo, The Names; Sigmund Freud:, Civilization and Its Discontents; Michele Foucault:, Discipline and Punish; Henry James, Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato,Phaedrus; Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things.

ENGL 6340 (6001). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS:  VICTORIAN POETRY IN ROMANTIC CONTEXTS. 2 W. 137 DH.  Murfin.

This course will focus on major and minor poems by at least six Victorian poets:  Matthew Arnold; Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Robert Browning; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; and Thomas Hardy.  Concurrently, we will be (re)reading influential works by at least three Romantic precursors, including William Wordsworth, John Keats, and Percy Bysshe Shelley, plus “classic” scholarly studies of Victorian poetry and the Victorian period by Douglas Bush, A. Dwight Culler, Graham Hough, Robert Langbaum, Jerome McGann, Misao Miyoshi, Christopher Ricks, Lionel Trilling, and so forth.  Some attention will be paid to Victorian nonfiction prose, but only insofar as it involves literary criticism (e.g., Arnold’s “The Study of Poetry”) that responds to Romantic precedents (“Wordsworth’s “Preface to Lyrical Ballads, Shelley’s “Defense of Poetry”).  

ENGL 7340 (6006). Seminar in British Literature. 2 TH. 137 DH.  Wheeler.

TBD

ENGL 7350 (3958). Media Ideologies in the Eighteenth-Century Anglophone Atlantic. 2 M. 138 DH.  Cassedy.

In this course, we will seek to understand the spread of print and reading into new areas of social and personal life in the eighteenth century, while also studying how eighteenth-century Britons and Americans made sense of this "media shift."  Although eighteenth-century observers were no doubt correct in their sense that an exponential growth in printed materials was having significant effects on their world, it has never been easy to specify what those changes were, or why they happened.  Print and literacy altered existing ideologies, but were also vehicles for them; they seemed to have their own determining logic, but that logic was also socially constructed.  Encounters with printed words also reshaped the meanings of unprinted words: as print and reading became more important, the oral and the scribal acquired a countervailing significance.  Whereas Western intellectuals had previously denigrated oral speech as vulgar noise, the eighteenth century saw the valorization of certain kinds of orality as cultural forms that preserved desired premodern values and that were purportedly on the brink of being lost.  The course will explore the eighteenth century's relationships to texts through readings in poetry, drama, travel narratives, fiction, and pedagogy by British and American writers such as Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Pope, Hannah Foster, Charles Brockden Brown, James Macpherson, and William Wordsworth.  Critical readings will include selections from major theorists of media history, Atlantic studies, and book history, including Walter Ong, Elizabeth Eisenstein, Adrian Johns, and William St. Clair.