English Courses

Course Descriptions, Fall 2011

Class Numbers are included in parentheses following the course number and are followed, when applicable, by the previous course catalogue number.

ENGL 1330-001+ (5250). THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE. 10 MWF. Hyer Hall 100. Neel.

Introductory study of nine major plays, including comedy, history, tragedy, and romance, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics. Ten unannounced quizzes, written mid-term and final exams, and one short, out-of-class paper.

Texts: Royal Shakespeare Company’s William Shakespeare: Complete Works, 2007 & Arp’s Synopses of the Plays.

ENGL 1365-001+# (3592). LITERATURE OF MINORITIES. 3:30 TTh. Hyer Hall 107. Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as both local and global. Writing assignments: two essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Ayala, American Chica; Bechdel, Fun Home; Tomine, Shortcomings, Urrea, Devil's Highway; Roth, Goodbye, Columbus; Hegedorn, Charlie Chan is Dead; Ulen, Crystelle Morning, and selected short stories distributed throughout the term.

ENGL 2302-001 (3055). BUSINESS WRITING. 11 TTh. Dallas Hall 351. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2302-002 (3056). BUSINESS WRITING. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 351. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2302-003 (5251). BUSINESS WRITING. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 351. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts: Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2310-001+ (3197). IMAGINATION AND INTERPRETATION. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 120. Walker Edin.

The conflicted and creative movement known as Modernism might be summed up by Ezra Pound’s ironic and iconic challenge to “make it new!” Yet the stylistic and thematic innovations of Modernism begin to surface years before, just as “old” Victorian themes linger in Modern texts. In this course, we will investigate together places of anticipation and nostalgia in canonical and non-canonical literature. Assigned reading will include Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, as well as short stories by James Joyce, poetry by Thomas Hardy, and selections from the “New Woman” writers. Course requirements include weekly reading responses, three short papers, a mid-term, and a final exam.

Texts: Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Virginia Woolf, Orlando; A New Woman Reader: Fiction, Articles, and Drama of the 1890s, edited by Carolyn Christensen Nelson; and other selected texts.

ENGL 2311-001+ (2815). POETRY. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 102. Holahan.

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

Texts: TBA.

ENGL 2311-002+ (3057). POETRY. 12 MWF. Hyer Hall 102. Neel.

Introduces students to poetry as an art form. Though not strictly historical in organization, the course emphasizes the long tradition of poetry written in English. Although most aspects of English poetry receive consideration, the course pays particular attention to verse form, poetic technique, thematic implication, and, to a limited degree, prosody. Three short papers (500 words); one medium paper (1,500 words); ten quizzes; one oral recitation; a written final examination; and regular class attendance are required. Texts: Norton Anthology of Poetry, fifth edition; Yale University Press edition of Hamlet; Rita Dove’s Mother Love and Sonata Mulattica (both Norton).

ENGL 2311-003+ (3644). POETRY. 12:30 TTh. Clements Hall 120. Swann.

What, exactly, is “poetry”? Why, over the centuries, have the most brilliant and creative writers in the English language turned to poetry to express themselves? What skills and knowledge does a contemporary reader need to understand and enjoy the extraordinary richness of English poetry written over the past five hundred years? And how can we use these skills and knowledge to appreciate the place of poetry in our own lives in twenty-first-century America? This course requires students to analyze a wide variety of poems written in English. Each student will develop an understanding of poetry and specific poems, learn about the principal conventions and techniques of poetry, and gain an appreciation of the cultural importance of poetry from the sixteenth century through to the present day. Course requirements include regular quizzes, three short essays, an oral presentation, and a comprehensive final exam.

Texts: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, 5th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard.

ENGL 2312-001+ (2417). FICTION. 9 MWF. Dallas Hall 137. Crusius.

An introduction to the art of fiction. Emphasis on recent novels and short stories. Special concern with satire, comedy, and humor. Writing assignments: quizzes, three essays, final examination.
Texts: Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Delillo, White Noise; Alexie, Reservation Blues; Proulx, Close Range.

ENGL 2312-002+ (3058). FICTION. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 101. Sae-Saue.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet, how does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? How does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to signify and to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.
Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, The Hummingbird’s Daughter, Salvador Plascencia: The People of Paper.

ENGL 2312-003H+ (5408). FICTION. 12 MWF. Hyer Hall 107. Sudan.

An introduction to the genre of fiction with an emphasis on the Gothic novel. The course will combine primary texts with short secondary texts. Writers include Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Emily Bronte, Wilkie Collins, and Bram Stoker. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, one longer essay.

Texts: TBA.

ENGL 2312-004+ (5259). FICTION. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 149. Murfin.

This course will investigate narrative fiction as a genre by looking at three of its sub-genres: the short story, the novel, and the novella. We will begin with nineteenth-century texts, studying some of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s best-known stories; Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein; and Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, a novella that, like Shelley’s novel, features multiple (potentially unreliable) narrators and an achronological plot. In the second half of the course, we will analyze and discuss Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, and Ian McEwen’s Saturday, twentieth and twenty-first century novellas and novels that not only further the experiments with narrative form undertaken by Shelley, Conrad, and James but that also develop a theme introduced by Hawthorne: the human monster. In addition to writing several short papers, students will take pop quizzes, a mid-term, and an essay final.

ENGL 2314-001H+ (3166). DOING THINGS WITH POEMS. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 105. Bozorth.

Now in 3D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation.
Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3d ed); Andrea Lunsford, EasyWriter (4th ed.).

ENGL 2315-001+ (2978). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 106. Dumitrescu.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, three essays, mid-term, final examination.
Texts: Murfin and Ray, The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Webster, The Duchess of Malfi; Pope, The Rape of the Lock; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; selected poems.

ENGL 2315-002+ (5407). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 138. Weisenburger.

Introduction to the discipline for English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Holman & Harmon, A Handbook to Literature; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Nathanael Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; James Joyce, Dubliners; Natasha Trethewey, Native Guard; Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep.

ENGL 2391-001 (3060). INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING. 3 MW. Dallas Hall 101. Otremba.

A workshop in which student poetry, directed exercises in basic elements of craft, and reading sample poems form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts: TBA

ENGL 2391-701 (5306). INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING. 5:30 MW. Dallas Hall 101. Otremba.

A workshop in which student poetry, directed exercises in basic elements of craft, and reading sample poems form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts: TBA

ENGL 2392-001 (2867). INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 11 TTh. Fondren Science 158. Smith, D.

A beginning workshop in the theory and practice of fiction writing. Assignments include in-class and at-home exercises, writing and revising short stories, as well as written responses to published stories.

Texts: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Edition) by Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, and Ned Stuckey-French, The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter 7th Edition, Richard Bausch (editor) and R.V. Cassill (editor).

ENGL 2392-002 (2868). INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 357. Smith, D.

A beginning workshop in the theory and practice of fiction writing. Assignments include in-class and at-home exercises, writing and revising short stories, as well as written responses to published stories.

Texts: Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Edition) by Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, and Ned Stuckey-French, The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction, Shorter 7th Edition, Richard Bausch (editor) and R.V. Cassill (editor).

ENGL 2392-003 (3603). INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 156. Haynes.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.
Texts: TBA.

ENGL 3310-001 (2418). CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. 11 MWF. Dallas Hall 101. Crusius.

An introduction to contemporary methods of interpreting literature and to the theoretical assumptions--about language, culture, gender, politics, sexuality, and psychology--informing these methods. Writing assignments: four short essays, final examination.

Texts: Stephen Lynn, Texts and Contexts; Lex Williford and Michael Martone, eds., The Scribner Anthology of Contemporary Short Fiction; course packet of readings.

ENGL 3310-002 (3165). CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Murfin.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination.

Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism.

ENGL 3341-001+ (5309). BRITISH LITERARY HISTORY II. 11 TTh. Hyer Hall 107. Bozorth.

Introduction to the later periods of English literature from the end of the eighteenth century, with practice in close reading and in the analysis of texts. Study of major authors along with consideration of historical contexts, critical problems, and themes. One third of the meetings are lectures, the rest discussions. Writing assignments: three short essays, two hour tests, frequent one-page writing assignments or quizzes, final examination.
Texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. II (8th edition); Bronte, Wuthering Heights; Wilde,Salome; Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; Lunsford, EasyWriter.

ENGL 3344-001+# (5310). VICTORIAN GENDER. 1 MWF. Hyer Hall 102. Newman.

Why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to us about what it means to be a man or woman, despite the differences between us and the Victorians? We will explore the way fiction, poetry, and other writing from the period constructs, reflects, questions, and protests the gender distinctions that Victorians understood as the foundation of the social world. Writing assignments: three papers (4-5 pages); mid-term and final examinations; reading quizzes; possible short, informal postings to discussion board or group discussion-planning.

Texts: C. Brontë, Jane Eyre; Dickens, Great Expectations, Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; selected nineteenth-century poems and cultural documents posted to Blackboard.

ENGL 3360-001+ (5311). TOPICS IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE:POSTMODERNISM. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Dickson-Carr.

Postmodernism in literature is, like so many movements and approaches before it, an easily misunderstood term. In ENGL 3360, our focus will be on the authors, theories, literary works, and history that comprise literary postmodernism. We shall begin by reading some of the theories that have informed definitions and discussions of the postmodern and its place in American literary and cultural history alongside exemplary stories and essays. The majority of the semester shall be spent reading the texts below to answer the following questions: What is postmodernism? What makes a literary work “postmodern”? Who are the major American authors writing in this mode, and how are they important to American literature, culture, and history? How is postmodernism different from literary modernism? How is it similar? Are we now “post-postmodern,” as some theorists argue?

The assigned authors represent a sampling of those most frequently classified as “postmodern,” will constantly question that label. Requirements will include one short paper, two longer papers, a final exam, regular reading quizzes, and other short writing assignments.

Texts (tentative): Kathy Acker, Don Quixote; Donald Barthelme, The Teachings of Don B. (selections). Don DeLillo, White Noise; Percival Everett, Erasure; William Gaddis, Carpenter’s Gothic; Toni Morrison, “Recitatif” andJazz; Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; Ishmael Reed, Flight to Canada. David Foster Wallace, A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again (selections).

ENGL 3379-001C (3148). CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 116. Satz.

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.
Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child ; Jamison,Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind;Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton,May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

ENGL 3383-001C (2997). LITERARY EXECUTIONS: IMAGINATION AND CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. N 11 MWF. Dallas Hall 116. Holahan.

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination.

Texts: TBA.

ENGL 3391-001 (3253). INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 106. Otremba.

An intermediate workshop in which student poetry, revisions, directed exercises and in depth discussions of craft that build on elements taught in ENGL 2391 form the content of the course. Prerequisite: ENGL 2391.

Texts: TBA

ENGL 3392-001 (3151). INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING. 3 MW. Dallas Hall 149. Haynes.

An intermediate workshop in the craft and practice of fiction writing. Assignments include in-class and at-home writing exercises, writing and revising short stories, as well as analysis of published works.

Texts: The Art of Fiction, by John Gardner; Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft (8th Edition) by Janet Burroway, Elizabeth Stuckey-French, and Ned Stuckey-French.

ENGL 4321-001 (5667). STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE: MEDIEVAL EPIC. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 137. Dumitrescu.

In this course we will follow the heroes of medieval epic as they vanquish dragons, seek treasure, fight to the death, betray and take vengeance, fall in (doomed) love, file lawsuits, play the fiddle, and make a host of bad decisions. Among the topics we will discuss along the way are: women in epic; manuscript and historical contexts; monsters, outsiders, and outlaws; ways of thinking about and representing violence; the role of epic in the creation of a community’s history; Christian and pagan traditions; and the afterlife of the medieval heroic narrative. Assignments: weekly reading responses, oral presentation, short essays, longer final paper.

Texts: Beowulf; Battle of Maldon; Dream of the Rood; Grettir’s Saga; Volsunga Saga; Nibelungenlied; Kudrun; The Song of Roland; Njal’s Saga.

ENGL 4323-001 (5320). CHAUCER. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 156. Wheeler.

Readings of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales from perspectives of medieval thought and contemporary criticism. Open to majors and non-majors. Writing assignments: 3 short essays, commentaries.
Text: Benson, ed., The Riverside Chaucer

ENGL 4330-001 (5321). RENAISSANCE WRITERS: QUEEN ELIZABETH I. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Swann.

This course will allow students to gain a multi-faceted understanding of Elizabeth I’s importance in Anglo-American literary and cultural history. The semester will begin with a brief overview of Elizabeth’s biography and the social, cultural, political, and religious history of her time. We shall then analyze Elizabeth I as a writer, examining a wide range of her poems, prayers, and speeches. Next, we’ll explore Elizabeth’s impact on other Renaissance authors, reading texts by such writers as Sir Philip Sidney; Edmund Spenser; Mary Sidney Herbert, Countess of Pembroke; Sir Walter Raleigh; and Mary Queen of Scots. The final section of the course will be devoted to Elizabeth’s post-Renaissance “afterlife”: we’ll consider how Elizabeth has been refashioned, in all media, from the seventeenth century through to our own moment in history. At the end of the semester, each student will have the opportunity to develop his or her own independent research project. Don’t worry if you haven’t done much research before: as a group, we’ll talk about strategies for devising research topics, as well as finding and using sources.

Assessment: regular attendance; active participation in discussions; exam; research project.

Texts: Elizabeth I: Collected Works, ed. Leah Marcus et al.; Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene; additional texts to be downloaded from Blackboard and the database Early English Books Online.

ENGL 4333-001 (2687). SHAKESPEARE. 2 MWF. Dallas Hall 106. Holahan.

Close reading of the major tragedies along with representative later comedies, problem plays, and romances. Reading will be supplemented by the viewing of videotaped performances. Writing assignments: three essays, quizzes, mid-term, final examination.
Text: Greenblatt, ed., The Norton Shakespeare.

ENGL 4343-001 (3254). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: AUSTEN, BRONTE, ELIOT. 12 MWF. Dallas Hall 137. Satz.

A consideration of the works of three major nineteenth century novelists against the background of history, gender constraints, and philosophical considerations Assignments: four papers of varying lengths, mid-term and final.

Texts: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Austen, Emma; Bronte, Jane Eyre; Bronte, Villette; Eliot, Middlemarch;and Eliot, Mill on the Floss.

ENGL 4360-001 (3443). STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE: THE TRANSNATIONAL AND INTER-ETHNIC TURNS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 1 MWF. Dallas Hall 143. Sae-Saue.

With an emphasis on ethnic narratives, this course seeks to understand how key U.S. fictions anticipate the “transnational” and “inter-ethnic” turns in contemporary U.S. literatures. We will investigate how important U.S. authors have imagined the particularities of racial difference in America beyond a Black/White paradigm, and we will study how their respective texts negotiate complex flows of cultural values between national boundaries. Students should note that this course will emphasize a formalist approach to understanding both how U.S. literatures imagine a broad spectrum of ethnic difference and how they articulate national belonging within a field crisscrossing cultural symbols. Can a formalist argument be made in order to better theorize the aesthetic, rather than the thematic, relationships between diverse U.S. texts? What do such investigations lend to current trends in “transnational” and “inter-ethnic” scholarship on U.S. literatures? As these questions imply, this class will map past and current arguments in ethnic literary scholarship, and it will seek to make interjections by proposing formalist readings of inter-ethnic contact and transnational symbolic traffic in order to complicate further theories that suggest that ethnic narratives are linear stories of a racial subject in transit between the borders of two distinct nations and two competing cultural discourses.
Authors: Jack London; John Steinbeck; Bret Harte; Americo Paredes; Helena Viramontes; Sandra Cisneros; Salvador Placencia; Chang-Rae Lee; Maxine Hong Kingston; Karen Tei Yamashita; Christina Garcia.

ENGL 4398-001 (5572). CRAFT OF FICTION. 5:30 W. Dallas Hall 120. Smith, D.

This course is an introduction to the literature and film of Australia. It will involve reading seminal Australian fiction and some poetry as well as watching important films to come out of that country. The course will also provide a brief cultural and historical context for understanding the emergence of Australian 'creative life.'"

Texts:

The Literature of Australia: An Anthology (College Edition), W. W. Norton & Company, General editor Nicholas Jose My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith by Thomas Keneally Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey Cloudstreet by Tim Winton The Songlines by Bruce Chatwin

ENGL 5310-001 (2419). SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 137. Schwartz.

An introduction to some of the philosophical and theoretical writings necessary to understand current critical practice. We shall examine assumptions underlying traditional critical methods and then work toward some of the critical modes that have come into practice in the last half of the 20thC and the first decade of the 21stC, including deconstructive,psychoanalytic, feminist, New Historical, queer, ethnic, and cultural approaches to literature. The emphasis throughout the course will be on the ways in which a non-foundationalist “semiotic” linguistics has provided ways of understanding literary works and other systems that constitute our culture. In addition to the texts listed below, we shall read essays by Foucault, Saussure, Derrida, Barthes, Gates, Spivak, Silverman, and Badiou, among others. Writing assignments: several short papers and one seminar essay.

Enrollment limit: By invitation only.

Texts: Brontë, Jane Eyre; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents; Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; James,Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato, Phaedrus. Silverman, The Subject of Semiotics.