English Courses

Course Descriptions, Fall 2010

Class Numbers are included in parentheses following the course number and are followed, when applicable, by the previous course catalogue number.

CANCELLED! ENGL 1330-001 (1704) [1320]. THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE. 10 MWF. Hyer 100. Mr. Neel.

Introductory study of nine major plays, including comedies, histories, tragedies, and occasionally romances, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics. Lectures include taped professional performances of scenes; required or recommended viewing of selected performances on stage, film, and television. Writing assignments: frequent detailed quizzes, two one-hour essay tests, final examination, one short paper.

Texts The Norton Shakespeare, Second Edition, 2008 & Arp’s Synopses of the Plays

ENGL 1362-001 (4356). CRAFTY WORLDS. 11 MWF. Dallas Hall 116. Mr. Holahan.

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination.

Texts James, The Spoils of Poynton; Hemingway, In Our Time; Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Faulkner, As I Lay Dying; Porter, Pale Horse, Pale Rider; Ellison, Invisible Man; Heller, Catch 22; DeLillo, Libra; McEwan, Saturday.

ENGL 1365-001#+ (4980). LITERATURE OF MINORITIES. 2 TTh. Perkins Hall 103. Mr. Levy.

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as both local and global. Writing assignments: two essays, mid-term, final examination.

Enrollment limited to Hilltop Scholars.

Texts Ayala, American Chica; Bechdel, Fun Home; Tomine, Shortcomings, Urrea, Devil's Highway; Roth, Goodbye, Columbus; Hegedorn, Charlie Chan is Dead; Ulen, Crystelle Morning, and selected short stories distributed throughout the term.

ENGL 2302-001 (2411). BUSINESS WRITING. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 343. Ms. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; Troyka & Hesse, Quick Access, 5th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2302-002 (2412). BUSINESS WRITING. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 351. Ms. Tongate.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written.

Texts Kolin, Successful Writing at Work, 8th ed; Troyka & Hesse, Quick Access, 5th ed.; additional readings posted on Blackboard or distributed in class.

ENGL 2310-001+ (2607). IMAGINATION & INTERPRETATION: ARTHURIAN LITERATURE. 11 MWF. Florence Hall 307. Mr. Anderson.

The legend of King Arthur has fascinated and engaged readers for nearly a thousand years. This class will examine the major texts of Arthurian literature beginning with its medieval roots in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain, the romances of Chrétien de Troyes, and Malory’s Morte Darthur. It will also consider later iterations of the legend, from Spenser’s Faerie Queene to the Victorian return to Camelot, from Mark Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court to T.H. White’s The Once and Future King. Along the way, we will ask (and perhaps begin to answer) who writes about King Arthur? Why do they do so, and what do we gain from exploring this material? Why does the legend continue to have such a grasp on our collective imagination? Weekly responses to the reading, quizzes, two short papers, a midterm and a final exam will be required.

Texts Geoffrey of Monmouth – The History of the Kings of Britain; Anon. – Culhwch and Olwen; Chrétien de Troyes – Arthurian Romances; Anon. - Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Sir Thomas Malory – Works(selections); Edmund Spenser – The Faerie Queene (selections); Mark Twain – A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court; William Morris – The Defense of Guenevere; T.H. White – The Once and Future King; additional excerpts from Gildas, Nennius, Chaucer, and a selection of medieval romances; possible films include Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Excalibur, and The Fisher King.

ENGL 2311-001+ (2124) [2305]. POETRY. 2 MWF. Dallas Hall 156. Mr. Holahan.

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 2311-002+ (2413) [2305]. POETRY. 11 TTh. Dallas Hall 138. Mr. Bozorth.

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature. Writing assignments: shorter and longer analytical assignments, totaling twenty pages; midterm; final examination.

Texts Poems, Poets, Poetry, 2d edition, ed. Helen Vendler; Easy Writer, ed. Andrea Lunsford.

ENGL 2312-001+ (1705) [2306]. FICTION. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 120. Mr. Crusius.

An introduction to the art of fiction. Emphasis on recent novels and short stories. Special concern with satire, comedy, and humor. Writing assignments: quizzes, three essays, final examination.

Texts Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Delillo, White Noise; Alexie, Reservation Blues; Proulx, Close Range.

ENGL 2312-002H+ (2414) [2306]. FICTION. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Ms. Sudan.

An introduction to the genre of fiction with an emphasis on the Gothic novel. The course will combine primary texts with short secondary texts. Writers include Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Emily Bronte, Wilkie Collins, and Bram Stoker. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, one longer essay.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 2312-003+ (2517) [2306]. FICTION. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 106. Mr. Gonzales Sau-Saue.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Writing requirements: short bi-weekly journal assignment (informal); four formal two-page papers.

Texts Kate Chopin "The Story of an Hour," Toni Morrison: The Bluest Eye, Carlos Bulosan: America is in the Heart, Rudolfo Anaya: Bless Me Ultima, Milton Murayama: All I Asking For Is My Body, Leslie Marmon Silko: Ceremony, and Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

ENGL 2314-001H+ (2560) [2308]. DOING THINGS WITH POEMS. 3 MW. Dallas Hall 101. Mr. Spiegelman.

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers. Some attention to matters of literary history. Writing assignments: approximately five short essays, daily paragraphs, final examination if necessary. Students will memorize 100 lines of poetry.

Texts Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry; Hollander, Rhyme’s Reason.

ENGL 2315-001+ (2318). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 101. Ms. Dumitrescu.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts Murfin and Ray, The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Webster, The Duchess of Malfi; Pope, The Rape of the Lock; Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; Anderson, Winesburg, Ohio; selected poems.

ENGL 2315-002+ (2319). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 11 MWF. Dallas Hall 101. Mr. Weisenburger.

Introduction to the discipline for English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts Holman & Harmon, A Handbook to Literature; William Shakespeare, The Tempest; Nathanael Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter; James Joyce, Dubliners; Natasha Trethewey, Native Guard; Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep.

ENGL 2315-003+ (2342). INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 357. Mr. Moss.

Introduction to the discipline for beginning English majors, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods.

Writing assignments: brief weekly exercises, four essays, midterm, final examination.

Texts Murfin and Ray, The Bedford Glossary of Literary and Critical Terms; Shakespeare, Hamlet; Stoppard,Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead; Blake, Songs of Innocence and of Experience; Eliot, The Waste Land; Baldwin, The Fire Next Time; Shelley, Frankenstein; Joyce, Dubliners.

ENGL 2391-001 (2416). INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING. 11 TTh. Fondren Science 158. STAFF.

A workshop in which student poetry and directed exercises in basic techniques form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts TBA.

CANCELLED! ENGL 2391-701 (4361). INTRODUCTORY POETRY WRITING. 5:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Mr. Otremba.

A workshop in which student poetry and directed exercises in basic techniques form the content of the course. Open to everyone, regardless of background and experience in poetry. Emphasis on contemporary poetry.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 2392-001 (2193) [2392]. INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 149. Mr. Haynes.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 2392-002 (2194) [2392]. INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 11 TTh. Dallas Hall 137. STAFF.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 2392-003 (5296) [2392]. INTRODUCTORY FICTION WRITING. 8 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. STAFF.

A beginning workshop in theory and technique, and the writing of fiction. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 3305-001 (4362) [3342]. WRITING AND THE PUBLIC INTELLECTUAL. 12 MWF. Dallas Hall 102. Mr. Crusius.

Study of the men and women whose essays and books shape our understanding of current events, culture, and society. Key questions: Why are we persuaded by some writers more than others? How should we assess what we read? How can we write more forcefully ourselves? The course will focus on consumer society. Some lecture, but the course will be organized around small-group collaborative research and issue-oriented class discussion. Writing assignments: three short essays; one longer essay; final examination.

Texts James Twitchell, Living It Up; Peter Whybrow, American Mania; Roger Rosenblatt, ed., Consuming Desires.

ENGL 3310-001 (1706) [3304]. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. 1 MWF. Hyer 102. Ms. Siraganian.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism? This course introduces linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse and applies a variety of contemporary critical approaches to a few literary texts. Writing assignments: bi-weekly short essays, final essay, final examination.

Texts Tyson, Critical Theory Today, Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Joyce, “The Dead”, Shakespeare, The Tempest, plus additional essays and poems.

ENGL 3310-002 (2559) [3304]. CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 156. Mr. Foster.

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism? This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts (tentative): Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide (second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Scribner); James Joyce, The Dead(Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare, The Tempest (Bedford Case Studies ed.); additional selected readings.

ENGL 3320-001 (4364). TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. 3 Th. TBA. Ms. Wheeler.

Majesty, Memory, and Mourning in the Middle Ages. This course focuses on history, literature, and art of the later Middle Ages. It is held in conjunction with the Dallas Museum of Art’s exhibition of the 15th-century mourners from the Dijon tomb of John the Fearless.

How did nobles, religious, and peasants perform acts of memory in the Middle Ages? We study transdisciplinary contexts of tomb statues (visiting the Dallas Museum of Art) embodying the Burgundian climax of a medieval European culture.

Texts Jean de Joinville, Life of Saint Louis, Jean Froissart, Chronicle, Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meung,The Romance of the Rose, Geoffrey Chaucer, Book of the Duchess, Parlement of Foules, House of Fame, Guillaume de Machaut, selected poems and music, Christine de Pisan, The Book of Chivalry and The City of Ladies, Philippe de Mezieres, Dream of the Old Pilgrim, Susan Marti et al., Splendour of the Burgundian Court,The Mourners, catalogue, Mary Carruthers, The Book of Memory, Magnificence in the Middle Ages, ed. S. Jaeger (2010).

ENGL 3340-001 (4365). TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 3:30 TTh. Hyer 107. Mr. Murfin.

This course will focus on major and minor poems by at least six Victorian poets: Matthew Arnold; Alfred, Lord Tennyson; Robert Browning; Dante Gabriel Rossetti; Christina Rossetti; and Thomas Hardy. Concurrently, we will read influential works by at least three Romantic precursors, including William Wordsworth, John Keats, and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Some attention will be paid to Victorian nonfiction prose, but only insofar as it involves literary criticism (e.g., Arnold’s “The Study of Poetry”) that responds to Romantic precedents (“Wordsworth’s “Preface to Lyrical Ballads, Shelley’s “Defense of Poetry”). Each student will lead one 30-minute discussion and write two critical analyses comparing and contrasting Romantic and Victorian lyrics. No mid-term, but there will be an essay final.

CANCELLED! ENGL 3362-001#+ (5054) [3367]. AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 9 MWF. Dallas Hall 116. Mr. Dickson-Carr.

The course is devoted to the study of key texts and authors in African American literary history. We will read works considered essential within the tradition of African American literature, as well as recent works that may be either nontraditional or not yet widely read. We shall pay special attention to the ways in which these works show how African Americans have constructed and developed individual identities as well as communities through shared experiences. In the process, we will explore the following: definitions of “race,” class, and gender; the nature of oppression; common tropes and literary figures; possibilities of transcendence. The ultimate goals of the course are to comprehend through the literature the historical situation and cultural dynamics of communities and the individuals they comprise, and to help broaden our understanding of American history and culture via the particular insights African American literature provides. Our main text will be The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, but we will supplement this with additional materials, as needed. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes; regular handwritten or online journaling, including one minor paper and responses to take-home and in-class prompts; two major papers (one requiring research); midterm and final examinations.

Texts Gates, McKay, et al., The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, Second Edition; Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Schuyler, Black No More; Ellison, Invisible Man; Morrison, A Mercy; Beatty,The White Boy Shuffle; additional essays, stories, and criticism.

ENGL 3363-001#+ (4367) [3371]. CHICANA/CHICANO LITERATURE. 12:30 TTh. Clements Hall 120. Mr. Gonzales Sau-Saue.

In order to familiarize students with some of the key works of the Chicana/o literary archive, this class will examine how the representative strategies between the selected texts comment on this group’s diverse range of social and cultural concerns. The first half of the course will give particular attention to those works deemed crucial to the formation of a Chicana/o cultural consciousness and to the institutionalization of Chicana/o studies. The tail-end of the course will introduce students to more recent Chicana/o texts whose formal and thematic attributes articulate new social, political, and cultural dilemmas within various Chicana/o communities across the U.S.

Objectives: This class is designed to explore how early and contemporary Chicana/o literatures challenge the nationalist origins of the field. Moreover, students will learn to appreciate the themes and aesthetic features of some of the most constitutive texts of the Chicana/o literary archive.

Writing requirements: short bi-weekly journal assignment (informal); one formal two-page paper; and an additional five-page paper (formal).

Texts Alurista: “Epic Poem of Aztlán”, José Villareal: Pocho, Américo Paredes: George Washington Gómez, The Hammon and The Beans (selections), Tomás Rivera: And the Earth Did Not Devour Him, Gloria Anzalduá: Borderlands/La Frontera, Cherrie Moraga: Loving in the War Years: Lo que nunca pasó por sus labios, Sandra Cisneros: The House on Mango Street, Oscar Casares: Brownsville.

ENGL 3374-001 (4369) [3363] {CF 3345}. LITERATURE OF RELIGIOUS REFLECTION. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Mr. Murfin.

Examination of issues of faith and doubt in British and American literature, drawn from texts reflecting both Christian and Jewish traditions as well as secular rationalism, agnostic questioning, romantic vision, meditative mysticism, and other modern approaches to religious and spiritual issues. Writing assignments: three essays, mid-term, final examination.

Texts George Eliot, Adam Bede; Potok, The Chosen; poems by Donne, Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, Dickinson, Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and others; essays by a variety of authors in the Judeo-Christian tradition.

ENGL 3379-001# (2530) {CFA 3379}. CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY. 9 MWF. Dallas Hall 115. Ms. Satz.

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

Texts Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child ; Jamison,Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind;Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton,May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines

ENGL 3383-001+ (2338). LITERARY EXECUTIONS: IMAGINATION AND CAPITAL PUNISHMENT. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 116. Mr. Holahan.

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 3391-001 (2720). INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING. 3:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 156. STAFF.

Workshop in which student poetry and directed exercises in basic techniques form the content of the course. Writing assignments: 12-15 poems. Prerequisite: ENGL 2391.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 3392-001 (2534). INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING. 12:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 138. Mr. Haynes.

An intermediate workshop in writing fiction, building on craft techniques taught in ENGL 2392. Writing assignments: class exercises, writing and rewriting short stories. Prerequisite: ENGL 2392.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 4332-001 (2365) [4336]. STUDIES IN EARLY MODERN BRITISH LITERATURE. 2 TTh. Dallas Hall 101. Ms. Sudan.

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the "city" became the major project of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners faced was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval one worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical concept of urban life in England. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century. Readings include poems, plays, novels, and prose by Wycherly, Pope, Swift, Defoe, Cleland, Burney, and Lewis. Writing assignments: weekly quizzes, two short essays, and one longer essay.

Texts TBA.

ENGL 4333-001 (1990). SHAKESPEARE. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 106. Mr. Moss.

It can be difficult to bear the sheer weight of the Shakespeare canon: Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, Twelfth Night,Much Ado, Henry V, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, King Lear, The Tempest (to name just ten of the famous plays, and let’s not forget Sonnets 18, 29, 116, 129, 130, and so on). In this course, we will not read any of these “greatest hits”; instead, by focusing on the less-beloved works, we will liberate ourselves from the usual bardolatry, and learn to locate Shakespeare fairly within the literary and dramatic traditions of the early-modern period. But don’t worry—hidden among the slower comedies, the overburdened tragedies, the less dazzling romances, and the least memorable histories, Shakespeare will still surprise us with a neglected masterpiece or two. Assignments: brief weekly exercises, two short essays, research paper, final exam.

Texts Shakespeare, Complete Sonnets and Poems, Comedy of Errors, Rape of Lucrece, Titus Andronicus, Two Gentlemen of Verona, Love’s Labors Lost, Merry Wives of Windsor, Measure for Measure, Troilus and Cressida,Coriolanus, Pericles, Cymbeline, Henry VIII, selected sources and criticism.

ENGL 4343-001 (2724). BRITISH LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTIONS. 1 MWF. Dallas Hall 143. Ms. Newman.

During the final decade of the nineteenth century, writers and ordinary people alike openly questioned, criticized, and rejected the settled gender ideology and conservative sexual mores that had been distinctive features of Victorian life. The “New Woman,” who desired independence and rejected marriage as her only vocation, arrived on the scene; the male aesthete, who preferred the beautiful to the useful, challenged Victorian ideals of manliness; and public scandals and new discourses, such as the trials of Oscar Wilde and the emergence of psychology and psychoanalysis, called attention to the pervasiveness of desires outside the prescribed norm. All of these developments helped create new identities, sometimes termed (by critics) “degenerate” or “decadent”; indeed, the term “The Decadence” is often used to signify the whole period, or at least, a significant movement within it. We will explore these developments through the literary figures, expression, and institutions that shaped and were shaped by them, with the aim of coming to terms with a decade that is currently being re-evaluated by a new generation of literary scholars. In the process, we will read both canonical and recently recovered “minor” literature, seeking to put the canonical in the context of what has more usually been forgotten.

Texts Nelson, ed., A New Woman Reader; Wilde, Salome; Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Freud, Dora; poetry by Amy Levy, Michael Field (the pseudonym of Katherine Bradley and Edith Cooper), Alice Meynell, and others; Dixon, The Story of a Modern Woman; other short works of poetry and non-fiction prose. Weekly quizzes and/or short writings; two short (3-5 page) papers and one longer essay with secondary sources (8-10 pages).

ENGL 4356-001 (2418). MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN WRITERS. 2 MWF. Dallas Hall 106. Mr. Weisenburger.

A course concentrating on four writers: three novelists and one dramatist. In their most significant work each one takes up major problems in U.S. history, especially the burdens of racism and violence. Our studies will focus on these writers’ uses and transformations of historical materials, and on ethical and political implications in their overt challenges to the ongoing project named America. How do these writers use imaginative literature to do what formal histories cannot do? In what ways and why do they represent U.S. history as, and through, trauma? How might we see our three contemporary writers responding to positions and challenges that Faulkner laid down? Our readings: William Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom! and Go Down, Moses; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian and No Country for Old Men; Toni Morrison, Beloved and A Mercy; August Wilson, Joe Turner’s Come and Gone and Fences. Requirements: two short papers, a research paper, and a final exam.

ENGL 4360-001 (4370). STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE: AMERICAN POETRY FROM 1900-1945. 10 MWF. Dallas Hall 102. Ms. Siraganian.

Do modern poems have meaning, and if so, how do we value them? How do readers relate to poems, and how do poems relate to a transforming world? This intensive study of American poetry from the first half of the twentieth century examines these questions, paying special attention to the fascinating – and contested – concept of modernism in the age of modernity. We will study poetry (and, occasionally, some short prose) in relation to the philosophical, political and cultural transformations of this exciting and tumultuous period, a time that included the Jazz Age, the Great Depression and two world wars. We will also analyze some of the major debates – both old and new – that critics make about these poems. Authors studied include Eliot, Pound, Loy, Frost, Stein, Williams, Stevens, Toomer, Grimké, Moore, and Hughes.

Writing assignments: 4 brief writing exercises, 3 longer essays, final examination.

Texts The New Anthology of American Poetry, Vol. 2: Modernisms 1900-1950, ed. Axelrod, Roman and Travisano, handouts, and short texts downloaded from Blackboard.

ENGL 4370-701 (4371) [4373]. FIVE POEMS. 5:30 MW. Dallas Hall 101. Mr. Spiegelman.

This is a course designed for people who like to read poems carefully and slowly. Very slowly. The subject will be five poems of medium length: Milton's "Lycidas," Pope's The Rape of the Lock, Wordsworth's Immortality Ode, Whitman's "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," and Eliot's The Waste Land." We shall spend at least two weeks on each poem and investigate it through various lenses, and employing a range of historical, textual, and critical materials. Students are expected to be familiar with the genre of poetry; some exposure to some of the works above will be helpful, although not mandatory. The class will function like a seminar, that is, students will be expected to contribute critical responses, e-mail postings, and scholarly evaluations every week. Each student will write a short paper on each of the five poems. A longer final paper may also be assigned, depending on how the shorter papers turn out. No exams.

Texts John Milton, The Complete Poems (Penguin Classics, John Leonard, ed.); Alexander Pope, The Rape of the Lock (Bedford Cultural Edition, Cynthia Wall, ed.); Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (Norton Critical Edition, Michael Moon, ed.); and T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land (Norton Critical Edition, Michael North, ed.).

ENGL 4392-001 (4372). ADVANCED FICTION WRITING. 3 MW. Dallas Hall 357. Mr. Smith.

Advanced Fiction Writing. Advanced course for students seriously interested in writing the short story or novel. Students are required to produce at least 50 pages of polished fiction. Reading quizzes are given over stories from the anthology The Contemporary American Short Story. Prerequisite: ENGL 3392 or permission of instructor.

ENGL 5310-001 (1707). SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY. 9:30 TTh. Dallas Hall 137. Ms. Schwartz.

An introduction to some of the philosophical and theoretical writings necessary to understand current critical practice. We shall examine assumptions underlying traditional critical methods and then work toward some of the critical modes that have come into practice in the last half of the 20thC and the first decade of the 21stC, including deconstructive, psychoanalytic, feminist, New Historical, queer, ethnic, and cultural approaches to literature. The emphasis throughout the course will be on the ways in which a non-foundationalist “semiotic” linguistics has provided ways of understanding literary works and other systems that constitute our culture. In addition to the texts listed below, we shall read essays by Foucault, Saussure, Derrida, Barthes, Gates, Spivak, and Silverman, among others. Writing assignments: several short papers and one seminar essay.

Enrollment limit: By invitation only.

Texts Brontë, Jane Eyre; Freud, The Antithetical Sense of Primal Words; Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought; James, Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato, Phaedrus. Silverman, The Subject of Semiotics.