English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Fall 2018

ENGL 1320-001—Cultures of Chivalry: King Arthur and the Joys of Chivalry

TTh 3:30-4:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Wheeler.    2012: CA1, HC1, OC      2016: CA, HC, OC

Courage! Honor! Intensity! Valor! Armour! Love! Romance! Youth! = CHIVALRY

In this course, we study the development of chivalric mentalities in literature, history, and culture from the Middle Ages to modern times. This course moves back and forth from the flowering of chivalry in twelfth-century Western culture to the current moment. Stories of King Arthur form the central thread around which we weave studies of chivalric education and variation, of chivalric rejection and renewal.

King Arthur is the most popular and most frequently revived Western hero from the Middle Ages to the current moment. This course examines aspects of the Arthurian story—Camelot, the knights of the Round Table, the Holy Grail—from its roots in the Middle Ages to its flourishing today. We focus our work on love—romantic love, family love, and love of friends—and profit—how stories of King Arthur can teach us to understand power and succeed in politics and even business organization.

 

ENGL 1330-001—The World of Shakespeare: With a Focus on Shakespeare’s use of Rome as a Setting for His Plays 

MWF 10-10:50.  100 Hyer Hall.  Neel.          2012: CA1   2016: LL 

Introductory study of eight major texts, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics.  Five tests, written mid-term and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity.  Play texts from the free Folger Shakespeare Library Digital Archive; lecture templates posted electronically on Canvas.  Theme for the semester: Shakespeare’s use of Ancient Rome for his plays.  We will begin with “The Rape of Lucrece,” which recounts the founding of the Roman Republic in 509 BCE, and end with Titus Andronicus, which describes Rome at the collapse of the Roman Empire about 380 CE.  And by reading such plays as Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, we will trace the trajectory of Rome through the flourishing and collapse of the Republic followed by the expansion and collapse of the Empire.  Satisfies UC 2016 Breadth: Language and Literature; counts as an elective in both the English major and the English minor.

 

ENGL 1362-001—Crafty Worlds

MWF 11-11:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination. Texts: TBD

 

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities: “Otherness” and Identity in America

TTh 2-3:20.  110 Hyer Hall.  Levy.         2012: CA1, HD     2016: LL

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, contemporary and literary perspectives.  We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the myriad terms/categories that have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity, including: “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc.   We examine the ways these categories have been deployed to assert and marginalize both group self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as both secure and situational.  

 

ENGL 1400-001—Developmental Reading and Writing

TTh 8:00-9:20.  135 McElvaney Hall.  Pisano.   2012: OC   2016: OC

English 1400 is a class that has been created to respond to the unique needs of some students whose writing and reading skills suggest that they would have little chance of succeeding in the DISC series. In an effort to prepare them for that experience, these students take a 4-hour course, ENGL 1400, that offers intensive work  on reading and writing skills. Annie Maitland and Pat Pisano have crafted a class in which the students receive instruction in reading for 1 hour per week specifically in regard to the texts about which Pat Pisano is having them write in the writing portion of the class (3 hours per week). Writing instruction focuses on sentence-level correctness, vocabulary, paragraphing, and the thesis sentence.  Reading instruction is explicit and systematic, with a focus on the general outcomes of reading. Specific areas of instruction include comprehension strategies, fluency, vocabulary, and word study skills. The goal is for students to emerge from the class more fully prepared to tackle essay-length writing assignments with an understanding of critical reading and analysis of texts.

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

M 2:00-2:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

W 2:00-2:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing

TTh 12:30-1:50.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002— Business Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2310-001—Imagination and Interpretation: Religion and Spirituality in Contemporary Literature

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2310-002Imagination and Interpretation: Chicana/o Culture & Lit

TTh 9:30-10:50.  107 Hyer Hall.  Sae-Saue.   2012: CA2, W       2016: CA, W


ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry

MW 3:00-4:20.  101 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.    2012: CA2, OC, W     2016: LL, W

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry

TTh 11:00-12:20.  105 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.

Can poetry help you live a better life?  In this course, we will talk about what poetry is, why it exists, how it works, what can be done with it, and why it’s fun, interesting, and important.  We will attend to various aspects of sound, form, and language, and how they combine to generate meaning.  We will, by working through great poems together, see how analysis leads to understanding (of poems, ideas, the world, and ourselves) and then to pleasure.  We’ll read lots of great British and American poems, many good ones, and a few awful ones, from the middle ages to the present day.  We’ll find poetry in unexpected places, and we’ll find unexpected things in it.  We’ll talk and sometimes argue, as we should, about what, and how, poems mean.  By the end of the course, you’ll have a much fuller sense of what poetry has to offer, and how to make the most of it.

University Curriculum: 2012 Creativity and Aesthetics II and Writing; 2016 Language & Literature and Writing

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction

TTh 12:30-1:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Sae-Saue.   2012: CA2, OC, W    2016: LL, W

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goals of the class are for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to understand how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships while also imagining particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. How does a text construct a cultural and social landscape? How does fiction organize ways human consciousness makes sense of determinate historical events? How does fiction articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation.

ENGL 2312-002 — Introduction to Fiction: Women Writing About The South

MWF 9:00-9:50. 101 Dallas Hall. S. Smith.     2012: CA2, OC, W    2016: LL, W

Women have been writing about the South for centuries. They write about love, loss, family, rape, race, coming of age, and social and political issues. Their fiction constructs historical and cultural identities. In the introduction to fiction course, the class will focus on contemporary novels, short stories, and films about the South. The class will discuss the elements of fiction, form, Language, themes, and historical, political and social issues within the stories. Possible texts and films: Jesmyn Ward: Salvage the Bones and Sing, Unburied, Sing, Alice Walker: The Color Purple and In Love and Trouble, Natalie Baszile: Queen Sugar, Tayari Jones: An American Marriage, Tananarive Due: Ghost Summer, Gayl Jones: Corregidora, ZZ Packer: Drinking Coffee Elsewhere.

ENGL 2312-003H—Introduction to Fiction: Look Again

TTh 9:30-10:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Foster.    2012: CA2, OC, W    2016: LL, W

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama: From the Beginnings in Ancient Greece through the English Renaissance to the American Drama of the Last Forty Years

CANCELED

 

ENGL 2314-001H—Doing Things with Poems: Serious Word Games

TTh 11:00-12:20.  120 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.   2012: CA2, OC, W     2016: LL, W, OC

Now in 4D—and Gluten-Free: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed.

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Those Who Wander

TTh 12:30-1:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Wilson.       2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W

Wanderers and wanderings have been literary staples, from medieval quests to Oscar-winning films. In turn, the experience of reading a book or film for the first time can take on the quality of an unexpected journey, in which you are hopeful that the destination will be an interesting one, but you are not entirely sure either what it will be or how you will get there. This course will introduce methods of reading and approaches to texts that will help you to navigate a wide range of new literary landscapes by developing habits of wandering productively. Our journey will take us from medieval England to 21st-century America, through a wide array of genres, and accompanied by many different speakers and guides. As we seek to foster our individual literary critical voices, we may all end up at very different destinations but throughout we will be learning how best to make sense of even the most surprising encounters.

Possible texts include ‘The Wanderer’; William Shakespeare, A Comedy of Errors; Milton, (short!) selections from Paradise Lost; poetry by Rita Dove, Bao Phi, Emily Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, John Keats; J. R. R. Tolkien, (short!) selections from The Lord of the Rings; essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson and Clifford Geertz; film by Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained.

 

ENGL 2315-002— Introduction to Literary Study: Seen and Seen Again

MWF 10:00-10:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Moss.     2012: CA2, W    2016: CA, W

Poets, playwrights and novelists show a strange affinity for double vision. This can take many forms: parallel plots featuring twins or imposters; second-chance narratives; serial perspectives on the same scene or event; a haunting sense of déjà vu; a return to some original sin or the scene of the crime. Working from the medieval period to the present in multiple genres, we will explore a series of such double-takes, asking what author and reader stand to gain from this much-used, well-known, yet still mysterious and powerful literary tradition. Don’t expect only one answer…

A tentative list of readings: Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors; Blake, Songs of Innocence and of Experience; Edgeworth, Castle Rackrent; Austen, Persuasion; Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest; James, The Turn of the Screw; Freud, “The Uncanny,” Larsen, Passing; Beckett, Waiting for Godot; Hitchcock, Vertigo (film); Barnes, The Sense of an Ending.

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 11:00-12:20. 127 Fondren Science. Haynes.  2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing

TTh 2:00-3:20.  149 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.      2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 12:00-12:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Ruben.      2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and helpfully discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 11:00-11:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Brownderville.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

The subject of this course is powerful language. How do writers craft language so as to enhance the reader’s experience of imagery, voice, metaphor, scene, character, and plot? To begin answering this question, students will write and revise their own pieces; respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005—Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 10:00-10:50.  116 Dallas Hall.  Smith.     2012: CA1, W   2016: CA, W

In this class students will write and revise stories, essays, and poems; respond to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary

 

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches to Literature

TTh 3:30-4:50.   101 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

Is there a meaning in a text? If so, how do we figure out the meaning of cultural forms—whether novels, poems, movies, or tweets—including language itself? And how do we understand and use literary criticism? This class addresses these questions by exploring the different theoretical and methodological approaches we use to read literature, to critique culture, and to understand the world. We will familiarize ourselves with a range of theoretical approaches, including structuralism and semiotics, feminism and gender studies, Marxism and cultural studies, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, and queer theory. Along the way, we will interpret both canonical and less familiar literary texts, examining the ways literature and culture make sense of the complex worlds in which we live. Writing assignments: short essays and a final examination. Texts will include Tyson, Critical Theory Today, Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Shakespeare, The Tempest, short stories by Hemingway, Chopin, and Joyce, poetry by Hughes, Rich, Frost, Bishop, and Toomer (among others),plus some additional essays.

 

CLAS 3312-001Classical Rhetoric

MWF 2:00-2:50.  137 Dallas Hall. Neel

ENGL 3344-001—Victorian Gender          

TTh 11:00-12:20.  102 Dallas Hall.  Newman.   2012: CA2, HD, W,   2016: HD, HFA, W

The word “Victorian” has been a synonym for “prudish” for about a hundred years.  One historian has asserted that the sexes were regarded as more radically, absolutely different during the nineteenth century than any time before or since.  Clearly we’re nothing like them--right?  

If that’s the case, why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to us about what it means to be a man or woman?  Take Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, which remains popular with readers, or Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, both of which we will read.  Or consider Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, which raise questions about female sexuality and gay male identity that still speak to us.  This was also an era when prostitution, birth control, and what it means to consent to sex (and the age when one could do so) were being debated; when gender roles, because so rigidly defined, were challenged; when the term “homosexual” was being coined, along with the concept and identity it names; and when writers found ways of covertly expressing same-sex desire.

Requirements: 3 papers (for a total of about 15 pages), occasional quizzes and discussion board postings, in-class midterm and blue-book final exam.

Texts: Brontë, Jane Eyre; Dickens, Great Expectations; Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; short essays, some poetry, and other readings posted on line or distributed in class.

 

ENGL 3346-001—American Literary History I: Constructing Early American Identity

TTh 11:00-12:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Greenspan.  2012: CA2, HC2, W  2016: HFA, HSBS, W

This course will explore the literary responses of a wide array of major American writers from 1775-1900 to issues and problems of individual, group, and national identity emerging in the wake of American political and cultural independence. Central issues will include nationalism as political and cultural phenomenon, individualism and freedom, history of authorship, race and slavery, minority identity, the Civil War, capitalism and literary culture. Writers to include Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Hannah Foster, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Abraham Lincoln, Henry James, Mark Twain, and Theodore Dreiser

 

ENGL 3360-001—Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Business Fictions

TTh 12:30-1:50.  127 Fondren Science.  Siraganian.   2012: CA2, HD, OC, W 2016: HFA, HD, OC, W

When you are working for a company, how do you distinguish your ideas, actions, and responsibilities from the firms’—if that is even possible? What is corporate culture or a corporate person, and how is it similar or different from any other kind of culture or person? By reading and thinking about short stories, novels, film, a television series, and a play, we will explore these issues and potential resolutions to them. The course especially considers how problems of action, agency, and responsibility become an intriguing challenge for writers of a variety of modern and contemporary fictions of the business world. Texts will include short stories (Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” Alice Munro’s “The Office”), novels (F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Last Tycoon, Mohsin Hamid’s How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia), and films, plays, and television (Modern Times, Glengarry Glen RossWorking Girl, and an episode Community). Assignments include reading responses, several short papers, a midterm, and a final.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African-American Literature: Wit, Irony, Satire, and Criticism

TTh 12:30-1:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Darryl.  2012: CA2, HD, W  2016: HFA, HD, W

At the heart of African American literature lies a spirit of dissent, with authors taking a critical look at American culture as they show the many complexities within African American communities and cultural products. In many cases, wit, satire, and irony—that is, critical humor—help African American authors and their works to raise important and challenging questions for us to explore and answer. 

This course takes as its premise that argument, opposition, dissent, and an ironic, satirical spirit are the foundation of African American literature and literary study. Dispensing with the myth of a monolithic, homogeneous African American community, we will focus upon critical issues and debates within African American literary and cultural history. Our goal will be to examine how these debates appear in the literature, whether implicitly or explicitly. We will begin in Colonial times and move through history, touching upon works that best illustrate our topic. In the process, we will read and analyze autobiographies, short stories, poems, novels, comic strips, graphic novels, and films.

Requirements will include three papers, with one requiring research; a midterm; a final; in-class and take-home writings. We will read selections from The Norton Anthology of African American Literature; short stories, essays, and novels by Paul Beatty, Ralph Ellison, Percival Everett, George S. Schuyler, Wallace Thurman, Mat Johnson, ZZ Packer, Danzy Senna, Colson Whitehead, and Toni Morrison; watch such films as Bamboozled, Dear White People, and Black Panther.

 

ENGL 3363-001—Chicana/Chicano Literature: Narratives at the US-Mexico Borderlands

TTh 9:30-10:50.  107 Hyer Hall.  Sae-Saue.  2012: CA2, HD, W  2016: HFA, HD, W

CANCELED

 

ENGL 3383-001—Literary Executions: Imagination and Capital Punishment

MWF 1:00-1:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination. Texts: TBA.

 

ENGL 3385-001—Literature of the Holocaust

MWF 9:00-9:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Satz.  2012: CA2, HD, OC, W   2016: HFA, HD, OC, W

This course explores both the literature of the Holocaust and issues surrounding the possibility of aesthetic portrayal  of this horrific event .   It considers   both Holocaust literature and post-Holocaust literature.  It will include texts such as Schwarz-Bart, Last of the Just; Wiesel, Night; Speigelman, Maus; Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen; Schlink, The Reader. Requirements:  four papers of various lengths, mid-term, final. This course will count for the Jewish Studies minor.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: The Big Rock Candy Mountain

MWF 1:00-1:50. 137 Dallas Hall. Brownderville.  2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W

In 1928 Haywire Mac recorded a folk song about the Big Rock Candy Mountains:

In the Big Rock Candy Mountains,

There’s a land that’s fair and bright,

Where the handouts grow on bushes

And you sleep out every night,

Where the boxcars all are empty

And the sun shines every day

On the birds and the bees

And the cigarette trees,

The lemonade springs

Where the bluebird sings

In the Big Rock Candy Mountains.

In treating the American imagination to this song, Haywire Mac invoked an age-old tradition with many names, all of them completely wonderful (e.g. Topsyturvydom, tipteering, misrule, souling, peace-egging, and mumming). This is carnival, the crossroads where clown and savior meet as one.

Again and again, when our imaginations whisk us away to this place, we discover to our delight that social hierarchies, rules and regs, and conventions of all kinds tumble upside down. Just at the moment when madness ignites, the sensuous joy of poetry surges to the fore. Letting loose a few choice expletives for the bossman of narrative and the prime minister of discourse, language goes free. No longer must it mean. No longer must it tell a story. At least not in any conventional sense. The nonsense that ensues contains the highest wisdom and beauty. In the end it is no nonsense at all. It is the trickster god and Lear’s fool. It is the quack doctor of the magical mumming plays and Emily Dickinson reminding us that “Much Madness is divinest Sense.” It is Gerard Manley Hopkins singing of “the dearest freshness deep down things.” And those “deep down things” are folklore, mythology, religion, and poetry at play in a realm of endless possibility.

In this course we will write poems, read, and muse in “a land that’s fair and bright” known affectionately in America as the Big Rock Candy Mountains.

 

ENGL 3390-002 Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting Workshop

MWF 11:00-11:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Rubin.    2012: CA2, W   2016: HFA, W

In this advanced course, students will regularly present their own screenwriting as well as critique that of their classmates. Alongside these workshops, we will analyze exemplary models of the form and pore over film clips to study the ways compelling dialogue is written and satisfying scenes are structured. The scope of this class will be catholic: Genres as varied as comedy, action, sci-fi, and noir will be discussed. ENG 2390 is a prerequisite for this course though Meadows students with a background in dramatic arts are encouraged to seek the permission of the instructor.

 

ENGL 4323-001—Chaucer: Chaucer's Shorter Poems

TTh 11:00-12:20.  156 Dallas Hall.  Wheeler.   2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

Study of Chaucer’s dream poems as well as his great love-and-war poem Troilus and Criseyde, along with a sprinkling of staggeringly long classics. ReadingThe Wadsworth Chaucer and background texts. Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations, short and longer paper.

 

ENGL 4333-001—Shakespeare: All the King’s Men

MWF 12-12:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Moss.    2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

When we refer to Shakespeare’s theater, we really mean an open-air, state-of-the-art polygonal structure altogether different from our modern playgoing experience. When we refer to the star of a Shakespeare play, we mean a single über-celebrity by the name of Richard Burbage, who also owned half of that polygon. When we laugh or roll our eyes at Shakespeare’s clown, we respond to a consummate performer, whose art had roots in ancient tradition, but whose profession was changing as fast as the latest jig. When we desire, fear, or pity Shakespeare’s queens and princesses, we engage with a series of apprentice boy-actors in feminine garb, whose identities are mostly lost to history but whose number included at least one of the greatest performers of any period or culture.

In this course, we will survey Shakespeare’s works—histories, comedies, tragedies, lyric and narrative poetry—with a constant eye on his relationship with his company, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men (later the King’s Men). To what extent did Shakespeare design his plays around the unique talents and status of Burbage, the company’s leading man and chief shareholder? How did the company and its playwright keep their celebrity clown—whose profession demanded he interrupt everyone and improvise everything—under control? How did such revolutionary roles as Juliet, Lady Macbeth, or Cleopatra develop out of the Elizabethan theater’s cumbersome system of casting male apprentices as women? In a theater with no director, how did Shakespeare’s plays come together?

Requirements: two shorter papers, one research paper, weekly posts to an online discussion list, creative project, final exam.

 

ENGL 4349-001—Transatlantic Studies II: Tough Mothers, 1740-1900

MWF 1:00-1:50.  149 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.  2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

Mary Wollstonecraft moved to Paris, found an American boyfriend, and then published an exposé about him after he abandoned her with their infant in the middle of the French Revolution.  She was one tough mother.

Two hundred miles away, Victoire-Aimée Gouin du Fief formed a band of counterrevolutionary insurgents and personally led battles against the French Revolution after her husband fled the country.  She was one tough mother.

Twelve thousand miles away, a whale bashed a hole in the side of a ship and sank it in the middle of the Pacific.  The fifteen surviving sailors crowded onto lifeboats and tried to sail to South America.  It took 95 days and they ended up having to eat each other.  Those were fifteen tough mothers.  (Sixteen if you count the whale.)

Some years later (never mind how long precisely), an inspired weirdo wrote the strangest book in the American literary canon.  Herman Melville was one tough mother.

Readings to include Wollstonecraft's Letters in Sweden (1796) and The Wrongs of Woman (1798); Chase's Shipwreck of the Whale-Ship Essex (1821); Melville's Moby-Dick (1851); Fern's Ruth Hall (1854); and other literary texts about "tough mothers" in numerous senses of the term.  Weekly response papers, lively class discussions, seminar paper.

 

ENGL 4350-001—Modern and Contemporary British Writers: British Modernism at the End of the World

TTh 2:00-3:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.  2012: IL, OC   2016: IL, OC

A century later, the radicalism of modernism others still challenges and shapes what writers are doing today.  “On or about December 1910, human character changed,” declared Virginia Woolf.  We will read some of the most revolutionary literature ever written in English, as poetry, fiction, and drama all took on weird, new forms in response to the upheavals of the early 20th century.  We will see how British and Irish writers responded modern psychology and anthropology, new developments in music and visual media, and controversial new attitudes about gender, sex, and class.  We will consider how the cataclysms of “The Great War” of 1914-18 and the Great Depression in the 1930s accelerated changes in poetry and fiction.  We will talk about how literature responded to rising independence movements in Ireland and India, and the prospect of a post-imperial, even post-Christian Britain.   And we will grapple with some of the most weird, wonderful, and powerful literature ever written in English.  While there will be some lecturing, students will help direct this seminar’s explorations in class, through short response papers, and on an online discussion board.  The final weeks will be devoted to discussing research and writing of the final research paper.  Texts:  Selected poetry by W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, Wilfred Owen; Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway; E. M. Forster, A Passage to India; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

 

ENGL 5310-001—Seminar in Literary Theory: Literature, The Secular, and the “Postsecular”

TTh 2:00-3:20.  357 Dallas Hall.  Newman.

In the late 1980s some intellectuals began to use the term postsecular to challenge widely accepted ideas about the place of religion in modern societies. They sought to revise what has been called the secularization narrative or thesis—that is, the idea that the separation of religion and state that began with the Enlightenment will eventually become a global norm, and that individual religiosity is destined to decline or even wither away.  World events at the beginning of the twenty-first century gave new urgency to claims that the death of God—or of the practices and beliefs we call “religion”--had been announced prematurely.  The same events also confirmed arguments made by some scholars that the secularization thesis, when applied globally, was a Western imposition.  Not surprisingly, these developments have affected the way some literary scholars interpret texts and think about the canon and the history of literary study as discipline. 

We will read selectively in some of the scholarship on secularization and the postsecular, but we will emphasize imaginative writing that has been read as exemplary texts of secularization, as well as other texts that can be read or reread under the banner of postsecularism.  As we make sense of these texts we will read essays introducing other matters of literary and cultural theory—for example, short introductions to feminism, post-colonialism, and other theoretical categories relevant to our texts.

Assignments: one or two short papers; two oral presentations, one of which will be linked to the final project of about twenty pages. Other work relevant to the latter will be a prospectus and provisional bibliography and a first draft.

Literary texts are still under consideration, but will include Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Leila Aboulelah, Minaret. The syllabus will be filled out with relevant literary and cultural criticism.

 

ENGL 6310-001—Advanced Literary Studies: Professionalization Workshop

W 3:00-5:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.     

The course has essentially two goals.  One is to develop a detailed understanding of the questions currently being asked and investigated by literary scholars.  The other is to practice certain highly specific tasks that are crucial parts of being a professional literary scholar, such as preparing a journal article, a fellowship proposal, or a conference paper.

 

ENGL 6311-001—Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

TTh 12:20-1:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

A survey of literary criticism and theory from some of the ancient roots of critical thought to contemporary literary practice: from Heraclitus to Badiou. The purpose of the course is to provide the theoretical background necessary to understand the discipline of literary study. The course will require regular critical responses and several essays analyzing both critical and literary texts. Enrollment limit: Graduate Students only. Possible texts: Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life; Alain Badiou, Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism; Ian Bogost, Unit Operations; Don DeLillo, The Names; Sigmund Freud:, Civilization and Its Discontents; Michele Foucault:, Discipline and Punish; Henry James, Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato, Phaedrus; Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things.

 

ENGL 6312-001—Teaching Practicum

F 1:00-3:50.  G1 Hyer Hall.  Stephens.

English 6312 (Teaching Practicum) is a year-long course designed to prepare graduate students in English seeking a Ph.D. to teach first-year writing at the college level and, in a larger sense, to design, prepare for, and teach college English classes at any level. During the fall semester, in addition to all of the texts assigned on the DISC 1312 syllabus, students will read and write critical responses to composition theory and the classroom (Lindemann’s A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers). Students will also read and discuss Engaging Ideas; The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom (John C. Bean); these texts provide students with an overview of the history of rhetoric and methods for fostering critical thinking and writing. Students will also critically assess and review contemporary criticism of rhetorical pedagogy. Finally, students will keep abreast of current issues in Composition Studies and Academia by reading recent online articles in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

ENGL 6340-001—British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Novel

M 3:00-5:50.  137 Dallas Hall. Murfin.

A reading-intensive survey of seven major works (dare I say “blockbusters?”) by the following Victorian writers:  Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy.  We will read two works by the same novelist in order to consider the issue of authorial development.  The theme of the course will be representation—historical, political, and novelistic—with special attention paid to the relationship between verbal and pictorial representation in illustrated Victorian novels.

Because a significant amount of reading will be required, writing assignments will be limited to one short and one medium-length paper.

 

ENGL 6380-001—History of Print Culture

T 3:30-6:20.  138 Dallas Hall. Greenspan.

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital and multimedia culture. In moving across four hundred years and formations of writing, it will provide a sophisticated entry to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions. Its goals will be to expose graduate students, first, to a literary history of the United States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property, access to information, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture, and society.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy; formations of lowbrow, middlebrow, and highbrow culture; the history of libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the ongoing shift from print-based to digital-based culture. 

 

ENGL 7340-001—Seminar in British Literature

Th 3:30-6:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.

Course #

Sec #

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1320

001

Cultures of Chivalry: King Arthur and the Joys of Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

2012: CA1, HC1, OC
2016: CA, HC, OC

1330

001

World of Shakespeare: with a Focus on Shakespeare’s Use of Rome as a Setting for His Plays

Neel

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

2012: CA1
2016: LL

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 116

1365

001

Literature of Minorities: "Otherness" and Identity in America

Levy

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

2012: CA1, HD
2016: LL, HD

1400

001

Developmental Reading and Writing

Pisano

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

MCEL 135

2012: OC
2016: OC

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C Dickson-Carr

M

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH105

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C Dickson-Carr

W

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH105

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

2012; IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

2012; IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

DISC 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Mueller

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

KCRC 0150

DISC 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Mueller

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

KCRC 0150

DISC 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

VSNI 0303

DISC 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

VSNI 0303

DISC 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

VSNI 0303

DISC 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

CMRC 132

DISC 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Rosendale

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

MCEL 0135

DISC 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Pickard

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

MCEL 0137

DISC 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Amsel

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

CMRC 0132

DISC 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CMRC 0132

DISC 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

CMRC 0132

 DISC 2305
 012H  

Honors Humanities Seminar I

 Mueller  TTh  12:30 PM
 1:50 PM
KCRC 0150
 
DISC 2305
 013H  

Honors Humanities Seminar I

 Mueller  TTh  2:00 PM
 3:20 PM KCRC 0150  
 DISC 2305
 014H  

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper
 MWF  10:00 AM
 10:50 AM
VSNI 0303
 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Religion and Spirituality in Contemporary Literature

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2310 002 Imagination and Interpretation: Chicana/o Culture Lit.
Sae-Saue TTh 9:30 AM
10:50 AM
HYER 107

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2311

001

Introduction to Poetry

Holahan

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W,

2311

002

Introduction to Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W,

2312

001

Introduction to Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 156

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

 2312 002
Introduction to Fiction: Women Writing about the South
 S. Smith
 MWF  9:00 AM
9:50 AM
DH 101
 

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2312

003H

Introduction to Fiction (Honors): Look Again

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2313

001

Introduction to Drama: From the Beginnings in Ancient Greece through the English Renaissance to the American Drama of the Last Forty Years

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, W, OC

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems (Honors): Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 120

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W, OC

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Those Who Wander

Wilson

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 116

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seen and Seen Again

Moss

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing

Haynes

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

FOSC 127

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Haynes

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 149

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Brownderville

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 102

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 116

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Foster

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 101

 CLAS 3312
 001  Classical Rhetoric  Neel  MWF  2:00 PM
2:50 PM
 DH 137
2012: HC2, KNOW, W
2016: HSBS, KNOW, W

3344

001

Victorian Gender

Newman

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HD, HFA, W

3346

001

American Literary History I: Constructing Early American Identity

Greenspan

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 137

2012: CA2, HC2, W
2016: HFA, HSBS,
W

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Business Fictions

Siraganian

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

FOSC 127

2012: CA2, HD, OC,
W
2016: HFA, HD, OC,
W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Wit, Irony, Satire, and Criticism

D Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 157

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HD, HFA, W

3363

001

Chicana/Chicano Literature: Narrative at the US-Mexico Borderlands

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HD, HFA, W

3383

001

Literary Executions: Imagination and Capital Punishment

Holahan

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 102

3385

001

Literature of the Holocaust

Satz

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, OC,
W
2016: HFA, HD, OC,
W

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The Big Rock Candy Mountains

Brownderville

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

4323

001

Chaucer: Chaucer's Shorter Poems

Wheeler

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

4333

001

Shakespeare: All the Kings' Men

Moss

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

4349

001

Transatlantic Studies II: TOUGH MOTHERS, 1740-1900

Cassedy

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

4350

001

Modern and Contemporary British Writers: British Modernism at the End of the World

Bozorth

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

5310

001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Literature, The Secular, and the "Postsecular"

Newman

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies: Professionalization Workshop

Cassedy

W

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

Foster

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00 PM

3:50 PM

Hyer 00G1

6340

001

British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Novel

Murfin

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

6380

001

History of Print Culture

Greenspan

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 138

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

Course #

Sec #

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1400

001

Developmental Reading and Writing

Pisano

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

MCEL 135

2012: OC 2016: OC

DISC 2305

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CMRC 0132

 

 2312 002

 Introduction to Fiction:Women Writing About The South

 S. Smith
 MWF  9:00 AM
9:50 AM
DH 101

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

3385

001

Literature of the Holocaust

Satz

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, OC, W

DISC 2305

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Mueller

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

KCRC 0150

 

2310 002 Imagination & Interpretation: Chicana/o Culture & Lit.
 Sae-Saue  TTh 9:30 AM
10:50 AM
HYER 107

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2312

003H

Introduction to Fiction (Honors): Look Again

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

3363

001

Chicana/Chicano Literature: Narratives at the US-Mexico Borderlands

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HD, HFA, W

1330

001

World of Shakespeare: with a Focus on Shakespeare’s Use of Rome as a Setting for His Plays

Neel

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

2012: CA1
2016: LL

DISC 2305

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

CMRC 0132

 

 DISC 2305
 014H  

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper
 MWF 10:00 AM
10:50 AM
VSNI 0303
 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Religion and Spirituality in Contemporary Literature

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2315

002

Introduction to Literary Study: Seen and Seen Again

Moss

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

2390

005

Introduction to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 116

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 116

 

DISC 2305

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Mueller

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

KCRC 0150

 

DISC 2305

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

VSNI 0303

 

DISC 2305

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Arbery

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

CMRC 132

 

DISC 2305

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Amsel

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

CMRC 0132

 

2311

002

Introduction to Poetry

Rosendale

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W,

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems (Honors): Serious Word Games

Bozorth

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 120

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W, OC

2390

001

Introduction to Creative Writing

Haynes

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

FOSC 127

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

2390

004

Introduction to Creative Writing

Brownderville

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 102

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

3344

001

Victorian Gender

Newman

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

2012: CA2, HD, W 2016: HD, HFA, W

3346

001

American Literary History I: Constructing Early American Identity

Greenspan

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 137

2012: CA2, HC2, W 2016: HFA, HSBS, W

3390

002

Creative Writing Workshop: Screenwriting Workshop

Rubin

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 120

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

4323

001

Chaucer: Chaucer's Shorter Poems

Wheeler

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

DISC 2305

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

VSNI 0303

 

2390

003

Introduction to Creative Writing

Rubin

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 137

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

4333

001

Shakespeare: All the Kings' Men

Moss

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

2302

001

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

2012; IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

DISC 2305

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Pickard

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

MCEL 0137

 

 DISC 2305
012H
 

Honors Humanities Seminar I

 Mueller  TTh  12:30 PM
1:50 PM
KCRC 0150
 

2312

001

Introduction to Fiction

Sae-Saue

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 156

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W

2315

001

Introduction to Literary Study: Those Who Wonder

Wilson

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 116

2012: CA2, W
2016: CA, W

3360

001

Topics in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Business Fictions

Siraganian

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

FOSC 127

2012: CA2, HD, OC, W
2016: HFA, HD, OC, W

3362

001

African-American Literature: Wit, Irony, Satire, and Criticism

D Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 157

2012: CA2, HD, W
2016: HD, HFA, W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

Foster

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

 

DISC 2305

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Hopper

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

VSNI 0303

 

3383

001

Literary Executions: Imagination and Capital Punishment

Holahan

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 102

 

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The Big Rock Candy Mountains

Brownderville

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 137

2012: CA2, W
2016: HFA, W

4349

001

Transatlantic Studies II: TOUGH MOTHERS, 1740-1900

Cassedy

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens

F

1:00 PM

3:50 PM

Hyer 00G1

 

1365

001

Literature of Minorities: "Otherness" and Identity in America

Levy

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

2012: CA1, HD
2016: LL, HD

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C Dickson-Carr

M

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH105

 

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C Dickson-Carr

W

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH105

 

2302

002

Business Writing

C Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

2012; IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

DISC 2305

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar I

Rosendale

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

MCEL 0135

 

 DISC 2305
 013H  

Honors Humanities Seminar I

 Mueller  TTh 2:00 PM
3:20 PM
KCRC 0150
 

2313

001

Introduction to Drama: From the Beginnings in Ancient Greece through the English Renaissance to the American Drama of the Last Forty Years

Canceled Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

Canceled

2012: CA1, OC, W
2016: LL, W, OC

2390

002

Introduction to Creative Writing

Haynes

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 149

2012: CA1, W
2016: CA, W

 CLAS 3312
001
 Classical Rhetoric  Neel  MWF  2:00 PM
 2:50 PM
 DH 137
2012: HC2, KNOW, W
2016: HSBS, KNOW, W

4350

001

Modern and Contemporary British Writers: British Modernism at the End of the World

Bozorth

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

2012: IL, OC
2016: IL, OC

5310

001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Literature, The Secular, and the "Postsecular"

Newman

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

 

2311

001

Introduction to Poetry

Holahan

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

2012: CA2, OC, W
2016: LL, W,

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies: Professionalization Workshop

Cassedy

W

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

 

6340

001

British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Novel

Murfin

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

 

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Literature

Foster

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 101

 

1320

001

Cultures of Chivalry: King Arthur and the Joys of Chivalry

Wheeler

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

2012: CA1, HC1, OC 2016: CA, HC, OC

6380

001

History of Print Culture

Greenspan

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 138

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137