English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Spring 2019

ENGL 1360-001—The American Heroine. 

MWF 9:00–9:50.  306 Dallas Hall.  Schwartz.         2012: CA1, HD  2016: CA, HD.

Works of North American Literature by women as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19thCentury to the contemporary period. Novels, memoirs, and short stories will be supplemented by other readings.Writing:Midterm and final examination; regular quizzes; some short writing assignments.Texts:Jacobs,Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison,The Bluest Eye; Chopin,The Awakening; Atwood,The Handmaid's Tale;Bechdel,Fun Home; and others.

 

ENGL 1363-001—The Myth of the American West.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  115 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger.    2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC.

In this course we study how and why 19th century realities of conquering the American West morphed into 20th century legend and myth. We also ask what defines those forms, how they changed, and why they endure. Our case studies include Texas emigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche people, as presented in factual, fictional, and cinematic versions; and then make a similar study of Buffalo Bill Cody’s celebrity in the late-19th century. We next turn to the ways that the romance of horse culture and gunfighters in late-19th and early-20th century paintings and sculpture, fictions and films, brought the Myth of the American West to its fullest expression. We conclude by studying revisions of that myth in contemporary film and fiction. Readings include historical and biographical sources, three classic Western novels, and a selection of popular Western films from the Silent Era to the present. Course requirements: evening viewing of 3 feature films, brief response papers, mid-term, and final exam. 

 

ENGL 1385-001—Power, Passion, and Protest in British Literature.

TTh 11:00–12:20.  357 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.              2012: CA1, HC1  2016: CA, HC

This course is a one-semester introductory overview of British literature, from its medieval beginnings to (almost) the present day, with special attention to literature’s role as an instrument of various forms of desire and power.  As we survey this history, we will consider not just great literature, but also its relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written.  

 

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel.

M 3:00–3:50.  ULEE 243.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2102-002—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel.

W 3:00–3:50.  ULEE 243.  Dickson-Carr, Carol. 

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

 

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.    2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2302-002—Business Writing.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  351 Dallas Hall.  Dickson-Carr, Carol.     2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

 

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry.

TTh 9:30–10:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.           2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry: Serious Word Games.

MWF 11:00–11:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.         2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed.

 

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: Families, Happy and Unhappy.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  116 Dallas Hall.  Newman.            2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

“Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” according to one famous novelist. That’s bad news for those of us who grow up in less-than-perfect families—that is, nearly everyone—but good news for those of us who like to read fiction, providing an inexhaustible supply of sad, funny, moving, amusing, disturbing, soothing, entertaining, and otherwise compelling stories about the institution that has nurtured us.

We will read fiction about nuclear families, extended families, broken families, immigrant families, rich, poor, “queer,” and absent families, families at the dawn of the industrial revolution and families in the digital era. We’ll consider the different ways that writers turn family life into plot, imagine character and play with language. In short, we’ll read about the family in order to understand fiction as an art.

Texts: Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Junot Diaz, This Is How You Lose Her; Curtis Sittenfeld (probably You Think It, I’ll Say It), Short fiction anthology (probably Ann Charters, The Story and Its Writer). Assignments: four short papers (4 pages); reading quizzes and informal writing; 1-2 brief oral presentations.

 

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: Religion & Spirituality in Contemporary Literature.

MWF 3:00–3:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Duke.                2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

In this course, we will dive into the religious, social, and political landscape of the last 40 years to explore what contemporary U.S. literature can tell us about contemporary U.S. religion, spirituality, and secularism.  How do contemporary writers imagine religious beliefs, practices, and communities?  How do religions traditions shape key social and political shifts in these decades, and how are they shaped by them?  What is the role of religion in politics?  In art?    We’ll read outstanding short stories and novels by contemporary writers like Jhumpa Lahiri, George Saunders, Michael Chabon, Louise Erdrich, and Jesmyn Ward. Along the way, we will also read further back into the 20th century, looking at what classic American writers like Wallace Stevens, Willa Cather, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O’Connor, and Allen Ginsberg have written about and in the languages of religion and spirituality. 

 

ENGL 2312-003H—Honors Fiction: Literature at the US-Mexico Border.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  102 Hyer Hall.  Sae-Saue.             2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

“For any dweller of the Southwest who would have the land soak into him, Wordsworth's ‘Tintern Abbey,’ ‘Ode: Intimations of Immortality,’ ‘The Solitary Reaper,’ ‘Expostulation and Reply,’ and a few other poems are more conducive to a ‘wise passiveness’ than any native writing.”

- J. Frank Dobie, A Guide To Life and Literature of the Southwest

Long regarded as the pre-eminent expert of Southwest culture, J. Frank Dobie has emerged as a controversial figure because of his tendencies to underestimate the power of “native writings” to generate meaningful expressions of local life. Whereas Dobie suggests that residents of the Southwest may properly regard this geography by reading the Anglo European canon (what he calls “good literature”), this class seeks to understand how local writers have used narrative forms in order to structure their own perceptions of social and cultural life in the region. This course will also locate how key southwestern texts written by Mexican Americans challenge their common categorization as a “provincial literature.” We will examine how local writers map cognitively the Southwest as a transnational geography which is interconnected to non-U.S. territories through complex social, economic, and cultural networks.  Through analyses of some of the most important and influential texts of or about the region, we will investigate how Chicana/o literatures generate competing visions of cultural identity. Also, we will explore how these writings constitute a transnational sense of space while engaging issues of race, citizenship, gender, and globalization.

 

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama.

TTh 9:30-10:50.   110 Hyer Hall.  Neel.                    2012: CA1, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC 

Introductory study of the origins of Western drama in ancient Greece.  Readings from all four of the great Greek playwrights: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes.  Particular focus on the way these writers present, represent, develop, and deconstruct such mythical characters as Clytemnestra, Helen, Iphigenia, Agamemnon, Orestes, and Aristophanes’ version of Socrates.  The course will conclude with a study of Aristotle’s Poetics, which was built from his observation of the plays we will read, and then with a unit on how modern directors continue to stage these plays in the contemporary world.  Four thirty-minute, factual tests; two out-of-class papers; one comprehensive, written final exam; one formal oral presentation. 

 

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Texts and Contexts.

TTh 11:00–12:20.  137 Dallas Hall.  Weisenburger. 2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

A course in the ways that skilled readers engage with, learn from, and take delight in literary texts--indeed, any written text. First we seek to sharpen close reading skills, and how to read and think critically about familiar literary forms: plays, poems and books of poems, the short story and the novel as kinds of fiction. Secondly our readings will also call on us to think critically about the ways that literary texts engage with their historical moment, with particular contexts of cultural and socio-political life and struggle. The traces left by texts and contexts will thus define our work in this course, and what we write about in scheduled essays. Indeed the third main goal of this class is to improve our writing—one sentence, page, and essay at a time. Our required texts: Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness,T. S. Elliott’s The Waste Land and Other Poems,Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, James Joyce’s Dubliners, Denis Johnson’s Train Dreams, William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard.  Expect to write four interpretive essays, a mid-term, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 2315-002—Introduction to Literary Study: Those Who Wander.

MWF 12:00–12:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Wilson.          2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

Wanderers and wanderings have been literary staples from medieval quests to Oscar-winning films. In turn, the experience of reading a book or film for the first time can take on the quality of an unexpected journey, in which you are hopeful that the destination will be an interesting one, but you are not entirely sure either what it will be or how you will get there. This course will introduce methods of reading and approaches to texts that will help you to navigate a wide range of new literary landscapes by developing habits of wandering productively. Our journey will take us from the classical world to 21st-century America, through a wide array of genres, and accompanied by many different types of speaker. As we will seek to foster our individual literary critical voices, we may all end up at very different destinations but throughout we will be learning how best to make sense of even the most unexpected encounters. Potential readings include: selections of epic poetry, from Homer's Odyssey to Milton's Paradise Lost; William Shakespeare's The Tempest; Samuel Taylor Coleridge's 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner'; and poetry by Emily Dickinson and Rita Dove, but this is a wandering course, so we will cover many other, varied terrains on our journey. 

 

ENGL 2318-001—Introduction to Digital Literature.

MWF 1:00–1:50.  152 Dallas Hall.  Wilson. 2012: W 2016: W, LL, TM

What are digital humanities? What is the relationship between technology and the humanities?  How can technology advance our understanding of language, literature, and culture? These are some of the large-scale questions that we will explore in this course. We rely on technologies such as digital maps, e-books, search engines, and databases every day, and understanding them and being able to work with them is a vital part of preparing for professional life. This course offers a hands-on introduction to using these technologies in academic research to analyze literature, and as well as enhancing your skills in academic work, the skills you learn are of immediate value to employers in the job market.

There have been major advances in the application of digital tools to analyze literature, resulting in the creation of new online resources for literary study such as the Milton Reading Room and the Walt Whitman Archive, as well as new research into large-scale patterns of language, ideas, sounds, and images within huge bodies of literary texts. In this course you will have the opportunity to learn the technologies that make this literary scholarship possible, from digitization to creating metadata, making digital maps of literary works, and text mining novels to detect patterns of thoughts, words, phrases, sounds, ideas, and more. We will also think about the theoretical implications of using digital technologies to analyze, advance, and promote the humanities. What are we to make of these advances? What kinds of intellectual questions do they open up? What does it mean to be a digital humanist?

 

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 9:00–9:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.            2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA

 

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 10:00–10:50.  120 Dallas Hall.  Haynes.         2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: TBA

 

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Rubin.               2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and discussing their classmates'.

 

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 12:00–12:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Smith.            2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

In this class students will write and revise stories, essays, and poems; respond to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-005H— Honors Introduction to Creative Writing: Next Year’s Words.

T 2:00–4:50.  117 Harold Simmons Hall.  Brownderville.  2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

“last year’s words belong to last year’s language 
And next year’s words await another voice.”

                                                            —T. S. Eliot, “Little Gidding”

It is sometimes said that literature has always been, and will always be, about love and death. If so many beautiful books have already been written on these great themes, why do we need new writing? As James Baldwin put it, the human story “has another aspect in every country, and a new depth in every generation.” It must be told again.

This course is a poetry workshop, where timeless themes meet the new words of now. Students will write and revise their own poems, respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work, and analyze published poems in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

Next Year’s Words, the first-ever Honors section of our introductory Creative Writing course, is about the tremendously exciting, and culturally necessary, adventure of the young writer. It’s about singing truth-song in a voice never heard before on earth.

This year can’t write the poems of 2019. Next year’s poetry needs next year’s words.

 

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches to Literature: Think Twice.

MWF 2:00–2:50.  157 Dallas Hall.  Foster.

Sure, we read for the story, for adventure, for knowledge of other minds and other worlds. But how does this happen? What is literature, anyway? How does it work? This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues we all use to talk and write about literature. We will read some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them, as well as some of the theorists who have shaped the discipline. Writing assignments: Seven 2-page Application Exercises; 1 final essay; and a final exam.

Texts (possible): Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas; Mohsin Hamid, Exit West; Bram Stoker, Dracula; Plato, Phaedrus; and additional selected texts.

 

CLAS 3312-001—Classical Rhetoric: Ancient Athens during the Rise and Fall of the World’s First Democracy.

TTh 12:30–1:50.  102 Dallas Hall.  Neel.                  2012: HC2, W, KNOW 2016: HSBS, W, KNOW

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Cleisthenes that began the world’s first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE. Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and study of philosophy emerged into history. Two out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and five reading quizzes. Satisfies three UC 2016 requirements: Writing Proficiency; Ways of Knowing; and Depth: History, Social, and Behavioral. Satisfies one course requirement for the Classical Studies program and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.

 

ENGL 3340-001—Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen’s Novels.

TTh 12:30–1:50. 157 Dallas Hall.  Holahan.            2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

This course covers the six major novels by Jane Austen.  It considers her repeated variations of courtship rituals: proposal, rejection or acceptance, and marriage.  Along the way, it also studies the literary techniques of narration, characterization, plot development, and style.  Certain topics (e.g., Austen’s various ‘limitations’) are studied in relation to historical background as well as in relation to stylistic      or literary concerns.  We will recall that one person’s focus is another person’s narrowness, and that  something similar might be said of ages.  Attention also goes to Austen’s idea of the novel and to the purposes of writing novels. This topic inevitably raises issues of authorial self-consciousness. Some (Henry James) claim that she had little or none; others (this instructor) claim that she had a good deal, that she plants a landscape garden or map for the modern novel.  Norton Critical Editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. Essays of short to middle length; and a final exam.

 

ENGL 3362-001—African American Literature: 19th Century Lives & Times.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  142 Dallas Hall.  Greenspan.         2012: CA2, W, HD 2016: HFA, W, HD

This course offers a journey through the momentous, tumultuous lives and times of nineteenth-century black folks – an era conventionally seen as one of slavery, civil war, reconstruction, and Jim Crow but no less one of the flourishing of African American literature, music, and newspapers and magazines. We will read a medley of the finest expressions of black literary creativity during this period, as well as screen 21st-century backward looks at the 19th-century past.

Likely authors: David Walker, Henry Highland Garnet, Maria Stewart, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, William Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Ellen Harper Watkins, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Pauline Hopkins, Charles Chesnutt, and Natasha Trethewey; likely movies: Twelve Years a Slave, Daughters of the Dust

 

ENGL 3367-001—Ethical Implications of Children’s Literature.

MWF 9:00–9:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Satz.                  2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW 2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things AreThe Giving Tree,Amazing GraceCurious GeorgeBabar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Palacio, Wonder; and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3370-001—Special Topics: Life Writing.

TTh 9:30–10:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Greenspan.

This is a nonfiction writing workshop devoted to the loosely-twinned genres of biography and autobiography. Over the course of the semester, students will ply their hand at each of these modes of life writing. To advance both their appreciation and their skill, they will read a selection of specimen texts in each of these genres. To improve their research skill, they will make exploratory forays into pre-21st-century lives via searches through print and visual sources and online databases. Each student will submit as a final project a significant work of nonfictional biography or autobiography. Note: This course counts toward the English with Creative Writing specialization.

 

ENGL 3379-001—Contexts of Disability: Gender, Care, and Justice.

MWF 10:00–10:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Satz.              2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW 2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child; Jamison, Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind; Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton, May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

 

ENGL 3384-001— Literature and Medicine: How We Talk about Illness, Doctors & Bodies.

MWF 11–11:50.  156 Dallas Hall.  Foster.                 2012: CA2, W, HD, PRIE2 2016: HFA, W, HD

The course will explore the literary understandings of illness and medicine. We will discuss how people experience illness as both practical and spiritual matters; the practices of doctors, nurses, and others who attend to the ill; the role of sickness and cure in our culture. We will consider how power, knowledge, and authority revolve around societies’ need to care for the body. And we will ask how ethical choices are expressed through the roles of individuals, institutions and governments.

 

ENGL 3390-001—Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen.

TTh 3:30–4:50.  153 Dallas Hall.  Rubin.                 2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W.

Discussing the work of Katherine Porter, the writer Mary Gaitskill names an important advantage the form of the short story has over visual media: "Film, both movies and television," Gaitskill writes, "may accomplish something like this [moment in Porter's work], or try to. But it is precisely the medium's felicity to the seen world that so often makes its attempts to portray the unseen world buffoonish." 

This class will explore the way great fiction evokes the world of the unseen. How is such a thing done? And what can make evocations of this unseen place so thrilling, spooky, and consoling?  In addition to reading the work of contemporary authors—and the writers who influenced them—students will be asked to listen to podcasts, such as Michael Silverblatt's Bookworm, and study interviews and essays.

This class is a fiction-writing workshop with an emphasis on reading and craft.

 

ENGL 4321-001—Studies in Medieval Literature: Before Thrones Were A Game: Medieval Literature in Westeros.

TTh 3:30–4:50.  106 Dallas Hall.  Keene.                 2012: HC2, KNOW, W 2016: IL, HSBS, OC, KNOW, W

In anticipation of the final season of the Game of Thrones series, this class will uncover the medieval stories that inspired George Martin’s world. Using a variety of literary sources — including romance literature, biography, and historical chronicles — we will encounter: the original Brienne of Tarth; knights both exemplary and sketchy; narratives of serial religious upheavals and conquests; imagined and historical uses of dragons; and even the Mother of Dragons. By the time winter finally arrives, we will be well steeped in the narratives that helped to lay the foundation for Westerosi lore.  

 

ENGL 4332-001—Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Sex and the City in the 18th Century.

TTh 2:00–3:20.  157 Dallas Hall.  Sudan.                 2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

 

ENGL 4349-001—Transatlantic Studies II: A is for American: New Media in the Atlantic World, 1650–1850.

TTh 11:00–12:20.  138 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.          2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

In this course, we will study the spread of print and other new communication technologies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries — a "media shift" that anticipated the electronic communications revolution that we are living through now.  How did people who lived through the early modern communications revolution make sense of it?  How did new media technologies affect the emergence of new American and British identities?  We’ll study the social and technological developments that made written expression and mass communication available to unprecedented audiences, with special attention to print, literacy, newspapers, and diaries.  Readings to include fiction and poetry by Jonathan Swift, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Dickinson, Daniel Defoe, John Bunyan, Hannah Foster, Washington Irving, and Phyllis Wheatley, and autobiographical writing by John Marrant, Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Franklin, Samson Occom, and John Gilchrist.  Weekly response papers; lively class discussions; seminar paper.

 

ENGL 4369-001—Transatlantic Studies III: LGBT Writing Before and After Stonewall.

MWF 2:00–2:50.  105 Dallas Hall.  Bozorth.            2012: IL, OC, HD 2016: IL, OC, HD

The Stonewall Rebellion of June 1969 marked the birth of the modern LGBT rights movement, and the decades since have seen the “coming out” of lesbian, gay, and transgender literature as well.  We’ll be reading some of the most influential novels, plays, and memoirs by UK and US queer writers from the 1960s to the present, considering the aesthetic, psychological, social, political and other elements of their work.  Among issues we’ll explore:  the ongoing fascination of stories about growing up, coming out, and sexual discovery; the search for a queer ancestry and the creation of personal and collective histories in textual forms; the spiritual meanings of queer sexuality, love, drag, disco, and sequins; the tensions (and harmonies) between sexual identity and race, ethnicity, and gender; the personal and political challenges posed by HIV/AIDS.  We’ll consider how artists adapt aesthetic forms to grapple with such things, whether in a coming-of-age novel, a memoir, film, or a stage play.  If this class were a movie, it would get an NC-17 rating:  this course requires an adult capacity to think, talk, and write explicitly about sex and the body in an intellectual context.  We will use a Discussion Board to post question and topics for class consideration, and students will collaborate on leading class discussions, reflecting their interests and research outside of class.  Writing assignments:  shorter and longer analytical papers, including a final research-based paper, totalling 25 pages. Probable texts:  Alison Bechdel, Fun-Home; Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man; Cleve Jones, When We Rise; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.

 

ENGL 6330-001—Proseminar in Early Modern British Literature: Reading Poetry.

Th 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Rosendale.

This is a course for everyone.  Not every English PhD needs to specialize in poetry, of course, but no PhD (or job applicant!) in British or American lit should be unable to read, understand, enjoy, discuss, and teach it.  Half proseminar, half reading workshop, this course will focus on short lyric poetry and the basics of understanding it well: form, sound, rhythm, and so forth as well as the higher-order skills of critical, analytical, interpretive reading and writing.

We will begin with the great, diamondlike sonnet sequences of the English Renaissance—Sidney’s, Spenser’s, Shakespeare’s—and their penetrating analyses of desire, deceit, subjectivity, agency, creation, beauty, and memory.  Having established some influential baselines (and also considered poems by early modern women like Mary Sidney and Mary Wroth), we will move on to Donne’s formal and thematic expansions of scope (including erotic and religious devotion, not always separately), and then to Herbert’s extraordinary formal laboratory, The Temple.  The latter weeks of the course will be shaped to the interests of the students taking it, and since people in all fields should be doing so, this will likely involve a wide historical and geographic range of poems: British and American, old and recent and anywhere in between.

 

ENGL 6345-001—American Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Printing Madness.

T 2:00–4:50.  138 Dallas Hall.  Cassedy.

An exploration of archival problems and methods in the study of Anglophone literatures and cultures in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Topics to include archival recovery, print culture studies, the histories of reading and writing, media shift, authorship, copyright, material texts, diaries, literacy, epistolarity, and print commerce.  Students will conduct primary research with archival material.  Readings will include major texts from transatlantic literary canons that thematize reading, writing, and authorship (e.g., by Swift, Pope, Richardson, Foster, Franklin, Irving, Hawthorne, and Melville); lesser-known primary materials; and secondary readings in literary, media, and cultural history from critics such as Elizabeth Eisenstein, Meredith McGill, Michael Warner, Lisa Gitelman, Friedrich Kittler, William St. Clair, Jacques Derrida, and Carolyn Steedman.

 

ENGL 7311-001—Seminar in Literary Theory: Theory, Now and Then.

W 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Siraganian.

Every English Ph.D. student takes the introductory theory seminar, but what should you read next—and how do you develop a “theory list” for your qualifying exams? This course is designed for graduate students interested in exploring recent developments and disputes in critical theory in relation to (slightly) longer philosophical genealogies, focusing on topics and authors not typically examined in either the first semester theory seminar or in other graduate classes. We will take about three weeks, give or take, on each of four topics—form, autonomy, feeling, and critique. Each has been a recent subject of interest, debate, or new analysis, yet each of these topics was also a source of critical and philosophical interest in years past. Our aim will be to make sense of today’s most exciting and controversial theoretical interventions and evaluate them both in relation to other theoretical trends and in connection to earlier theory. In addition to historical and philosophical essays (from writers such as Adorno, Benjamin, Cavell, Fish, Jameson, Lukács, Richards, Trilling, etc.), we will read contemporary theory that is likely to include some of the following: Stephen Best and Sharon Marcus, “Surface Reading” (2009), Nicholas Brown, Autonomy: The Social Ontology of Art under Capitalism (2019), Rita Felski, The Limits of Critique (2015), Caroline Levine, Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (2015), Ruth Leys, The Ascent of Affect: Genealogy and Critique (2017), Sianne Ngai, Our Aesthetic Categories: Zany, Cute, Interesting (2012). However, I am also open to incorporating other contemporary related theory; feel free to email me suggestions before January 2019. In addition to in-class presentations, students will have the option of either writing four shorter papers (one per topic) or one longer, synthesizing seminar paper. 

 

ENGL 7376-001—Special Topics: A History of Metatheater in Three Acts .

M 2:00–4:50.  137 Dallas Hall.  Moss.

Why does stage-drama, that most expressive of genres, so often and so obsessively prove introspective? Why is so much theater devoted to showing us how theater is made? We might expect playwrights to reflect on their own art, of course, as Sophocles, Shakespeare, or Beckett routinely do, but what drives theater troupes or for that matter theater audiences to commit to metatheatrical display? Indeed, what are we to make of metatheater, since after all it is a dramatized account of dramatic production, never dramatic production itself? To what extent is metatheater merely a version of the self-regard we find in all the arts, or does drama’s fundamental obsession with performativity and audience response generate a distinct variety of aesthetic introspection? Which of the many critical and theoretical approaches to dramatic authorship, performance, and reception best suit this odd but persistent tendency of the stage to stage itself?

 

Our efforts to answer some if not all of these questions begin in ancient Greece and Rome, with Attic tragedy, Old and New Comedy, and an initial attempt to contextualize our inquiry in responsible theater history, classical criticism and theory, even archaeology. After an interludic week on the civic mystery cycles of medieval England, we turn to the playwrights and professional companies of the Renaissance (not just Shakespeare and the Chamberlain’s Men) for a tour of the “wooden O’s” and an introduction to the personnel—star tragedians, celebrity clowns, and male apprentices in drag—whose influence largely dictates how scenes are designed and characters conceived and performed in all subsequent theater history. A weeklong pause for the Restoration (actresses!) gives way to a romp through the twentieth century, focusing on the Theater of the Absurd, Brecht (inevitably), Beckett (thank goodness), postcolonial and activist theater, culminating in a final week’s discussion of 21st-century metatheater and/or analogues in film (e.g., German expressionism, French New Wave, Hitchcock and the theorists infatuated with him).

 

Likely or possible dramatic authors include Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, the “York Realist,” Shakespeare, Jonson, Beaumont, Middleton, Dryden, Congreve, Wycherley, Ibsen, Wilde, Brecht, Ionesco, Beckett, Stoppard, Césaire, Shepard, Fugard, Churchill, Kane. We’re talking three plays a week. Non-dramatic authors might or might not include Aristotle, Sidney, Sedgwick, Butler, Cavell, Zizek, Deleuze, etc. Secondary readings will occasionally take the form of articles on metatheater, but mostly we will contextualize, burying ourselves in theater history in order to observe metatheater’s organic growth from that soil. Obviously the syllabus is still under construction but there should be something here for all students in whichever field.

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1360

001

American Heroine

Schwartz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 306

2012: CA1, HD 2016: CA, HD

1363

001

Myth of the American West

Weisenburger

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 115

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

1385

001

Power, Passion, and Protest in Brit Lit

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 357

2012: CA1, HC1 2016: CA, HC

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

ULEE 243

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

ULEE 243

2302

001

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W 2016: IL, OC, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

11:00

11:50

VSNI 0303

ENGL/ DISC 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 0303

ENGL/ DISC 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 0303

ENGL/ DISC 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery, J.

TTh

11:00

12:20

HCSH 0107

ENGL/ DISC 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery, J.

TTh

12:30

1:50

HCSH 0107

ENGL/ DISC 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Arbery, J.

TTh

2:00

3:20

HCSH 0217

ENGL/ DISC 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 143

ENGL/ DISC 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 143

ENGL/ DISC 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 106

ENGL/ DISC 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 153

ENGL/ DISC 2306

011H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Rosendale, T.

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 120

ENGL/ DISC 2306

012H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Pickard, K.

TTh

11:00

12:20

LDRC 104

2311

001

Intro to Poetry

Holahan

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

2311

002

Intro to Poetry: Serious Word Games

Bozorth

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 120

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: Families, Happy and Unhappy

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

2312

002

Intro to Fiction:  Religion & Spirituality in Contemporary Literature

Duke

MWF

3:00

3:50

DH 157

2012: CA2, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

2312

003H

Honors Fiction: Literature at the US-Mexico Border

Sae-Saue

TTh

12:30

1:50

HYER 102

2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W

2313

001

Intro to Drama

Neel

TTh

9:30

10:50

HYER 110

2012: CA1, W, OC 2016: LL, W, OC

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study: Texts & Contexts

Weisenburger

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 137

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: Those Who Wander

Wilson

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

2318

001

Intro to Digital Literature

Wilson

MWF

1:00

1:50

DH 152

2012: W
2016: W, LL, TM

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 156

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

002

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 120

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

Rubin

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith

MWF

12:00

12:50

DH 102

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

2390

005H

Honors Intro to Creative Writing: Next Year’s Words

Brownderville

T

2:00

4:50

HCSH 117

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Lit: Think Twice

Foster

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 157

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric: Ancient Athens During the Rise and Fall of the World’s First Democracy

Neel

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 102

2012: HC2, W, KNOW            2016: HSBS, W, KNOW

3340

001

Topics in Brit Lit: Age of Revs: Jane Austen’s Novels

Holahan

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 157

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

3362

001

African-American Lit: 19th Century Lives & Times

Greenspan

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 142

2012: CA2, W, HD 2016: HFA, W, HD

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Children's Lit

Satz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 105

2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW 2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

3370

001

Special Topics: Life Writing

Greenspan

TTh

9:30

10:50

DH 137

Counts towards CW specialization for spring 2019 only

3379

001

Contexts of Disability: Gender, Care, & Justice

Satz

MWF

10:00

10:50

DH 106

2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW 2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

3384

001

Literature and Medicine: How We Talk about Illness, Doctors & Bodies

Foster

MWF

11:00

11:50

DH 156

2012: CA2, W, HD, PRIE2
2016: HFA, W, HD

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Lit: Before Thrones Were A Game: Medieval Literature in Westeros

Keene

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 106

2012: IL, HC2, KNOW, W
2016: IL, HSBS, OC, KNOW, W

4332

001

Studies in Early Modern Brit Lit: Sex and the City in the 18th Century

Sudan

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 157

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4349

001

Transatlantic Studies 2: A is for American: New Media in the Atlantic World, 1650–1850

Cassedy

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 138

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

4369

001

Transatlantic Studies 3: LGBT Writing Before and After Stonewall

Bozorth

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 105

2012: IL, OC, HD 2016: IL, OC, HD

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Lit: Reading Poetry

Rosendale

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 137

6345

001

American Lit in the Age of Revolutions: Printing Madness

Cassedy

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

7311

001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theory, Now and Then

Siraganian

W

2:00

4:50

DH 137

7376

001

Special Topics: A History of Metatheater in Three Acts

Moss

M

2:00

4:50

DH 137

 

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1360

001

American Heroine

Schwartz

MWF

9:00

9:50

DH 306

2012: CA1, HD
2016: CA, HD

 2390 001

Intro to Creative Writing

 Haynes  MWF  9:00  9:50 DH 156

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 3367 001

Ethical Implications of Children's Lit

Satz
MWF
9:00
9:50
DH 105

2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW
2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

ENGL/ DISC 2306

 007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.
MWF
 10:00 10:50
DH 143
 2390  002  

Intro to Creative Writing

Haynes  MWF 10:00
10:50
DH 120

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

3379
001 Contexts of Disability: Gender, Care, & Justice Satz  MWF 10:00
10:50
DH 106

2012: CA2, W, HD, OC, KNOW
2016: HFA, W, HD, OC, KNOW

ENGL/ DISC 2306

 008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R. MWF  11:00 11:50
DH 143

ENGL/ DISC 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

11:00

11:50

VSNI 0303

 2311 002
Intro to Poetry: Serious Word Games Bozorth MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 120

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

 2315 002
Intro to Literary Study: Those Who Wander Wilson MWF 11:00
11:50
DH 138

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

 3384 001

Literature and Medicine: How We Talk about Illness, Doctors & Bodies

Foster MWF
11:00
11:50
DH 156

2012: CA2, W, HD, PRIE2
2016: HFA, W, HD

ENGL/ DISC 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

12:00

12:50

VSNI 0303

2390 004

Intro to Creative Writing

Smith MWF
12:00
12:50
DH 102

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

Hopper, V.

MWF

1:00

1:50

VSNI 0303

ENGL/ DISC 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R.  MWF   1:00  1:50 DH 106
 2318 001

Intro to Digital Humanities

Wilson MWF
1:00
1:50
DH 152

2012: W
2016: W, LL, TM

ENGL/ DISC 2306

 010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

McConnell, R. MWF  2:00  2:50 DH 153

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches to Lit: Think Twice

Foster

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 157

4369

001

Transatlantic Studies 3: LGBT Writing Before and After Stonewall

Bozorth

MWF

2:00

2:50

DH 105

2012: IL, OC, HD
2016: IL, OC, HD

2312 002
Intro to Fiction: Religion & Spirituality in Contemporary Literature Duke MWF
3:00
3:50
DH 157
 

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

 7376 001

Special Topics: A History of Metatheater in Three Acts

 

Moss

 M  2:00 4:50
DH 137

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

M

3:00

3:50

ULEE 243

7311 001

Seminar in Literary Theory: Theory, Now and Then

 

Siraganian

W  2:00 4:50
DH 137

2102

002

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

C. Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

ULEE 243

 2311 001

Intro to Poetry

Holahan TTh 9:30
10:50
DH 120

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

2313 001

Intro to Drama

Neel  TTh 9:30
10:50
HYER 110

2012: CA1, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

 3370 001

Special Topics: Life Writing

Greenspan  TTh 9:30
10:50
DH 137
Counts towards CW specialization for spring 2019 only

1385

001

Power, Passion, and Protest in Brit Lit

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

DH 357

2012: CA1, HC1
2016: CA, HC

ENGL/ DISC 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

 

Arbery, J.

TTh 11:00
12:20
HCSH 0107
 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

012H
 

Honors Humanities Seminar II

 

Pickard, K.

TTh
11:00
12:20
LDRC 104
2315 001 Intro to Literary Study: Texts & Contexts

Weisenburger

TTh
11:00
12:20
DH 137
 

2012: CA2, W 2016: CA, W

4349 001

Transatlantic Studies 2: A is for American: New Media in the Atlantic World, 1650–1850

Cassedy TTh 11:00
12:20
DH 138  

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

2302

001

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

ENGL/ DISC 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

 

Arbery, J.

 TTh 12:30
1:50
HCSH 0107
 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

 011H  

Honors Humanities Seminar II

 

Rosendale, T.

TTh
12:30
1:50
DH 120
 2312 003H
Honors Fiction: Literature at the US-Mexico Border Sae-Saue  TTh 12:30
1:50
HYER 102
2012: CA2, W 2016: LL, W
 2390 003

Intro to Creative Writing

Rubin
TTh
12:30
1:50
DH 138

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

 

CLAS 3312

 001 Classical Rhetoric: Ancient Athens During the Rise and Fall of the World’s First Democracy  Neel TTh
12:30
1:50
DH 102
 

2012: HC2, W, KNOW
2016: HSBS, W, KNOW

3340 001
Topics in Brit Lit: Age of Revs: Jane Austen’s Novels  

Holahan

TTh 12:30
1:50
DH 157

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

1363 001
 

Myth of the American West

 

Weisenburger

 TTh 2:00
3:20
DH 115

2012: CA1, HC1
2016: CA, HC

2302

002

Business Writing

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 351

2012: IL, OC, W
2016: IL, OC, W

 

ENGL/ DISC 2306

 006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

 

Arbery, J.

 TTh 2:00
3:20
HCSH 0217

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: Families, Happy and Unhappy

Newman

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 116

2012: CA2, W, OC
2016: LL, W, OC

3362

001

African-American Lit: 19th Century Lives & Times

Greenspan

TTh

2:00

3:20

DH 142

2012: CA2, W, HD
2016: HFA, W, HD

 

4332

 

001

Studies in Early Modern Brit Lit: Sex and the City in the 18th Century  

Sudan

 

TTh

2:00

 

3:20

 

DH 157

 

2012: IL, OC 2016: IL, OC

3390

001

Creative Writing Workshop: The World of the Unseen

Rubin

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 153

2012: CA2, W 2016: HFA, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Lit: Before Thrones Were A Game: Medieval Literature in Westeros

Keene

TTh

3:30

4:50

DH 106

2012: IL, HC2, KNOW, W
2016: IL, HSBS, OC, KNOW, W

2390

005H

Honors Intro to Creative Writing: Next Year's Words

Brownderville

T

2:00

4:50

HCSH 117

2012: CA1, W 2016: CA, W

6345

001

American Lit in the Age of Revolutions: Printing Madness

Cassedy

T

2:00

4:50

DH 138

6330

001

Proseminar in Early Modern British Lit:
Reading Poetry

Rosendale

Th

2:00

4:50

DH 137