Operational Excellence Metrics

 

The following metrics are provided to monitor the ongoing performance of several services or processes. Initially, the metrics previously tracked on the Operational Excellence website will appear below. We will provide additional measurements throughout the year.

SMU Facilities Metrics

 
  • Goal: To continually see a decline in customer requested work orders to attain a level not to exceed 50%.
  • Includes all base services and additional services work orders. Additional services work orders impact the results due to their unplanned, unforeseen and out-of-sequence nature.
  • Excluded: Preventive maintenance work orders and SMU in Taos.
  • Facilities managers started submitting self-identified work requests in the computerized maintenance management system on March 1, 2016.

 

  • Goal: To minimize and keep average customer submitted work orders under 1 per SMU FTE (Faculty & Staff) perf fiscal quarter.
  • Includes all base services and additional services work orders. Additional services work orders impact the results due to their unplanned, unforeseen and out-of-sequence nature.
  • Excluded: Preventive maintenance work orders and SMU in Taos.
  • Staff/facilities counts used for calculating this metric are obtained from SMU’s Institutional Research website.
  • *Beginning 2017 Q4, data was not available due to a change in service provider.

     

  • Goal: To complete corrective work orders within an average of 10 calendar days.
  • Includes all base services and additional services work orders. Additional services work orders impact the results due to their unplanned, unforeseen and out-of-sequence nature.
  • *New CMMS System rolled out (TMA) in 2015Q1.
  • **Procedural change in the beginning of 2015Q3 to close open work orders.
  • ***Procedural change in the beginning of 2016Q2 to allow technicians to close work orders in real time.
  • Q1 2022 reflects an increase in average days to complete which coincides with a significant staffing shortage during this quarter.

 

 
  • The methodology for Q1 2018 through Q4 2021 reflects the calculation of tickets opened and closed in the same quarter. We will leave this calculation but add the overall average calculation for all tickets during the same quarters, which was the original calculation.

Energy Highlights FY 2021 vs FY 2020 

**Reported metrics are for the Dallas Main Campus - All Facilities Tied into Patterson Hall Central Plant** (88% of total SMU power, 90% of natural gas, 95% of water)

  • Square Footage up 1.0% from 4,492,030 to 4,542,437 (up 4% from FY17 baseline)
     -  Added the Gerald J Ford Research and Innovation Center.
  • Electrical Consumption down 7% from 82.4 million to 76.5 million kWh (down 15% from FY17 including new construction)
    Electrical consumption was down due to continued improvements made in plant efficiencies and controls, energy recommissioning and
    conservation measures. The pandemic also contributed as there were reduced staff and student body during much of the academic year.
    However, energy savings were maximized because of energy conservations measures implemented during this time. Cooling degree days were
    down by 18% from 2,172 to 1,791.

  • Electrical Costs were down 18% from $4.87 million to $4.01 million (down 38% from FY17 baseline)
    Electrical cost reduction was due in large part to the 7% reduction in consumption, plus the benefit of unused power “sold ba ck” at market price
    during the February winter storm (net $156k). There was also a slight overall reduction in cost per kWh from $0.0586 to $0.05 35, in part because
    of our participation in the curtailment program during summer months.
  • Natural Gas Consumption was up 3% from 268,258 to 275,481 MMBtu (up 7% from FY17 baseline)
    Heating degree days were up by 12% from 2,510 to 2,803, and responsible for some of the increase in consumption.
  • Natural Gas Costs were up 3% from $1,070,646 to $1,102,629 (down 9% from FY17 baseline)
    Natural gas costs were up proportionally with increase in consumption.

  • Total Energy Costs were down 14% from $5.94 million to $5.11 million (down 34% from FY17 including new construction)
    Energy costs are largely fixed in both electricity and natural gas, reflecting SMU strategy for predictability and stability. El ectricity is hedged
    through 2030, while natural gas is hedged through 2024.

SMU Annual Energy Metrics:

Energy Metrics Summary
Goal: Reduce 10% from FY17 Baseline
Metric FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 Goal
EUI 128.73 132.14 122.03 122.33  118.08 115.857
ECI $1.76 $1.66 $1.37 $1.32  $ 1.12 $1.58
KWH / GSF 20.48 20.94 20.70 18.35  16.83 18.43
KW /Ton     0.67 0.63  0.63 0.66
  • EUI – Significant 4% reduction in Energy Utilization Index exclusively due to reduced electrical energy consumption. Natural gas consumption actually increased,
    keeping SMU from meeting our target.
     
  • ECI – Solid 16% decline in the Energy Cost Index exclusively due to reduced electrical consumption for the year. Exceeded Goal by $0.46 per gross square foot. 
  • KWH/GSF – Exceptional 8% reduction in electrical (kwh) energy consumption per gross square foot of campus building space. Exceeded goal by 1.60 kWh per gross
    square foot.
     
  • KW/Ton  – Holding steady at 0.63 which remains below our goal of 0.66 for a rolling 12 month average.
  • Metrics presented represent all facilities powered by the SMU electrical sub-station. This includes all the West Campus with the exception of the Childcare facility and the Daniel House apartments.
  • Also, it does include the Robson Aquatic Center. All other East Campus facilities are excluded. 

Water Metrics Summary

Metric FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20  FY21
Gallons/Yr 236M  218M  224M   237M  217M
WUI (Gal/GSF) 54.09 49.36 50.84  52.92  47.89

  • Gallons measures total domestic water consumed for the year. Domestic water is used in building facilities, central plants, and
    irrigation. Further breakout of this utility is shown in the pages that follow.
  • In FY21 there was an 8% reduction in domestic water consumption compared to FY20.
  • Gal/GSF, which is also the Water Utilization Index (WUI) metric, measures gallons per square foot of building space. In FY21 this
    number decreased by 10%.
  • The decrease in FY21 was largely due to less consumption in building spaces.
  • Also, it does include the Robson Aquatic Center. All other East Campus facilities are excluded.

Irrigation Metrics Summary (sub-portion of water metrics)

Metric FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20  FY21
Gallons/Yr 31M 32M 38M  44M   49M
WUI (Gal/GSF) 16.77 17.11 20.64  23.72  26.47
 
  • Gallons in this table shows total domestic water usage for irrigation for the year.
  • FY21 shows a 12% increase in irrigation consumption, or 5.1 million gallons compared to FY20.
  • Irrigation Gallons per sq. ft. of irrigated area continued its increase YoY (graphic to the left).
  • The main campus system has 1,333 irrigation zones, and over 11,000 rotors and sprayers, plus miles of drip irrigation.

Rainfall Metrics Summary

Metric FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20  FY21
Rain (inches) 29.99 39.98 53.43 33.44  36.76

Water Graph
  • WUI measures total domestic water consumed compared to total square feet of building space, and includes irrigation. 
  • This metric is significantly influenced by weather and rainfall.

Irrigation_Graph
    • This metric shows the water consumed for irrigation compared to total square feet irrigated.
    • Significant reduction in rainfall in FY20, increased need for irrigation water. 

Accomplishments in FY21

  • Total energy spend was down by $836,248 (electricity & natural gas)

  • Electrical tariff costs were down by $132,015 compared to last year, based on reduced consumption and our
    successful participation in last summer’s curtailment program.

  • Received $26,159 for SMU’s participation in the ERCOT ERS30 program.

  • Strong progress toward the SMU Energy Utilization Index goal positioned us within 3 points of our target.

  • Continued to exceed our Energy Cost Index goal.

  • Continued to exceed our facility space efficiency metric (KWH per gross sq.ft .) for a second consecutive year.

  • Continued to exceed our cooling plant efficiency metric (KW per ton) for a second consecutive year, well
    ahead of the national average.

  • Continued Energy Recommissioning projects in campus facilities and the Central Plants, improving their
    efficiency and comfort levels. 

Noteworthy:

  • Financial impact on our utilities during the February winter storm was minimal due to three factors: exceptional emergency response
    teamwork to minimize damages and energy consumption, “sell back” of our excess contracted electrical energy, and Atmos’s waving cost of penalty gas.