ISEM EXCURSIONS

ISEM EXCURSIONS

ISEM continues to build on its invitational excursions and have journeyed to Iceland, Yellowstone, the Aleutian Islands, the North Slope, the Galapagos Islands, and the Channeled Scablands among other places, to examine the relationship between Earth's resources and the future of humankind. Special thanks are due to Shade Tree Studios for making documentaries of the ISEM excursions.

 CLICK ON THE IMAGE TO VIEW MOVIE.

 

BIG BONE LICK, KENTUCKY, 2014

Big Bone Lick, Kentucky, is considered the Cradle of North American Vertebrate Paleontology. It was known to George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, who developed ideas of climate change from the mammoths and mastodons  entombed in the salt. It quickly drew the attention of Thomas Jefferson who kept a mastodon tooth from there at Monticello and sent Lewis and Clark to find them alive in the American West, thus ushering in the concept of extinction. Glenn Storrs, Assistant Vice President for Collections at the Cincinnati Museum Center, and Kenneth Tankersley, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Geology at the University of Cincinnati, hosted the group at Big Bone Lick and a behind the scenes tour of the Cincinnati  Museum, including a look at an original letter from William Clark. Stanley Hedeen, author of Big Bone Lick: The Cradle of American Paleonotology, provided a special book signing for the participants.  [Movie coming soon.]

 

 

 

 

THE CHANNELED SCABLANDS, 2013

A tour through Washington, Idaho, & western Montana, to the Channeled Scablands, a unique feature of Earth’s surface formed by the bursting of an Ice Age glacial dam and the ensuing gigantic flood. It is a story of scientific sleuthing and intrigue, and led to an understanding the surface of Mars.  John Soennichsen, author of Bretz’s Flood, the biography of the scientist who unraveled the mystery, provided a unique perspective on the trip.  [Movie coming soon.]

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIG SKY AND BADLANDS: TOUR OF THE DAKOTAS, 2008

A tour of southwestern North Dakota, northwestern South Dakota and southeastern Montanan. Areas of interest included the Late Cretaceous strata of the Hell Creek Formation and the Custer Battlefield at Little Bighorn and Medora. The Red Trail Ethanol Plan near Richardton, North Dakota provided a first hand look and a chance to discuss corn-based ethanol and its economic effects. The trip continued at the South Dakota School of Mines where Dr. James Martin provided an inside tour of the Paleontology Museum and a visit to the Bid Badlands east of Rapid City. The trip concluded with a visit to the Black Hills and Mt. Rushmore.

 

 

 

 

 

HOT ROCKS: STUDYING GEOTHERMAL POTENTIALS
IN THE GREATER YELLOWSTONE AREA, 2007

A study of the regional geology and geothermal resources in northwestern Wyoming, the trip began in Jackson, Wyoming to review the geologic setting of Jackson Hole, and continuing northward into Yellowstone National Park. Hosing the group there were Dr. Robert Smith, Professor of Geology and Geophysics at University of Utah, and Dr. Roy Mink, former director of the US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Continuing east to Cody participants were hosted by ISEM Board Chairman Leighton Steward, and an SMU fossil locality on the Hoodoo Ranch in the Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, where they were hosted by ISEM Trustee, Tom Meurer.

 

 

 

 

ICELAND: A CRUCIBLE OF POWER, 2006

Located atop the Mid-Atlantic ridge, the spreading center for the Atlantic Ocean Basins, thermal energy in the form of hot water is abundant.  Iceland makes extensive use of hot water to heat its buildings, to keep its streets and sidewalks free of ice, to generate electricity, and to provide energy for a variety of industrial uses. Shell Hydrogen is also a major player in helping to set up the infrastructure to gradually convert the ground transportation system in Iceland to hydrogen fuel, starting with the Reykjavik municipal bus system. Meetings included senior representatives of Reykjavik Energy, Shell Hydrogen, Alcoa, the Iceland Geosurvey, and Iceland NuEnergy among others. Visits included a field trip to the major geothermal producing area in the rift valley east of Reykjavik, the geothermal distribution systems in southwestern Iceland, the Shell Hydrogen Busline and system maintenance facilities.