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May, June and July course lists are now visible!

June and July Sessions on the Dallas Campus

Students may enroll in up to two courses in each of the June and July sessions OR up to two courses in the full session.
Most classes meet Monday – Friday for 2 hours each day.  Class meeting times vary by course.

PLEASE NOTE: This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change.
A complete list of courses will be visible on my.SMU in early March.

 

The official course list will be visible on my.SMU in early March.


June Session 2017 Program Dates
Monday June 5 to Wednesday July 5

Students may enroll in up to two courses for a total of 7 credit hours during the June session.
Most classes meet Monday – Friday for 2 hours each day.  Class meeting times vary by course.

Scroll down to view course offerings from:
 
Cox School of Business
Dedman College
Lyle School of Engineering
Meadows School of the Arts
Simmons School of Education

 

Cox School of Business (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ACCT 2301
INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING.
Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.
Seema Bhushan M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
ACCT 2301
INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING.
Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.
Seema Bhushan M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ACCT 2302
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING.
Introduces the use of accounting information for management purposes, including decision-making, planning, and control of operations. Students learn to integrate topics in cost determination, economic analysis, budgeting, and management and financial control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.
James Brimson M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ACCT 2310
ACCOUNTING CONCEPTS.
A broad introduction to financial, cost, and managerial accounting concepts and practices. Stresses the understanding of financial statements as contrasted to the preparation of these documents. Covers product cost, including estimating overhead and the underlying assumptions. Discusses using managerial accounting techniques for decision-making, including break-even analysis, relevant costing, and budgeting. Students who already have credit for ACCT 2301 will not receive credit for this course. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.
Liliana Hickman-Riggs MTW 8:00 am - 10:50 am
ACCT 3311
INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I.
An overview of financial statements and revenue recognition that focuses on the left-hand side (assets) of the balance sheet. Provides the necessary foundation for comprehension by users and preparers of the information in financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Reserved for Cox majors.
William Browning M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ACCT 4315
FEDERAL INCOME TAX I.
Covers the conceptual basis and structure for the determination of income taxes, including the tax research methods used in preparing tax returns, solving problems, and planning business decisions. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Reserved for Cox majors.
Wendy Wilson MTW 9:00 am - 11:50 am
BL 3335
BUSINESS LAW.
Emphasizes the nature, formation, and application of law with a macro view; also public law and regulation of business. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; MATH 1309 or 1337; and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors.
Catherine Weber MTW 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
BLI 3302
BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS AND LEADER DEVELOPMENT.
Promotes students' professional success as effective communicators and leaders. Covers interpersonal skills and the vital role that ethics, integrity, and trust play in leading a successful business. Students develop skills for effective career management, business presentations, business writing, and teamwork; enhance their ability to plan and manage projects individually and in a team setting; and increase their understanding of contemporary business topics. Reserved for Cox majors and BBA Scholars.
James Bryan Hilary Mcilvain TWTH 12:00 pm - 3:20 pm
CISB 5397
ENTREPRENEURSHIP: STARTING A BUSINESS.
Covers planning for a new business. Topics include the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs, profit and cash flow forecasts, sources of information, sales forecasts and the importance of relevant experience, entrepreneurial marketing, financing, and the business plan. Prerequisites: FINA 3320, MKTG 3340 and/or ADV 3362, MNO 3370, ITOM 2308/3306. Reserved for Cox majors.
Patricia Kriska MTW 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm
FINA 3310
FINANCE CONCEPTS.
Survey of concepts, practices, and problems surrounding financial markets, securities, and decision-making. Includes time value of money, market efficiency, evaluation of securities, and capital budgeting. Required for the minor in business. Students may not receive credit for this course and FINA 3320. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.
Brian Young TWTH 11:30 am - 2:20 pm
FINA 3312
PERSONAL FINANCE.
Covers personal financial planning. Topics include setting up financial accounts at banks and brokerages; investments in stocks and mutual funds; personal income taxation; auto, property, life, and health insurance; and employee benefit plans. Elective for minor in business. B.B.A. majors can take course for free elective credit only.
Brian Young TWTH 3:00 pm - 5:50 pm
FINA 3320
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT.
Survey of concepts, practices, and problems surrounding financial markets, securities, and decision-making. Includes time value of money, market efficiency, evaluation of securities, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; MATH 1309 or 1337; STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors and minors in business administration. Students will not receive credit for this course and ECO 4368.
Nathan Walcott MW 9:00 am - 1:20 pm
ITOM 2308
INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR MANAGEMENT.
Discusses computer technologies for the management of information resources in business. Covers spreadsheet analytical tools for data analysis, reporting, and forecasting. Also includes database design and implementation for data storage, retrieval, aggregation, and reporting as well as the creation of Web pages using HTML. Requires laptops equipped with the Windows operating system and Microsoft Office for use in class. Prerequisite: ITOM 2305 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; STAT 2301, 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors and minors in business administration only.
Allen Gwinn M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
MKTG 3340
FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING.
Examines the nature of marketing decisions; the environment in which these decisions are made; and the relationship of these decisions to the firm, business, and society. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301, ECO 1311 and 1312, MATH 1309 or 1337, and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340, EMIS 3340, ITOM 2305, STAT 2331, STAT 4340. Reserved for Cox majors, minors in business administration, or management science majors. Students may not receive credit for both MKTG 3340 and ADV 1341.
Clyde Rupert MTW 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
MNO 3310
MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS.
Provides a broad survey of key issues, theories, and practices that underpin how organizations function, evolve, and perform. Topics include motivation, job design, organizational theory, leadership, organizational culture, competitive strategy, and competitive advantage. Required for the minor in business. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.
David Lei MTW 8:00 am -10:50 am
MNO 3370
MANAGEMENT.
Develops skills in managerial behavior that facilitate high performance and satisfaction as well as continued self-development for all organization members. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301; ECO 1311 and 1312; MATH 1309 or 1337; and STAT 2301 or one from the following: CSE 4340; EMIS 3340; ITOM 2305; STAT 2331, 4340. Reserved for Cox majors, minors in business administration, and management science majors.
Tom Perkowski M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am

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Dedman College (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ANTH 3301
HEALTH, HEALING, AND ETHICS: CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES ON SICKNESS AND SOCIETY.
A cross-cultural exploration of cultures and organization of medical systems, economic development and the global exportation of biomedicine, and ethical dilemmas associated with medical technologies and global disparities in health.
Carolyn Smith-Morris M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ANTH 3314
PEOPLES OF AFRICA.
A contemporary study of the cultures and social structures of sub-Saharan African peoples and an examination of the dynamics of contemporary African societies.
Beibei Yang M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
ANTH 3315
ORIGINS OF CIVILIZATION.
Considers those cultural and historic factors that led to the development of agriculture and the first urban states in Egypt and Mesopotamia.
Amanda Aland M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ANTH 3350
GOOD EATS AND FORBIDDEN FLESH: CULTURE, FOOD, AND THE GLOBAL GROCERY MARKET.
A cultural perspective on food that blends biological and medical information about human nutrition and development with an exploration of the global market of eating. Prerequisites: Advanced standing and ANTH 2301, or permission of instructor.
Carolyn Smith-Morris M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
BIOL 1101
INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY LAB.
Laboratory to complement lecture of BIOL 1301.
Carolyn Harrod TBD
BIOL 1301
INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY.
Introduction to the study of living organisms: ecology, evolution, diversity, and physiology. BIOL 1301, 1302 are prerequisites for all advanced courses in biological sciences.
Teresa Strecker M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
BIOL 3304
GENETICS.
An introduction to the structure, function, and transmission of the hereditary material. Prerequisites: BIOL 1401 and CHEM 1304.
William Orr M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
CHEM 1113
GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1303. Withdrawal from CHEM 1113 requires withdrawal from CHEM 1303.
Jennifer O'Brien TBD
CHEM 1301
CHEMISTRY FOR LIBERAL ARTS.
Designed for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.
Helen Babbili TBD
CHEM 1303
GENERAL CHEMISTRY.
Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs.
Werner Horsthemke TBD
CHEM 3117
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3371.
Chinwon Rim TBD
CHEM 3371
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Designed to satisfy the requirements of the chemistry major and health-related professions student. The first term deals primarily with aliphatic chemistry, with special emphasis on stereochemistry. The second term emphasizes aromatic substances and the chemistry of biologically relevant molecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, 1304, 1113, 1114.
Alan Humanson TBD
DISC 1313
INQUIRY SEMINAR.
This course is a topic-based seminar through which students continue to develop their critical reading and writing skills, employing analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and/or integration, while learning to employ research protocols for the various discipline or disciplines represented in the course. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: C- or better in DISC 1312 or ENGL 1301.
Mary Catherine Mueller M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 1311
PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS: CONSUMERS, FIRMS, AND MARKETS.
Explains tools of economic analysis and focuses on the individual participants in the economy: producers, workers, employers, and consumers.
Raj Deb M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
ECO 3301
PRICE THEORY (INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS).
Building on topics covered in ECO 1311, this course considers problems of microeconomics that are more advanced, with a focus on understanding how consumers behave, firms make pricing and output decisions, and market structure impacts the behavior of firms and consumers. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.
Raj Deb M-F 10:00am - 11:50 am
ECO 3355
MONEY AND BANKING.
Analyzes central and commercial banking. A student may not receive credit for both ECO 3355 and FINA 3330. Prerequisites: C- or better in ECO 1311, 1312. Reserved for economics majors and markets and cultures majors only.
Saltuk Ozerturk M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
ECO 4351
LABOR ECONOMICS.
An overview of labor supply and labor demand models, with extensions to models of taxes and tax credits, welfare, and Social Security. Also, models of wage determination and extensions such as the effects of minimum wage, performance-based pay, unions, and discrimination. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.
Dann Millimet M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ECO 4378
FINANCIAL ECONOMICS AND INVESTMENT BEHAVIOR.
Gives a theoretical basis for financial analysis within the context of the total process of investment decision-making, and develops the theoretical foundations for analysis of equities, bonds, and portfolio performance. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, or ECO 4368 or FINA 3320 and C- or better in ECO 3301 and in ITOM 2305 or STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340. Reserved for economics majors and minors. (ECO 4378 cannot be taken if the student has taken FINA 4320 or 4326.)
Saltuk Ozerturk M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ECO 5353
LAW AND ECONOMICS.
Examines economic theories that explain the development of common law and constitutional law and the economic implications of contracts, antitrust laws, and liability rules. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or C- or better in the following: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.
Helen Reynolds MW 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm; SA 9:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 5360
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: MACROECONOMIC PERSPECTIVES.
A macroeconomic examination of the economic issues faced by developing countries. Topics include population growth, national savings, capital accumulation, human capital formation, government institutions, and international integration. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or C- or better in the following: ECO 3302 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340.
Thomas Osang MW 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm; SA 9:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 5365
PUBLIC FINANCE.
Covers the theories of the public sector and the problems of market failures, externalities, and preference revelation. Specific government expenditure policies are analyzed. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or C- or better in the following: ECO 3301 and STAT 2301, 2331, or 4340. Recommended: ECO 3302.
Kathy Hayes M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 5375
ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS FORECASTING.
Presentation of methods used by economists to forecast economic and business trends and ways of evaluating the usefulness of these methods. Students may not receive credit for this course and STAT 5375. Prerequisites: C- or better in the following: STAT 2301, 2331; or STAT 4340; or ITOM 2305 and ECO 5350.
Indro Dasgupta TTH 6:00 pm - 8:50 pm; SA 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
ENGL 2312
FICTION.
Analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of fiction, with attention to terms and issues relevant to the genre.
Beth Newman M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
ENGL 3332
SHAKESPEARE.
Studies of Shakespeare's major works in context with English history, society, and culture, including literary and theatrical conventions and practices. Topics vary by term; may be repeated for credit under a different subtitle.
Michael Holahan M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ENGL 3367
ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CHILDREN'S LITERATURE.
Examination of children's literature with emphasis on notions of morality and evil, including issues of colonial-ism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class.
Martha Satz M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ENGL 3379
LITERARY AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS OF DISABILITY: GENDER, CARE, AND JUSTICE.
An examination of disability as a cultural construct, with attention to how literary, ethical, and political representations bear upon it, and in relation to gender, race, and class issues.
Martha Satz M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
FREN 1401
BEGINNING FRENCH: TERM ONE.
Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: This course is reserved for students with no previous knowledge of French.
Gwen Aaron online
GEOL 3343
THE GEOLOGY OF WESTERN US NATIONAL PARKS.
Explores the geological history of the Southwestern United States. The class will involve several days in-classroom and 10 days of field work where students will be camping/hiking/mapping in several U.S. National Parks and Monuments. First year students (including those with only limited geological experience), sophomores, and students considering earth or environmental sciences as a major/career are encouraged to apply. Instructor permission required.
Matt Hornbach Ian Richards TBD
HIST 2337
HISTORY OF SPORTS IN THE UNITED STATES.
The social, cultural, and business history of sport in the U.S. Focus on the cultural meaning and ethical components of sports in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Alexis McCrossen M-F 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
HIST 3348
AMERICAN FAMILIES: CHANGING EXPERIENCES AND EXPECTATIONS.
Explores changes in American family life from the Colonial period to the present. Seeks to understand how family ideals, structures, and roles have shaped and have been shaped by social and historical change.
Crista DeLuzio M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
HIST 3359
EUROPE IN THE AGE OF THE REFORMATION, 1520–1598.
The political, economic, religious and cultural history of Europe, including the impact of the Protestant and Catholic reform movements.
Laurence Winnie M-F 3:00 PM - 5:00 pm
LATN 1401
BEGINNING LATIN I.
Structures of the Latin language: vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Also, introduction to Roman history and culture, and simple readings from Latin authors.
Justin Germain M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 1309
INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE.
Derivatives and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications to the time value of money, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, and computation of areas. Applications to business and economics. (Natural science and engineering students must take MATH 1337. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1303 or a C- or higher in MATH 1303.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 1337
CALCULUS I.
Differential and integral calculus for algebraic, trigonometric functions, and other transcendental functions, with applications to curve sketching, velocity, maximum-minimum problems, area and volume. (Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1304 or a C- or higher in MATH 1304.
Staff M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
MATH 1338
CALCULUS II.
A continuation of MATH 1337 through differential and integral calculus, areas, techniques of integration, improper integrals, and infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1337 (or MATH 1309 and departmental permission).
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 2339
CALCULUS III.
A continuation of MATH 1338. Includes parametric equations, polar coordinates, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1338 or 1340.
Staff M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
MATH 3353
INTRODUCTION TO LINEAR ALGEBRA.
Matrices and linear equations, Gaussian elimination, determinants, rank, geometrical notions, eigenvalue problems, coordinate transformations, norms, inner products, orthogonal projections, and Gram-Schmidt and least squares. No credit is given if taken after MATH 5353. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1338 or 1340.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
PHIL 1301
ELEMENTARY LOGIC.
An introductory course in symbolic logic. Logic provides a means for determining whether the purported conclusion of an argument really does follow from the premises. In symbolic logic, mechanical procedures are developed for determining whether a given argument is valid. The techniques and skills acquired through logic have important applications not only within other academic areas such as the sciences and humanities, but may be of use within various professional areas, including law.
Matt Lockard TBD
PHIL 1318
CONTEMPORARY MORAL PROBLEMS.
An introduction to philosophical ethics focusing on questions in applied ethics. Students begin by exploring ethical theories and philosophical methods. The majority of the course is devoted to applying those theories and methods to some of the most controversial and pressing issues confronting contemporary society. Topics vary, but the following are representative: abortion, animal rights, affirmative action, capital punishment, economic justice, euthanasia, sexuality, war and terrorism, and world hunger. Class discussion is an important component of the course, as is reading and (in some sections) writing argumentative essays about these issues.
Kirsten Egerstrom TBD
PHIL 3351
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY (ANCIENT).
A study of the major philosophers from Thales to Plotinus, including Plato and Aristotle.
Eric Barnes TBD
PHYS 1105
MECHANICS LABORATORY.
Taken as a complement to PHYS 1303, 1307.
Richard Guarino MWF 11:00 am - 1:50 pm
PHYS 1105
MECHANICS LABORATORY.
Taken as a complement to PHYS 1303, 1307.
Richard Guarino MWF 2:00 pm - 4:50 pm
PHYS 1303
INTRODUCTORY MECHANICS.
For science and engineering majors. Covers vector kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, rotational motion, special relativity, and structure of matter. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1337.
Simon Dalley M-F 11:00 am - 12:50 pm
PHYS 1307
GENERAL PHYSICS I.
For life sciences majors. Covers vector kinematics, Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, rotational motion, vibrations, waves, and fluids. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1337.
Durdana Balakishiyeva M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am
PSYC 2351
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY.
A study of the theories, causes, assessment, and treatment of abnormal behavior, including depression, anxiety, psychosis, personality disorders, and other forms of psychopathology in adults. There is an examination of the continuum of normal and abnormal behavior, with consideration of historical and cultural perspectives, ethical concerns, and research methodologies in understanding psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300 and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.
Michael Lindsey M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
PSYC 3341
SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY.
Addresses the question of how an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by his/her social environment; includes topics such as attitude change, conformity, attraction, aggression, and small-group behavior.
Chris Logan M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
PSYC 3364
FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY.
Examination of the interface between psychology and the legal system, focusing in particular on the role of mental health experts in criminal trials and civil disputes. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300 and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.
Jill Johnasson-Love MTWTH 5:00 pm - 7:50 pm
PSYC 4321
BEHAVIORAL ACTION OF DRUGS.
Addresses the principles of drugs and behavior, classification, and chemical effects of behaviorally active drugs; influences of environmental, response, and task variables; and the evaluation and treatment of addiction. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300, PSYC 2301, and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.
Jim Calvert M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
RELI 3319
HEBREW BIBLE.
An introduction to the Old Testament and to the religion and history of ancient Israel. Special emphasis is given to the ancient Near Eastern roots of biblical religion and to the modern interpretation of biblical myth, epic, and prophecy.
Serge Frolov M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
RELI 3321
RELIGION AND THE HOLOCAUST.
A study of responses to the Holocaust by Jews and Christians. Includes an overview of the history of the Holocaust as it affected the Jewish communities of Central and Eastern Europe. Students read personal memoirs of survivors of ghettos, concentration camps, and Nazi Germany. Postwar responses include questions of faith after the Holocaust, Christian responsibility for modern anti-Semitism, the impact of the Holocaust on the creation of the State of Israel and Middle East politics today, and postwar relations between Jews and Germans.
Serge Frolov M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
SOCI 3351
SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY.
Examines the relationship between social structure and the family by considering the historical development of the family, variations in families, and current issues and changes affecting the family.
Brita Andercheck M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
SOCI 4363
THE ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE.
Examination of law enforcement and criminal court systems, as well as the ideal of justice and public policy. Prerequisites: SOCI 1300 and sophomore standing or above.
Michele Meitl M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
SOCI 1300
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY.
This course presents the sociological approach to understanding human behavior. Sociology considers how particular life experiences, attitudes, and values are shaped by membership in ascribed and achieved social categories such as social class, race/ethnicity, sex, sexuality, and nationality.
Brita Andercheck M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
SOCI 2377
INTRODUCTION TO MARKETS AND CULTURE.
General introduction to economic sociology, examining the effects of culture and social relations on shaping production, distribution, and consumption in domestic and global markets. Prerequisite: First-year, sophomore, or junior standing only. Must have access to Microsoft Excel.
Sheri Kunovich online
SPAN 1401
BEGINNING SPANISH I.
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.
Marlen Collazo MWF 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
SPAN 1402
BEGINNING SPANISH II.
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.
Miroslava Detcheva MWF 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
SPAN 3355
SPANISH CONVERSATION.
An advanced course for majors and nonmajors intended to increase active command of the language. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 2302 or 2312. Not for heritage or native speakers of Spanish.
Ruben Sanchez-Godoy M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
STAT 2301
STATISTICS FOR MODERN BUSINESS DECISIONS.
A foundation in data analysis and probability models is followed by elementary applications of confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Introduces the use of Excel for statistical analysis, with a focus on business applications.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
STAT 2331
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL METHODS.
An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
WGST 3380 HUMAN SEXUALITY.
This course explores the biosocial aspects of human sexuality and sex behaviors. A multidisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective will be used to address a wide range of theoretical and pragmatic sexual issues.
Josephine Ryan M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
WL 3309
FRENCH CINEMA: 1945 TO THE PRESENT.
Uses cultural studies theory to explore the evolution of the French national identity from the end of the Nazi occupation of France in 1945 to the present day.
Dayna Oscherwitz MWF 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm

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Lyle School of Engineering (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
CEE 7/5362
ENGINEERING ANALYSIS WITH NUMERICAL METHODS.
Applications of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and other engineering applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Usama El Shamy M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm
ME 2142
FLUID MECHANICS LABORATORY.
Experiments in fluid friction, pumps, boundary layers, and other flow devices to complement lecture material of ME 2342. Prerequisite or corequisite: ME/CEE 2342.
Staff TBD
ME 2310
STATICS.
Equilibrium of force systems, computations of reactions and internal forces, and determinations of centroids and moments of inertia. Also, introduction to vector mechanics. Prerequisite: MATH 1337.
Staff TBD
ME 2320
DYNAMICS.
Introduction to kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Also, Newton's laws, kinetic and potential energy, linear and angular momentum, work, impulse, and inertia properties. Prerequisite: C or better in CEE/ME 2310.
Staff TBD
ME 2331
THERMODYNAMICS.
The first and second laws of thermodynamics and thermodynamic properties of ideal gases, pure substances, and gaseous mixtures are applied to power production and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, MATH 2339, and a C or better in ME/CEE 2310.
Staff TBD
ME 2342
FLUID MECHANICS.
Fluid statics, fluid control volume, and applications; irrotational flow; Bernoulli's and Euler's equations; similitude and dimensional analysis; differential analysis of fluid flow; incompressible viscous flow; and boundary layer theory. Prerequisites: MATH 2339, PHYS 1303 and C or better in CEE/ME 2310. Corequisite: MATH 2343. ME/CEE 2320 is recommended but not required.
Staff TBD
ME 3132
HEAT TRANSFER LABORATORY.
Experiments in conduction, convection, and radiation to complement lecture material of ME 3332. Prerequisite or corequisite: ME 3332.
Staff TBD
ME 5374
ADVANCED CAD/CAE.
Focuses on advanced modeling techniques, structural analysis and optimization, kinematical and dynamical analysis, mechanism design and virtual prototyping, and thermal analysis and flow simulation. Emphasis on hands-on use of state-of-the-art CAD/CAE systems. Prerequisite: ME 2372 or consent of instructor.
Staff TBD
ME 7/5362
ENGINEERING ANALYSIS WITH NUMERICAL METHODS.
Application of numerical and approximate methods in solving a variety of engineering problems. Examples include equilibrium, buckling, vibration, fluid mechanics, thermal science, and surveying problems. Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Usama El Shamy M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm

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Meadows School of the Arts (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ARHS 1306
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE.
A contextual history of European and North American architecture from classical antiquity to the present century, with particular emphasis on 1400 to the present. Students will be introduced to basic principles and terminology, but the course will focus on the social and cultural meanings of the built environment in its urban context.
Staff TBD
ASPH 1310
INTRODUCTION TO VIDEO.
Provides an opportunity to understand and master the craft of video production in the context of art. Using Final Cut Pro and higher-end cameras with full manual controls, students experiment with the many ways to generate moving images. Covers methods and concepts derived from film and video: point of view, shot composition, spatial and time continuity, lighting, and superimposition. Encourages the comparison of narrative and non-narrative formal systems. Also, the most important practitioners of video as art and the intersection of video with film, theatre, installation art, and architecture.
Marwa Benhalim M-F 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm
ASPT 1300
INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING.
A first course in painting from life, objects, and concepts. Emphasis is placed on space, materials, color, analysis of form, and critical judgment.
Juan Negroni M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am
CCPA 2310
RHETORIC, COMMUNITY, AND PUBLIC DELIBERATION.
Examines the role of rhetoric and public deliberation in the production and maintenance of communities and the larger public sphere. Topics include the formation and rhetoric of the civil rights movement, the structural factors impacting the modern public sphere, and the skills necessary to be an informed citizen. Prerequisite: DISC 1312.
Stephanie Martin M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
CCPA 2327
COMMUNICATION THEORY.
Introduces the foundational concepts, theories, and approaches to the study and practice of human communication. Includes a historical overview and discussions of contemporary ethical questions. Prerequisite: DISC 1312.
Maria Dixon M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
CCPA 3300
FREE SPEECH AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT.
Examines the philosophy, cases, and issues relevant to the First Amendment right to free expression, with a focus on internal security, obscenity, pornography, slander, and the regulation of communication. Also, the foundations of legal argumentation. Prerequisite: SMU Pre-Major or enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs or B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in corporate communication and public affairs or law and legal reasoning program.
Michele Meitl M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
DANC 1303
BEGINNING MODERN DANCE.
Introduction to basic movement skills, experiences, and concepts of modern dance. Not for credit in the dance major.
Christopher Dolder M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
DANC 3374
THE EVOLUTION OF AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATRE.
Examines the evolution of American musical theatre, from its roots in minstrelsy, burlesque, and vaudeville, to its adolescence in comic opera, operetta, and musical comedy, to its codification as musical theatre. Includes the early forms of popular entertainment, the integration of dance, music, and drama into the form known as musical theatre, and the figures of the 20th century who refined this integration on Broadway and in Hollywood.
Patty Delaney M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
FILM 2332
AMERICAN POPULAR FILM AND TELEVISION.
An in-depth examination of specific aspects of American popular cinema and/or television, with a focus on questions of popular culture and ideology, the historical development of styles and genres, and the impact of the Hollywood film industry. Specific topics vary from term to term.
Derek Kompare M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
FILM 3351
INTERNATIONAL FILM HISTORY.
Overview of the development of the cinema as a technology, an art form, an industry, and a social institution, beginning with the origins of the medium and tracing its major movements and configurations up to the present. Required of all majors.
Kevin Heffernan M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
JOUR 2312
NEWS REPORTING.
Rigorous foundation writing and reporting course needed to complete the major. Students gain fundamental skills (e.g., gathering, documenting, organizing, and writing news) that are essential to accurate, fair, clear, and concise journalism. Includes lecture and lab. Restricted to journalism majors and minors or fashion media majors and minors. Prerequisites: JOUR 2103 (or 2303) and 2302.
Karen Thomas M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
JOUR 4398
DIGITAL JOURNALISM.
Students explore the use of new communication technologies for multimedia storytelling; work with social media as a tool for newsgathering, community building, and the fostering of audience engagement; learn about Web metrics and search engine optimization techniques; and update and perfect their personal portfolio websites and social media presence. Prerequisites: JOUR 2103 (or 2303), 2302, 2304, 2312; junior or senior standing. Restricted to majors and minors.
Michele Houston M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
THEA 2309
THEATRE MOVEMENT FOR NONMAJORS.
Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.
Sara Romersberger M-F 1:00 pm - 2:50 pm
THEA 2311
THE ART OF ACTING.
Basic work in acting, voice, and movement for the nonmajor. Relaxation, concentration, imagination, and the actor's exploration and use of the social world.
Sara Romersberger M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
THEA 2321
SPECTACLE OF PERFORMANCE.
Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.
Steve Woods M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am

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Simmons School of Education (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
APSM 3315
COMMUNICATION IN SPORT.
Facilitates the improvement of communication skills for coaches through the introduction of various communication styles and techniques and furthers an understanding of conflict resolution and negotiation.
Derek Marr M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
APSM 4371
REVENUE IN SPORTS.
This course covers sports industry revenue topics, including professional league and team revenue generation, franchise ownership and valuation, corporate sponsorship, sports media revenue, and industry selling practices. Prerequisite: APSM 2310.
Michael Stone M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
APSM 5300
SENIOR PROJECT.
Teaches the process of formal inquiry to plan, execute, and report results regarding a scientific question of interest. Prerequisite: STAT 2301 or 2331. Reserved for APSM majors. Senior standing only (at least 90 credit hours required).
Gashaw Abeza M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
HDEV 1401
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I.
An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.
Suzanne Terrio M-F 10:00 am - 12:50 pm
HDEV 1401
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I.
An introductory study of grammar and language, with an emphasis on developing question-and-answer skills. The student learns conversational strategies to help maintain a conversation.
Suzanne Terrio M-F 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm
PRW 1101
PRW1: CONCEPTS OF WELLNESS.
The course introduces students to the University and explores three sets of issues: 1) the role of personal responsibility in coping with college and life's other transitional periods; 2) challenges and opportunities such as managing time and stress, benefiting from diversity and autonomy, dealing with pitfalls related to alcohol and drugs, and exploring resources and activities on campus; and 3) personal finance decisions while at SMU and later in life, including managing money, using credit cards, and making major purchases. Also, introduces the e-portfolio that students use to record and reflect upon their activities. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fall term restricted to first-year standing only.)
Donna Gober M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
PRW 2130
PRW2: PHYSICAL FITNESS: POWER YOGA.
Focuses on three main areas of yoga practice: deep breathing, exercise (postures), and meditation. Includes selected activities designed to target health-related fitness.
Donna Gober M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am

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 The official course list will be visible on my.SMU in early March.


July Session Program Dates
Thursday, July 6 to Friday, Aug 4

Students may enroll in up to two courses for a total of 7 credit hours during the July session.
Most classes meet Monday – Friday for 2 hours each day.  Class meeting times vary by course

Scroll down to view course offerings from:
 
Cox School of Business
Dedman College
Lyle School of Engineering
Meadows School of the Arts
Simmons School of Education

 

Cox School of Business (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ACCT 2301
INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING.
Develops an understanding of how the fundamental activities of a business enterprise are reflected in its financial statements, and how financial accounting information can be used effectively for external decision-making purposes (decisions such as investment, credit, risk management, and financing). Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312 and MATH 1309 or 1337.
Seema Bhushan M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am
ACCT 2302
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING.
Introduces the use of accounting information for management purposes, including decision-making, planning, and control of operations. Students learn to integrate topics in cost determination, economic analysis, budgeting, and management and financial control. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301.
Liliana Hickman-Riggs M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ACCT 3312
INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II.
Continuation of ACCT 3311. Focuses on items on the right-hand side (liabilities and stockholders' equity) of the balance sheet. Prerequisite: ACCT 3311. Reserved for Cox majors.
Donald Key TWTH 9:00 am - 11:50 pm
BUSE 3310
MARKETS AND FREEDOM.
Discusses the indicators of economic freedom and the benefits of globalization. Explores how markets raise living standards, including the roles that technology, globalization, public policy, and economic growth play in a functioning market economy. This course can count as free elective credit for Cox majors; however, students cannot receive credit for both BUSE 3310 and STRA/FINA 4355.
Michael Cox TTH 3:00 pm - 7:20 pm
CISB 2388
ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONCEPTS.
Students are introduced to concepts at each stage of the entrepreneurial process, including opportunity identification, opportunity evaluation, acquiring resources, launching and managing the new venture, and exit strategies. Students also play the role of investors and learn to pitch to investors. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it. Reserved for non-Cox majors and business minors only.
Simon Mak MTW 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
MKTG 3310
MARKETING CONCEPTS.
Covers the basic principles of consumer marketing and the role of each element of the marketing mix. Emphasizes creating a familiarity with the marketing strategy and planning processes and viewing marketing within a societal context. Required for the minor in business. Students who have already completed MKTG 3340 will not receive credit for this course. Cox majors and minors in business administration will not receive credit for this course and may not enroll in it.
Charles Besio MTW 9:00 am - 11:50 am
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Dedman College (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ANTH 3310
GENDER AND SEX ROLES: A CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE.
Cross-cultural and historical comparison of the life experiences of women and men in the areas of family, marriage and kinship, economic and political participation, sexuality, reproduction, ritual, and religion.
Jessica Lott M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ANTH 3313
SOUTH AMERICAN INDIANS OF THE PAST AND PRESENT.
A survey of the archaeology and ethnology of indigenous South Americans, from c. 13,000 years ago to recent times, focusing on environments, subsistence, and related levels of sociopolitical integration from Tierra del Fuego to the Amazon basin and the Andes.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
BIOL 1102
INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY LAB.
Laboratory to complement lecture of BIOL 1302.
Carolyn Harrod TBD
BIOL 1302
INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY.
Introduction to the study of living organisms: ecology, evolution, diversity, and physiology. BIOL 1301, 1302 are prerequisites for all advanced courses in biological sciences.
Alejandro D'Brot M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
BIOL 3350
CELL BIOLOGY.
The structure and function of cells. Prerequisites: BIOL 1401, 1402. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1304.
Megan Romeo M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
CHEM 1114
GENERAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Prerequisite: CHEM 1113. Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1304.
Andrea Adams TBD
CHEM 1301
CHEMISTRY FOR LIBERAL ARTS.
Designed for students with weak backgrounds in chemistry and for liberal arts students.
Mark Schell TBD
CHEM 1304
GENERAL CHEMISTRY.
Primarily for science majors, premed students, and engineering students. Introduces the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry, including stoichiometry, the structure of matter, energy relationships involved in the transformation of matter, the dynamics of such transformations, and some descriptive chemistry of the important elements. Prerequisite to all advanced courses in the department. Withdrawal from CHEM 1303, 1304 requires withdrawal from corresponding labs. Prerequisites: CHEM 1303, 1113.
Patty Wisian-Neilson TBD
CHEM 3118
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 3372. Prerequisite: CHEM 3117.
Alan Humanson TBD
CHEM 3372
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
For chemistry majors and students interested in health-related professions. Emphasizes spectroscopy and the chemistry of functional groups. Prerequisites: C- or higher in CHEM 3371, 3117. Corequisite: CHEM 3118.
Alex Lippert TBD
DISC 1311
FOUNDATIONS OF WRITTEN AND ORAL DISCOURSE.
This class gives students practice in the reading, writing, and analytical skills necessary for the successful completion of DISC 1312 and 1313. Students approach writing as a process of drafting, revising, and editing, and they work on sentence-level and paragraph-level writing skills as they build toward essay-length writing projects. Students must earn a C- or better.
Elena Cardona M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
DISC 1313
INQUIRY SEMINAR.
This course is a topic-based seminar through which students continue to develop their critical reading and writing skills, employing analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and/or integration, while learning to employ research protocols for the various discipline or disciplines represented in the course. Students must earn a C- or better. Prerequisite: C- or better in DISC 1312 or ENGL 1301.
Lori Ann Stephens M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 1312
PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS: INFLATION, RECESSION, AND UNEMPLOYMENT.
Covers inflation, unemployment, and growth from both national and global perspectives. Tools of economic analysis include models of open economies. Prerequisite: C- or better in ECO 1311.
Nathan Balke M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
ECO 1312
PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS: INFLATION, RECESSION, AND UNEMPLOYMENT.
Covers inflation, unemployment, and growth from both national and global perspectives. Tools of economic analysis include models of open economies. Prerequisite: C- or better in ECO 1311.
Nathan Balke M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
ECO 3302
INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS.
Investigates the factors that influence the level of aggregate income in an economy and the decision-making that ultimately results in the determination of levels of consumption, investment, or employment. Students analyze the impact of various government fiscal policies (using general equilibrium models) and the behavior of business cycles and patterns across various countries. Prerequisites: ECO 1311, 1312, 3301 and MATH 1309 or 1337.
Priyanka Chakraborty M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
FREN 1402
BEGINNING FRENCH: TERM TWO.
Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: C- or better in FREN 1401, a minimum qualifying score on the SMU French placement exam, or permission of area chair.
Janet Dodd MWF 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
GERM 1401
BEGINNING GERMAN.
Stresses acquisition of basic skills: speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing.
Stephen Grollman online
HIST/HRTS 2325
HUMAN RIGHTS IN MODERN SOUTH ASIA.
In this course, students will examine some of the most pressing human rights issues in twentieth and twenty-first century South Asia, including questions of gender, environmental justice, and caste. 
Rachel Ball-Phillips M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
HIST 3336
CULTURAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
Analysis of the literature, art, architecture, music, drama, popular amusements, and social customs of America since 1877.
Alexis McCrossen M-F 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
LATN 1402
BEGINNING LATIN II.
Structures of the Latin language: vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Also, introduction to Roman history and culture, and simple readings from Latin authors. Prerequisite: C- or better in 1401.
Justin Germain M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 1304
PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS.
Graphs, functions, basic analytic geometry, exponentials, logarithms, trigonometry, and inverse functions. Prerequisites: Three years of high school math at the level of Algebra I and above. No credit is given if taken after any calculus course. Credit is not given for both MATH 1303 and 1304. Intended for students planning to take MATH 1337.
Staff TBD
MATH 1309
INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS FOR BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE.
Derivatives and integrals of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions with applications to the time value of money, curve sketching, maximum-minimum problems, and computation of areas. Applications to business and economics. (Natural science and engineering students must take MATH 1337. Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1303 or a C- or higher in MATH 1303.
Staff M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
MATH 1337
CALCULUS I.
Differential and integral calculus for algebraic, trigonometric functions, and other transcendental functions, with applications to curve sketching, velocity, maximum-minimum problems, area and volume. (Credit not allowed for both MATH 1309 and 1337.) Prerequisite: Placement out of MATH 1304 or a C- or higher in MATH 1304.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 1338
CALCULUS II.
A continuation of MATH 1337 through differential and integral calculus, areas, techniques of integration, improper integrals, and infinite sequences and series, including Taylor series. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1337 (or MATH 1309 and departmental permission).
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
MATH 2339
CALCULUS III.
A continuation of MATH 1338. Includes parametric equations, polar coordinates, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: C- or higher in MATH 1338 or 1340.
Staff M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
MATH 2343
ELEMENTARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS.
First-order equations, linear equations, Laplace transform linear systems, and phase plane. Prerequisite: C- or better in MATH 1338 or 1340.
Staff M-F 8:00 am - 9:50 am
PHIL 1317
BUSINESS ETHICS.
Examines the moral dimensions of actions and practices in the business world. Students explore ethical theories and standards of evaluation for actions and practices generally, and discuss how these theories and standards apply to a variety of issues in business. Topics vary, but the following are representative: advertising, capitalism vs. socialism, corporate culture, product quality and safety, the responsibilities of corporations to the societies that sustain them, the use of animals in product testing, and working conditions and compensation.
Ken Daley TBD
PHIL 3352
HISTORY OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY (MODERN).
Survey course in the history of modern philosophy covering the modern period, from Descartes to Hume, including Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, and Berkeley. We will examine many seminal writings in philosophy on such key issues as rationalism and empiricism, the nature of external reality and one's knowledge of it, the existence and nature of God, the relation between mind and body, causa-tion, induction, and the nature of morality and moral action. Satisfies one part of the history requirement for philosophy majors; may be used to satisfy the history requirement for philosophy minors.
Steve Hiltz TBD
PHIL 3364
PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY.
A survey of topics in the philosophy of biology, including evolution versus creationism, fitness, units of selection, adaptationism, biological taxonomy, evolution in humans, cultural evolution, and niche construction.
Justin Fisher TBD
PHYS 1106
ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM LABORATORY.
Taken as a complement to PHYS 1304, 1308. Prerequisite: PHYS 1105 or self-test.
Richard Guarino MWF 11:00 am - 1:50 pm
PHYS 1106
ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM LABORATORY.
Taken as a complement to PHYS 1304, 1308. Prerequisite: PHYS 1105 or self-test.
Richard Guarino MWF 2:00 pm - 4:50 pm
PHYS 1304
INTRODUCTORY ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM.
For science and engineering majors. Covers electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, and special relativity. Prerequisite or corequisite: MATH 1338.
Randall Scalise M-F 11:00 am - 12:50 pm
PHYS 1308
GENERAL PHYSICS II.
For life sciences majors. Covers electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation, and geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1303 or 1307.
Richard Guariano M-F 9:00 am - 11:50 am
PSYC 1300
INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY.
Broad introduction to psychology as a behavioral science with special emphasis on cognition, development, learning, social, personality, physiological, and clinical psychology (psychopathology and psychotherapy).
Michael Lindsey M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
PSYC 3332
DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY.
A survey of the processes and variables that influence the development of the fetus, infant, child, and adolescent. Emphasis is on theories and research in such areas as perceptual, cognitive, language, social/emotional, and moral development.
Michael Lindsey M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
PSYC 4363
PSYCHOLOGY OF CONFLICT RESOLUTION.
Covers research and theory in the psychology of interpersonal conflict, as well as mechanisms for resolving, managing, or avoiding conflict. Emphasized domains are alternative dispute resolution, close relationships, and workplace and international conflict. Prerequisites: PSYC 1300, PSYC 2301, and one additional psychology course, or instructor approval.
Chris Logan M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
SOCI 2300
SOCIAL PROBLEMS.
Examines social problems within the contexts of their particular societies and cultures; how a social problem is defined; and how solutions are shaped by politics, corporations, media interests, and social movements.
Brita Andercheck M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
SOCI 3351
SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY.
Examines the relationship between social structure and the family by considering the historical development of the family, variations in families, and current issues and changes affecting the family.
Brita Andercheck M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
SPAN 1401
BEGINNING SPANISH I.
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for stu-dents who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.
Allison Larkin online
SPAN 2310
INTERMEDIATE APPLIED SPANISH FOR HEALTHCARE.
For students comfortable using Spanish in all time frames who need to improve fluency and expand vocabulary. Focuses on development of oral and written expression and cultural competency in healthcare contexts.
Ana Melgarejo-Acosta online
SPAN 2401
INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I.
For students who are relatively comfortable expressing their personal needs and describing their immediate environment in Spanish. Moves students toward fluency through significant vocabulary expansion and mastery of advanced verbal and sentence structure. To varying degrees, attention is devoted to cultural competence and to the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1402 or equivalent.
Joy Saunders MWF 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm
SPAN 1401
BEGINNING SPANISH I.
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. Prerequisite: An approved placement exam score or approval of WLL adviser.
Allison Larkin online
SPAN 1402
BEGINNING SPANISH II.
Develops insight into the interconnectedness of the fundamentals of language and their application to communication. Provides rudimentary linguistic skills (vocabulary and grammar) and an acquaintance with the Spanish-speaking world – tools that allow further study of Hispanic cultures. Focuses on the four linguistic skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Each course is comprised of a fundamentals module (MWF) and an applications (TTH) module. Enrollment is required in both. Reserved for students who have no previous Spanish experience or who have 2 years or less of Spanish. A student may not receive credit for both SPAN 1402 and SPAN 1502. Prerequisite: C- or better in SPAN 1401, an approved placement exam score, or approval of WLL adviser.
Veronica Leon MWF 12:00 pm - 2:50 pm
STAT 2301
STATISTICS FOR MODERN BUSINESS DECISIONS.
A foundation in data analysis and probability models is followed by elementary applications of confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and regression. Introduces the use of Excel for statistical analysis, with a focus on business applications.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
STAT 2331
INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL METHODS.
An introduction to statistics for behavioral, biological, and social sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, and inferential statistics, including hypothesis testing and contingency tables.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
WGST 2322
GENDER: IMAGES AND PERSPECTIVES.
An interdisciplinary examination of the ways femininity and masculinity have been represented in the past and present, with attention to what is constant and what changes.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
WL 3308
INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL LINGUISTICS.
This course is an introduction to the field of linguistics, which is concerned with the study of human language in the broadest sense.
Gabriela Vokic M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
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Lyle School of Engineering (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
CSE 1341
PRINCIPLES OF COMPUTER SCIENCE.
Introduces the fundamental concepts of computer science and object-oriented design of reusable modules. Covers basic object-oriented concepts of composition, inheritance, polymorphism, and containers. First course for computer science and computer engineering majors and minors.
David Smith M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am
CSE 1342
PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS.
Introduces the constructs provided in the C/C++ programming language for procedural and object-oriented programming. Computation, input and output, flow of control, functions, arrays and pointers, linked structures, use of dynamic storage, and implementation of abstract data types. Prerequisite: C- or better in CSE 1341 or equivalent, a grade of at least 4 on the AP Computer Science A Exam, or departmental consent.
Ira Greenberg M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm
EE 1301
MODERN ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY.
A lecture and laboratory course examining a number of topics of general interest, including the fundamentals of electricity, household electricity and electrical safety, an overview of microelectronics, concepts of frequency and spectrum, the phonograph and the compact disc, bar codes, and communication by radio and TV. Designed for nontechnical students who want to be more knowledgeable. Not open to EE majors.
Staff TBD
ME 2372
INTRODUCTION TO CAD.
Introduces mechanical computer-aided design. Surveys technical topics related to CAD and computer-aided manufacturing, with emphasis on the hands-on use of interactive computer graphics in modeling, drafting, assembly, and analysis using a state-of-the-art CAD system.
Staff TBD
ME 5372
INTRODUCTION TO CAD.
Introduces mechanical computer-aided design. Surveys technical topics related to CAD and computer-aided manufacturing, with emphasis on the hands-on use of interactive computer graphics in modeling, drafting, assembly, and analysis using a state-of-the-art CAD system. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.
Staff TBD
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Meadows School of the Arts (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
ASIM 1310
CREATIVE CODING I.
Explores computation as a powerful generative medium. Working with the open-source processing development environment and Java programming language, students learn the fundamentals of creative coding and computational thinking, including object-oriented programming. Hands-on topics include algorithmic drawing, procedural imaging, 2-D and 3-D animation, visualization, interactivity, and gaming.
David Smith M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am
ASIM 3305
CREATIVE CODING II.
Introduces advanced creative coding principles using the C++ programming language and OpenGL and openFrameworks graphics libraries. Students learn how to design software systems for real-time performance, 3-D virtual environments, interactive applications, mobile games, and augmented installations. Prerequisite: ASIM 1310, or CSE 1341, or permission of instructor.
Ira Greenberg M-F 3:00 pm - 4:50 pm
CCPA 2300
PUBLIC SPEAKING IN CONTEXT.
Introduces the theory and practice of public speaking, including rhetorical principles, evidence, nonverbal communication, and visual aids. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the B.A. in corporate communication and public affairs, B.A. in public relations and strategic communication, or minor in law and legal reasoning program.
Ben Voth M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
CRCP 1310
CREATIVE CODING I.
Exploring computation as a powerful generative medium, students learn the fundamentals of coding and computational thinking, including object-oriented programming. Hands-on topics include algorithmic drawing, procedural imaging, 2-D and 3-D animation, visualization, interactivity, and gaming.
David Smith M-F 9:00 am - 10:50 am
CRCP 3305
CREATIVE CODING II.
Introduces advanced creative coding principles using the C++ programming language. Students learn how to design software systems for real-time performance, 3-D virtual environments, interactive applications, mobile games, and augmented installations. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or ASIM 1310, CRCP 1310, or CSE 1341.
Ira Greenberg M-F 3 pm - 4:50 pm
DANC 1303
BEGINNING MODERN DANCE.
Introduction to basic movement skills, experiences, and concepts of modern dance. Not for credit in the dance major.
Christopher Dolder M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
FILM 1304
PRODUCTION 1.
Practical, comprehensive course in the fundamentals of digital video and audio production, covering cameras, microphones, lighting, shooting, editing, sound design, and outputting. Incorporates hands-on exercises, screenings, lecture, and group and individual video projects. Required of all majors.
Mark Kerins M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
FILM 2354
SCREENWRITING 1.
Introduces the language of screenwriting. Topics include the creative process of idea generation and ways to make a story filmable; the creation of memorable and redeemable characters; the arc and transformation of story, including the setup, the question or conflict, the turning point, and the climax or ending; and the details of proper format and presentation. Required of all majors.
Paula Goldberg M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
FILM 3300
FILM AND TELEVISION GENRES - SCIENCE FICTION.
Examines questions of genre pertinent to film and television by focusing on various generic forms and their history.
Rick Worland M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
FILM 3303
FILM ACTING.
Designed to help the director understand the actor's process of crafting performances from objectives, obstacles, substitutions, inner objects, beats, actions, and doings. Explores a basic overview of these techniques through monologue and scenes. Concentrates on the unique circumstances given to the single-camera film actor: set etiquette (film crew breakdown, terminology), technical basics (the shots), blocking (hitting the mark), and general camera awareness (overlapping, cheating, matching). Also, the marketing needed to secure an acting job (headshots, agents and managers, auditioning, callbacks).
Paula Goldberg M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
FILM 3359
NATIONAL CINEMAS - CONTEMPORARY ASIAN CINEMA.
Examines the social, economic, technological, and aesthetic histories of cinema from various nations. Also, the concept of “national cinema.”
Kevin Heffernan M-F 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm
JOUR 2302
ETHICS OF CONVERGENT MEDIA.
Explores the ethical issues (e.g., free speech, privacy, and government regulation and censorship) that provide the foundation for all communication fields and have become more complex as media and industries have converged.
Tony Pederson M-Th 10:00 am - 12:20 pm
JOUR 2304
BASIC VIDEO AND AUDIO PRODUCTION.
Offers practical training in the fundamentals of broadcast communication. Students learn the basic techniques, including field production and editing, and control room and studio editing. Includes lecture and lab. Prerequisite: JOUR 2103 or 2303.
Pam Harris-Hackett Lect: M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am. Lab: 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
THEA 2309
THEATRE MOVEMENT FOR NONMAJORS.
Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.
William Lengfelder M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
THEA 2309
THEATRE MOVEMENT FOR NONMAJORS.
Students develop beginning skills as an acrobat, a stage fighter, an imaginative physical improviser, and a deviser of physical stories and storytelling. This hands-on course helps the student find a process that can be used to create character or to broach any movement or physical challenge presented by a role for the stage, in a public-speaking situation, or in any part of life. Designed for nonmajors.
William Lengfelder M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
THEA 2311
THE ART OF ACTING.
Basic work in acting, voice, and movement for the nonmajor. Relaxation, concentration, imagination, and the actor's exploration and use of the social world.
Kevin Hofeditz M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
THEA 2321
SPECTACLE OF PERFORMANCE.
Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.
Steve Woods M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
THEA 2321
SPECTACLE OF PERFORMANCE.
Students learn to deconstruct spectacle and to analyze its influence upon themselves and society. Offers the opportunity to go backstage to experience firsthand how effects are achieved. Students are required to attend performances in a wide range of live venues and discuss what they observe, enabling them to view performance on a critical level. For majors and nonmajors.
Steve Woods M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
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Simmons School of Education (This list is PRELIMINARY and subject to change)

Course  Title Faculty Time (s)
APSM 2310
CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN SPORT MANAGEMENT.
Explores the functional areas of business, management principles, contemporary issues, and future considerations for organizations within the fitness and sports industries. Gateway course for sport management concentration majors; successful completion is mandatory to be invited into the program. Recommended corequisite: APSM 3322, 3332, OR 3340. Reserved for students with fewer than 90 credit hours.
Susan Holland M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
APSM 3322
BIOMECHANICS.
Introduces the scientific basis of support and motion in humans and other vertebrate animals, drawing equally on musculoskeletal biology and Newtonian mechanics. Prerequisite: APSM 2310 or 2340.
Laura Robinson-Doyle M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
APSM 3340
APPLIED MANAGEMENT SKILLS IN SPORTS AND FITNESS.
An extensive study of organizational functions, methods of operation, and types of ownership. Also, the role of organizations in contemporary society as they relate to fitness and sport enterprises today. Prerequisite: APSM 2310 or 2441.
Michael Stone M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
APSM 3372
ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS IN SPORT.
Examines the role of public relations specific to the industry of sport, focusing on the conceptual, strategic, and technical understanding of the operation and business of public relations in sport communication. Prerequisite: APSM 2310.
Susan Holland M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
APSM 4310
PSYCHOLOGY OF SPORT.
Explores various psychological theories and research related to sport and exercise behavior.
Derek Marr M-F 2:00 pm - 3:50 pm
PRW 1101
PRW1: CONCEPTS OF WELLNESS.
The course introduces students to the University and explores three sets of issues: 1) the role of personal responsibility in coping with college and life's other transitional periods; 2) challenges and opportunities such as managing time and stress, benefiting from diversity and autonomy, dealing with pitfalls related to alcohol and drugs, and exploring resources and activities on campus; and 3) personal finance decisions while at SMU and later in life, including managing money, using credit cards, and making major purchases. Also, introduces the e-portfolio that students use to record and reflect upon their activities. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. (Fall term restricted to first-year standing only.)
Staff M-F 12:00 pm - 1:50 pm
PRW 2125
PRW2: PHYSICAL FITNESS: GROUP FITNESS.
This boot camp style class introduces a variety of group fitness activities such as kickboxing, jogging, Pilates, calisthenics, indoor rowing, and strength training.
Staff M-F 10:00 am - 11:50 am
HDEV 1402
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II.
Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.
Suzanne Terrio M-F 10:00 am - 12:50 am
HDEV 1402
AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II.
Examines the development of receptive and expressive language skills. The student learns to express, negotiate, and interpret meaning in American Sign Language.
Suzanne Terrio M-F 1:00 pm - 3:50 pm
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