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McGinnis-Ritchie Award

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The McGinnis-Ritchie Award

 

Robert F. Ritchie, who died in 1997, was a long-time and generous supporter of the Southwest Review. In 1960 he established the John H. McGinnis Memorial Award to honor the man who edited the Southwest Review from 1927 to 1943. With a bequest in his will, Mr. Ritchie enabled us to maintain the tradition of his generosity. Since 1998, the McGinnis-Ritchie Award has been given annually to the best works of fiction and nonfiction published during the previous year in these pages. The awards consist of cash prizes of $500.

 

Susan Neville

2015 McGinnis-Ritchie Award for Fiction
"Here"
(Volume 100, number 4)

 

Susan Neville is the author of seven collections of creative nonfiction and fiction, including Invention of Flight, winner of the Flannery O'Connor Award for Short Fiction, and In the House of Blue Lights, winner of the Richard Sullivan Fiction Prize. Her stories have appeared in two Pushcart Prize anthologies. She lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Melissa Pritchard

2015 McGinnis-Ritchie Award for Fiction
"Mrs. Wisdom"
(Volume 100, number 4)

Melissa Pritchard is the author of ten books and has received, among other awards, the Flannery O'Connor Award, the Carl Sandburg Award, a Barnes and Noble Discover Great New Writers Award, two appearances in The Pushcart Prize Anthology and two in the O.Henry Awards. She has published fiction and nonfiction in The Paris Review, Ecotone, Conjunctions, A Public Space, the Southern Review, the Wilson Quarterly, O, the Oprah Magazine, and many other journals and magazines. Her newest book, a collection of essays, A Solemn Pleasure: To Imagine, Witness, and Write, is a Poets & Writers "Best Books for Writers" selection, a Literary Hub "Best Books about Books" selection, and a Publisher's Weekly "Top Ten: Literary Biographies, Essays, and Criticism."

Robert Crossley

2015 McGinnis-Ritchie Award for Nonfiction, Essay
"Prospects and Living Pictures"
(Volume 100, number 4)

Robert Crossley's latest book is Imagining Mars: A Literary History (Wesleyan University Press, 2011). In recent years, his essays have appeared in The Sewanee Review, English Literature in Transition, Smithsonian Air and Space, Science Fiction Studies, The Dictionary of National Biography, Philological Quarterly, and The Massachusetts Review. He is emeritus professor of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston.

Kay Harel

2015 McGinnis-Ritchie Award for Nonfiction, Essay
"A Natural History of 'The Owl and the Pussycat'"
(Volume 100, number 4)

Kay Harel lives in New York City with companions of several species. All speak a lingua franca. Harel likes to practice her English.