Current Students

Course Descriptions

Descriptions of non-EDU courses that are required by some of the Department of Teaching and Learning programs follow the EDU descriptions.

The Spring 2014 semester schedule is available for download here.

EDU 1110. ORACLE
This is a one-semester, one-credit-hour course which counts as a University free elective. Designed to improve reading and learning efficiency, Oracle is directed to first-year through graduate students who want to acquire advanced reading and learning techniques. Its content is developed from the educational theories and techniques on which both learning and teaching are based.

EDU 1305. Public Speaking & Communication
This course is a basic course which acquaints students with principles of successful public speaking; provides activities which lead to the development of good speaking, listening and organizational skills.

EDU 1306. Developmental Mathematics
This course refreshes and strengthens algebraic skills, especially those needed for success in precalculus.

EDU 1307. Essentials of College Writing
This course emphasis is placed on reading comprehension, grammar, and punctuation mastery appropriate to university-level thinking.

EDU 1308. Psychology of Learning
This course is a theoretical overview of how human learning occurs.

EDU 2101. Practicum: Group Leadership
This course is a unique leadership experience which gives students a laboratory for assessing learned concepts and skills about leadership. Course content includes discussions on empowerment, public speaking, ethics, and citizenship.

EDU 2102. Practicum: Group Leadership
This course is a one-hour credit for a minimum of 15 clock hours practicum either on campus or in the community.

Prerequisite: Must have completed EDU 2101.

EDU 2305. Persuasive Speaking and Communication
This course is a basic course that facilitates understanding of the theory and practice of persuasions as a means for influencing beliefs, opinions, and actions. It focuses on clear, logical, and persuasive communication; analysis; reasoning; use of evidence; and practice in effective delivery.

Prerequisite: Must have completed EDU 1305.

EDU 2350. Educational Psychology
This course focuses on aspects related to the learning process, such as education theories, characteristics of learners, nature and measurements of abilities, motivation, and successful classroom practice.

EDU 2355. Literacy and Society
This course primary function is to serve as a structured service learning opportunity that fosters academic growth, citizenship, leadership, and civic responsibility. Readings and course activities relate to the relationship between literacy and society. Throughout the semester, students will tutor local elementary school students, as well as complete related assignments.

EDU 3301. The Art and Science of Parenting
This course students will examine the literature pertaining to parenting and consider how parental beliefs, attitudes, and expectations affect the manner in which parents interact with their children.

EDU 4300. Foundations of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
This course students will develop/analyze lesson plans in all content areas using TESOL competencies, emphasizing language concepts, acquisition, teaching and assessment strategies, and the role of culture in language acquisition.

EDU 5100/5200/5300. Special Topics
This course students will work on a personalized system of instruction. Most of the work in this course is to be done as an independent study.

EDU 5121 / 5122 / 5123. Field Experience I/II/III
This course gives students opportunities to work in appropriate school settings. Field Experience I allows students to observe a functioning classroom. Field Experience II concerns special populations. Field Experience III allows students to shadow a teacher in preparation for student teaching.

EDU 5124 / 5125 / 5126. Field Experience I/II/III
This course gives students opportunities to work in appropriate school settings. Field Experience I allows students to observe a functioning classroom. Field Experience II concerns special populations. Field Experience III allows students to shadow a teacher in preparation for student teaching.

EDU 5318. Formative and Summative Assessment
This course is an explanation and practice of formal and informal assessment strategies and how assessment outcomes should inform instruction and be shared with families. All assignments relate to putting assessment skills into practice in the classroom.

EDU 5327. Integrating Teaching and Learning
This course reviews the nature and design of educational activities: theory, research, and practice of unit planning and lesson planning for active learning which meets the needs of individual students.

EDU 5331. Content Area Studies for Elementary School
This course is an exploration of science, social studies, art, music, drama, and physical education content for EC through 6th grade students and effective teaching strategies for each content area.

EDU 5335. Adolescent Development and Cognition
This course focuses on theory of adolescent growth and development and its application in the classroom. The study of how adolescents learn and the conditions under which they learn best guide this course.

EDU 5343 / CCPA 5301. Leadership Theories and Practices
This course is an examination of the theories and skills necessary for the development of effective leadership. It includes opportunities for evaluating leaders and leadership behavior in a variety of contexts.

EDU 5348. Introduction to Diverse Learners
This course is a study of diversity, multicultural concepts, and inclusion and exploration of issues, policies, and professional practice relevant to teaching.

EDU 5349. Learning Environment and Professionalism (EC-12)
This course focuses on major issues facing teachers in establishing and maintaining a positive and productive learning environment, as well as the professional roles and responsibilities of teachers.

EDU 5355. Teaching Mathematics in Elementary School
This course evaluates learning materials and teaching methods focusing on knowledge and skills required for EC through 6th-grade students.

EDU 5357. Emergent Literacy
This course examines principles of literacy learning in young children and predictable stages of oral language, writing, and reading development. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 5358. Conventional Literacy
This course introduces theories, practices, and materials for teaching reading/writing in primary grades.  All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 5363 / 5364. Elementary Student Teaching
This course requirement is a 15-week assignment in an elementary school that has a diverse student population. The course includes a seminar on campus every two weeks. Students are assigned an SMU Supervisor who observes in the classroom at least four times a semester. A portfolio is required.

EDU 5367. Creating Successful Classrooms
This course students will examine current research that promotes student-centered teaching and constructivist practices. Various teaching and learning strategies of teaching in effective classrooms will be the focus of the course.

EDU 5371. Secondary Instruction: Content Area Methods
This course students refine content knowledge, methods, and strategies specific to their content area and level of certification.

EDU 5373 / 5374. Secondary Student Teaching
This course requirement is a 15-week assignment in an middle/high school that has a diverse student population. The course includes a seminar on campus every two weeks. Students are assigned an SMU Supervisor who observes in the classroom at least four times a semester. A portfolio is required.

EDU 5375 / 5376. Internship I/II: High School / Middle School
This course requires a full-year assignment as the teacher of record in a public or accredited private school. Supervision by SMU faculty is required.

EDU 5385 / 5386. Internship I/II:  EC - 6
This course requires a full-year assignment as the teacher of record in a public or accredited private school. Supervision by SMU faculty is required.

EDU 6100. Independent Study
This course students work on a personalized system of independent study.

EDU 6101/6102/6103/6104. Practicum Experience
This course provides the opportunity for clinical teaching and therapy practices. Clinical teaching reports and therapy demonstrations are required. Each student is assigned an adviser to answer questions and provide support and guidance. (Learning Therapy Only)

EDU 6105. Current Issues in Dyslexia: Dyslexia Identification Process, Kindergarten and Beyond
This course presents an in-depth outline of steps for early identification of dyslexic students. This identification involves more than administering a battery of tests. A team approach, involving persons with information regarding the students, is integral to the identification process. Central to the team are knowledgeable classroom teachers. Early identification is a key to successful remediation is also discussed, including current research that shows this can be accomplished for children as young as 5 years of age, before they experience real failure.

EDU 6106. Advanced Learning Disabilities (Project Read: Written Expression)
This course examines Project Read/Language Circle, an alternative language arts program that offers a systematic learning experience with direct teaching concepts through multisensory techniques. The Framing Your Thoughts: The Written Expression Strand curriculum delineates a process for expressing thoughts in written form. Abstract concepts of sentence construction and word function are developed concretely with symbols.

EDU 6107. Study of Psycholinguistics (Project Read: Reading Comprehension--Report Form and/or Story Form)
This course focuses on Project Read/Language Circle, an alternative language arts program that offers a systematic learning experience with direct teaching concepts through multisensory techniques. The Reading Comprehension curriculum, which presents the underlying structure and format of language in both expository and narrative forms, is also explored. This strand is divided into report-form (expository) and story-form (narrative) written information. It teaches a process of analyzing the underlying structure of expository and narrative writing.

EDU 6108. Colloquium: SALT (Structured Accelerated Language Training)
This course presents techniques for modifying academic language therapy, from word attack to reading comprehension, organizing and extending thoughts for written expression, and improving handwriting skills.

EDU 6109. Seminar/Practicum Curricular Issues: WorkSmart
This course explores WorkSmart, a strategy for increasing dyslexic students? self-esteem and advocacy competencies. Is it based on the premise that the biggest problem most people with dyslexia face is not the learning difference itself but the way they cope with it.

EDU 6110. Adapted Learning Therapy (Automaticity and Rate)
This course outlines explicit suggestions for helping students develop proficient decoding (reading) and encoding (spelling) skills to a level of automaticity that does not require conscious thought or effort. It also offers pointers on how students can be taught to understand how different kinds of texts are organized, as well as a repertoire of strategies for understanding these texts.

EDU 6111. Dyslexia Teaching Level 2 & 3
This course is an instruction in levels 2&3 of EDMAR MTA curriculum.  Focus is on cognitive and linguistic structure of written language and writing in phonetic concepts related to reading and spelling. (LT only)

EDU 6112. Dyslexia Teaching Level 4 & 5
This course focus is on cognitive and linguistic structure of written language and writing in phonetic concepts related to reading and spelling. (LT only)

EDU 6115. Early Language Development (Phonological Awareness)
This course explores current research that confirms that children who have a greater degree of phonological awareness when they enter school are better equipped to learn to read. A more advanced form of phonological awareness is called phoneme awareness, which is the understanding that speech can be broken down into even smaller units called phonemes. Since few preschoolers spontaneously attain phonemic awareness, this course teaches appropriate activities to help build these skills by engaging preschoolers in activities that draw their attention to the existence of phonemes in spoken words.

EDU 6116. Topics in Learning Therapy (Procedures & Measures for Assessing Students for Dyslexia)
This course serves as a guide for developing a referral, assessment, and placement process for identifying the student with dyslexia. Time will be devoted to analyzing all existing information on the student, including formal test results, in order to make an educational identification of dyslexia. In addition, this course will also focus on accommodations, modifications, and teaching strategies that may be used for the dyslexic student in the regular classroom.

EDU 6117. Project Read: Report Form
This course focuses on Project Read/Language Circle, an alternative language arts program that offers a systematic learning experience with direct teaching concepts through multisensory techniques. The Reading Comprehension curriculum presents the underlying structure and format of language in both expository and narrative forms. This strand is divided into report-form (expository) and story-form (narrative) written information. It teaches a process of analyzing the underlying structure of expository and narrative writing.

EDU 6118. C
Students will engage in an in-depth study of dyslexia in this course. Students will examine current research related to dyslexia and topics pertaining to reading intervention and accommodations.

EDU 6134. Survey of Learning Strategies
This course emphasizes learning styles and processes, as well as organized patterns and cognitive development of the dyslexic student. Survey study skills and learning strategies used in the classroom or in clinical practice are discussed.

EDU 6141. Literacy Practicum 1
This course gives students opportunities to apply content from EDU 6340 (Literacy Acquisition) and use materials and strategies discussed in EDU 6340 in their own school settings.

Prerequisite: EDU 6141 is to be taken concurrently with EDU 6340.

EDU 6142. Literacy Practicum 2
This course gives students opportunities to apply content from EDU 6363 (Advanced Literacy Development) and use materials and strategies discussed in EDU 6363 in their own school settings.

Prerequisite: EDU 6142 is to be taken concurrently with EDU 6363.

EDU 6200. Independent Study
This course allows students to work on a personalized system of independent study.

EDU 6231. Early Language Development
The course provides a continuation of instruction in introductory levels of the curriculum. Techniques and procedures previously introduced are refined and systems of record keeping and progress reporting are discussed. (Learning Therapy only)

EDU 6233. Advanced Course C, Advanced Cognitive & Linguistic Structures of Written Language, Part III
This course is a continuation and completion of instruction in advanced levels of curriculum. Students acquire more sophisticated therapy techniques, including transition and closure, and review record keeping and student progress measurement. Also included is discussion of professional dyslexia-related organizations. (Learning Therapy only)

EDU 6260. Common Cognitive and Linguistic Structures of English Part 1
This course provides teachers with evidence-based practices for teaching children who have dyslexia and related written language disorders. Building on terminology and concepts in EDU 6330, the course presents the most common cognitive and linguistic structures of written English (CLSE) related to reading and spelling.

Prerequisite: EDU 6330

EDU 6302. Design and Assessment of Learning
This course is a review of research and practice in learning theory, instructional design, and assessment strategies. Students will be required to investigate studies supporting "best practices" in the classroom.

EDU 6303. Learning Environment and Professionalism
This course is an investigation of student needs that teachers must meet as well as different aspects of professionalism expected of classroom teachers. Students will be required to analyze studies supporting "best practice" in classroom management and professional development.

EDU 6304. Interpreting Educational Research
This course teach educators how to understand and critically evaluate educational research. Topics include a review of basic statistics, introduction to experimental design and procedure, and ethics in research. The emphasis throughout the course is on application through the study of current research articles in education.

EDU 6305 Differentiated Instruction
This course introduces assessment and curriculum design concepts that facilitate differentiation by studying design principles for assessment and using data to plan and implement differentiation of learning processes and student products.

EDU 6310. Philosophical Ideas in Education
This course reviews a variety of educational philosophies, past and present, that drive educational practice. Primary focus is on those philosophies which have most influenced American education, and on the development of a personal philosophy of education to guide everyday practice in school.

EDU 6311. Literacy Consultation
This course presents the most current understanding of literacy consultation and coaching. The purpose of this course is to prepare teachers and other specialists to provide professional consultation and coaching to their peers in order to support the reading development of all students in the school.

Prerequisites: EDU 6340 and EDU 6363. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 6312/ANTH 6311. Applied Linguistics
This course provides an introduction to basic concepts in linguistics and their application in meeting practical educational goals. It includes an emphasis on first and second language learning.

EDU 6313. Spanish for Bilingual Teachers
This course helps teachers improve their oral and aural skills in Spanish through in-class activities and through projects and assignments. Guest lecturers from the Hispanic community provide opportunities to experience the diversity of Hispanic cultures and language. Course assignments facilitate the acquisition of the social and academic vocabulary necessary to work with students and families whose first language is Spanish. Much of class lecture and discussion will take place in Spanish, and knowledge of Spanish is required.

EDU 6315. Diverse Learners
This course introduces students to different teaching approaches that help create equal educational opportunities for students from diverse racial, ethnic, social-class, and cultural groups. The course will provide strategies to make teaching more effective in increasingly diverse schools. Some sections of this course require Spanish proficiency.

EDU 6317. Culture and Community in Education
This course examines relationships between schools, families, and communities from various research perspectives. It focuses on the roles of school and community in delivering culturally-appropriate instruction and services to students from diverse backgrounds. Some sections of this course require Spanish proficiency.

EDU 6319. Fundamentals of Bilingual Education
This course offers an examination of the history and implementation of various bilingual education program models. Particular attention is given to research of bilingual program models and issues related to recruitment, training, and retention of bilingual education teachers.

EDU 6320. Language Teaching Research, Theory, and Practice
This course introduces the methodology of second language instruction with an emphasis on current research and theory of language acquisition and teaching. ESL program designs are reviewed, and classroom applications and assessments are discussed in the context of specialized ESL classrooms.

EDU 6321. Bilingualism/Biliteracy
This course provides an exploration of the theoretical foundations, methods, and materials for literacy instruction in bilingual instructional settings. Special emphasis is placed on language and literacy for students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

EDU 6322. Educational and Behavioral Psychology
This course is an advanced survey of areas in psychology with direct application in schools and the educational process, including developmental psychology, learning and the brain, motivation and motivational change, and the theory and practice of testing. The emphasis is on application to real-world problems.

EDU 6323. Literacy Assessment
This course presents the most current understanding of literacy development and assessment based on recent research. The course focuses on formal and informal literacy assessment procedures at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Emphasis is on gathering and interpreting assessment information for making instructional decisions.

Prerequisites: EDU 6340 and EDU 6363. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 6324. Content Methods
Study of teaching strategies specific to content areas and levels of certification. Includes the examination of research promoting content instruction. In depth reading assignments unique to content areas of specialty will be required.

Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA or better in EDU 6328. Reserved for students in the MED: With Certification Program.

EDU 6325. Educating the Gifted and Talented
This course includes surveys of the history of the field, basic terminology and definitions, major models and theories, and effective program prototypes for gifted students. Students review characteristics of the gifted and talented and overview identification and assessment procedures for gifted students. Attention is given to analyzing the traits of effective teachers and counselors and to developing models for interaction with gifted students.

EDU 6326. Content Area Studies
Exploration of science, social studies, art, music, drama and physical education content for Pre-K-4 students and effective teaching strategies for each content area. Readings from research journals in the content areas will be required, along with the development of research-based instructional strategies. Prerequisite: 2.0 GPA or better in EDU 6327. Reserved for students in the MED: With Certification Program.

EDU 6327 Learning to Read and Write
This course is designed for the elementary cohort members of the M.Ed. with Certification program. This course introduces research, practices, and materials for teaching reading/writing in grades PK-1. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 6328 Strategic Teaching
This course examines a variety of instructional strategies proven to engage learners in the middle and high school learning environment and gives students an opportunity to practice developing skills in communication and facilitating learning.

EDU 6329. EC-6 Math
This course is an evaluation of learning materials and teaching methods in mathematics focusing on the knowledge and skills required for pre-kindergarten through 6th grade students.  Study of the research in math concept development will be required.

EDU 6330. Survey of Dyslexia and Related Learning Disabilities
This course offers an introduction to language communication concepts and educational activities for teaching individuals with developmental dyslexia and related language learning difficulties. It also includes a study of the characteristic symptoms of dyslexia, implications of the disorder, diagnosis, and multisensory and discovery language remediation techniques. Practicum opportunities are included along with an introduction to curriculum level I. Reserved for students in the Masters of Education Reading and Writing Program. For Dallas Cohort Only. This is also a required course for all Learning Therapy students.

EDU 6331. Cognitive and Linguistic Structures of Written Language
This course provides instruction in the teaching of curriculum level II. It focuses on cognitive and linguistic structures of written language and writing and phonetic concepts related to reading and spelling. It also examines the historical development of English and its relevance to language disabilities. (Learning Therapy only)

EDU 6332. Advanced Cognitive and Linguistic Structures of Written Language, Part I
This course offers an overview of advanced dyslexia instruction. It also introduces upper levels of the curriculum and begins instruction in the more complex aspects of the English written code. (Learning Therapy only)

EDU 6333. Advanced Cognitive and Linguistic Structures of Written Language, Part II
This course is a continuation of EDU 6332. Previously developed procedures and techniques are refined, and phonetic irregularities and semantic and syntactic structures are examined. (Learning Therapy only)

EDU 6336 Reading and Writing to Learn
This course is designed for the elementary cohort members of the M.Ed. with Certification program. This course introduces research, practices, and materials for teaching reading/writing in grades 2-6. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

Prerequisites: EDU 6327 Learning to Read and Write

EDU 6339. Bilingual Content and Instruction
This course is designed for students who will be teaching in bilingual education classrooms or administering bilingual education programs.  Class participants will review current research in reading in the content areas and will strengthen their knowledge in critical content vocabulary and mechanics of spelling and writing in Spanish. Much of class lecture and discussion will take place in Spanish and knowledge of Spanish is required.

EDU 6340. Literacy Acquisition
This course presents the most current understanding of early reading acquisition based on recent research. The course focuses on learning experiences that students need to acquire fundamental reading skills, typically learned in pre-kindergarten through second grade. Specifically, the class focuses on the theory, research base, and application of specific procedures for designing and delivering reading and language arts instruction to students including those who have disabilities, or are dyslexic, second language learners, and/or advanced learners. Field experiences throughout the semester are required. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 6342. Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders: Introductory Course
This course is an introduction to the study of literacy instruction for students with dyslexia and related disorders. Specifically, the course focuses on the characteristics of dyslexia and related disorders, definitions, basic terminology, and research-based components of instruction. The course provides practical application of the theoretical underpinnings of reading development to inform instructional decisions for students with dyslexia and related disorders.

EDU 6343. Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders: Reading Comprehension
This course provides teachers with evidenced-based practices teaching students with dyslexia and related disorders. Specifically, the course focuses on research-based vocabulary and reading comprehension instruction.

Prerequisite: EDU 6342/Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders Introductory Course

EDU 6344. Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders: Writing
This course provides teachers with evidenced-based practices teaching students with dyslexia and related disorders. Specifically, the course focuses on research-based written expression instruction.

Prerequisites: EDU 6342/Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders: Introductory Course; EDU 6343/Literacy Instruction for Students with Dyslexia and Related Disorders: Reading Comprehension

EDU 6347. Creativity: Theories, Models, and Applications
This course surveys the concept of creativity. Topics covered include instruments and techniques for identifying creativity, theories and models of creativity, techniques for creativity enhancement, futuristics and challenges unique to creative persons.

EDU 6363. Advanced Literacy Development
This course presents the most current understanding of advanced literacy development based on recent research.  The course focuses on learning experiences that students need to be successful in school and in later life.  Specifically, the course focuses on the theory, research base, and application of specific procedures for designing and delivering reading and language arts instruction to upper elementary and secondary students, including those who have disabilities, or are dyslexic, second-language learners and/or advanced learners. Field experiences throughout the semester are required.

Prerequisite: EDU 6340. All literacy classes require field experiences in local schools.

EDU 6370. Physical Science: Chemistry
This course focuses on developing models of effective instructional strategies designed to promote student learning and understanding of physical concepts and processes. In addition, research will be utilized to help practitioners identify misconceptions and develop practical methods to help students accurately conceptualize the physical models. Topics of study include: matter and elements; chemical and physical changes; acids, bases and solutions; atomic structure; periodic properties; interpretation of chemical formulas and equations; bonding; and behavior of gases.

EDU 6371. Life Science
This course involves participants in activities designed to help them achieve an understanding of and the decision-making process based on current research pertaining to concepts in biological science. In addition, students will learn methods for communicating and collaborating with colleagues and leadership, mentoring, and coaching skills. Topics of study include: levels of organization of living organisms; cell structure and function; mechanisms of genetics; evolution and classification; heredity and reproduction; and interdependence within environmental systems.

EDU 6372. Physical Science:  Physics
This course will highlight the development of practical methods for demonstrating and using models, planning laboratory experiences, managing science equipment, and handling safety concerns. Students will focus on processes, tenets, and assumptions of multiple methods of inquiry leading to scientific knowledge. Topics of study include: force and motion; wave; light; sound; quantum phenomena; conservation of energy and momentum; and electricity and magnetism.

EDU 6373. Earth and Space Science
This course involves participants in activities surrounding the structure, function and history of Earth Systems and the components and characteristics of the solar system and the universe. In addition, models of effective instructional strategies will be developed to promote student learning and understanding of Earth/Space science concepts and processes. Topics of study include: Earth in space and time; Earth structures and composition; rocks; fossils; and Earth systems.

EDU 6379. Numerical Reasoning: Numbers and Operations
This course covers topics including number systems and their properties: integers, rational numbers, irrational numbers, and complex numbers; real number line; numerical base systems; significant historical developments; decimal representation; axiomatic systems and introductory group theory; set theory; cardinality; recurrence relations; prime numbers; the fundamental theorem of arithmetic; greatest common divisors; least common multiple; division algorithm; Euclidean algorithm; introductory number theory; modular arithmetic; and problem solving. In addition to advanced mathematical content that informs elementary, middle, and secondary teaching, practical models for effectively teaching numerical reasoning, number systems, and operations for EC-12 mathematics will be discussed, as will components for developing effective mentoring relationships.

EDU 6380. Algebraic Reasoning and Patterns
This course discusses functional relationships and their properties: patterns; variable expressions; definitions and properties of functions; graphs; one-to-one; invertibility; compositions; various linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic models; the fundamental theory of algebra; algebraic applications of functions in everyday life; modeling; significant historical developments; rates of change; calculus; introductory analysis; and problem solving. In addition to advanced mathematical content that informs elementary, middle, and secondary teaching, practical models for effectively teaching students about patterns, variables and functional relationships for EC-12 mathematics will be discussed, as will components for developing effective mentoring relationships.

EDU 6381. Geometry and Measurement
This course delves into Euclidean geometry and proof: axiomatic systems; definitions, theorems, postulates, proofs; similarity; proportional reasoning; constructions; measurement; spatial reasoning; plane isometries, translations, rotations, reflections; dilations; trigonometric functions; inductive/deductive reasoning; mathematical induction; symbolic logic, proofs and invalid arguments; significant historical developments; introductory topology; coordinate geometry; vectors; matrices; introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, Elliptic and Hyperbolic; and problem solving. In addition to advanced mathematical content that informs elementary, middle, and secondary teaching, practical models and available technological tools for effectively teaching students about geometry, measurement and proof for EC-12 mathematics will be discussed, as will components for developing effective mentoring relationships.

EDU 6382. Everyday Mathematics: Probability and Statistics
This course focuses on methods of representing and analyzing data: measures of central tendency and measures of dispersion; introductory combinatorics; discrete and continuous random variables; expected value; statistical foundations; inference; random samples; properties of binomial, geometric and normal distributions; law of large numbers; central limit theorem; significant historical developments; stochastic matrices; regression; and problem solving. In addition to advanced mathematical content that informs elementary, middle, and secondary teaching, practical models and available technological tools for effectively teaching probability and statistics and overcoming common student misconceptions in EC-12 mathematics will be discussed, as will components for developing effective mentoring relationships.

EDU 6384. Teaching and Learning with Technology
The content of this course includes: models of instructional design and development; the fundamentals of technology, hardware, software, and networks; technology-based instructional tools; audio, assistive technologies; blogging and other social media; laws and issues related to equity and access; copyright, fair use, patent, trademarks, and the use of and respect for intellectual property. Students utilize a variety of software applications to create classroom related projects. EDU 6384 is the first in the Master Technology Teacher (MTT) sequence. It is a prerequisite for the other three classes in the sequence. Education students who are not enrolled in the MTT program or who are not in the specialization are welcome to take this class.

EDU 6385. Technology-Related Instructional Assessment
The content of this course includes: instructional assessment models and strategies; rubrics; technology-based formative and summative assessments; portfolios; Web 2.0 assessments; gaming; performance-based graphic organizers; and instructional planning. Projects for the course will include designing performance-based assessments, formative and summative assessments, rubrics and games. Students will utilize data for instructional planning and improvement. Students will create technology-based assessments to plan for differentiation. The course is the second/third in the Master Technology Teacher (MTT) specialization.

Prerequisite: EDU 6384. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 6387.

EDU 6386. Multimedia Design and Development for Educators
The content of this course includes the design, the development, and use of interactive media and multimedia in the classroom. Media explored will include audio, video, still images, animated .gifs, photo manipulation, photography, animation, graphics, and stop motion video. Students will assume the role of instructional designers in order to create multimedia productions for use in their classrooms. The course is the second/third in the Master Technology Teacher (MTT) specialization.

Prerequisite: EDU 6384. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 6387.

EDU 6387. Research and Professional Development in the Information Age
The content of this course includes: current issues and trends in technology-related instruction; the TPACK model; the fundamentals of mentoring, coaching, and leadership as they pertain to professional development, communication and facilitation strategies, collaborative pedagogy in technology instruction, and new Web 2.0 technologies. Students will design and present a professional development workshop, demonstrating cumulative knowledge of all of the classes in the specialization. This course is the final course in the Master Technology Teacher (MTT) specialization.

Prerequisites: EDU 6384, EDU 6385, and EDU 6386.

EDU 6388. Curriculum Development For Gifted And Talented Learners
This course builds the foundation for development of differentiated curricula for the gifted.  Students study effective teaching strategies, learn how to adapt curriculum for individual differences, study the organization of curriculum and instruction for the gifted (scope and sequence, issues related to integrated and interdisciplinary curriculum, and grouping issues). Emphasis is placed on the teaching of higher-level cognitive skills within the disciplines.

EDU 6389.  Special Topics
This course allows students to work independently with an instructor on a targeted topic.

EDU 6390. Classroom Instruction and Assessment for Language Learners
This course focuses on classroom applications of ESL teaching and learning. Students will examine factors that influence English language and literacy development and will develop instructional approaches and pedagogical materials that meet the needs of English language learners.

EDU 6397. Growth and Development of the Gifted
This course examines the differentiated affective characteristics and needs of the gifted, including a review of general counseling theories, effective communication skills with the gifted, and the assessment of affective needs. Students will develop strategies for assisting the gifted and developing social and interpersonal skills. Issues surrounding the potential of the gifted to achieve and make significant contributions to society as a whole are reviewed.

EDU 7313. Advanced Assessment
This course focuses on theories and methods of evaluating and designing assessments (tests, scales, questionnaires, surveys, observations, etc.) for a broad range of uses in educational research and for clinical evaluations in special education and psychology; Psychometric methods; Classical and item-response theory; Statistics used in reliability and validity of tests; Reviewing published tests.

EDU 7314.  Advanced Multivariate Statistics
This course is a continuation of EDU 7312 including multiple regression, discriminant function, canonical correlation, basic structural equation modeling, factor analysis, and hierarchical linear models; Other methods used in research and assessment by visiting lecturers or guest speakers; Computer applications.

Non-EDU Courses required by some of the Teacher Education Programs

ANTH 6306. Anthropology & Education
This course focuses on the anthropological approach to the study of schools and how an anthropological framework can provide insight into the nature of education and classroom interaction. In addition, the development of education in its cultural, economic, political, religious, and social contexts will be examined. Special consideration will be given to "bilingual" and "bicultural" (and "multicultural") education in the United States, in Mexico, and elsewhere in the Americas.

ANTH 6347. Mesoamerican Ethnology
This course examines the anthropological literature on contemporary Mesoamerica within an interdisciplinary framework.

HIST 5330. Seminar in Mexican-American History: Texas and the Tejanos
This course is an examination of the growing historiography on Mexican-Americans which focuses on the relationship between their ethnic identity and the Southwest.

PSYC 6106/EDU 6134. Cognition
This course emphasizes learning styles and processes, as well as organizational patterns and cognitive development of the dyslexic student. Study skills and learning strategies used in the classroom and clinical practice are surveyed.

PSYC 6283. Seminar/Practicum Curriculum Issues
This course is a continuation and completion of instruction in advanced levels of curriculum. Students acquire more sophisticated therapy techniques, including transition and closure. Record keeping and student progress measurements are reviewed and professional dyslexia-related organizations are discussed.

PSYC 6331. Survey: Learning Strategies
This course emphasizes learning styles and processes, as well as organizational patterns and cognitive development of the dyslexic student. Study skills and learning strategies used in the classroom and clinical practice are surveyed.

PSYC 6354. Psychological Testing and Assessment
This course is designed to assist the Learning Therapist in interpreting diagnostic reports and in administering brief screening instruments.

Courses Not Currently Offered

ANTH 6332. Special Problems: Research in the Hispanic Community
This course provides graduate students with first-hand experience in doing ethnographic and survey research in Hispanic communities located in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area and its extensions in north Texas. Students focus their fieldwork on neighborhoods and communities surrounding designated schools with bilingual and bicultural student populations. The research enterprise (project design, implementation, data analysis, and report-writing) is done in teams and involves shared responsibilities for the final written report and oral presentation.

EDU 1301. American Sign Language I
This course explores the development of American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf community. It is taught without using voice. Signing naturally is based on the functional-notional approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction.

EDU 1302. American Sign Language II
This course continues the development of American Sign Language and its application within the Deaf community. It is taught without using voice.  Signing naturally is based on the functional-notional approach to learning sign language. This approach organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction.

EDU 2310. Leadership Dynamics
This course is an examination of the theories and skills necessary for the development of effective leadership with an emphasis on leadership, its theory and practice.

EDU 4367. Humans in Their Natural Environment
This course studies the relationship and bond between humans and their natural environment. One's primal connection to the land is considered in a healing context. The research explored focuses on the intimate link between the health of humans and their ecosystems.

EDU 5310. Civic Leadership
This course focuses on individual and community transformations, resulting from civic leadership, will be examined in the classroom and experientially through a required community service component occurring outside the classroom.

EDU 6300. Independent Study
This course students work on a personalized system of independent study.

EDU 6306. Brain Strategies for Teaching Social Studies
This course explores left and right brain strategies for mastering Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in 5th, 8th, and 11th grade social studies. Emphasis is given to left and right brain learning styles, as well as critical and creative thinking skills. The course implements the 1981 Nobel Prize-winning discovery that accelerated learning ensues from presenting information simultaneously to both brain hemispheres.

EDU 6316. Mesoamerican Ethnology
This course provides an understanding of contemporary Meso-America by examining the literature and field data from anthropological and interdisciplinary viewpoints. Much of class lecture and discussion will take place in Spanish, and knowledge of Spanish is required.