Film and Media Arts

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Regardless of area of specialty, ambitious and motivated students can pursue internships in Dallas, Los Angeles, New York and other major cities.

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Students have the opportunity to participate in the Division’s biennial full-length feature film project, produced by students with the mentorship of industry-respected faculty.

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Students can gain hands-on access to equipment the very first year and can hone their craft in scriptwriting, directing, producing, lighting, audio recording and more.

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Alumni projects have included work on Lincoln, August Rush, Jurassic Park, Supernatural, King of the Hill, Wishbone, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and other well-known productions.

Classes

Jump to:

List of undergraduate courses by category
List of graduate courses
List of courses by number, with course descriptions and prereqs

Courses by Category

PRODUCTION
Writing Courses

  • FILM 2354 Screenwriting 1
  • FILM 3364 Screenwriting 2
  • FILM 3365 Advanced Screenwriting Workshop

Camera / Shooting Courses

  • FILM 1304 Production 1
  • FILM 3301/ASPH 3390 Experimental Camera
  • FILM 3304 Production 2
  • FILM 3305 MOS Camera
  • FILM 3306 Nonfiction Production
  • FILM 3309 Multicam Production
  • FILM 3316 16MM Production
  • FILM 4301/ADV 4397 TV Ad Concepting and Production
  • FILM 4305 Cinematography

Editing / Post-Production Courses

  • FILM 3308 Editing
  • FILM 3384 Sound 1
  • FILM 3385 Sound 2
  • FILM 3391 Topics in post-production (specific focus/content varies by semester/instructor)
  • FILM 4306 Introduction to Animation
  • FILM 4307 Introduction to 3-D Animation
  • FILM 4308 post-production Visual FX

Other Specialization Courses

  • FILM 3303 Film Acting
  • FILM 3302 Convergent Media
  • FILM 3390 Topics in Production (specific focus/content varies by semester/instructor)
  • FILM 4317 Film Directing

CRITICAL STUDIES
General Courses

  • FILM 1301 Art of Film and Media
  • FILM 1302 Media and Culture
  • FILM 3314 Comics: From Panels to Screens
  • FILM 2362/CFA 3362 Diversity and American Film: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality
  • FILM 3375/CFA 3375 Post War European Cinema: 1945-Present
  • FILM 4351 Mapping Modernism: Artistic Collaborations in Paris and Moscow 1890-1940
  • FILM 4353 Film and Media Theory

Topics Courses (specific content/focus varies by semester/instructor)

  • FILM 2332 American Popular Film/Television
  • FILM 3300 Film and Television Genres
  • FILM 3310/CF 3390/WL 3310 Screen Artists
  • FILM 3359 National Cinemas
  • FILM 3395 Topics in Film and Media Studies
  • FILM 3397 Gender and Sexuality in Media

FILM/MEDIA HISTORY

  • FILM 2306 History of Recorded Music
  • FILM 2344 History of Animated Film
  • FILM 2351 International Film History
  • FILM 2364 History of Cinema-TV Comedy
  • FILM 3352 American Film History
  • FILM 3353 American Broadcast History
  • FILM 3355 History of Documentary Film and Television

MEDIA INDUSTRIES

  • FILM 3328 Media Management
  • FILM 3330 Media Sales
  • FILM 3335 Film Exhibition and Distribution
  • FILM 3361 Media Programming
  • FILM 3396 Topics in Media Industries (focus/topic varies by semester/instructor)
  • FILM 4304 New Media Distribution
  • FILM 4316 Film Producing
  • FILM 4399 Global Media Systems

CAPSTONE

  • FILM 5212 Thesis Film 2
  • FILM 5214 Research Thesis
  • FILM 5311 Thesis Film 1
  • FILM 5312 Media Career Preparation
  • FILM 5315 Critical Studies Seminar

OTHER / MISCELLANEOUS

  • FILM 4125 Internship (1 credit)
  • FILM 4225 Internship (2 credit)
  • FILM 5110, 5210, 5310 Directed Study
  • FILM 5110, 5210, 5310 Directed Study
  • FILM 4325 Internship (3 credit)
  • FILM 5199 Presentation and Critique

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

FILM 1301: Art of Film and Media
Introduction to the fundamental visual and audio techniques used in cinema, television, and emerging media to convey meaning and mood. Careful analysis of selected films, TV shows, and other media. Required of all majors.

FILM 1302: Media and Culture
Survey of the relationship between media and society. The technological, economic and legal aspects of the media industries will also be explored. Required of all majors and minors.

FILM 1304: Production 1
Practical, comprehensive course in the fundamentals of video and audio production, covering cameras, microphones, lighting, shooting, editing, sound design, and outputting. Incorporates hands-on exercises, screenings, lecture, and group and individual video projects. Required of all majors.

FILM 2306: History of Recorded Music
Connects major periods of recorded music to innovations in music hardware with special focus on the importance of music to the radio, television, cinema, and new media industries.

FILM 2332: American Popular Film and Television
In-depth examination of specific aspects of the American popular cinema, focusing upon questions of popular culture and ideology, of the historical development of styles and genres, and of the impact of the Hollywood film industry. Specific topics and films will vary from term to term.

FILM 2344: History of Animated Film
This course provides a critical and historical overview of the development of the animated film from its origins in the 19th century to the present.

FILM 2351: International Film History
This course provides an overview of the development of the cinema as a technology, as an art form, as an industry, and as a social institution beginning with the origins of the medium and tracing its major movements and configurations up to the present.

FILM 2354: Screenwriting 1
Introduces the language of screenwriting. Topics include the creative process of idea generation and what makes a story filmable; creating memorable and redeemable characters; the arc and transformation of story, including the setup, the question or conflict, the turning point, and the climax or ending; and the details of proper format and presentation. In application, students produce two short film scripts as their midterms and finals, and they gain an understanding of the characteristics of a good short film and the differences between shorts and feature scripts.

FILM 2362/CFA 3362: Diversity and American Film: Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality
Historical survey of representations of race/ethnicity, class structure, gender and sexual orientation in American cinema, as well as the opportunities for minorities within the industry.

FILM 2364: History of Cinema-TV Comedy
Survey of the development of comedy in the film and television, with an emphasis on a historical examination of comic films and TV shows and a theoretical analysis of the phenomena of humor and laughter.

FILM 3300: Film and Television Genres
Examines questions of genre pertinent to film and/or television by focusing on various generic forms and their history. The specific genres under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 3301/ASPH 3390: Experimental Camera
Pushing the technical boundaries of cameras as capture devices, students experiment with the creative aesthetic possibilities therein (still and/or motion) and then draw from a variety of genres to create short, experimental films. Exploring diverse concepts such as storytelling, portraiture, documentary, poetry, and abstraction, students combine elements including still photography, animation, graphics, narration, sound effects, and original music to create motion picture media. Prerequisite(s): FILM 1304; or ASPH 1300, 1310; or instructor permission is available for students with a working knowledge of the camera (aperture, shutter speed, focal length) and a basic understanding of video editing. Students are required to have access to at least a digital still camera.

FILM 3302: Convergent Media
Explores the technical, legal, and practical requirements for creating cross-platform media, from preproduction through distribution. Also, covers crowd sourcing, projects distributed on the Web, and projects utilizing the interactive nature of the Web. The goal is to understand, at a fundamental level, how the Web works and all the components/tools that allow interactivity to happen. This course demystifies Internet and Web technology for non-technical people.

FILM 3303: Film Acting
This class is designed for the director to understand the actor’s process. How performances are crafted from objectives, obstacles, substitutions, inner objects, beats, actions, and doings. A basic overview of these techniques is explored through monologue and scenes. The class concentrates on the unique circumstances given to the single-camera film actor: set etiquette (film crew breakdown, terminology), technical basics (the shots), blocking (hitting the mark), and general camera awareness (overlapping, cheating, matching). Also, the marketing needed to secure an acting job (headshots, agents and managers, auditioning, callbacks).

FILM 3304: Production 2
Intermediate-level production course building on the lighting, camera work, editing, and sound design skills and techniques learned in FILM 1304. The course focuses on developing an artistic vision and includes the basics of directing, preproduction, grip, double-system sound, set etiquette, and crewing. Students produce individual short narratives in addition to working together on an all-class project. Prerequisites: FILM 1304, 2354.

FILM 3305: MOS Camera
A focus on visual language and advanced camera and lens techniques. Each student makes a short film, shooting only non-synchronous original material and concentrating on visual design through effective lens choice, mise-en-scène, location usage, and production design. The course covers prime lenses, exposure, latitude, color grading, and other camera-specific technologies, and provides hands-on experience with high-end camera equipment. Students gain a deeper understanding of how to use visual language to express their ideas. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 3306: Non-fiction Production
This course combines the history and practice of non-fiction field production. Hands-on demonstrations, screenings, readings, lectures, and discussions prepare students to produce and create a short documentary piece. Classes include an emphasis on research, pre-planning, and writing skills as integral components of video production. Students create a 5- to 10-minute documentary project on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 3308: Editing
This course on the creative art and craft of editing develops storytelling and rhythmic sensibilities through close study of films, critique and discussion of works in progress, and hands-on practice. Projects include short editing exercises, reworks of students’ own existing projects, and re-edits of others’ films. Prerequisite: FILM 1304.

FILM 3309: Multi-camera Production
Multiple-camera shooting has long been a staple of such things as three-camera television shooting and live sporting events, but as cameras have gotten cheaper and more accessible, multicam has found a place in a vast range of applications. This class covers the variety of ways multiple-camera techniques are used and the advantages and disadvantages of each compared with each other and with single-camera shooting. The class produces several multicam projects covering a variety of content types and shooting styles. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 3310/CF 3390/WL 3310: Screen Artists
This course examines the questions of authorship pertinent to the cinema by focusing on the works of one or more film artists. The specific directors, producers, screenwriters, and other artists treated by the course will vary from term to term.

FILM 3314: Comics: From Panels to Screens
Overview of comics, one of the most influential aesthetic forms of the past century, with emphasis on aesthetics (including genre), cultural history, and function as a media industry. Also analyzes the relationship between comics and other media forms, particularly film and TV.

FILM 3316: 16MM Production
A focus on visual language and 16mm film production techniques. Each student makes a short film, shooting only non-synchronous original material. Covers use and operation of the Bolex 16mm film camera: incident light meter, fixed focal length lenses, film speeds, and color temperature ratings. Also, visual design through effective lens choice, mise-en-scène, location usage, and production design. Students gain a deeper understanding of how to use visual language to express their ideas. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 3328: Media Management
Explores the relationship between the theory and practice of broadcast and cable management with emphasis on legal and economic constraints on these media outlets.

FILM 3330: Media Sales
Examines the contemporary world of electronic media sales. The goals are to combine strategic thinking with creative thought while keeping the target audience/client in mind.

FILM 3335: Film Exhibition and Distribution
Examines contemporary practices in the distribution and exhibition of theatrical feature films, including the roles of audience survey techniques, booking, publicity, and advertising.

FILM 3352: American Film History
An overview of U.S. film history from the silent period to the present day. Emphasis on the genres, directors, cinematic techniques, and industrial factors that advanced the art of Hollywood and independent filmmakers.

FILM 3353: American Broadcast History
Focus on the history of American TV, with an emphasis on the industrial and sociocultural aspects of the medium’s development. Issues of race, gender, class, genre, sexuality, and national identity are studied in the context of significant television shows of the past and present.

FILM 3355: History of Documentary Film and Television
An overview of the development of the documentary mode in cinema and television, offering a survey of the nonfiction film and video provided by newsreels, training films, propaganda movies, wartime documentaries, and reality TV.

FILM 3359: National Cinemas
The social, economic, technological and aesthetic histories of cinema from various nations, and the concept of national cinema. Specific nations under consideration vary from term to term.

FILM 3361: Media Programming
Analysis of the development of program ideas and the research and strategies involved in programming media outlets.

FILM 3364: Screenwriting 2
The purpose of the class is to produce a first draft feature screenplay. Review of proper format and act structure leads to a more in-depth exploration of story, character, dialogue, scenes and scene sequencing, narrative devices, and the emotional payoff. Each student pitches his or her idea twice: the logline (short summary) pitch at the beginning of the term and the 10-minute room pitch at the end of the term. Work includes step outlines of each act, scene readings, and collective feedback, culminating in a fully realized first draft screenplay. Prerequisite: FILM 2354.

FILM 3365: Advanced Screenwriting Workshop
Writing is rewriting. Every student is required to enter this class with a first draft feature length screenplay. In order to strengthen and deepen the story, students work on solidifying characters and giving them clear agendas and goals, fixing story problems, identifying the central conflict and serving it, getting dirty and killing the darlings – anything superfluous that doesn’t move the story forward – making the scene sequences work and satisfy, punching up dialogue, eliminating clichés, and working toward the final edit. Prerequisite: FILM 3364.

FILM 3375/CFA 3375: Post War European Cinema: 1945-Present
Presents an overview of postwar European cinema focusing on major films, directors, and national movements. Considers cultural and stylistic features that differ from Hollywood-genre models. (Summer Abroad)

FILM 3384: Sound 1
Sound-for-picture course covering the use of sound throughout the production and post-production process. Includes an introduction to microphone selection and placement, recording techniques, routing in a studio, Foley and ADR, tools for designing sound effects, sound editing, post-production mixing, audio processors, and automation. Students also learn how to record, edit, and mix in Pro Tools.  Work includes individual and group sound design projects as well as written sound design plans. Prerequisite: FILM 3304 or MSA 3310.

FILM 3385: Sound 2
Audio-driven course covering production and post-production mixing and audio-related output and distribution considerations. Also, in-depth coverage of processors, cleanup, automation, routing within Pro Tools, surround mixing for film, multichannel miking, and live routing techniques. May include topics such as stems, live mixing, and music mixing, depending on student and instructor interests. Prerequisite: FILM 3304 or MSA 3310.

FILM 3385: Sound 2
Advanced audio course expanding on the ideas and tools covered in FILM 3384. Focus is on creative sound design, including sound effect creation, synthesis and sampling, artistic approaches to using sound over the course of an entire work, and storytelling through sound.  Advanced techniques in recording, editing, and mixing build on topics covered in Sound 1.  This class also includes an emphasis on the re-recording mix, including surround sound mixing, and mastering. Additional topics such as MIDI, stems, live mixing, music mixing, and mixing for different venues may be added depending on student and instructor interests. Prerequisite: FILM 3384

FILM 3390: Topics in Production
Focus on a specific area of production. Subjects and prerequisites vary from term to term.

FILM 3391: Topics in post-production
Focus on a specific topic of film/video post-production. Subjects and prerequisites vary from term to term.

FILM 3395: Topics in Film and Media Studies
Focus on a specific topic pertinent to film and media studies. May focus on film and/or television history, criticism, critical theory, etc. Topics vary from term to term.

FILM 3396: Topics in Media Industries
Industries Focus on a specific topic related to the business/industrial side of film and media. Subjects vary from term to term.

FILM 3397: Gender and Sexuality in Media
Focus on a specific topic related to gender and sexuality in film and media. Subjects vary from term to term.

FILM 4125, 4225: Internship
This course allows students to earn academic credit through practical experience gained by working in the professional media, either part-time during the fall or spring terms, or full-time during the summer. Students may take a maximum of three credit hours of internship. One hundred fifty hours of work per term is calculated as three credit hours. Internship credit is given on a pass/fail basis only. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, upper division standing.

FILM 4301/ADV 4397: TV Ad Concepting and Production
Working collaboratively, students create and develop ideas for 30-second commercials for predetermined clients, complete all necessary preparation for producing these concepts, and shoot and edit them into finished ads. Focus is on real-world commercial-style production, emphasizing how to address clients’ specific needs while maintaining the creative elements of design and production. Completed ads are submitted to national and/or international advertising competitions and festivals. Usually offered during the January or summer term. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. Generally, students must have taken ADV 3395 and/or FILM 3304 beforehand, though in special cases exceptions may be made.

FILM 4304: New Media Distribution
Discusses the distribution and monetization of online video. Industry concepts such as measuring return on investment, identifying the major industry players in new media distribution, and sustaining an online filmmaking brand are framed within the contemporary, multiplatform video marketplace.

FILM 4305: Cinematography
Cinematography is the articulation of motion picture language through the technical and aesthetic concerns of the lens, composition, lighting, visual design, camera movement, and point of view. Students explore each of these elements in theory and in practice to better develop their visual storytelling skills. Examination and analysis of art, print media, films, videos, and TV shows is complemented by demonstration of and intensive hands-on practice with camera, lighting, grip, electric, and filtration. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 4306: Introduction to Animation
Studies in traditional animation principles, including squash and stretch, timing and spacing, morphing, paths of action, overlapping actions, walk/run cycles, balance, and jumping. Introduction to character animation with class exercises in character acting, in both voice and movement, helps students translate performance into their animated characters. Students have opportunities to work with multiple methods of animation, including 2-D traditional hand drawn, Claymation, stop motion, and 2-D/3-D CGI software. Prerequisites: FILM 1304 and instructor consent.

FILM 4307: Introduction to 3-D Animation
An introduction to computer graphics with an emphasis on the popular software package Maya. Includes focus on the user interface, creating of 3-D geometry using polygonal techniques, materials and textures, kinematics, animation, and camera lighting techniques. This course explores the various aspects and fundamentals of computer graphics. Students gain an understanding of the workflow necessary to create 3-D imagery. Assignments employ students to combine a variety of techniques to become familiar with the computer animation production process. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher.

FILM 4308: Post-Production Visual FX
Studies in design concepts and application to broadcast graphics and visual special FX. Advanced green screen keying and compositing techniques, motion tracking, working within 3-D space, and setting up virtual cameras and lights using After Effects and Apple Motion. An introduction to 3-D design. Project based focusing on visual FX design and advanced key framing techniques for animating FX with final compositing into live-action footage. Prerequisites: FILM 3304 and instructor consent.

FILM 4316: Film Producing 
Lectures and discussions by both faculty and guest speakers provide an overview of the basic business and legal aspects of film and television production.

FILM 4317: Film Directing
Covers all elements of the directing process, with specific emphasis on how the film director works with screen actors and captures actors’ performances to fit the director’s unique vision. Working from a script throughout the term, students learn script analysis, character outline, casting, rehearsals, and on-set direction. Students create a casting notice, hold auditions, and work with professional and/or student actors. Prerequisite: FILM 3304.

FILM 4325: Internship
This course allows students to earn academic credit through practical experience gained by working in the professional media, either part-time during the fall or spring terms, or full-time during the summer. Students may take a maximum of three credit hours of internship. One hundred fifty hours of work per term is calculated as three credit hours. Internship credit is given on a pass/fail basis only. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, upper division standing.

FILM 4351: Mapping Modernism: Artistic Collaborations in Paris and Moscow 1890-1940
Investigates artistic modernism, emphasizing fertile collaborations and exchange in art, dance, theatre, music, and film. Focuses on Paris, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, 1895–1940.

FILM 4353: Film and Media Theory
Overview of major theoretical writings on cinema, TV, and new media (including the work of theorists such as Andre Bazin, Sergei Eisenstein, Laura Mulvey, and Christian Metz) and the application of various analytical approaches to specific texts. Prerequisites: FILM 1301, 2351.

FILM 4399: Global Media Systems
Overview of contemporary globalized media industries, policies, and texts, with an emphasis on how cultural differences and similarities are represented, marketed, and contested in television, film, and other media forms. Prerequisite: FILM 2351 or instructor consent.

FILM 5110, 5210, 5310: Directed Study
Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member. A directed study is a close collaboration between the professor and an advanced student who conducts a rigorous project that goes beyond the experience available in course offerings. The student must secure written permission from the instructor and return a completed directed studies form to the division office before the start of the term during which the study is to be undertaken. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

FILM 5199: Presentation and Critique
Students, faculty, and guests share creative and/or scholarly works in progress for discussion and constructive criticism. Meets biweekly. Graded pass/fail; absence or significant tardiness at more than two sessions results in a failing grade. All students are required to present work at least once over the course of the term. For those taking this as the completion of a thesis project begun in FILM 5211, 5214, or 5216, a passing grade requires completion of the thesis project to the satisfaction of the student’s faculty committee and subsequent presentation of the thesis project in this course. Requires instructor permission. May be taken up to twice for credit.

FILM 5212: Thesis Film 2
A course centered on completing a high-quality senior thesis film using classes as a workshop to improve projects in the preproduction, production, and post-production phases. This course is designed as the culmination of the production curriculum, providing a forum for putting the ideas, skills, and techniques learned throughout the curriculum into use on one ambitious piece. The student enrolled must be the director and primary creative force behind the project proposed (e.g., cannot propose to be the producer, writer, or director of photography for the film but not direct it). The thesis film must ultimately be defended to and approved by a faculty committee. Prerequisite: FILM 5311.

FILM 5214: Research Thesis
An advanced critical studies course in which students research, write, and defend a 10,000- to 15,000-word research paper, developed in consultation with a faculty adviser. The thesis is designed to synthesize interests and works that the student may have developed in previous critical studies courses, and to potentially serve as an essay for scholarly publication or for application to a graduate program in media studies. While the course is individually structured and highly self-directed, it also requires regular meetings with the thesis adviser. The thesis must ultimately be defended to and approved by a faculty committee. Prerequisites: Two 2000-level or above FILM critical studies courses, senior standing, and acceptance through a competitive application process.

FILM 5310: Directed Study
Independent study under the direction and supervision of a faculty member. A directed study is a close collaboration between the professor and the student who conducts a rigorous project that goes beyond the experience available in course offerings. The student must secure written permission from the instructor and return a completed directed studies form to the Division office before the start of the term during which the study is to be undertaken. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FILM 5311: Thesis Film 1
A course centered on completing a high-quality senior thesis film using classes as a workshop to improve projects in the preproduction, production, and post-production phases. This course is designed as the culmination of the production curriculum, providing a forum for putting the ideas, skills, and techniques learned throughout the curriculum into use on one ambitious piece. The student enrolled must come in the first day with director’s book in hand and be the director and primary creative force behind the project proposed (e.g., cannot propose to be the producer, writer, or director of photography for the film but not direct it). The thesis film must ultimately be defended to and approved by a faculty committee. Prerequisites: Completion of all other production requirements, senior standing, and acceptance through a competitive application process.

FILM 5312: Media Career Preparation
Students prepare themselves to enter the professional media industry. Students refine and finish their existing film or video projects, enter their work into festivals, and create demo trailers of same. They also create business cards, develop their résumés, and create a professional website that incorporates the demo trailers of their work. Guest speakers and field trips to local film/video/audio facilities provide introductions and insight into the various areas of employment within the film industry. Fulfills the department’s capstone requirement. Prerequisites: FILM 3304 and two other 2000-level or above production courses.

FILM 5314: Thesis
Capstone history/criticism course. Prerequisites: Instructor consent and prior completion of all other history/criticism requirements.

FILM 5315: Critical Studies Seminar
A high-level research seminar, with variable topics; check course listing each time it is offered. Fulfills department’s capstone requirement. Prerequisites: FILM 2351 plus at least one other 3000- or 4000-level critical studies course; non-majors need consent of instructor.

FILM 5353: Film/Media Theory
Overview of major theoretical writings on cinema, TV, and new media (including the work of theorists such as Andre Bazin, Sergei Eisenstein, Laura Mulvey, and Christian Metz) and the application of various analytical approaches to specific texts.

Graduate Course Descriptions

FILM 6301: Experimental Camera
Pushing the technical boundaries of cameras as capture devices, students experiment with the creative aesthetic possibilities therein (still and/or motion) and then draw from a variety of genres to create short, experimental films. Exploring diverse concepts such as storytelling, portraiture, documentary, poetry, and abstraction, students combine elements including still photography, animation, graphics, narration, sound effects, and original music to create motion picture media. Prerequisite(s): FILM 1304; or ASPH 1300, 1310; or instructor permission is available for students with a working knowledge of the camera (aperture, shutter speed, focal length) and a basic understanding of video editing. Students are required to have access to at least a digital still camera.

FILM 6308: Editing
This course on the creative art and craft of editing develops storytelling and rhythmic sensibilities through close study of films, critique and discussion of works in progress, and hands-on practice. Projects include short editing exercises, reworks of students’ own existing projects, and re-edits of others’ films.

FILM 6310: Screen Artists
This course examines the questions of authorship pertinent to the cinema by focusing on the works of one or more film artists. The specific directors, producers, screenwriters, and other artists treated by the course will vary from term to term.

FILM 6313: Contemporary Media Studies
This course prepares students themselves for careers applying the concepts of film/media studies, though in-depth research into career options (including doctoral programs, secondary school media teaching opportunities, and analytical positions within the media industries). Students will also create original research/analysis projects work on film/media.

FILM 6314: Comics: From Panels to Screens
Overview of comics, one of the most influential aesthetic forms of the past century, with emphasis on aesthetics (including genre), cultural history, and function as a media industry. Also analyzes the relationship between comics and other media forms, particularly film and TV.

FILM 6316: Producers’ Seminar
Lectures and discussions by both faculty and guest speakers provide an overview of the basic business and legal aspects of film and television production.

FILM 6325: Internship
This course allows students to earn academic credit through practical experience gained by working in the professional media, either part-time during the fall or spring terms, or full-time during the summer. One hundred fifty hours of work per term is calculated as three credit hours. Internship credit is given on a pass/fail basis only. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

FILM 6333: Film and Television Genres
Examines questions of genre pertinent to film and/or television by focusing on various generic forms and their history. The specific genres under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 6351: Seminar in Media History
An intensive research seminar in film/media history and criticism. The specific topic under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 6352: Seminar in Popular Film
An intensive research seminar in popular film history, criticism and theory. The specific topic under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 6353: Seminar in Popular Media
An intensive research seminar in popular media history, criticism and theory. The specific topic under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 6354: Seminar in Contemporary Media Culture
An intensive research seminar in contemporary popular film/media cultures and industries. The specific topic under consideration will vary from term to term.

FILM 6361: Media Programming
Analysis of the development of program ideas and the research and strategies involved in programming media outlets.

FILM 6395: Topics in Film and Media Studies
Focus on a specific topic pertinent to film and media studies. May focus on film and/or television history, criticism, critical theory, etc. Topics vary from term to term.

FILM 6396: Topics in Film and Media Industries
Focus on a specific topic related to the business/industrial side of film and media. Subjects vary from term to term.

FILM 6397: Gender and Sexuality in Media
Focus on a specific topic related to gender and sexuality in film and media. Subjects vary from term to term.

FILM 6399: Global Media Systems
Overview of contemporary globalized media industries, policies, and texts, with an emphasis on how cultural differences and similarities are represented, marketed, and contested in television, film, and other media forms.

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