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Portrait of Katherine C. Engel

Kate Engel

Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Ph.D., history, University of Wisconsin; B.A., Haverford College
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Selected Publications

Religion and Profit: Moravians in Early America (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009, paper 2011).

  • 2010 Dale W. Brown Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Anabaptist and Pietist Studies, awarded by the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies.

“The SPCK and the American Revolution: The Limits of International Protestantism,” Church History, March 2012, 8(1), 77-103.

“Moravians in the Eighteenth-century Atlantic World,” Journal of Moravian History, 12(1), Spring 2012, 1-19.

“Religion and the Economy: New Methods for an Old Problem,” Early American Studies 8(3), Fall 2010, 482-514.

“The Evolution of the Bethlehem Pilgergemeine,” in Jonathan Strom and James Melton, eds., Pietism in Two Worlds (New York: Ashgate, 2009), 163-181.

“’Commerce that the Lord Could Sanctify and Bless’: Moravian Participation in Transatlantic Trade, 1740-1760” in Michele Gillespie and Robert Beachy, eds., Pious Pursuits: German Moravians in the Atlantic World (New York: Berghahn Books, 2007), 113-126.

“Bridging the Gap: Religious Community and Declension in Eighteenth-century Bethlehem, Pennsylvania,” 1650-1850: Ideas, Aesthetics and Inquiries in the Early Modern Era, 11 (2005), 407-442.

“The Strangers’ Store: Moral Capitalism in Moravian Bethlehem, 1753-1775,” Early American Studies 1(1), January 2003, 90-126.

  • 2003 Colonial Society of Pennsylvania Article Prize

Dr. Kate Carté Engel is an Associate Professor of Religious Studies specializing in early American and Atlantic religion.  Prior to coming to SMU in 2012, she was associate professor of history and Rothrock Fellow at Texas A&M University.  She is the author of Religion and Profit: Moravians in Early America (2009, paper 2011), which was awarded the 2010 Dale W. Brown Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Anabaptist and Pietist Studies. She has published many articles, including in Church History and Early American Studies. She has been a Charles A. Ryskamp Fellow of the American Council of Learned Societies, an affiliate fellow of the Center for the Study of Religion at Princeton University, a Franklin Fellow of the American Philosophical Society, and a Barra Postdoctoral Fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies. Her research and teaching interests center on the role of religion in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world, especially as it intersects with political and economic developments.  Her current project, The Cause of True Religion, investigates the consequences of the American Revolution for transatlantic Protestant networks in North America, Britain, and Europe.