Programs

Hamilton Undergraduate Research Scholars Program

Established to provide opportunities to Dedman College undergraduates for hands-on research, Jack and Jane Hamilton founded the Hamilton Undergraduate Research Scholars Program in 2008. Devoted to the legacy of their parents, Diane Buford ('71) and Dan Hamilton ('79) continue the program to this day. The Hamilton Undergraduate Research Scholars Program enables Dedman College's most promising students (in the sciences, social sciences, or humanities) to collaborate with top faculty researchers and contribute to the creation of cutting-edge knowledge in significant and meaningful ways. Faculty/student teams carry out primary research for one semester or up to one year.

Each faculty/student team submits a competitive proposal for the project to the Program Director. The call for proposals goes out in early August of each academic year to all Dedman College faculty. Normally the proposals, which are due at the end of August, are submitted by the faculty member. They are 1-2 pages in length and must identify the student and the student’s background and contain a brief description of the project the student will be working on, as well as the time frame (one semester, 2 semesters). Proposals should also include the student’s ID number and best contact telephone number. A small number of Hamilton Undergraduate Research Scholar Awards are also made for the summer with a request for applications going out in late April.

Awards are up to $1500/semester ($3000 for the year) with matching funds available from the University Undergraduate Research Program. Hamilton Scholars have successfully delivered papers on their research at professional meetings or submitted their work to professional journals. There are funds available in this program to support these endeavors. Each year there is a reception for Hamilton Scholars and their mentors and some of the scholars present their work in oral or poster format. Hamilton Scholars are also recognized at the University Honors Convocation.

Students who are interested in this program should speak to a faculty member with whom they are interested in working. Faculty members who are interested in this program should identify a student interested in participating. For further information, contact Caroline B. Brettell, Director, Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute (cbrettel@smu.edu; 214-768-4254).

Hamilton Scholars

Summer 2014 Physics Scholars
Nicole Hartman and Mayisha Nakib of the physics department have been accepted to prestigious programs for the summer. Nicole will be doing an REU (Research Experience for Undergraduates) at Columbia University and going to CERN for 10 weeks to work on the Large Hadron Collider. Mayisha has been accepted to Student Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) at the SLAC National Accelerator Center, working on dark matter experiments. These programs are highly competitive and we are so proud to have our hardworking students represent SMU!

HAMILTON SCHOLARS 2014-2015

 

Summer 2014

Division II

Miles Fisher: “Autonomic Adjustments to Psychosocial stress: Markers of Psychological and Physical Health Risk? (Mentor: Thomas Ritz, Psychology)

Courtney Cox: “SMU CARe Project” (Mentor: Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology)

Daniel Trujillo: “SMU CARe Project” (Mentor: Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology)

Katie Bridges: "Victim and Perpetrator Status and Perceived Blame for Rape” (Mentor: Lorelei Simpson Rowe, Psychology) 

Division III

Adam Gannon: “The Role of Peroxiredoxins in Alleviating Alzheimer’s Pathology” (Mentor Svetlana Radjuk, Biological Sciences)

Collette Marchesseault: “Drug Discover for Failed Cancer Chemotherapies.”  (Mentor: John Wise, Biological Sciences)

Mindy McClean: “Assembly and Application of Phospholipid Nanodiscs for the Study of P-glycoprotein (Mentor: Pia Vogel, Biological Sciences)

Camille Biard: “Computational Study of 1,2-dioxetane Chemiluminescent Molecules” (Mentor: Peng Tao, Department of Chemistry)

Rachel Crusius: “Classifying Signs of Regulator Interactions in Gene Networks” (Mentor: Brandilyn Stigler, Mathematics)

Jessica Otah: "Classifying Signs of Regulator Interactions in Gene Networks” (Mentor: Brandilyn Stigler, Mathematics)

ACADEMIC YEAR 2014-15

Division II

Psychology

Courtney Cox: “SMU CARe Project” (Mentor: Chrystyna Kouros)

Daniel Trujillo: SMU CARe Project” (Mentor: Chrystyna Kouros)

Julia Pylant: “College Student Beliefs about Response to Sexual Violence” (Mentor: Lorelei Simpson Rowe)

Kate Bridges: “Victim and perpetrator Status and Perceived Blame for Rape” (Mentor: Lorelei Simpson Rowe)

Political Science

Steven Evans: “Non-Governmental Organization Decision-Making in Kenya.” (Mentor: Karisa Cloward)

Anika Reza: “U.S. Counter-terrorist Measures Before and After 9/11 and the Iraq War” (Mentor: Hiroki Takeuchi)

Sociology

Brandon Roselius: “Women’s Roles in Communist Legislatures in Eastern Europe, 1945-1989” (Mentor: Sheri Kunovich)

Kate Restino: “Women’s Roles in Communist Legislatures in Eastern Europe, 1945-1989” (Mentor: Sheri Kunovich)

Division III

Biology

Benjamin Dupree: “The role of the pentose phosphate pathway in longevity regulation by the p53 tumor suppressor” (Mentor: Johannes Bauer)

Rebecca Brady: “Functional and Transitive Similarities between the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type-1 (HTLV-1) p30II and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6 Oncoproteins” (Mentor: Robert Harrod)

Rachel Gardner: “Molecular Mechanisms of Oncogene-Activation by HTLV-1 p30II and HPV E6 Oncoproteins” (Mentor: Robert Harrod)

Collette Marchesseault: “Drug Discovery for Failed Cancer Chemotherapies –Modeling Mammalian P-Glycoproteins in Bacteria” (Mentor: John Wise)

Ketetha Olengue: “Computational Optimization of P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors to Help Failed Cancer Chemotherapies” (Mentor: John Wise)

Mindy McClean: “Assembly and Application of Phospholipid Nanodiscs for the Study of P-Glycoprotein” (Mentor: Pia Vogel)

Tyrell Russell: “Sensitization of Triple Negative Breast Cancer to Chemotherapies” (Mentor: Pia Vogel)

Zainab Fatima: “The Assembly of a Membrane-bound Enzyme: Respiratory Complex I” (Mentor: Steve Vik)

Kristina Lackey: “DNA Clones to make Transgenic Drosophila Lines” (Mentor: Rick Jones)

Chemistry

Kaley El-Arab: “Novel LOV Domains Integrating Light and oxidative Stress” (Mentor: Brian Zoltowski) (For Spring 2015)

Gretchen Hook: “Novel Methods for the Synthesis of Carboline Scaffolds” (Mentor: Ed Biehl)

Physics

Matthew Bruemmer: “A Study of Environmental Factors Affecting Material Storage for Next Generation Dark Matter Experiments” (Mentors:  Jodi Cooley and Stephen Sekula)

Daniel Gum: “Cross Discipline Study in Robotic Telescope Mechanics and Gamma-ray Burst Astrophysics” (Mentor: Robert Kehoe)

Ashleigh Miller: “Multi-wire Chamber and Multi-strip Gas Chamber Detectors in High Energy Physics Experiments” (Mentor: Jingbo Ye)