Women's and Gender Studies

But for the Grace of God:

Is Religiosity a Risk or Protective Factor in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration?

There is an upcoming talk, "But for the Grace of God: Is Religiosity a Risk or Protective Factor in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration?" at 5:00pm, March 22 in McCord Auditorium, Dallas Hall 306. The talk will be given by Claire M. Renzetti: Endowed Chair for Studies of Violence Against Women, Center for Research on Violence Against Women, and Professor of Sociology at the University of Kentucky. The talk is presented support from the Scott-Hawkins Lecture Series, the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, the Department of Anthropology and Department of Psychology.

Talk abstract: Research has shown that religious people, compared with non-religious people, express greater concern for the welfare of their intimate partners, have better marital adjustment and less marital conflict, and are able to resolve conflicts with their partners more productively. Although some observers have argued that religious beliefs and teachings may legitimate or even encourage the subjection of women to men, especially wives to husbands, others report that religion and religiosity may contribute to a reduction in negative interactions, including physical and psychological abuse, between intimate partners. This study extends previous research by using measures that tap multiple dimensions of religiosity to examine its effects on likelihood of perpetrating intimate partner violence among a national sample of adult men.

About the lecturer: Claire M. Renzetti is editor of the international, interdisciplinary journal, Violence Against Women; co-editor of the Interpersonal Violence book series for Oxford University Press; and editor of the Gender, Crime and Law book series for Northeastern University Press. She has authored or edited 16 books and numerous book chapters and articles in professional journals.

For more information, please contact Professor Nia Parson, nparson@smu.edu