Women's and Gender Studies

Fall 2011 Courses

Summer Sessions

ECO 4351: Labor Economics

Summer I TuTh 6:00 – 8:50 Sa 10:00 – 12:50, H. Reynolds

Within the framework of various market theories, this course will explore wages, discrimination, effects of unions, unemployment rates, international labor migration and the changes wrought in recent years by the influx of women in the labor force, including subsequent effects on economic theory and policy.

ECO 5357: Economics of Human Resources

Summer II M-F 10:00 - 11:50, E. Wheaton

The course examines the labor supply decisions of women in significant detail. Discrimination has also had an important impact on the labor market, and the course focuses on these issues as well. Gender pay differentials have been one outcome of that and the course will examine that problem and how to rectify it as well.

ENGL 3367/CF 3364: Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

Summer I M-F 10:00 - 11:50, M. Satz
This course will examine children’s literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class.

ENGL 3379/CFA 3379: Literary And Cultural Contexts Of Disability: Gender, Care, And Justice

Summer I M-F 12:00 - 1:50, M. Satz
This course examines issues of disability from literary, cultural, and philosophical perspectives. It grapples with current debates in disability studies providing the student with a variety of contexts to examine them.

HIST 3301/CF 3317: Human Rights: America's Dilemma

Summer I MTuW 2:00 – 5:00 & MTuW 6:30 – 9:30, R. Halperin
The study of human rights requires intellectual history and moral courage, for no society has been totally innocent of human rights abuses. This course will examine certain violations of human rights within their context, and will highlight crimes based upon race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and religion of both perpetrators and the victims.

RELI 3375/ CF 3343: Wives, Mothers, Lovers, Queens: Expressions of the Feminine Divine in World Religions and Cultures

Summer I M-F 12:00 – 1:50, S. Frolov
The course will explore and compare the images of feminine divine in India, Mesopotamia, Syro-Palestine, Egypt, ancient Israel and Greece, concentrating upon the function of female deities in the pantheon and their relationship to male gods and to the worshippers. Special attention will be paid to the paradox of a powerful female deity in a male-dominated culture, the role of such deities in the empowerment of women, both in the past and today, and the problem of divine masculinity in monotheism.

SOCI 3351: Marriage and Family

Summer I M-F 12:00 – 1:50, A. Tan
The purpose of this course is to enhance understanding of the relationship between social structure and the family. We will use sociological theories and concepts to describe/explain the historical development of the family, variations in the American family, and current issues and changes affecting the family.

SOCI 3371: Sociology of Gender

Summer I M-F 10:00 - 11:50, D. Branch
Roles of men and women in American Society; analysis of the acquisition, content, and consequences of sex roles; social movements and implications for social change. Fulfills co-curricular requirement for Diversity.

WGST 2380/CFA 3303: Human Sexuality

Summer I M-F 10:00 - 11:50 & M-F 2:00 - 3:50, J. Caldwell-Ryan
This course explores the biosocial aspects of human sexuality and sex behaviors. A multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural perspective will be used to address a wide range or theoretical and pragmatic social issues.

Fall Session

CF 3405: Troubled Youth

TuTh 11:00 – 12:20, Staff
This course explores American adolescence from contemporary and historical perspectives, covering the period from the eighteenth century onward, and focusing on the period between the Civil War and the present.

CFA 3348: American Families: Changing Experiences and Expectations (Honors Section)

TuTh 9:30 - 10:50, C. DeLuzio
This course will explore changing expectations for and experiences of American families from the colonial era to the present. We will focus on the multiplicity of forms family life has taken in the past, paying careful attention to differences of race, class, ethnicity, gender and age. Our goal is to understand the ways in which family structures and ideals have shaped and been shaped by larger forces of social and cultural change.

ECO 4351: Labor Economics

MWF 12:00 - 12:50, E. Wheaton
Within the framework of various market theories, this course will explore wages, discrimination, effects of unions, unemployment rates, international labor migration and the changes wrought in recent years by the influx of women in the labor force, including subsequent effects on economic theory and policy.

ENGL 3344: Victorian Gender

MWF 1:00 – 1:50, B. Newman
Why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to us about what it means to be a man or woman, despite the differences between us and the Victorians? We will explore the way fiction, poetry, and other writing from the period reflects, questions, and protests the gender distinctions that Victorians understood as the foundation of the social world.

ENGL 3379/CFA 3379: Literary And Cultural Contexts Of Disability: Gender, Care, And Justice

MWF 10:00 - 10:50, M. Satz
This course examines issues of disability from literary, cultural, and philosophical perspectives. It grapples with current debates in disability studies providing the student with a variety of contexts to examine them.

HIST 3301/CF 3317: Human Rights: America's Dilemma

Tu 6:30 - 9:20, R. Halperin
The study of human rights requires intellectual history and moral courage, for no society has been totally innocent of human rights abuses. This course will examine certain violations of human rights within their context, and will highlight crimes based upon race, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and religion of both perpetrators and the victims.

PSYC 3371: Psychology of Women

W 6:30 - 9:20, C. Soutter
This course offers both men and women students a deeper understanding of women as individuals. It will investigate personality theories as they relate particularly to women. Against this theoretical backdrop it will examine modern women’s options and conflicts, motives and values, and their perceptions of their individuality in the face of rapid social change.

RELI 3375/CF 3343: Wives, Mothers, Lovers, Queens: Expressions of the Feminine Divine in World Religions and Cultures

TuTh 2:00 – 3:20, S. Frolov
The course will explore and compare the images of feminine divine in India, Mesopotamia, Syro-Palestine, Egypt, ancient Israel and Greece, concentrating upon the function of female deities in the pantheon and their relationship to male gods and to the worshippers. Special attention will be paid to the paradox of a powerful female deity in a male-dominated culture, the role of such deities in the empowerment of women, both in the past and today, and the problem of divine masculinity in monotheism.

SOCI 3351: Marriage and Family

MWF 9:00 - 9:50, A. Tan
The purpose of this course is to enhance understanding of the relationship between social structure and the family. We will use sociological theories and concepts to describe/explain the historical development of the family, variations in the American family, and current issues and changes affecting the family.

SOCI 3371: Sociology of Gender

MWF 10:00 - 10:50, D. Branch
Roles of men and women in American Society; analysis of the acquisition, content, and consequences of sex roles; social movements and implications for social change. Fulfills co-curricular requirement for Diversity.

SOCI 4373: Class, Race, and Gender Inequality

TuTh 11:00 - 12:20, S. Kunovich
Unequal distribution of power, prestige, and opportunity within society; causes and consequences.

WGST 2322/CFA 3302: Gender: Images and Perspectives

M 6:30 - 9:20, J. Caldwell-Ryan
MW 3:00 - 4:20, TBA

This course introduces men and women students to issues relating to women today and prepares them for more specialized courses on women offered within the separate departments. Constant and changing aspects of women will be examined from the perspective of anthropology, psychology, sociology, biology, history, economics, business, religion, and literature.

WGST 2380/CFA 3303: Human Sexuality

TuTh 11:00 – 12:20 & TuTh 3:30 - 4:50, J. Caldwell-Ryan
This course explores the biosocial aspects of human sexuality and sex behaviors. A multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural perspective will be used to address a wide range or theoretical and pragmatic social issues.

WGST 3310: Gender and Human Rights

Th 6:30-9:20, J. Caldwell-Ryan
Introduction to global women’s human rights and other intersections of human rights and gender such as abuse of children’s rights, gender-based violence, health and reproductive rights and evolving concepts of sexual rights.

WGST 4303: Women Studies Internship

This course offers students experience with organizations serving women or addressing women's and gender issues, as well as with varied potential careers or volunteer opportunities in the community.

WGST 4309: Independent Studies

A supervised practicum and/or directed readings on specific problems or themes under faculty guidance. Approval of Coordinator is required.