Faculty

Jim Hollifield

Professor
Director of the Tower Center
for Political Studies

Ph.D., Duke University
Carr Collins Hall 222
214-768-2825

James F. Hollifield received his doctorate in political science at Duke University in 1985. Currently he is professor of International Political Economy, director of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies at SMU. In addition to SMU, he has held faculty appointments at Auburn, Brandeis, and Duke Universities. In 1992 he was associate director of Research at the CNRS and the Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Internationales of the FNSP in Paris. From 1986 to 1992 he was a research associate at Harvard University's Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies and co-chair of the French study group, and in 1991-92 he was an associate at Harvard's Center for International Affairs. He has worked as a consultant for the U.S. Government, as well as several organizations, including the United Nations and the OECD.

Hollifield has been the recipient of grants from private foundations and government agencies, including the Social Science Research Council, the Sloan Foundation, and the National Science Foundation. He has written numerous articles and books, including Searching for the New France (Routledge, 1990) with George Ross, Immigrants, Markets and States (Harvard University Press, 1992), and Controlling Immigration (2nd edition, Stanford University Press, 2002) with Wayne Cornelius and Philip Martin. He just completed his fifth book, entitled Immigration et L'Etat-Nation (Immigration and the Nation-State), published by l'Harmattan, Paris. His most recent work looks at the rapidly evolving relationship between trade, migration, and the nation state. He is the co-editor (with Calvin Jillson ) of Pathways to Democracy, The Political Economy of Democratic Transitions (Routledge, 1999) and of Migration Theory, Talking Across Disciplines (Routledge, 2000) with Caroline B. Bretell.  His teaching interests lie primarily in the areas of international and comparative political economy.

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