Courses

Fall 2104

1300. An Introduction to Critical Thinking.
Learning to analyze, evaluate and present information in order to better assess one’s own beliefs and to persuade others more effectively.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)

** Proficiencies & Experiences/Quantitative Reasoning

 

001

MWF

12:00PM- 12:50PM

HYER0204

Professor Hiltz

______________________________________________________________________________
1301. Elementary Logic.
An introductory course in symbolic logic. Logic provides a means for determining whether the purported conclusion of an argument really does follow from the premises. In symbolic logic, mechanical procedures are developed for determining whether a given argument is valid. The techniques and skills acquired through logic have important applications not only within other academic areas such as the sciences and humanities, but may be of use within various professional areas, including law.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Quantitative Reasoning

001

TR

9:30AM - 10:50AM

HYER0200

Professor Ehring

002

MWF

11:00AM - 11:50AM

HYER0110

Professor Lockard

______________________________________________________________________________

1305. Introduction to Philosophy.
A general introduction to the central questions of philosophy; topics include the theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics and political philosophy. Typical questions might include: Can we know the world outside our minds? Is it rational to believe in a God who allows evil to exist? Do the laws of physics allow for human freedom? Is morality more than a matter of opinion? Can there be unequal wealth in a just society? Readings will include classical authors such as Plato, Descartes, Locke, Hume and Mill, as well as contemporary philosophers. The focus of the course will be on arguments for and against proposed solutions to key problems of philosophy.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)

001

TR

3:30PM - 4:50PM

HYER0111

Professor Chuard

002

TR

12:30PM - 1:50PM

HYER0106

Professor Howell

003

TR

8:00AM - 9:20AM

HYER0110

Professor Daley

701

MW

5:00PM - 6:20PM

HYER0106

Professor Bartlett

004H

TR

3:30PM - 4:50PM

HYER0201

Professor Thompson

 

______________________________________________________________________________

 

1316. Introduction to Ethics.

This course is an introduction to moral philosophy and to a few of the central problems therein. What things are good in themselves or in their own right? There are many goods—pleasure, knowledge, virtue, and so on. But which of the many things that are good are good in themselves, rather than only because they are means to other things that are good? What makes right actions right? Does the moral rightness or wrongness of an action depend solely on the value of its consequences? Or can the moral status of an action depend on other factors, such as the rights of individuals or the intentions with which it is done? Is there an objective morality? Is morality merely a human construct, or is there a set of real moral norms or standards? The course will focus on these and other central questions in moral philosophy, on proposed answers to them, and on arguments for and against those proposed answers.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)

001

TR

3:30PM - 4:50PM

DALL0116

Professor Robinson

______________________________________________________________________________

1317. Business Ethics. A discussion of the moral and political issues surrounding a free enterprise system. Students will be introduced to basic moral theory. Further topics will include distributive (or economic) justice, the moral prefer ability of capitalism and socialism, and selected concrete moral issues such as truth in advertising, worker safety and affirmative action.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)

001

MWF

3:00PM - 3:50PM

HYER0200

Professor Hiltz

002

TR

9:30AM - 10:50AM

HYER0111

Professor Daley

003

MWF

8:00AM - 8:50AM

HYER0110

Professor Popovic

004

MWF

9:00AM - 9:50AM

HYER0204

Professor Hiltz

______________________________________________________________________________

1318. Contemporary Moral Problems. An introduction to philosophical ethics focusing on questions in applied ethics. Students will explore ethical theories, philosophical methods, and their application to some of the most controversial and pressing issues confronting contemporary society. Topics vary, but the following are representative: abortion, animal rights, affirmative action, capital punishment, economic justice, euthanasia, sexuality, war and terrorism and world hunger. Class discussion is an important component of the course, as is reading and writing argumentative essays about these issues.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)


001

MWF

9:00:00 AM - 9:50:00 AM

FOSC0155

Professor Daley

002

MWF

12:00:00 PM - 12:50:00 PM

HYER0111

Professor Daley

003

MWF

4:00:00 PM - 4:50:00 PM

HYER0201

Professor Hiltz

701

W

6:30:00 PM - 9:20:00 PM

HYER0204

Professor Popovic

702

M

6:30:00 PM - 9:20:00 PM

HYER0110

Professor Popovic

004

MWF

11:00:00 AM - 11:50:00 AM

HYER0200

Professor Sverdlik

703

MW

5:00:00 PM - 6:20:00 PM

HYER0110

Professor Popovic

005H

TR

8:00:00 AM - 9:20:00 AM

HYER0107

Professor Gollop

______________________________________________________________________________

3301. Intermediate Logic.
Introduces the formal theory of the logical systems students have already learned to use: sentential logic and predicate logic. Students learn to prove the completeness and soundness of both of these systems. Also, simple nonstandard logical systems such as modal, epistemic, or deontic logic, if time permits. Prerequisite: PHIL 1301 or its equivalent.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

MWF

2:00:00 PM- 2:50:00 PM

HYER0200

Professor Lockard

______________________________________________________________________________
3310. Advanced Topics in Philosophy- Personal Identity .
The focus of this course will be on what is it for a person to continue to exist over time.  For example, we are fairly certain that a little boy at 2 could age and change into an old man of 90. What is it that makes him the same person? All of his cells could have changed and transformed and been replaced, his memory may have declined, and he may not even recognize himself if given a picture of himself as a little boy. But the old man is the same person as the little boy. We will consider the full range of contemporary philosophical theories of personal identity over time including psychological theories and physical theories. Does personal identity across time consist in the continuity of memories, beliefs, and psychological traits? Or is it a matter of the continuity of the body or just the brain? Or the persistence of an immortal and immaterial soul? Does personal identity matter as much as we think it does? We will discuss these and related questions in the light of actual and imagined cases (including science fiction cases involving brain transplants and "Star Trek" style cases involving teletransportation).
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

TR

12:30:00 PM - 1:50:00 PM

HYER0111

Professor Ehring

______________________________________________________________________________

3314.  Metaphysics.
Metaphysics, perhaps one of the oldest and most central philosophical subdisciplines, is an attempt to think more carefully about the structure of reality and the nature of the many things making up such a reality. The course will survey some contemporary metaphysical questions about time and space, the nature of material objects and the essence of persons, what causation really is and what natural laws might amount to. 
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing and Information Literacy

001

TR

2:00:00 PM - 3:20:00 PM

HYER0200

Professor Chuard

 

3315. Philosophy of Mind.
A systematic treatment of the nature of consciousness, self, and person.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing and Information Literacy

 

001

TR

12:30:00 PM - 1:50:00 PM

FOSC0155

Professor Thompson

 

3316. Minds, Brains, and Robotics.
Topics may include neural networks, artificial intelligence, perception and action, consciousness, robotics, dynamical systems, embodied cognition, game theory, and the evolution of cognition.  Prerequisites:  Two courses in cognitive-science related fields (Philosophy, Computer Science/Engineering, Psychology, Linguistics, Biology or Anthropology)
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

TR

3:30:00 PM - 4:50:00 PM

G001

Professor Fisher

 

3351. History of Western Philosophy (Ancient).
This course surveys the history of western philosophy during the ancient period.  We begin with the metaphysical and cosmological views of the Presocratics. We then turn to the central ideas of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle with a focus on their ethical and political views. 

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

MWF

10:00:00 AM - 10:50:00 AM

HYER0201

Professor Barnes

 

 

3364 (CF 3364). Philosophy of Biology.
A survey of topics in the philosophy of biology, including evolution versus creationism, fitness, units of selection, adaptationism, biological taxonomy, evolution in humans, cultural evolution, and niche construction.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

                                                      001C

TR

11:00:00 AM - 12:20:00 PM

HYER0106

Professor Fisher

________________________________________________________________________
3373. Philosophy of Criminal Law.
By what right does society punish some people? What is the correct amount of punishment? Who ought to be punished? Students examine various philosophical responses to these questions. Other topics include, excuse and justification, the punishment of attempts, and the psychology of deterrence. Every year a new special topic is covered. This year it will (probably) be the nature of the discretion that prosecutors have in the US criminal justice system.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing and Information Literacy

001

MWF

2:00:00 PM - 2:50:00 PM

HYER0201

Professor Sverdlik

 

3374. Philosophy of Law.

This course explores some central and interrelated questions in philosophy of law, or jurisprudence, with a particular emphasis on the role that morality plays in (a) our understanding of law and in (b) the interpretation and application of the law. We will examine some alternative proposals for understanding law and its relation to morality, including those offered by positivist, natural law, and interpretivist theories of law. One question here is whether the content of law—what is legal or illegal—ever depends on the content of morality—on what is right, just, or fair? We will explore some philosophical problems in the interpretation and application of laws (statutes, precedents, etc.). One question here is whether, and if so how, interpreting and applying laws involves making value judgments, including moral judgments. Another is whether the United States Constitution enacts the “original understanding” of freedom of speech, due process of law, equal protection of the laws, and so on; or whether—instead—it directs us to apply our own, perhaps quite different, understandings of these concepts. (The latter view is called “the moral reading” of the Constitution.) And we will explore some questions about the moral authority of law. One question here is whether there is a moral obligation to obey the law. Another is whether, and if so why, punishing those who break the law is morally justified.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

TR

12:30:00 PM - 1:50:00 PM

FOSC0153

Professor Robinson

______________________________________________________________________________

3375. Advanced Topics in Philosophy- Neuroethics.
Neuroethics concerns two distinct sorts of questions. On the one hand it concerns the ethics of neuroscience.  These questions involve the distinct worries that arise when performing experiments on human brains, but perhaps even more interestingly are the worries that arise with the technologies that constitute both the tools and the results of these sciences.  For example: Should one be able to use imaging techniques (such as fMRI's) as evidence in courtrooms, either as lie detectors or as indications of future dispositions to criminality?  What sort of pharmaceutical enhancements should be allowed? Should pills that improve memory or computational skills be made available? And if so, should there be some effort to make sure that they do not widen and perpetuate already existing inequalities?  Neuroethics also concerns the neuroscience of ethics.  The brain is our moral compass, and the magnets which determine its reading are available for empirical investigation. Through the study of pathologies, such as sociopathy, we can come to the uncomfortable realization that our "moral sense" is contingently grounded. Through the study of more typical subjects, we can determine the neural activity that affects our own moral judgments. What does this tell us about ethics?  In this course, we will focus on the first sort of question, but will spend several weeks on the latter as well.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

001

TR

3:30:00 PM - 4:50:00 PM

HYER0102

Professor Howell

______________________________________________________________________________

3376. Bioethics.
Bioethics is the study of the ethical issues that arise in health care and the health sciences. The aim of this course is to provide you with a toolkit of theories and methods for solving ethical dilemmas that arise in healthcare. The course begins with a theory and background section, which motivates the problems and lays out the tools and methods that will form your toolkit for understanding, analyzing and solving problems is bioethics. The second section focuses on bioethical issues arising within the institutions and businesses of healthcare and health science, including distributive justice in the provision of and access to healthcare, and questions about the morality of the for-profit business of healthcare such as managed care organizations and pharmaceuticals. The third section focuses on bioethical issues involved in the individual experience of medicine and health science such as ethics of the various roles of healthcare providers, ethical issues involving the beginning, middle, and end of life. A background theme of the course is the issue of multiculturalism and inequality within medicine, and how our disparate socio-economic statuses, backgrounds, beliefs, and experiences can both create and help to resolve ethical issues in health care.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Information Literacy

001

TR

11:00AM - 12:20PM

HYER0102

Professor Gollop