Courses

Summer and Fall 2017

Summer Session 1

 

1301. Elementary Logic.
An introductory course in symbolic logic. Logic provides a means for determining whether the purported conclusion of an argument really does follow from the premises. In symbolic logic, mechanical procedures are developed for determining whether a given argument is valid. The techniques and skills acquired through logic have important applications not only within other academic areas such as the sciences and humanities, but may be of use within various professional areas, including law. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; law and legal reasoning.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Quantitative Reasoning


0011

M-F

10:00Am – 11:50 AM

HYER0107

Professor Lockard

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
1318. Contemporary Moral Problems.
An introduction to philosophical ethics focusing on questions in applied ethics. Students will explore ethical theories, philosophical methods, and their application to some of the most controversial and pressing issues confronting contemporary society. Topics vary, but the following are representative: abortion, animal rights, affirmative action, capital punishment, economic justice, euthanasia, sexuality, war and terrorism and world hunger. Class discussion is an important component of the course, as is reading and writing argumentative essays about these issues. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; ethics.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion


0011

TWTH

2:00PM – 5:00PM

HYER0110

Professor Egerstrom

______________________________________________________________________________________________________
3351.
History of Western Philosophy (Ancient).
This course surveys the history of western philosophy during the ancient period.  We begin with the metaphysical and cosmological views of the Presocratics. We then turn to the central ideas of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle with a focus on their ethical and political views.
**Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing

0011

M-F

10:00AM – 11:50AM

DALL0156

Professor Barnes


Summer Session 2

 

 

1317. Business Ethics.
A discussion of the moral and political issues surrounding a free enterprise system. Students will be introduced to basic moral theory. Further topics will include distributive (or economic) justice, the moral prefer ability of capitalism and socialism, and selected concrete moral issues such as truth in advertising, worker safety and affirmative action. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; ethics.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion

0012

TWTH

3:00PM – 6:00PM

HYER0110

Professor Daley

________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3352. History of Western Philosophy (Modern). 
Survey course in the history of modern philosophy covering the modern period, from Descartes to Hume, including Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, and Berkeley. We will examine many seminal writings in philosophy on such key issues as rationalism and empiricism, the nature of external reality and one’s knowledge of it, the existence and nature of God, the relation between mind and body, causation, induction, and the nature of morality and moral action. Satisfies one part of the history requirement for philosophy majors; may be used to satisfy the history requirement for philosophy minors.
**Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Pillars/Historical Context
** Depth/History/Social/Behavioral Sciences
** Depth//Humanity/Fine Arts

0012

M-F

1:00PM – 2:50PM

DALL0102

Professor Hiltz

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________
3364. Philosophy of Biology.
A survey of topics in the philosophy of biology, including evolution versus creationism, fitness,
units of selection, adaptationism, biological taxonomy, evolution in humans, cultural evolution, and niche construction.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** ** Depth//Humanity/Fine Arts

0012

TWTH

3:00PM- 6:00PM

Hyer0107

Professor Fisher

 


Fall 2017

 

1301. Elementary Logic.
An introductory course in symbolic logic. Logic provides a means for determining whether the purported conclusion of an argument really does follow from the premises. In symbolic logic, mechanical procedures are developed for determining whether a given argument is valid. The techniques and skills acquired through logic have important applications not only within other academic areas such as the sciences and humanities, but may be of use within various professional areas, including law. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; law and legal reasoning.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Quantitative Reasoning


001

TR

11:00 AM - 12:20 PM

ULEE0303

Professor Lockard

002

TR

9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

HYER0200

Professor Ehring

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________
1305. Introduction to Philosophy.
A general introduction to the central questions of philosophy; topics include the theory of knowledge, philosophy of religion, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethics and political philosophy. Typical questions might include: Can we know the world outside our minds? Is it rational to believe in a God who allows evil to exist? Do the laws of physics allow for human freedom? Is morality more than a matter of opinion? Can there be unequal wealth in a just society? Readings will include classical authors such as Plato, Descartes, Locke, Hume and Mill, as well as contemporary philosophers. The focus of the course will be on arguments for and against proposed solutions to key problems of philosophy.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion


001

TR

11:00AM – 12:20PM

HYER0106

Professor Daley

002

TR

2:00PM – 3:20PM

FOSC0155

Professor Chuard

003H/004C

TR

8:00AM - 9:20AM

HYER0110

Professor Daley - honors/hilltop

005

TR

3:30 PM - 4:50 PM

HYER0201

Professor Fisher

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1316. Introduction to Ethics.
This course is an introduction to ethics, or moral philosophy, that focuses on questions in ethical theory. Topics vary, but the following are representative. What makes our lives good or bad, better or worse? What makes our actions morally right or morally wrong? Is the distinction between doing harm and allowing harm a morally relevant one? Can our intentions affect the rightness/wrongness of our actions? When and why is it right for the state to punish criminals? Is there a real, objective difference between right and wrong? The course will focus on arguments for and against major positions on issues such as these.
May be used to fulfill requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; ethics.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion

 

 

001H/002C

TR

2:00PM – 3:20PM

HYER0200

Professor Robinson- honors/hilltop

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1317. Business Ethics.
A discussion of the moral and political issues surrounding a free enterprise system. Students will be introduced to basic moral theory. Further topics will include distributive (or economic) justice, the moral prefer ability of capitalism and socialism, and selected concrete moral issues such as truth in advertising, worker safety and affirmative action. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; ethics.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion

001

MWF

10:00 AM - 10:50 AM

Dall0357

Professor Egerstrom

002

WMF

2:00 PM - 2:50 PM

DLSB0110

Professor Hiltz

003

MWF

3:00 PM - 3:50 PM

FOSC0158

Professor Hiltz

004

MWF

9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

DALL0115

Professor Egerstrom

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1318. Contemporary Moral Problems.
An introduction to philosophical ethics focusing on questions in applied ethics. Students will explore ethical theories, philosophical methods, and their application to some of the most controversial and pressing issues confronting contemporary society. Topics vary, but the following are representative: abortion, animal rights, affirmative action, capital punishment, economic justice, euthanasia, sexuality, war and terrorism and world hunger. Class discussion is an important component of the course, as is reading and writing argumentative essays about these issues. Satisfies elective requirements in the following majors and minors: philosophy; ethics.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion


001

MWF

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

FOSC0158

Professor Egerstrom

002

MWF

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

DALL0153

Professor Hiltz

003

MWF

12:00 PM - 12:50 PM

HYER0200

Professor Hiltz

004

TR

12:30 PM -1:50 PM

DLSB0132

Professor Matey

005

MWF

2:00 PM - 2:50 PM

DALL0115

Professor Egerstrom

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
1319. Technology, Society, and Value.

Advances in technology are raising many ethical issues that require serious considerations. We will discuss issues surrounding such technologies and how they affect the views of warfare, privacy, human enhancement, and artificial intelligence.
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 1)
** Breath/Philosophy/Religion
** Breath/Technology/Mathematics

001

MWF

11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

FOSC0152

Professors Daley

002

MWF

9:00 AM - 9:50 AM

DLSB0110

Professors Dale

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

KNW 2308. Mathematical Models of Cognition.
Examines mathematical models at various levels of idealization, including models that capture fine-grained changes within individual neurons, models that consider the interaction of large networks of neurons, and computational models that describe stages of visual processing, and models that describe ways in which ideal rational agents would update probabilistic beliefs and make decisions in light of new evidence. Considers the relations between these different sorts of models, their respective strengths and weaknesses, and how they can be used to test hypotheses about cognition in humans and animals and for designing computer systems with artificial intelligence

** Foundation/Ways of Knowing
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts

001

TR

12:30 PM -1:50 PM

FOSC0153

Professor Fisher/ Professor Hedrick

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3301. Intermediate Logic.
Introduces the formal theory of the logical systems students have already learned to use: sentential logic and predicate logic. Students learn to prove the completeness and soundness of both of these systems. Also, simple nonstandard logical systems such as modal, epistemic, or deontic logic, if time permits. Prerequisite: PHIL 1301 or its equivalent.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Breath/Technology/Mathematics


001

TR

2:00 PM - 3:20 PM

HYER0G21

Professor Lockard

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3314. Metaphysics.
Some of the most central and traditional questions in philosophy are metaphysical: Do objects really exist? What are they? And what are persons: do we persist over time, can we survive change? Are we really free, or are all our actions determined by the laws of nature? Are our minds simply reducible to our brains? Are there such things as souls? How about the properties of things – objects have sizes and shapes, we have nationalities and genders, but what are these properties exactly? Can we know anything about the ultimate structure of reality? Does it include God? Is science the only way to discover what really exists and how things really are? This course offers a systematic approach to these questions and others.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing

001

TR

12:30 PM -1:50 PM

HyER0106

Professor Ehring

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3315. Philosophy of Mind.
A systematic treatment of the nature of consciousness, self, and person.

** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts

 

001

TR

3:30 PM - 4:50 PM

HYER0111

Professor Matey

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3321. Time, Space, and Metaphysics.
Does time pass? Do the past and the future exist? Is space a thing? What are the laws of nature? This course introduces some central issues in the metaphysics of science.

 ** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Information literacy
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Oral Communication


001

TR

3:30 PM - 4:50 PM

DALL0102

Professor Chuard

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3351. History of Western Philosophy (Ancient). 
This course surveys the history of western philosophy during the ancient period.  We begin with the metaphysical and cosmological views of the Presocratics. We then turn to the central ideas of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle with a focus on their ethical and political views. **Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)

** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing


001

TR

9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

HYER0102

Professor Howell

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3363. Aesthetic Experience and Judgement.
Attention is devoted to the following questions: What is beauty? Are there any standards or rules concerning what is beautiful? What is art? Why is art an important part of human culture? Students also consider the role of emotion in art, the problem of correct interpretation, and the nature of tragedy.
** Pillars/Creativity/Aesthetics
** Breadth/Creativity/Aesthetics
** Foundation/Ways of Knowing

701

MWF

5:00 PM - 6:20 PM

HYER0106

Professor Bartlett

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3373. Philosophy of Criminal Law.
By what right does society punish some people? What is the correct amount of punishment for a given crime? Why should the law excuse some people who are convicted of criminal acts? We examine the classical philosophical theories of retributivism and utilitarianism, as well as some contemporary writers who try to combine them. Each year the course also focuses on one important issue in the contemporary criminal justice system of the U.S. Recent topics have included the legalization of marijuana, convictions of innocent persons, stop-and-frisk policing, and prosecutorial discretion.
**
Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Pillars/Indvdls/Inst/Cultures II
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts
** Depth/Hist/Social/Behav Sci
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Information Literacy
** Proficiencies & Experiences/Writing

001

MWF

2:00 PM - 2:50 PM

HYER0201

Professor Sverdlik

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________
3380. Ethics: Morality, Self-Interest, and Justice.
Explores issues in normative ethical and political theory, with a particular emphasis on morality, self-interest, and justice. Topics vary, but the following are representative. Might enlightened self-interest be the basis of morality? Is a morally right action one that maximizes overall happiness or well-being, or are there moral rights or duties that prohibit the sacrifice of individuals or their interests for the sake of the greater good? Does individual well-being (or self-interest) consist of pleasure and freedom from pain? Do our subjective interests (our desires or preferences) determine what is ultimately best for us, or are there desire-independent goods, such as knowledge or moral virtue? To what extent, if any, does justice permit inequality of income or wealth? Do individuals have “natural” rights that prohibit the state from using certain means (e.g., taxes and transfers) to promote greater social welfare or less economic inequality?
** Pillars/Philosophical/Religious/Ethical Inquiry (Level 2)
** Depth/Humanities/Fine Arts


001

TR

9:30 AM - 10:50 AM

DALL0102

Professor Robinson