English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Fall 2015

ENGL 1330-001: THE WORLD OF SHAKESPEARE
MWF 10:00 – 100 HYER – NEEL

English 1330, The World of Shakespeare: An introduction to the study of William Shakespeare.  Course uses eight of the texts that Shakespeare set in the Classical World of Greece and Rome to learn about the age in which Shakespeare himself lived (1564-1616), to learn about how Renaissance Europe saw the Classical World (from mythic times to the collapse of the Roman Empire), and to learn how the study of literature offers rich sites for the study of ethics, politics, love, and literature itself.  Written mid-term and final examinations plus ten quizzes.  Satisfies Pillars I Creativity and Aesthetics requirement.  Class attendance mandatory.

ENGL 1362-001: CRAFTY WORLDS
MWF 1:00 – 110 HYER – HOLAHAN

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination.

Texts: TBD

ENGL 1365-001: LITERATURE OF MINORITIES
TTh 2:00 – 110 HYER – LEVY

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as  self-selected and imposed, as fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, and as local and global.

ENGL 2310-001: IMAGINATION AND INTERPRETATION
"Disaster Porn": Tragedy, Mayhem, and Mass Destruction in American Literature
MWF 11:00 – 120 DH – McAvoy

People have always been fascinated with and strangely entertained by accounts of natural disaster, murder, train wrecks, plane crashes, acts of terrorism, and war. This course will examine a variety of texts (novels, short stories, poems, essays, film) to see how individuals in nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century America have made sense of or imagined personal, national, and global tragedies and disasters. Students will be expected to contribute regularly to class discussion, complete quizzes, write focused analyses of a text or texts, and complete written exams to demonstrate their knowledge of and engagement with assigned material. Some of these materials may contain adult language, graphic (descriptions of) violence, and deal with controversial topics or themes.

ENGL 2310-002: IMAGINATION AND INTERPRETATION
TTh 8:00 – 106 DH – STAMPONE

Who am I? Why am I here? What is love? What is death to me? This class will introduce students to life’s biggest questions through the lens of literature. To answer these questions, students will be introduced to a variety of historical periods, artists, genres, and forms. Students will be expected to contribute regularly to class, complete quizzes, write focused responses on a work or works, and write exams that demonstrate their knowledge of assigned material. Please note that some of the works deal with adult themes and use adult language.

Texts:

Austen, Jane, Pride and Prejudice (ISBN 9780393976045): Beckett, Samuel, Waiting for Godot (ISBN 978-0802144423): Chopin, Kate, The Awakening (ISBN 978-0312446475): Cooper, James Fenimore, The Pioneers (ISBN 978-0140390070): Greene, Graham, The Power and the Glory (ISBN 978-0142437308): Miller, Arthur, Death of a Salesman (ISBN 978-0140481341): Shelley, Mary, Frankenstein (ISBN 978-0312191269)

ENGL 2311-001: POETRY
MWF 11:00 – 138 DH – HOLAHAN

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 Texts: TBA.

ENGL 2311-002: POETRY: A Poet-Guided Tour
TTh 2:00 – 102 DH – MOSS

In this course, we will introduce ourselves to the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry. Each week we will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focusing on a representative poet in each case. Hence, we will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg, and so forth. Course requirements: two short papers, one research paper, weekly posts to an online discussion list, midterm exam, final exam.

Course text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry.

ENGL 2311-003: POETRY
TTH 11:00 -- 137 DH – ROSENDALE

Analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of poetry, with attention to terms and issues relevant to the genre.

ENGL 2312-001H: FICTION
TTh 9:30 – 149 DH – SAE-SAUE

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet how does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? How does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation. Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, you will be able to: identify several formal elements in a work of literature. Write an analysis of an interpretive problem in a work of literature. Possible texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway.

ENGL 2312-002:  FICTION
MWF 9:00 – 137 DH – STAFF

Analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of poetry, with attention to terms and issues relevant to the genre.

Texts:  TBD.

ENGL 2312-003:  FICTION
MWF 11:00 – 116 DH – DIACONOFF

Analysis, interpretation, and appreciation of poetry, with attention to terms and issues relevant to the genre.

Texts:  TBD.

ENGL 2314-001H: DOING THINGS WITH POEMS
MWF 12:00 – 137 DH – BOZORTH

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3rd ed.).

ENGL 2315-001: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY:  IMAGINING “AMERICA” IN NARRATIVE
TTH 11:00 – 120 DH – ARDS

In this course, you will learn to interpret literature through close attention to literary form, genre, and historical context.  This critical project is grounded in the thematic approach of exploring the idea of “America” in texts that have been central to the definition of American national identity during crucial periods of national transformation. 

Sample texts include The Tempest, Shakespeare; Daisy Miller, Henry James; Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman; The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, James Weldon Johnson; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee; We Need New Names, NoViolet Bulawayo

ENGL 2315-002: INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY
MWF 1:00 – 149 DH – WEISENBURGER

This introductory course in literary study will develop critical reading and writing skills.  We begin by posing a basic question:  what sets literary writing apart as a field of study, in terms of what it is and does, with language?  What distinctive features define the poetics of the lyric, of fiction or drama?  And by what terms do we recognize, enjoy, and critically understand particular forms such as a Renaissance English play or a modern American detective story?  We also attend to the broad range of ways scholars in this field study literary texts.  Our own writing also is a vital part of this project; for we will work closely with and on student writings throughout the semester.  So one course objective is to make ourselves into more subtle and disciplined readers of literary writing, another is to improve our own writing through literary studies.  During the term plan to read slowly, closely, and to write about:  a Shakespeare play, a detective fiction, a novella, a book of lyrical poems by a contemporary American poet, a short story collection by Irish fiction writer James Joyce, and a classic example of the realist novel.  Writing assignments will include four short papers, a midterm, and a final exam.  

ENGL 2390-001: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
TTh 12:30 – 138 DH – HAYNES

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. 

Texts: Imagining Fiction, Janet Burroway, 4th edition. Pearson 2014

ENGL 2390-001: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
MWF 10:00 – 120 DH – DIACONOFF

Workshop on the theory and techniques of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.

ENGL 2390-001: INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
MWF 10:00 – 357 DH – MILAZZO

Workshop on the theory and techniques of writing fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. 

ENGL 3310-001: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE
TTh 11:00 – 156 DH – MURFIN

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination. Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism

ENGL 3310-002: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO LITERATURE
TTh 12:30 – 149 DH – SAE-SAUE

How to read literature? How to make meaning of cultural forms, including language itself? How to regard the imaginary representation of a real social situation? How to understand and to make use of “literary criticism”? This class addresses these questions by exploring how theory offers us a logic with which to read literature, to critique culture, and to understand historical conditions. We will familiarize ourselves with a range of theoretical approaches in order to interpret familiar literary texts. In doing so, we will learn to apply theory in order to examine the ways literature and culture seek to make sense of the complex worlds in which we live.

Throughout the course, we will look closely at key writings by some of the most influential (and most recognizable) linguistic, literary and cultural theorists of our field, including Ferdinand Saussure, Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Edward Said, Judith Butler, Gloria Anzaldua, and Henry Louis Gates. We will explore the ideas of these transformative thinkers to critique some of the most recognizable literary texts of our discipline, including works by: Franz Kafka, Virginia Wolf, Joseph Conrad, William Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, Sophocles, Samuel Beckett, Toni Morrison, and more!

CLAS 3312-001: CLASSICAL RHETORIC
MWF 2:00 – 0137 DH – NEEL

Classical Studies 3312: Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world's first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE.  Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and the study of philosophy emerged into history.  Three out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and ten reading quizzes.  Satisfies UC Writing Proficiency; Pillars II Philosophy, Religion, and Ethical Inquiry; Pillars II Historical Contexts; one requirement for the Classical Studies program; and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.  Class attendance required.

ENGL 3346-001: AMERICAN LITERARY HISTORY I
TTh 11:00 – 149 DH – GREENSPAN

This course will explore literary responses of a wide array of major American writers from 1775-1900 to questions and problems of individual, group, and national identity emerging in the wake of American political and cultural independence. Central issues will include nationalism as political and cultural phenomenon, individualism and freedom, history of authorship. Authors to include Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Hannah Foster, Washington Irving, William Apess, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Abe Cahan, and Theodore Dreiser. Course Requirements: 2 papers, midterm, and final exam.

ENGL 3360-001: AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: CONTEXT OF FERGUSON
TTH 2:00 – 357 DH – ARDS

This course examines the causes and contexts of the social movement that emerged out of Ferguson, Missouri, in the summer of 2014. We will draw on history, cultural criticism, and documentaries to explore how the Ferguson narrative compares to what is traditionally thought of as the modern civil rights movement, asking how changes in (social) media, civil institutions such as the church, social issues, and political values have shaped contemporary movements. For each question we will turn to cultural texts across a range of genres—plays and poetry, a novel and a memoir, essays and film—to ask what their narrative strategies and ethical preoccupations can teach us about an era that has been widely touted as “post-civil rights” but is in fact defined by continuing struggles for social justice.

Sample texts include the following: Killing Trayvons: An Anthology of American Violence, eds. Kevin Gray and JoAnn Wypijewski; The Gettin Place, Susan Straight; Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992, Anna Deavere Smith; The Good Negro, Tracy Scott Wilson; Redefining Realness, Janet Mock; Zoot Suit, Luis Valdez; Rosewood, John Singleton; Freedom Riders, Stanley Nelson; various essays by writers such as Ida B. Wells-Barnett, James Baldwin, and Vijay Prashad.

ENGL 3362-001: AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: HURSTON, WALKER, MORRISON
MWF 11:00 – 101 DH – SATZ

The study of three important figures in twentieth century literature—Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison--with attention to the interrelationships among the writers and their works as well as to the relation of the works to important events and movements in American history, such as slavery, segregation, and the Civil Rights movement. Various critical approaches to the works. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM Diversity credit by petition. Writing assignments: four essays, mid-term, final examination. Texts: Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, selected short stories; Walker, Meridian, The Color Purple, Possessing the Secret of Joy; Morrison, The Bluest Eye, Sula, Beloved, Jazz; essays by Hurston and Walker.

ENGL 3379-001: CONTEXTS OF DISABILITIES
MWF 10:00 – 102 DH – SATZ

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.  Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Child ; Jamison, Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind; Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton, May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

ENGL 3383-001  – Imagination/Capital Punishment
MWF 10:00  – 116 DH – Holahan

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination.

Texts: TBA

ENGL 3390-001: STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
WRITING HUMOR
MWF 12:00 – 138 DH – DIACONOFF

Life is a comedy to those who think, a tragedy to those who feel.—Horace Walpole
Comedy is the art of making people laugh without making them puke
.—Steve Martin

Humor writing presents special challenges, both practical and theoretical. What makes a piece of literary writing funny? Should the success of humor writing always be measured by how hard it made the reader laugh? Does analyzing the techniques of humor kill the humor? What are the conditions under which humor works best as social critique? These are some of the questions this course will seek to answer through readings of works by well-known humor writers of the modern era and through workshop discussion of students’ creative essays. Students are expected write about 40 pages of polished work, including first drafts and final revisions. Published authors may include canonical American humor writers such as Mark Twain, S.J. Perelman, James Thurber, Langston Hughes (the “Simple” stories), and Dorothy Parker, as well as more recent writers such as Dave Barry and Patricia Marx and anthologies like the McSweeney’s-published Created in Darkness by Troubled Americans and Hokum: An Anthology of African-American Humor. A special focus on parody may include works such as Andrew Shaffer’s Fifty Shames of Earl Grey.   

ENGL 3390-002: STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
TTh 3:30 – 156 DH – HAYNES

English 3390: Craft-Focused Fiction Writing Workshop: Building on basic techniques developed in Introduction to Creative Writing, students will further develop their skills, with particular attention to scenecraft and to increasing their range of technique. In addition to fiction, students will write craft analyses of published fiction.

ENGL 3390-003: STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING
MWF 9:00 – 357 DH – MILAZZO

Continues the development of fiction, nonfiction, and poetic craft while also engaging students in new media, community-based writing, publishing, editing, and the deeper study of professional technique.

ENGL 4323-001: CHAUCER
TTh 9:30 – 156 DH – WHEELER

Study of Chaucer’s dream poems as well as his great love-and-war poem Troilus and Criseyde, along with a sprinkling of staggeringly long classics.

Text: The Wadsworth Chaucer

ENGL 4333-001: SHAKESPEARE: SHAKESPEAREAN PAIRINGS
TTh 11:00 – 156 DH – MOSS

Shakespearean Pairings

As a dramatist, Shakespeare populates his stages with twins, couples, best friends, and arch-rivals. As a lyric and narrative poet, he likewise cultivates mirror-images, relishing the interplay of complementary or antithetical pairings of language, metaphor, and tone. Shakespeare’s double-vision moreover extends between his texts—so much so that often the most rewarding way to study them is in tandem, allowing each play or poem to illuminate its counterpart. In this course, we will identify Shakespeare as the poet of pairs, close-reading the doublings within each work and interpreting the often surprising binary relations between them. Course requirements: two shorter papers, one research paper, weekly posts to an online discussion list, creative project, final exam.

Course texts: Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors; Titus Andronicus; Venus and Adonis; Sonnets; Romeo and Juliet; A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Richard II; Henry V; Cymbeline; The Winter’s Tale

 

ENGL 4343-001: AGE OF REVOLUTIONS: ROMANTIC POETRY AND FICTION
TTh 2:00 – 137 DH – MURFIN

This course will cover poems by three major Romantic poets—William Wordsworth, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and George Gordon, Lord Byron—and three novels.  One of the novels was written during the Romantic period (Frankenstein, which Mary Shelley composed while she and her husband were vacationing with Byron), the other two were products of the subsequent, Victorian era (Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights and George Eliot’s Adam Bede) but were powerfully influenced by Romantic poetry.  We will note and discuss the persistence of various themes, motifs, and genres across the period beginning in 1798 (the publication date of Wordsworth’s Lyrical Ballads) and ending in 1859 (the year in which Adam Bede was published) but also consider the various ways in which these evolve over time. (Thus, Shelley’s poetry will be seen to revise Wordsworth’s; Brontë’s Heathcliff  as a type of Byronic Hero; the landscapes found in Frankenstein and Adam Bede as darkened versions of ones found in Romantic poetry, and so forth.)  Two papers will be required:  one short (due around mid-term), one long (due toward the end of the semester.  The longer paper will cover several of the works we have read and must make use of secondary sources.

ENGL 4350-001: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY BRITISH WRITERS: RADICALISM AND BRITISH MODERNISM
MW 2:00 – 157 DH – BOZORTH

A century later, the radicalism of modernism others still challenges and shapes what writers are doing today.  “On or about December 1910, human character changed,” declared Virginia Woolf.  We will read some of the most revolutionary literature ever written in English, as poetry, fiction, and drama all took on weird, new forms in response to the upheavals of the early 20th century.  We will see how British and Irish writers responded modern psychology and anthropology, new developments in music and visual media, and controversial new attitudes about gender, sex, and class.  We will consider how the cataclysms of “The Great War” of 1914-18 and the Great Depression in the 1930s accelerated changes in poetry and fiction.  We will talk about how literature responded to rising independence movements in Ireland and India, and the prospect of a post-imperial, even post-Christian Britain.   And we will grapple with some of the most weird, wonderful, and powerful literature ever written in English.  While there will be some lecturing, students will help direct this seminar’s explorations in class, through short response papers, and on an online discussion board.  The final weeks will be devoted to discussing research and writing of the final research paper.

Texts:  Selected poetry by W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden, Wilfred Owen; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse; E. M. Forster, A Passage to India; James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

ENGL 4360-001: STUDIES IN MODERN AMERICAN LITERATURE
TTh 2:00 – 101 DH – GREENSPAN

Course Description: This course will examine and discuss representations of family in works by a diverse array of leading twentieth-century American fictions, films, and photographs. Readings to include works by Theodore Dreiser, Willa Cather, Henry Roth, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Arthur Miller, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Philip Roth, and Art Spiegelman. Likely films: Alan Crosland, The Jazz Singer (starring Al Jolson, 1927); Alan Segal, Death of a Salesman (starring Lee Jay Cobb, 1966); Richard Linklater, Boyhood (2014). Course Requirements: short papers, midterm, and final research project.

ENGL 5310-001: SEMINAR IN LITERARY THEORY: DISTINCTION SEMINAR
MW 3:00 – 101 DH – WEISENBURGER

Aristotle’s Poetics conceived of violence as typical of spectacle—the aesthetically least significant stuff of literary art. Among the six elements of drama he ranked spectacle last, after plot, character, theme, dialog, rhythm.  If so unimportant, even degraded material aesthetically and ethically, why then are violent spectacles so pervasive in literary and artistic expression, especially in the modern age?  If violence is bad for you, why do we have so much of it, in print and on-screen?  And how then can we better, that is to say critically, understand violence in modern and contemporary literature—perhaps also in narrative film?  To think through such questions our seminar will take up a range of literary texts:  Shakespeare’s bloodiest revenge play, The Most Lamentable Roman Tragedy of Titus Andronicus (1594), and what surely must be America’s bloodiest novel, Cormac McCarthy’s award winning Blood Meridian (1986). Other texts will likely include Nathanael West’s Miss Lonelyhearts &The Day of the Locust (1933, 1939), Sherman Alexie’s Indian Killer (1996), Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987), and Natasha Trethewey’s Native Guard (2006).  To think critically about this problem we will read some classic philosophical essays of violence: by Walter Benjamin, Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, Pierre Bourdieu, and Judith Butler, as well as Slavoj Zizek’s 2006 book, Violence.  Writing:  brief responses, two short papers, and a research paper, digested for oral presentation before the seminar in May.  

ENGL 6310-001: ADVANCED LITERARY STUDIES
T 3:30 – 102 DH – SUDAN

ENGL 6311-001: SURVEY OF LITERARY CRITICISM
TTh 11:00 – 102 DH – FOSTER

A survey of literary criticism and theory from some of the ancient roots of critical thought to contemporary literary practice: from Heraclitus to Badiou. The purpose of the course is to provide the theoretical background necessary to understand the discipline of literary study. The course will require regular critical responses and several essays analyzing both critical and literary texts. Enrollment limit: Graduate Students only. Possible texts: Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life; Alain Badiou, Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism; Ian Bogost, Unit Operations; Don DeLillo, The Names; Sigmund Freud:, Civilization and Its Discontents; Michele Foucault:, Discipline and Punish; Henry James, Eight Tales from the Major Phase; Plato, Phaedrus; Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things.

ENGL 6312-001: TEACHING PRACTICUM
F 2:00 – TBD – STEPHENS

English 6312 has two purposes: First, it serves as an introductory support structure for PhD candidates who are teaching their first first-year writing classes at SMU. Second, in a general way, it introduces graduate students to the field of composition studies that has emerged in North American English Departments in the last forty years. The course helps PhD students write syllabi for and plan their classes for the fall term; it also offers an ongoing conversation about grading, conferences, classroom management, etc. In addition, all students read three books that outline the development of the field of composition studies, and each student reads and reports on a fourth book that describes the field as it exists now.

Texts:  TBA.

ENGL 6360-001: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN LITERATURE
M 3:00 – 138 DH – DICKSON-CARR

In this proseminar, we will focus upon the authors, theories, literary works, and historical circumstances that led to the postmodern era in American literature and culture. We shall begin by reading some of the theories that have fundamentally informed definitions and discussions of the postmodern, as well as the movement’s roots in American modernism. In general, we shall examine these authors to attempt answers to the following questions: What is postmodernism? What makes a literary work “postmodern”? Who are the major American authors writing in this mode, and how are they important to American literature, culture, and history? How is postmodernism different from literary modernism? How is it similar? Are we now post-postmodern, as some theorists argue? If so, when did this happen, and how? The assigned authors represent a sampling of those most frequently classified as “postmodern,” although we are always free to interrogate that label. The theoretical grounding with which the course begins should remain with us. To that end, we will read most works in conjunction with critical reviews and studies that will help open our discussions. Our goal is to come to a new understanding of the ontological and epistemological questions that postmodern literature addresses, which may very well force us to rethink American literature and its place in the discipline. Primary authors my include, but will not be limited to: Acker; Barth; Barthelme; Coover; DeLillo; Reed; Morrison; Pynchon; Vonnegut; Wallace. Secondary authors will include: Baudrillard; Derrida; Foucault; Haraway; Hutcheon; Jameson; Lyotard; Weisenburger.

Written Requirements: Weekly responses; an in-class presentation; two major analytical papers.

ENGL 7340-001: SEMINAR:  HEARTH AND HOME, CITY AND
COURT IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
TH 3:30 – 138 DH – WHEELER

In this course on some roles of place in Middle English culture, we will discuss texts from drama produced for and in city cultures to domestic correspondence within a single family (The Paston Letters). Malory’s Morte D’Arthur and some poems by Chaucer will also be considered. 

ENGL 7376-001: SEMINAR: FAITH, DOUBT, AND UNBELIEF IN THE VICTORIAN ERA
W 3:00 – 137 DH – NEWMAN

The term agnosticism was coined in 1869 by Thomas Henry Huxley, a proponent of Darwin’s work.   A late twentieth-century study of Victorian writers is titled God’s Funeral, after a poem of Thomas Hardy’s.  But that’s not the whole picture.   This course aims to test--inevitably, to verify, but also to complicate--the truism that the Victorian period was an age of doubt.  We will do so in the context of the recent critical discourse about secularism and secularization.   Some of the questions we will ask: How does Victorian literary culture, which also produced the discipline of “English Literature,” participate in the creation of a secular civic life?  How did some Victorian writers seek to bring about the “re-enchantment of the world” about which contemporary scholars have been writing?  What else besides science contributed to the crises of faith experienced by influential Victorian writers and thinkers?  How do gender, sexuality, and British imperialism enter into the picture?   And what about those who maintained their faiths or deepened them, converted, or explored “occult,” proto-New-Age spiritualties such as theosophy?  Texts will be chosen from the following: Tennyson, In Memoriam; Mrs. Humphry Ward, Robert Elsmere; the Autobiographical Sketches of Annie Besant (who married a clergyman, became an atheist and socialist, and later, a theosophist); essays by Matthew Arnold; poetry by Christina Rossetti, D.G. Rossetti, and A. C. Swinburne; Amy Levy, Reuben Sachs; Olive Schreiner, Story of an African Farm; possibly Charlotte Yonge’s The Heir of Redclyffe or some other popular religious novel as a context for George Eliot’s The Mill on the Floss or Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure.

 

Cat#

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel, Jasper

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

CA1

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan, Michael

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

Hyer 110

TBD

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy, Bruce

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

CA1/HD

1400

001

Dev Reading & Writing

Pisano, Patricia

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 105

OC

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

IL/W/OC

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

IL/W/OC

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Disaster Porn

McAvoy, Amanda

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 120

CA2/W

2310

002

Imagination and Interpretation

Stampone, C.

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 106

CA2/W

2311

001

Poetry

Holahan, Michael

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 138

CA2/W

2311

002

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss, Daniel

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 102

CA2/W

2311

003

Poetry

Rosendale, T.

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 137

CA2/W

2312

001C

Fiction

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 149

CA2/W/OC

2312

001H

Fiction

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 149

CA2/W/OC

2312

002

Fiction

Staff

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

CA2/W/OC

2312

003

Fiction

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 116

CA2/W/OC

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems

Bozorth, Richard

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 137

CA2/W

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study

Ards, Angela

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 120

CA2/W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study

Weisenburger, S.

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

CA2/W

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes, David

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

CA2/W

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 120

CA2/W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 357

CA2/W

3310

001

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Murfin, Ross

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

 

3310

002

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

 

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel, Jasper

MWF

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DALL0137

HC2

3346

001

American Lit History I

Greenspan, Ezra

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 149

HC2/CA2/W

3360

002

African-American Lit: Context of Ferguson

Ards, Angela

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

CA2/W

3362

001

African-American Lit: Hurston,  Walker,  Morrison

Satz, Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 101

CA2/W/HD

3379

001C

Contexts of Disability-CFA 3379

Satz, Martha G

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

CA2/W/HD/OC

3383

001C

Imagination/Captl Punishment/CF 3305

Holahan, Michael N

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 116

TBD

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing: Writing Humor

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

CA2/W

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Haynes, David

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

CA2/W

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Milazzo, Joe

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 357

CA2/W

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler, Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 156

OC/IL

4333

001

Shakespeare:

Shakespearean Pairings

Moss, Daniel

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

OC/IL

4343

001

Age of Revolutions: Romantic Poetry and Fiction

Murfin, Ross

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

OC/IL

4350

001

Mod & Contemp: Radicalism and British Modernism

Bozorth, Richard

MW

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 157

OC/IL

4360

001

Studies In Modern American Lit

Greenspan, Ezra

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 101

OC/IL

5310

001

Distinction Seminar

Weisenburger, S.

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Sudan, Rajani

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Foster, Dennis

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens, Lori

F

2:00 PM

4:50 PM

 

 

6360

001

Modern & Contemp American Lit

Carr, Darryl

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 138

 

7340

001

Seminar: Medieval

Wheeler, Bonnie

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

7376

001

Seminar: Religion and Doubt in Victorian Era

Newman, Beth

W

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

 

 

Professor Codes: “P#’s”

Ards P05

Bozorth P12

Brownderville P 14

Cassedy P20

Crusius P:23

Dickson-Carr P 28

Foster P32

Greenspan P 34

Haynes P35

Holahan P40

Moss P52

Murfin P54

Murfin P54

Neel P56

Newman P58

Rosendale P59

Sae-Saue P33

Satz P60

Schwartz P63

Siraganian  P65

Spiegelman P70

Sudan P75

Weisenburger P84

Wheeler P85

 

 

 

University Curriculum Components

 

W:           Writing               

HD:         Human Diversity

IL:           Information Literacy

OC:          Oral Communication

 

CA1:       Creativity & Aesthetics Level 1

CA2:      Creativity & Aesthetics Level 2

HC1:       Historical Contexts Level 1

HC2:      Historical Contexts Level 2

 

 

Cat#

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

2312

002

Fiction

Staff

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

CA2/W/OC

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 357

CA2/W

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel, Jasper

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

CA1

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 120

CA2/W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 357

CA2/W

3379

001C

Contexts of Disability-CFA 3379

Satz, Martha G

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

CA2/W/HD/OC

3383

001C

Imagination/Captl Punishment/CF 3305

Holahan, Michael N

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 116

TBD

2310

001

Imagination and Interpret.

McAvoy, Amanda

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 120

CA2/W

2311

001

Poetry

Holahan, Michael

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 138

CA2/W

2312

003

Fiction

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 116

CA2/W/OC

3362

001

African-American Lit: Hurston,  Walker,  Morrison

Satz, Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 101

CA2/W/HD

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems

Bozorth, Richard

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 137

CA2/W

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing: Writing Humor

Diaconoff, Cara

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

CA2/W

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan, Michael

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

Hyer 110

TBD

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study

Weisenburger, S.

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

CA2/W

4350

001

Mod & Contemp: Radicalism and British Modernism

Bozorth, Richard

MW

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 157

OC/IL

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel, Jasper

MWF

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DALL0137

HC2

6360

001

Modern & Contemp American Lit

Carr, Darryl

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 138

 

5310

001

Seminar In Literary Theory

Weisenburger, S.

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

 

7376

001

Seminar: Religion and Doubt in Victorian Era

Newman, Beth

W

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

 

1400

001

Dev Reading & Writing

Pisano, Patricia

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 105

OC

2310

002

Imagination and Interpret.

Stampone, C.

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 106

CA2/W

2312

001C

Fiction

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 149

CA2/W/OC

2312

001H

Fiction

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 149

CA2/W/OC

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler, Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 156

OC/IL

2311

003

Poetry

Rosendale, T.

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 137

CA2/W

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study

Ards, Angela

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 120

CA2/W

3310

001

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Murfin, Ross

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

 

3346

001

American Lit History I

Greenspan, Ezra

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 149

HC2/CA2/W

4333

001

Shakespeare:

Shakespearean Pairings

Moss, Daniel

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

OC/IL

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Foster, Dennis

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

 

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

IL/W/OC

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes, David

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

CA2/W

3310

002

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Sae-Saue, Jayson

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

 

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy, Bruce

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

CA1/HD

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate, Vicki

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

IL/W/OC

2311

002

Poetry: A Poet-Guided Tour

Moss, Daniel

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 102

CA2/W

3360

002

African-American Lit: Context of Ferguson

Ards, Angela

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

CA2/W

4343

001

Age of Revolutions: Romantic Poetry and Fiction

Murfin, Ross

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

OC/IL

4360

001

Studies In Modern American Lit

Greenspan, Ezra

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 101

OC/IL

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Sudan, Rajani

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Haynes, David

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

CA2/W

7340

001

Seminar: Medieval

Wheeler, Bonnie

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens, Lori

F

2:00 PM

4:50 PM