English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Spring 2016

 

ENGL 1363-001: The Myth of The American West [HC1, CA1]

11:00 AM MWF, 115 DH, Weisenburger

In this course we study how the realities of conquest in the nineteenth century American West were transformed into twentieth century legend and myth.  Our case studies include Texas emigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche, as presented in factual, fictional, and cinematic versions; the late-19th phenomenon of Buffalo Bill Cody’s worldwide celebrity; the romance of horse culture and gunfighters in mid-20th century novels and films; and late-20th century revisions to that tradition.  Readings will include biographical and historical sources, representative novels, and a selection of classic Western films from the Silent Era to the present.  Course requirements: evening viewing of 3 feature films, several brief response papers, a mid-term and final exam. 

 

ENGL 1385-001: Power, Passion, and Protest in British Literature [HC1, CA1]

12:30 PM MWF, 306 DH, Sudan

A high-speed, one-semester introductory overview of British literature, from its medieval beginnings to (almost) the present day, with attention to literature’s capacities to pursue desire and to exercise (and resist) various kinds of power. As we survey this history, and trace the story of one of the world’s great cultural treasures, we will consider literature in relation to the social, political, intellectual, and religious histories in which it was written, as well as its relevance to our own time. Authors covered will include Chaucer, Shakespeare, Wroth, Donne, Milton, Behn, Swift, Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Rossetti, Tennyson, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Beckett. Method of instruction: lecture and discussion. Methods of evaluation: midterm and final exams, quizzes, short essays, participation.

 

ENGL 2302-001: Business Writing [IL, OC, W]

12:30 PM TTh, 351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2302-002: Business Writing [IL, OC, W]

2:30 PM TTh, 351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2310-001: Imagination and Interpretation: Literature and Life Questions [CA2, W]

8:00 AM MWF, 156 DH, Stampone

Who am I? Why am I here? What is love? What is death to me? This class will introduce students to life’s biggest questions through the lens of literature. To answer these questions, students will be intr oduced to a variety of historical periods, artists, genres, and forms. Students will be expected to contribute regularly to class, complete quizzes, write focused responses on a work or works, and write exams that demonstrate their knowledge of assigned material. Please note that some of the works deal with adult themes and use adult language.

 

ENGL 2311-001: Poetry [CA2, W]

12:00 PM MWF, 153 DH, Holahan

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-002: Poetry [CA2, W]

11:00 AM MWF, 138 DH, Newman

A poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art instead of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us—and we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so will provide you with something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works, which will help you as a reader and writer in whatever you do.  And it will also provide you with a pleasure that may grow on you slowly—or all at once. Text: Helen Vender, Poems, Poets, Poetry, third edition. Requirements: four short papers, occasional shorter writing assignments, exercises, and/or blackboard postings, 1-2 presentations, some quizzes.

ENGL 2311-003: Poetry [CA2, W]

11:00 AM TTh, 137 DH, Bozorth

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to spot exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3d ed.); Andrea Lunsford, EasyWriter (4th ed.).

 

ENGL 2312-001: Fiction [CA2, W]

9:30 AM TTh, 120 DH, Sae-Saue

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet how does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? How does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation. Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, you will be able to: identify several formal elements in a work of literature. Write an analysis of an interpretive problem in a work of literature. Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway

 

ENGL 2312-002: Fiction [CA2, W]

9:00 AM MWF, 156 DH, McAvoy

This course is an introduction to reading, interpreting, discussing, and writing about works of fiction with a particular emphasis on Gothic tales and Gothic elements in American literature from the late 18th to the early 21st century. Literary critic Charles L. Crow defines the American Gothic as “the imaginative expression of the fears and forbidden desires of Americans… [and] it offers a forum for discussing some of the key issues of American society, including gender and the nation’s continuing drama of race.” This course will cover a variety of fictional texts that relate in some way to the Gothic genre and will interrogate what it is about Gothic themes, elements, and plots that American authors have found so useful in their explorations of central issues in American society over the last three centuries. How can seemingly fantastic, supernatural, grotesque, and terrifying stories provide grounds for serious discussions and critiques of life in America? We will think about this and a number of other questions throughout the course of the semester. Possible texts: Charles Brockden Brown, Wieland; Hannah Crafts, The Bondwoman’s Narrative; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Cormac McCarthy, The Road; short stories by Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Edgar Allan Poe, Joyce Carol Oates, and Shirley Jackson.

 

ENGL 2314-001H: Doing Things With Poems [CA2, W]

9:30 AM TTh, 137 DH, Spiegelman

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers. Some attention to matters of literary history. Writing assignments: approximately five short essays, daily paragraphs, final examination if necessary. Students will memorize 100 lines of poetry. Texts: Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry; Hollander, Rhyme’s Reason

 

ENGL 2315-001: Introduction to Literary Study: Imagining “America” in Narrative [CA2, W]

11:00 AM MWF, 120 DH, Ards

In this course, you will learn to interpret literature through close attention to language, form, genre, and historical context.  This critical project is grounded in the thematic approach of exploring the idea of “America” in texts that have been central to the definition of New World identities. Across four thematic sections—discovery, nationhood, citizenship, borders—the course features exemplary writers and a diverse selection of literary genres to understand how narrative shapes (trans)national character. Sample texts include The Tempest, Shakespeare; Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte; Daisy Miller, Henry James; The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, James Weldon Johnson; Slouching Toward Bethlehem, Joan Didion; Drown, Junot Diaz; and Americanah, Chimananda Adichie.

ENGL 2315-002: Introduction to Literary Study [CA2, W]

12:30 PM TTh, DH 102, Neel

Reading, thinking about, discussing, and writing about the great texts of imaginative literature have been the foundation for advanced education in the West since Isocrates and Plato opened their schools sometime around 390 BCE in Athens.  This course is based on and operates deeply within that 2,500-year-old tradition.  We will begin with literature from Golden Age Greece and the Judeo-Christian Apocrypha and then concentrate on the high-culture Anglo-American canon of the last three centuries, considering poetry, drama, and fiction and concluding with creative non-fiction and film.  Three out-of-class papers, one major in-class paper, and occasional reading quizzes.  Satisfies the UC Writing Proficiency and Creativity and Aesthetics Pillars II requirement.  Class attendance required.

 

ENGL 2390-001: Introduction to Creative Writing [CA2, W]

12:30 PM TTh, 138 DH, Brownderville

The subject of this course is powerful language. How do words move readers? To begin answering this question, students will write and revise poems, short stories, and creative essays; respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s creative work; and analyze published texts in three-page critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. Toward the end of the semester, each student must submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-002: Introduction to Creative Writing [CA2, W]

10:00 AM MWF, 106 DH, Milazzo

What does it mean to be "literary"? Of course, to be literary is to be engaged in the act of writing, and to be generating written expressions of both a particular quality and a certain constitution.  But such expressions, as much as they are the product of any given writer's innate talent, are also grounded in the writer's attitudes, habits, proclivities, discipline, and familiarity with the raw materials of the craft of writing itself.  As such, being literary entails more than writing.  To be literary is to assume a disposition; to be literary is to care about language and its use; to be literary is to be conversant in a specific discourse and the vocabulary appropriate to that discourse; to be literary is to be analytical with respect to writing, both one's own and others'; and to be literary is to declare one's affiliation with a community of writers, one whose membership is local and contemporary even as it also ranges far back over ta variety of traditions and projects itself forward into some barely glimpsed posterity.

Over the course of the semester, we will work together to gain a better understanding of the above definition of the literary. Via regular reading (of model texts; of each others' texts, via workshop) and writing assignments (common, completed in class; individualized, completed on each student's own time), we will familiarize ourselves with the essentials of the major literary genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction. We will each also commit to and reflect upon our own unique writing practices, and collaborate on addressing those pragmatic questions—e.g., "How do I find the time to write?"—that every author confronts.

 

ENGL 2390-003: Introduction to Creative Writing [CA2, W]

2:00 PM TTh, 115 DH, Diaconoff

This course introduces students to the practice of writing poems, short stories, and creative essays. Class time is devoted to the study of published pieces, workshop discussion of students' pieces, and in-class writing exercises. Some students taking it will have no prior experience in creative writing, whereas others might have quite a bit. One presupposition of the course is that students will learn at least as much from reading and responding to each other’s writing as they will from any other activity. Students will write and revise poems, stories, and creative essays to culminate in a portfolio for each of those genres; short (2-3 page) critical papers will also be assigned (one each in the poetry, fiction, and creative essay units). The course will culminate in the division of the class into small-group collectives who work together to curate a literary ‘zine. Texts: Richard Hugo, The Triggering Town; Jeff Knorr and Tim Schell, eds, A Writer’s Country.

 

ENGL 3310-001: Contemporary Approaches to Literature

11:00 AM TTh, 152 DH, Murfin

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination. Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism

 

ENGL 3310-002: Contemporary Approaches to Literature

12:30 PM TTh, 102 Hyer, Sae-Saue

How to read literature? How to make meaning of cultural forms, including language itself? How to regard the imaginary representation of a real social situation? How to understand and to make use of “literary criticism”? This class addresses these questions by exploring how theory offers us a logic with which to read literature, to critique culture, and to understand historical conditions. We will familiarize ourselves with a range of theoretical approaches in order to interpret familiar literary texts. In doing so, we will learn to apply theory in order to examine the ways literature and culture seek to make sense of the complex worlds in which we live.

Throughout the course, we will look closely at key writings by some of the most influential (and most recognizable) linguistic, literary and cultural theorists of our field, including Ferdinand Saussure, Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Edward Said, Judith Butler, Gloria Anzaldua, and Henry Louis Gates. We will explore the ideas of these transformative thinkers to critique some of the most recognizable literary texts of our discipline, including works by: Franz Kafka, Virginia Wolf, Joseph Conrad, William Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, Sophocles, Samuel Beckett, Toni Morrison, and more!

 

CLAS 3312-001: Classical Rhetoric [HC2, PRIE2]

9:30 AM TTh, 143 DH, Neel

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world's first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE.  Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and the study of philosophy emerged into history.  Three out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and ten reading quizzes.  Satisfies UC Writing Proficiency; Pillars II Philosophy, Religion, and Ethical Inquiry; Pillars II Historical Contexts; one requirement for the Classical Studies program; and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.  Class attendance required.

 

ENGL 3340-001: Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen: Manners, Morals, Courtship [CA2, W]

2:00 PM MWF, 153 DH, Holahan

This course covers the six major novels of Jane Austen.  It considers the repeated variations of courtship, proposal, rejection or acceptance, and marriage.  Along the way, it also studies the literary techniques of narration, characterization, plot development, and style.  Certain topics (e.g., Austen’s various ‘limita-tions’) are studied in relation to historical background as well as in relation to stylistic or literary concerns.  Some attention is also given to Austen’s idea of the novel and the purposes of writing novels. This inevitably raises the issue of authorial self-consciousness. Some (Henry James) have claimed she had none; others (this instructor)  have claimed she had a good deal. Norton Critical Editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.

 

ENGL 3344-001: Victorian Gender [CA2, HD, W]

1:00 PM MWF, 115 DH, Newman

The word “Victorian” has been a synonym for “prudish” for about a hundred years.  One historian has asserted that the sexes were regarded as more radically, absolutely different during the nineteenth century than any time before or since.  Clearly we’re nothing like them—right?  

If that’s the case, why does the literature of Victorian England still speak so meaningfully and directly to us about what it means to be a man or woman?  Take Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, which remains popular with readers, or Charles Dickens’s Great Expectations, both of which we will read.  Or consider Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, which raise questions about female sexuality and gay male identity that still speak to us.  This was also an era when prostitution. birth control, and what it means to consent to sex (and the age when one could do so) were being debated, the term “homosexual” was being coined, and gender roles, after a long period of rigidity, were being openly questioned. Requirements: 3 papers (for a total of about 15 pages), occasional quizzes and discussion board postings, in-class midterm and final exams. Texts: Brontë, Jane Eyre; Dickens, Great Expectations; Hardy, Tess of the d’Urbervilles; Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; short essays, some poetry, and other readings posted on line or distributed in class.

 

ENGL 3348/CF 3374: History of Print and Digital Culture in America [CA2, HC2]

11:00 AM TTh, 357 DH, Greenspan

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital and multimedia culture. In moving across four centuries of writing, it will introduce students from various disciplinary tracks to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions. Its goals will be to expose them, first, to a literary history of the United States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture, and society.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy; formations of lowbrow, middlebrow, and highbrow culture; the history of libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the ongoing shift from print-based to digital-based culture.

 

ENGL 3362-001: African American Literature [CA2, HD, OC, W]

3:00 PM MWF, 153 DH, Ards

Since its eighteenth-century beginnings, some have considered African American literature a human impossibility and others, an act of self-assertion. The understanding of what constitutes an African American literary tradition, consequently, has been rife with debate and redefinition. In this course, we will examine how black writers wrestled with major themes and motifs of American literature to respond to these questions of origin, legitimacy, and tradition. We will read authors within the major literary movements of their time and consider their direct influence on later generations. Some writers we will read are Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, James Weldon Johnson, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Janet Mock.

 

ENGL 3366-001: American Literary History II [CA2, HC2, W]

2:00 PM TTh, 116 DH, Greenspan

This course will offer a survey of the literary and cultural history of the United States from the turn of the twentieth century to the present. It will introduce students to a wide variety of leading writers of the period: Charles Chesnutt, Willa Cather, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Nathaniel West, Arthur Miller, Flannery O’Connor, Toni Morrison, Maxine Hong Kingston, Art Spiegelman, Louise Erdrich, and Michael Chabon. It will also include a unit on twentieth-century film and drama.

 

ENGL 3385-001: Literature of the Holocaust

10:00 AM MWF, 120 DH, Satz

This course explores both the literature of the Holocaust  and issues surrounding  the possibility of aesthetic  portrayal  of this horrific event .   It considers   both Holocaust literature and post-Holocaust literature.  It will include texts such as Schwarz-Bart, Last of the Just; Wiesel, Night; Speigelman, Maus; Borowski, This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen; Schlink, The Reader. Requirements:  four papers of various lengths, mid-term, final. This course will count for the Jewish Studies minor

ENGL 3380: Literature and Medicine [CA2, PRIE2, HD, W]

11:00 AM MWF, 107 Hyer, Nixon

What can Hemingway teach us about surgery and pain? Susanna Kaysen about being diagnosed with a personality disorder? Atul Gawande about the uncertain path of medicine? Through literature, we can begin to imagine experience of medicine for both doctors and patients. These experiences often escape our grasp. The sick and injured, after all, live in a complex relationship not only with doctors and hospitals, but with friends and family, law and government, insurance and big pharma. The ill take on a new identity as the patient, and see themselves swept up into the narratives of a healthcare system whose goals often seem at odds with those of the patient. Doctors must tend to the bodies and minds of patients, but also handle family, colleagues, medical institutions and the accidents of nature. This course will help us to understand the roles each of us play as patients and healers. We will begin by considering the case history, the story that defines what has brought doctor and patient together. But the story is always bigger and older than two people speaking. We will have to think, for example, about the stories, both horrific and heroic, that arise in response to the maladies that afflict us individually and collectively (as Ebola has transformed the health narrative world-wide). We’ll consider the birth of the modern clinic in an enlightenment world; the role of the mentally ill as sanity’s shadow; and the stories doctors tell to help them endure the hardships of medicine. We will explore the ethical dilemmas that arise in this age of medical marvels when we must decide who will live, for how long, under what conditions, at what expense, at whose choice. We will read a wide variety of literature, history, biography, philosophy, and science to help us understand the ways in which illness and medicine talk together. 

ENGL 3390-001: Studies in Creative Writing [CA2, W]

3:30 PM TTh, 142 DH, Brownderville

In this workshop-intensive course, students will write, revise, and analyze poetry. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. Students will write five-page belletristic articles about published poetry. In addition, toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own poems. Texts will include slender volumes of poetry such as David Berman’s Actual Air, Kay Ryan’s Say Uncle, and Ross Gay’s Bringing the Shovel Down. Successful students will begin to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary poetry.

 

ENGL 3390-002: Studies in Creative Writing [CA2, W]

2:00 PM MWF, 137 DH, Milazzo

In this workshop-intensive course, we will work together to gain both a broad and deep understanding of what it means to devise settings for one's narratives. We will examine elements of time, place, and cultural context at both the micro- and macro- levels via both regular in-class writing exercises and readings of model texts. We will discuss the various tools and techniques that a diverse array of authors employ in order to create mappable as well as navigable fictional realities. We will also practice certain of these techniques, and focus our workshop sessions on further illuminating those authorial choices that become "rules" for determining how individual imaginary worlds function. This course will also provide an opportunity to experiment with collaborative writing (the exact nature of this project TBD, as student input will be solicited).

ENGL 3390-003: Studies in Creative Writing: Fairy Tales and Fiction [CA2, W]

9:30 AM TTh, HYER 110, Diaconoff

For fiction writers, studying fairy tales means going back to the basics in order to clear space for even more richness and complexity in our stories. At least, that is the hope for this course. In fairy tales, the elements of fiction are so highly concentrated as to seem raw; the stories have the immediate, inevitable quality that can seem like magic to writer and reader alike. With their unique ability to combine elements of “real” life and the logic of dreams to result in effects that bypass the rational mind, fairy tales and folk tales can lead the writer to a realm of image and emotion otherwise not accessible. At the same time, it’s fascinating to read fairy tales in their guise as socializing mechanisms. What do they say about the values of the culture in which they’re read and taught to children? How might we “write back” at them—how might we question the underlying assumptions of the lessons they impart?

Students will write three stories for workshop as well as a series of shorter (2-3 page) critical papers and, likely, a series of shorter creative exercises. Published readings will include folk tales in versions collected by the Brothers Grimm and Charles Perrault as well as contemporary fairy-tale based stories by the master of that form, Angela Carter (The Bloody Chamber), and the writers collected in Kate Bernheimer’s anthology My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me as well as the journal Fairy Tale Review. Movie versions of famous fairy tales may also be an object of interest in the course.

ENGL 4323-001: Chaucer [IL, OC]

9:30 AM TTh, 156 DH, Wheeler

Study of Chaucer’s dream poems as well as his great love-and-war poem Troilus and Criseyde, along with a sprinkling of staggeringly long classics. Text: The Wadsworth Chaucer

 

ENGL 4332-001: Studies in Early Modern British Literature: Shakespearean Pairings  [IL, OC]

3:30 PM TTh, 102 DH, Moss

As a dramatist, Shakespeare populates his stages with twins, couples, best friends, and arch-rivals. As a lyric and narrative poet, he likewise cultivates mirror-images, relishing the interplay of complementary or antithetical pairings of language, metaphor, and tone. Shakespeare’s double-vision moreover extends between his texts—so much so that often the most rewarding way to study them is in tandem, allowing each play or poem to illuminate its counterpart. In this course, we will identify Shakespeare as the poet of pairs, close-reading the doublings within each work and interpreting the often surprising binary relations between them. Course requirements: two shorter papers, one research paper, weekly posts to an online discussion list, creative project, final exam. Texts: Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors; Titus Andronicus; The Rape of Lucrece; SonnetsLove's Labors Lost; Twelfth Night; The Merchant of Venice; Measure for Measure; Othello; The Winter’s Tale.

 

ENGL 4343-001: British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Secrecy in the 19th-Century Novel  [IL, OC]

2:00 PM TTh 153 DH, Murfin 

A consideration of six works of fiction dating from the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Some of these texts include important secrets known to the narrator and some characters (but not others, sometimes including the protagonist). Others contain information unknown by the narrator and/or reader until revelatory turning points in the plot. Still other works seem to involve additional secrets that are never revealed, except through what J. Hillis Miller calls “traces or marks,” “indirect signs announcing their hidden existence”—secrets perhaps unknown at any conscious level by the authors themselves. Such fictions often involve real or phantasmal doubles (twins) or Doppelgängers (counterparts); their plots often contain instances of what Freud termed the “uncanny” and are typically conveyed through complex, achronological narrative structures. (These include twice-told tales, interpolated stories, and so-called “Chinese box” narratives that at once invite readers to be “in on” the secret and that, at the same time, keep readers at a distance.) Works covered will include Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, Thomas Hardy’s The Mayor of Casterbridge, Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim and The Secret Sharer, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, and Ford Madox Ford’s The Good Soldier. In addition to writing a short paper and a longer paper involving secondary sources, students will complete three in-class writing assignments and lead a discussion.

 

ENGL 4356-001: American Poetry, 1945–Present  [IL, OC]

12:30 PM TTh, 115 DH, Spiegelman

This course is an introduction to some of the major poets and poetic currents in the USA, roughly from 1945 to the present, including Beat and Confessional poetry, formalism and the avant-garde. We shall discuss, albeit peripherally, the changing place of poetry in culture, and issues of gender, and the relationship of poetry to the public realm, but our primary focus will center on the reading of particular poems, and the ways in which an individual poet arranges his or her creative life and output.  The aim is to help you develop the skills and perspectives you’ll need to appreciate---and write cogently about---recent poetry, in response to the aesthetic and speculative issues it raises.  This is a course in how to read contemporary poetry, and in why it matters.  Previous work in poetry is expected but not required. The focus will be on the following poets: Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, James Merrill, Allen Ginsberg, John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Louise Glück, and Jorie Graham. Other poets (Richard Wilbur, Anthony Hecht, Howard Nemerov, Frank O’Hara, Anne Carson) will be brought into the discussion. There will be several short paper assignments, a mid-term exam, a final paper, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 4369-001: Transatlantic Studies III: Contemporary LGBT Writing  [IL, OC]

2:00 PM TTh, 157 DH, Bozorth

The Stonewall Rebellion of June 1969 marked the birth of the modern gay rights movement, and the decades since have seen the “coming out” of lesbian, gay, and transgender literature as well.  We’ll be reading some of the most influential novels, plays, and memoirs by British and US queer writers from the 1960s to the present, considering the aesthetic, psychological, social, political and other elements of their work.  Among issues we’ll explore:  the ongoing fascination of stories about growing up, coming out, and sexual discovery; the search for a queer ancestry and the creation of personal and collective histories in textual forms; the spiritual meanings of queer sexuality, love, drag, disco, and sequins; the tensions (and harmonies) between sexual identity and race, ethnicity, and gender; the personal and political challenges posed by HIV/AIDS.  We’ll consider how artists adapt aesthetic forms to grapple with such things, whether in a coming-of-age novel, a memoir, film, or a stage play.  If this class were a movie, it would get an NC-17 rating:  this course requires an adult capacity to think, talk, and write explicitly about sex and the body in an intellectual context.  We will use a Discussion Board to post question and topics for class consideration, and students will collaborate on leading class discussions for each text, reflecting their interests and research outside of class.  Writing assignments:  shorter and longer analytical papers, including a final research-based paper, totalling 25 pages. Possible texts:  Alison Bechdel, Fun-Home; Richard Blanco, The Prince of Los Cocuyos, Alan Hollinghurst, The Swimming-Pool Library; Christopher Isherwood, A Single Man; Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits; Tony Kushner, Angels in America; Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name; Mark Merlis, An Arrow’s Flight; Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit.

 

English 6360-001: Disability Studies and Literature

2:00 PM W, 157 DH, Satz

This course melds an exploration of the emerging field of disability studies with an examination of how that theory may be applied to life writing and works of  fiction.  Disability theory will be explored from such earlier works as Goffman’s Stigma  and  Foucault’s The Birth of the Clinic, through works such as  Thomson’s Extraordinary Bodies and Scarry’s The Body in Pain  and recent post-modernist and feminist writings in disability theory. The course will delve into definitional quandaries concerning disability in a cultural context  and ethical dilemmas particularly emerging from new reproductive technologies and the exploding field of genetics.  Life Writings will be chosen from such work as Mairs, Waist-High in the World, Kuusisto, Planet of the Blind, Greely, Autobiography of a Face , Patchett, Truth and Beauty, Berube,  Life as We Know It, Cohen, Dirty Details, Skloot, In the Shadow of Memory, Lorde,  Cancer Journals, and  Johnson, Too Late to Die Young.  Fictional works will be chosen from such works as Castillo,  Peel My Love Like an Onion, Petry, The Street, Barth, End of the Road, Brontë, Villette,  Eugenides, Middlesex , Kesey, One Flew Over the Cuckoo;’s Nest,  Lessing,  The Fifth Child and stories of Flannery O’Connor.  RequirementsWeekly response papers, role as seminar leader, 3 mid-length papers. 

 

Engl. 6380-001: History of Print and Digital Culture, 1639–Present

5:00 PM W, 120 DH, Greenspan

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital and multimedia culture. In doing so, it will introduce English Ph.D. students to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions; present them with multiple possible master narratives of literary history tied to authorship, printing, technology, and legal regimes such as copyright; and give them a learned context for understanding editorial, scholarly and institutional components of academic life.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy; the history of libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the historical shift from print-based to digital based culture and its consequences for the conduct of scholarly research.

ENGL 7340, Seminar in British Literature: For All Time: Eminent Non-Shakespeareans

3:30 PM, 357 DH, Rosendale

 

            In a 1623 poem that powerfully shaped centuries of subsequent attitudes, Ben Jonson famously described his drinking buddy Will Shakespeare as uniquely “not of an age but for all time!”  In this Jonson was doubly wrong.  Not only was Shakespeare a keen partaker and analyst of the concerns of his own age; he was also not alone in addressing contemporary issues in enduring and influential ways that have both anticipated and shaped the problematics of our own time.  Jonson’s apotheosizing impulse explicitly denigrates several of his great contemporaries—Spenser, Kyd, Marlowe—in order to create the towering, singular Shakespeare that has overpeered British (and American) literature ever since.

            This course will focus on releasing from Shakespeare’s penumbra a number of extraordinary 16th- and 17th-century authors who can still speak to aftertimes in surprising and compelling ways about sex, politics, agency, form, subjectivity, progress, epistemology, economics, God, aspiration, identity, gender, desire, truth, representation, ethics, social organization, reading, good & evil, and much more.  Each week we will focus on one or two writers and carefully think about their work in its own time; we will also consider that work’s significance in the intellectual, political, literary, and critical times to come, including our own.  Potential objects of attention include More, Tyndale, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney (Philip and Mary), Spenser, Hooker, Kyd, Marlowe, Jonson, Lanyer, Beaumont, Webster, Cary, Donne, Herbert, Ford, Milton, Browne, Burton, Hobbes; enrollees will have some say as to who and what we cover.

ENGL 7350-001: “A White Man’s Country,” Race and Nation during The Nadir

2:00 PM M, 157 DH, Weisenburger

 

Bookending our semester’s readings with Lydia Maria Child’s A Romance of the Republic (1867) and George Schuyler’s Black No More (1931), we focus on the period 1890 -1930, decades U.S. historians have named The Nadir.  It’s a period of hotly contested cultural, socio-political, and legal struggles over race and rights, and especially over the nation’s supposed racial identity, its fictional purity. The period’s Battle of the Books presents rich potentials for studies of canonical, recently recuperated and long forgotten novels, popular, middlebrow and highbrow. We’ll contextualize them against Supreme Court justices’ legal fictions upholding segregation. And with an American visual and verbal print culture obsessing over questions of race and nation. We will ask: How did African American writers answer the bloody fictions of loud and proud white supremacists? Why were white liberal responses so self-disabled? To answer, our other fictions (both print and etext versions) will include: Arthur Henry, Nicholas Blood, Candidate (1890); William Dean Howells, An Imperative Duty (1891); George Ade, Pink Marsh (1897); Sutton Griggs, Imperium in Imperio (1899); Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition (1902); Robert Lee Durham, The Call of the South (1908); Thomas Dixon Jr., The Clansman (1905); James Weldon Johnson, Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912). Among the documents for this work: Booker T. Washington, “Atlanta Exposition Address” (1895); W. E. B. Du Bois, “Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others” (1903); Ida B. Wells, A Red Record (1895); U.S. v. Cruikshank, 92 U.S. 542 (1875); Civil Rights Cases 109 U.S. 3 (1883); Plessy V. Fergusson 163 U.S. 537 (1896).  Requirements:  paper proposal and working bibliography, presentation, and seminar paper of ca. 25 pages.  

Cat #

Sec.#

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Room

UC

1363

001

Myth Of The American West

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 115

CA1, HC1

1385

001

Power, Passion, And Protest In Brit Lit

Sudan, Rajani

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 306

CA1, HC1

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 351

IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 351

IL, OC, W

2310

001

Imagination And Interpretation

Stampone, Christopher

MWF

8:00 AM

DALL 156

CA2, W

2311

001

Poetry

Holahan,Michael N

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, W

2311

002

Poetry

Newman, Beth

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 138

CA2, W

2311

003

Poetry

Bozorth, Richard

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 137

CA2, W

2312

001

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 120

CA2, W

2312

002

Fiction

McAvoy, Amanda

MWF

9:00 AM

DALL 156

CA2, W

2314

001

Doing Things With Poems

Spiegelman, Willard

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 137

CA2, W

2315

001

Intro To Literary Study

Ards,Angela Ann

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 120

CA2, W

2315

002

Intro To Literary Study

Neel, Jasper

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 102

CA2, W

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg A

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 138

CA1, W

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Milazzo, Joe

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL 106

CA1, W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Diacanoff, Cara

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 115

CA1, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches To Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 152

3310

002

Contemporary Approaches To Lit

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

TR

12:30 PM

HYER 102

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel,Jasper

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 143

HC2, PRIE2

3340

001

Topics In Brit Lit In The Age Of Revs

Holahan, Michael

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, W

3344

001

Victorian Gender

Newman, Beth

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL 115

CA2, HD, W

3348

001

History Of Print And Digital Culture

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 357

CA2, HC2

3362

001

African-American Literature

Ards,Angela Ann

MWF

3:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, HD, OC, W

3366

001

American Literary History Ii

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 116

CA2, HC2, W

3385

001

Literature Of The Holocaust

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL 120

3384

001

Literature And Medicine

Nixon, M. K.

MWF

11:00 AM

HYER 107

CA2, PRIE2, HD, W

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg A

TR

3:30 PM

DALL 142

CA2, W

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Milazzo, Joe

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL 137

CA2, W

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Diacanoff, Cara

TR

9:30 AM

HYER 110

CA2, W

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler,Bonnie

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 156

IL, OC

4332

001

Studies In Early Modern British Literature

Moss, Daniel D

TR

3:30 PM

DALL 102

IL, OC

4343

001

Brit Lit In The Age Of Revolutions

Murfin,Ross C

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 153

IL, OC

4356

001

American Poetry, 1945-Present

Spiegelman, Willard

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 115

IL, OC

4369

001

Contemporary Lgbt Writing

Bozorth, Richard

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 157

IL, OC

Cat #

Sec.#

Title

Instructor

Day

Time

Room

UC

2310

001

Imagination And Interpretation

Stampone, Christopher

MWF

8:00 AM

DALL 156

CA2, W

2312

002

Fiction

McAvoy, Amanda

MWF

9:00 AM

DALL 156

CA2, W

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Milazzo, Joe

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL 106

CA1, W

3385

001

Literature Of The Holocaust

Satz, Martha

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL 120

1363

001

Myth Of The American West

Weisenburger, Steven

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 115

CA1, HC1

2311

002

Poetry

Newman, Beth

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 138

CA2, W

2315

001

Intro To Literary Study

Ards,Angela Ann

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL 120

CA2, W

3384

001

Literature And Medicine

Nixon, M. K.

MWF

11:00 AM

HYER 107

CA2, PRIE2, HD, W

2311

001

Poetry

Holahan,Michael N

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, W

3344

001

Victorian Gender

Newman, Beth

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL 115

CA2, HD, W

3340

001

Topics In Brit Lit In The Age Of Revs

Holahan, Michael

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, W

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Milazzo, Joe

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL 137

CA2, W

3362

001

African-American Literature

Ards,Angela Ann

MWF

3:00 PM

DALL 153

CA2, HD, OC, W

2312

001

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 120

CA2, W

2314

001

Doing Things With Poems

Spiegelman, Willard

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 137

CA2, W

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel,Jasper

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 143

HC2, PRIE2

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Diacanoff, Cara

TR

9:30 AM

HYER 110

CA2, W

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler,Bonnie

TR

9:30 AM

DALL 156

IL, OC

2311

003

Poetry

Bozorth, Richard

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 137

CA2, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches To Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 152

3348

001

History Of Print And Digital Culture

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

11:00 AM

DALL 357

CA2, HC2

1385

001

Power, Passion, And Protest In Brit Lit

Sudan, Rajani

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 306

CA1, HC1

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 351

IL, OC, W

2315

002

Intro To Literary Study

Neel, Jasper

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 102

CA2, W

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg A

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 138

CA1, W

3310

002

Contemporary Approaches To Lit

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

TR

12:30 PM

HYER 102

4356

001

American Poetry, 1945-Present

Spiegelman, Willard

TR

12:30 PM

DALL 115

IL, OC

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 351

IL, OC, W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Diacanoff, Cara

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 115

CA1, W

3366

001

American Literary History Ii

Greenspan, Ezra

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 116

CA2, HC2, W

4343

001

Brit Lit In The Age Of Revolutions

Murfin,Ross C

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 153

IL, OC

4369

001

Contemporary Lgbt Writing

Bozorth, Richard

TR

2:00 PM

DALL 157

IL, OC

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg A

TR

3:30 PM

DALL 142

CA2, W

4332

001

Studies In Early Modern British Literature

Moss, Daniel D

TR

3:30 PM

DALL 102

IL, OC