English Courses

Course Descriptions and Schedule

Spring 2015 Course Descriptions

 

ENGL 1360 001 (2974) – The American Heroine

12:30 TTH – 306 DH – Schwartz

Works of American literature as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19th Century to the contemporary period. Novels will be supplemented by other readings. Several short writing assignments; midterm and final examinations; some quizzes. Texts: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Erdrich, Tracks; other short novels and short stories TBA. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY

 

 

ENGL 1362 001 (5888) Crafty Worlds

12:30 TTH – 115 DH – Holahan

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination.

 Texts: TBD

 

 

ENGL 1380 001 (5933) Introduction to Literature

9:00 AM MWF – 100 Hyer – Cassedy

 

What kinds of books sold well in early America, and what do those books indicate about Americans?  This course is a tour of American books that sold in huge numbers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  These books raise issues that remain at the center of American life: wealth, religion, sex, race, independence, youth, freedom.  Some of these early American bestsellers established templates for stories we continue to tell; others tell stories that we don’t tell so much anymore.  We will investigate both.  Texts to include most of the following: New England Primer (1690), Bunyan, The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678), Rowlandson, Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration (1682), Goethe, The Sorrows of Young Werther (1774), Paine, Common Sense (1775), Franklin, Autobiography (1771-84), Rowson, Charlotte Temple (1791), Hawthorne, selected tales, Douglass, Narrative of the Life (1845), Fern, Ruth Hall (1855), Boucicault, The Octoroon (1859), Alger, Ragged Dick (1868), Twain, Huckleberry Finn (1884).  Grading: Midterm, final, two essays, class participation.

 

 

ENGL 2302 001 (2995)

12:30 PM – 351 DH – Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.


 

ENGL 2302 001 (2996)

2:30 PM – 351 DH – Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

 

ENGL 2310 001 (3454) Imagination and interpretation  

11:00 AM MWF – 107 HYER – Kokic

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as both self‐selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as both local and global. The Literature of Minorities helps prepare students for the diverse workplace and society they will live in throughout the twenty‐first century.  

 

 

ENGL 2310 002 (3766) Imagination and interpretation  - Sex, Lies, and Murder: Victorian Thrillers

1:00 PM MWF – 115 - DH Nixon

This course will introduce you to the genre of horror and suspense that was popular before television and radio existed. Many students are quite familiar with “the Gothic” (e.g., Wuthering Heights or Jane Eyre), but a whole body of literature called “sensation fiction” followed this genre in the 1860s and ‘70s. As the name suggests, these books and short stories were meant to inspire emotional sensations such as fear, anxiety, and shock. However, the name of this genre also called to mind the Victorians’ very palpable sense that this sort of literature could inspire inappropriate physical sensations in their tales of sex and adultery. Sensation literature was long considered a “low-brow” form of writing and devoid of the characteristics of “true” or “artistic” literature; in spite of this, however, sensation literature was some of the most popular writing of the time. Tennyson himself said he was “steeped” in sensation literature. By reading this highly popular and prominent but now often forgotten literary form, we will consider how society defines art as well as what it pushes to the margins of its consciousness even as it consumes it with verve.

 

 

 ENGL 2311-001 (2724) – Poetry

3:30 TTH – 102 DH – Bozorth

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to spot exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Texts: Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry (3d ed.); Andrea Lunsford, EasyWriter (4th ed.). GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

 

ENGL 2311-002 (2645) – Poetry

11:00 TTH – 137 DH – Moss

One of the major’s “Gateway” courses and our introduction to lyric  poetry. The first half of the course focuses on the fundamentals of English verse: rhythm, meter, rhyme, and stanza-form, followed by a foray into free verse. In the second half of the semester, we shift our attention to the themes and genres of English and American lyric traditions: elegiac poetry as an expression of love or loss, for example, or poetry in its relation to its companion arts, or to social and political context. Our basic text will be the Norton Anthology of English Poetry, supplemented with excerpts from Helen Vendler’s Poems, Poets, Poetry, Paul Fussell’s Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, and John Hollander’s Rhyme’s Reason. Course requirements include weekly responses to the class’s online discussion board, short critical papers, imitation exercises, and recitations. 

ENGL 2311-003 (3182) – Poetry

12:30 TTH – 138 DH – Newman

 

A poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art instead of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us—and we need to learn to read it.  Learning to do so will provide you with something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works, which will help you as a reader and writer in whatever you do.  And it will also provide you with a pleasure that may grow on you slowly—or all at once.Text: Helen Vender, Poems, Poets, Poetry, third edition. Requirements: four short papers, occasional shorter writing assignments, exercises, and/or blackboard postings, 1-2 presentations, some quizzes.

 

ENGL 2312-001 (2678) – Fiction

10:00 AM MWF – 120 DH – Booker

This course is an introduction to reading and writing about fiction with an emphasis on dystopian stories. In 1984, George Orwell writes, “the best books…are those that tell you what you know already.”  The haunting power of dystopian narratives like 1984 (or, more recently, The Hunger Games, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, etc.) is the sense that their bleak vision of the future is not so far removed from the world we know already.  In this course, we will investigate how these narratives reflect our collective fears and attempt to shape our responses to social problems.  Texts: Shirley Jackson, “The Lottery;" E. M. Forster, “Harrison Bergeron;" Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., “The Machine Stops;” Lois Lowry, The Giver; Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid’s Tale; Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go  

 

ENGL 2312-002 (3455) – Fiction

9:00 AM MWF – 156 DH – Crusius

An introduction to the art of fiction. Emphasis on recent novels and short stories. Special concern with satire, comedy, and humor. Writing assignments: quizzes, three essays, final examination.

Texts Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn; Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five; Delillo, White Noise; Alexie, Reservation Blues; Proulx, Close Range.

 

 

ENGL 2312-003 (5889) – Fiction

9:00 AM MWF – 115 DH – Sae-Saue

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goal of the class is for students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities and cultural geographies. Yet how does a text construct a cultural landscape and organize human consciousness? How does a work of fiction comment on a determinate historical moment? How does it articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relations. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected texts work to organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically and having understood how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of textual representation. Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course, you will be able to: identify several formal elements in a work of literature. Write an analysis of an interpretive problem in a work of literature. Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway

 

ENGL 2312-004 (5891) – Fiction

12:00 PM MWF – 153 DH – Wadle

Description Coming Soon

 

ENGL 2312-005H (5974) – Fiction

12:30 PM TTH – 120 DH – Weisenburger

Human beings use story-telling to compose and express understandings of ourselves, others, and our world. While giving us pleasure, narrative also structures memory and is thus foundational to critical and historical thinking and knowledge-making in general. This class aims to build analytical, critical, and writing skills through guided studies of and writings about the short story, novella, novel, and narrative film. We ask what individual fictions do, how they do what they do, where and why these doings are unique to narrative art, and how some stories work to conserve storytelling traditions while others work disrupt conventions. Developing such critical sensitivities to the designs of literary narratives will sharpen our sense of how narrative operates in other fields. This is an introductory course using discussion and lecture, close-reading, and short critical essays. Texts: a fiction anthology, Raymond Chandler’s classic detective novel, The Big Sleep (1939), & Toni Morrison’s historical novel, A Mercy (2009). GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 1, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING.

 

 

ENGL 2314-001H (2767) – Doing Things with Poems

11:00 AM TTH– 138 DH – Spiegelman

Introduction to the study of poems, poets, and how poetry works, focusing on a wide range of English and American writers. Some attention to matters of literary history. Writing assignments: approximately five short essays, daily paragraphs, final examination if necessary. Students will memorize 100 lines of poetry. Texts: Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry; The new edition of John Hollander's Rhyme's Reason will be used, instead of the older ones.

 

ENGL 2315-001 (3183) – Introduction to Literary Study

11:00 AM MWF – 120 DH – Siraganian

Introduction to the discipline of literary study, covering methods of literary analysis in selected texts spanning a range of genres and historical periods. Assignments: short writing, essays, final exam.

Texts: Short fiction and essays by Edgar Allan Poe and Leslie Marmon Silko; poetry by William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, Gwendolyn Brooks; short play by Samuel Beckett; novels by Jane Austen, Edith Wharton, and Mark Twain; film by Heckerling (Clueless). 

 

ENGL 2315-001 (2725) – Introduction to Literary Study

9:30 AM TTH -- 120 DH – Ards

In this course, you will learn to interpret literature through close attention to literary form, genre, and historical context.  This critical project is grounded in the thematic approach of exploring the idea of “America” in texts that have been central to the definition of American national identity during crucial periods of national transformation. Sample texts include The Tempest, Shakespeare; Daisy Miller, Henry James; Leaves of Grass, Walt Whitman; The Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, James Weldon Johnson; To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee; We Need New Names, NoViolet Bulawayo

 

 

ENGL 2390-001 (3456) – Introduction to Creative Writing

10:00 AM MWF – 106 DH – Haynes

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. 

Texts: Imagining Fiction, Janet Burroway, 4th edition. Pearson 2014

 

ENGL 2390-002 (3457) – Introduction to Creative Writing

11:00 MWF – 138 DH – Diaconoff

Introduction to Creative Writing. This course introduces students to the practice of writing poems, short stories, and creative essays. Class time is devoted to the study of published pieces, workshop discussion of students' pieces, and in-class writing exercises. Texts: Richard Hugo, THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Jeff Knorr and Tim Schell, eds, A WRITER’S COUNTRY.

 

 

ENGL 2390-003 (3458) – Introduction to Creative Writing

11:00 AM TTH – 107 Hyer – Diaconoff

Introduction to Creative Writing. This course introduces students to the practice of writing poems, short stories, and creative essays. Class time is devoted to the study of published pieces, workshop discussion of students' pieces, and in-class writing exercises. Texts: Richard Hugo, THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Jeff Knorr and Tim Schell, eds, A WRITER’S COUNTRY.

 

 

ENGL 2390-004 (5893) – Introduction to Creative Writing

3:30 PM TTH – 142 DH – Brownderville

The purpose of this course is to study fundamentals of craft in three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students produce their own work, critique their peers’, and analyze published texts. Toward the end of the semester, each student is required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres.

 

 

ENGL 3310-001 (2342) – Contemporary Approaches to Literature

11:00 SM MWF – 156 DH – Crusius

 

An introduction to literary theory. It is taken by most English majors because theory has assumed an importance in our field it did not have only a few decades ago. One cannot now be a well-educated person in English--or for that matter, in the liberal arts generally--without a basic knowledge of theory. We shall cover many approaches to contemporary criticism, each with its own theory of what interpretation should be and do. Of necessity, we shall only scratch the surface of a complicated and intriguing subject, but the surface is interesting, and should lead you to further reading in more depth on your own, some of which I shall suggest as we go along.

 

ENGL 3310-002 (2343) – Contemporary Approaches to Literature

12:30 PM TTH – 102 Hyer – Murfin

 

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination. Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism.

 

 

ENGL 3320-001 C (5949) – Topics in Medieval Literature

3:30 PM TTH – 156 DH – Wheeler

A team-taught, interdisciplinary course that includes a spring-break week of travel in France. In the High Middle Ages, especially the 12th century forward, new ways of thinking and cultural expression in all the arts reflect key moments of transformation and innovation as well as others of appalling strife. Where do we see these changes most prominently, and what can we learn from them? This course approaches this question in a unique way: through readings in history, art history, and literature, along with an intensive visit over spring break to medieval sites in southern France and Paris. Permission of instructor and trip expenses required. Two papers, presentation during trip, journal, final exam. Meets on some Fridays, 2–5 156 DH. WHEELER (with J. Adams and P Patton).

Foundations/Ways of Knowing –

Pillars/Creativity & Aesthetics (Level 2) 

Proficiencies & Experiences/Information Literacy

Proficiencies & Experiences/Global

Proficiencies & Experiences/Oral Communication 

 

ENGL 3340-001 (5894) Topic: Love in the Age of Machines

11:00 AM MWF – 137 DH – Booker

In 1856, George Eliot wrote an essay, “Silly Novels by Lady Novelists,” that criticized certain nineteenth-century novels as “frothy” and “pitiable” because of their inferior concern with the feminized, formulaic genre of romance.  Even today, many readers consider romance novels to be a “guilty pleasure.”  In contrast, novels that take on subjects like politics and the economy are more often praised as serious and important.  So, what do we do with novels that combine these two very different concerns?  In this course, we will read sweeping love stories that take place against the backdrop of a “serious” nineteenth-century topic: the rise of machines like the industrial factory and the railroad.  Texts: novels by Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Benjamin Disraeli, and Elizabeth Gaskell.  Grading: class participation, three short papers, final exam.

 

ENGL 3340-002 (5895) – Topic: Jane Austen

9:30 AM TTH – 137 DH – Holahan

 

This course covers the six major novels of Jane Austen.  It considers the repeated variations of courtship, proposal, rejection or acceptance, and marriage.  Along the way, it also studies the literary techniques of narration, characterization, plot development, and style.  Certain topics (e.g., Austen’s various ‘limita-tions’) are studied in relation to historical background as well as in relation to stylistic or literary concerns.  Some attention is also given to Austen’s idea of the novel and the purposes of writing novels. This inevitably raises the issue of authorial self-consciousness. Some (Henry James) have claimed she had none; others (this instructor)  have claimed she had a good deal. Norton Critical Editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion.

 

 

 

ENGL 3347-001 (5896) – Topic: White Whale

1:00 PM MWF – 120 DH – Cassedy

This course is about obsessive pursuits of elemental evil hidden in plain sight.  It’s about characters who become convinced that something must be hunted out and excised from the world: characters who cannot tolerate a world in which that thing exists, and who drive themselves to increasingly extreme ends to root it out.  The course will center on two large-scale narratives about such quests: Herman Melville’s novel Moby-Dick (1851) and Nic Pizzolatto’s HBO teledrama, True Detective (2014).  Other readings will help us place Moby-Dick and True Detective within pertinent historical, generic, and thematic contexts: southern gothic, noir, crime fiction, buddy narratives, seduction and captivity narratives, Mardi Gras, procedurals, detective fiction, pulp, horror, Louisiana, oil, cults.  In addition to the two central texts, readings will include about half of the following: Mark Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Robert W. Chambers, The King in Yellow; Karen Russell, “St. Lucy’s Home for Girls Raised by Wolves”; Edgar Allan Poe, “Murders in the Rue Morgue,” “Mystery of Marie Roget,” “Fall of the House of Usher”; Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown,” “The Minister’s Black Veil”; H.P. Lovecraft, “The Call of Cthulhu”; Kate Chopin, The Awakening; Jorge Luis Borges, selected short fiction; Cabeza de Vaca, La Relación; Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find”; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno or Billy Budd; Werner Herzog’s film Fitzcarraldo and Les Blank’s film Burden of Dreams; Dion Boucicault, The Octoroon.  Grading: Class participation, two papers, final exam.

No previous familiarity with Moby-Dick or True Detective required. 

 

 

ENGL 3348-001/ CF 3374 (5898) History of Print and Digital Culture in America

3:30 PM MW – 157 DH –Greenspan

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital and multimedia culture. In doing so, it will introduce students from various disciplinary tracks to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions. Its goals will be to expose them, first, to a literary history of the United States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture, and society.   Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy; and the history of libraries and archives, with and without walls. Course Requirements: 2 short papers, midterm, and final exam


 

ENGL 3362-001 (3186) – African-American Literature

2:00 PM TTH – 143 DH – Dickson-Carr

This course is devoted to the study of crucial texts and authors in African American literary history. We will read works considered essential within the tradition of African American literature as well as recent works that may be either nontraditional or not yet widely read. We shall pay special attention to the means through which these works demonstrate how African Americans have constructed and developed individual identities as well as communities through shared experiences. In the process, we will explore the following: definitions of “race,” class, and gender; the nature of oppression; common tropes and literary figures; possibilities of transcendence. The ultimate goals of the course are to comprehend through the literature the historical situation and cultural dynamics of communities and the individuals they comprise, and to help broaden our understanding of American history and culture via the particular insights African American literature provides. Our main text will be The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, but we will supplement this with additional materials, as needed. Written requirements: regular reading examinations; regular short writing assignments, including responses to take-home and in-class prompts; three major papers (one requiring research); midterm and final examinations.

Texts (subject to change): Gates, McKay, et al., The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, Second Edition; Baker, Nat Turner; Schuyler, Black No More; Ellison, Invisible Man; Morrison, Beloved; Beatty, The White Boy Shuffle; additional essays, stories, and criticism.

 

ENGL 3365-001C/ CF 3398 (5899) – Jewish American Literature

2:00 PM MW – 157 DH – Greenspan

This course will provide a survey of Jewish American literature and culture (including film, comics, popular humor) running from the period of mass immigration in the late 19th century through the present. It will sample leading works by a wide array of major Jewish writers, including Emma Lazarus, Sholem Aleichem, Lamed Shapiro, Anzia Yezierska, Abe Cahan, Delmore Schwartz, Tillie Olsen, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Allen Ginsberg, and Philip Roth; and film makers and comic book writers, including Steven Spielberg and Art Spiegelman. Course Requirements: 2 short papers, midterm, and final exam University Curriculum: C&A2, W

ENGL 3366-001 (3783) – American Literary History

11:00 AM TTH– FOSC 127 – Dickson- Carr

In ENGL 3366-001, we shall study the construction and revision of America and American cultures conducted by some of the most famous authors in modern America. This course is designed to provide an overview of both the historical and cultural information surrounding outstanding American literary works even as we discover the forms American authors have used to express different facets of American life. Our overarching goal will be to construct for ourselves definitions of what it means or has meant, in practical terms, to be an American, whether through the artists we study or our own knowledge and experiences. In the process, we shall continuously engage these texts via careful, close analysis of them as literature and as documents of American culture. Written requirements: regular reading examinations; regular short writing assignments, including responses to take-home and in-class prompts; three major papers (one requiring research); midterm and final examinations.

Texts (subject to change): Lauter, Paul, ed. The Concise Heath Anthology of American Literature, Second Edition; Twain, Pudd’nhead Wilson; Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49; DeLillo, White Noise.

  

ENGL 3367-001C (3784) – Ethical Implications in Children’s Literature

11:00 AM MWF – 115 DH – Satz

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination.

Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle,Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Yang, American Born Chinese ;and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3374-001HC/ CF 3345 (3380) – Literature of Religious Reflection

3:30 PM TTH – 325 CLEM –Newman

An examination of issues of faith and doubt, focusing on British and American literature, primarily from the nineteenth, twentieth, and early twenty-first centuries.    Among the questions we will ask: how did writers deal imaginatively with the intellectual developments of the nineteenth century that made received religious teachings difficult for many to believe?  (These include, but are not limited to, the publication of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species in 1859.)   Other considerations will include romantic vision, agnostic questioning, secular rationalism, cultural pluralism, the afterlife, assimilation and identity, and inter-generational conflict.  Texts will draw from Jewish and Muslim experiences as well as the Christian ones that represent the dominant tradition in both literatures.  We may (if we have time) explore some influential non-literary essays that analyze religion as a cultural and psychological phenomenon (e.g., William James; Sigmund Freud). Assignments: three essays, mid-term, final examination; in-class presentation(s); periodic postings to Blackboard. Texts (not a final list): Earlier works: poems by Donne, Herbert, and Bradstreet; Nineteenth century:  Gosse, Father and Son; Tennyson, In Memoriam; Frederic, The Damnation of Theron Ware; poems by Blake, Wordsworth, Emily Brontë, Christina Rossetti, Dickinson, A.C. Swinburne, Thomas Hardy, G. M. Hopkins;  twentieth century and contemporary: Aboulelah, Minaret; Robinson, Gilead; short fiction by Roth and Ozick; poems by Stevens, Larkin, and others. 

 

 

ENGL 3377-001 (6070) Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality  

12:30 PM TTH – 102 DH – Bozorth

Normal, perverted, evil, heavenly, unhealthy, beautiful, backward, queer: all ways to label same-sex desire and love for thousands of years. The course will focus on some of the most important literature by and about LGBT people since the modern "invention" of homosexuality. It will also set this writing in historical context, considering the ongoing influence of ancient Greek, Judaic, and Christian views of sex. Finally, it will examine how race, ethnicity, the Stonewall Rebellion, and HIV/ AIDS have shaped contemporary LGBT culture. Writing assignments: weekly response papers and longer essays, totaling twenty pages; final examination. Texts: Plato, Symposium; selections from the Bible and the writings of St. Augustine; Shakespeare, Sonnets; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Portrait of Mr. W.H., Salome; Bechdel, Fun Home; selected poetry by Homer, medieval monks, Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, Christina Rossetti, Walt Whitman, Audre Lorde, and others. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM: PERSPECTIVES, HUMAN DIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY CURRICULUM: PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/HUMAN DIVERSITY, PILLARS/CREATIVITY & AESTHETICS LEVEL 2, PROFICIENCIES & EXPERIENCES/WRITING

 

ENGL 3384-001 (5900) Literature and Medicine

2:00 PM TTH – 115 DH – Foster

UC components: CA 2, PREI 2, W

What can Hemingway teach us about surgery and pain? Susanna Kaysen about being diagnosed with a personality disorder? Atul Gawande about the uncertain path of medicine? Through literature, we can begin to imagine experience of medicine for both doctors and patients. These experiences often escape our grasp. The sick and injured, after all, live in a complex relationship not only with doctors and hospitals, but with friends and family, law and government, insurance and big pharma. The ill take on a new identity as the patient, and see themselves swept up into the narratives of a healthcare system whose goals often seem at odds with those of the patient. Doctors must tend to the bodies and minds of patients, but also handle family, colleagues, medical institutions and the accidents of nature. This course will help us to understand the roles each of us play as patients and healers. We will begin by considering the case history, the story that defines what has brought doctor and patient together. But the story is always bigger and older than two people speaking. We will have to think, for example, about the stories, both horrific and heroic, that arise in response to the maladies that afflict us individually and collectively (as Ebola has transformed the health narrative world-wide). We’ll consider the birth of the modern clinic in an enlightenment world; the role of the mentally ill as sanity’s shadow; and the stories doctors tell to help them endure the hardships of medicine. We will explore the ethical dilemmas that arise in this age of medical marvels when we must decide who will live, for how long, under what conditions, at what expense, at whose choice. We will read a wide variety of literature, history, biography, philosophy, and science to help us understand the ways in which illness and medicine talk together. 
 

 

ENGL 3390-001 (3526) Studies in Creative Writing

2:00 MWF – 153 DH – Haynes

In this course students will read and analyze prose and poetry that examines life on the cusp of adulthood.  Students will create their own original works that explore coming of age.  As part of the course the class will edit and publish (either online or in-print) a collection of writings on this theme.

Text:  Welcome to Your Life, Haynes and Landsman, Milkweed Edition 1998

 

ENGL 3390-002 (3527) Studies in Creative Writing

12:30 TTH – 343 DH – Brownderville

In this class we will juxtapose the most conventional and unconventional work in contemporary American poetry, examine it closely, and compose poems in the various modes represented by the readings. We will explore avant-garde verse, traditional work such as New Formalism, and modes in which traditional and avant-garde practices overlap. (An example of such overlap is the handmade poetry book whose physical design is part of its content. On the one hand, it can be seen as a traditionalist’s reaction against electronic publishing. On the other hand, it is cutting-edge innovation.) Avant-garde and traditional poetry schools sometimes share a sense of isolation from mainstream American poetry. We will investigate the creative strategies they employ in order to build community among their readers and practitioners. Workshop will constitute a significant component of this course, which will weave together the Editing and Publishing, Writers in the World, and Craft strands of the new Creative Writing curriculum.

ENGL 3390-003 (5935) Studies in Creative Writing

2:00 PM TTH – 116 DH – Diaconoff

This course is an upper-level workshop in writing the creative essay. In general, a creative essay is a text that tells of factual events or phenomena but does so using the techniques and assumptions of creative writing: descriptive language, the sense of a thesis or theme discovered in the process of writing, and, in narrative essays, a plotted story. Memoir pieces, including entries in a personal blog; comedy sketches or other types of humor pieces; travel articles; observations of the natural world written as stories; even op-ed pieces published in the newspaper can all be considered creative essays.

 In addition to workshop discussion of students' essays, we'll read canonical and contemporary examples of essays in a variety of modes, including a memoir in graphic (comic-book) form, Alison Bechdel’s FUN HOME. Other readings will include selections from THE BEST AMERICAN ESSAYS OF THE CENTURY and full collections including Joan Didion’s THE WHITE ALBUM, Leslie Jamison’s THE EMPATHY EXAMS, and Roxane Gay’s BAD FEMINIST. One sub-theme of the course will be what it means to write about public issues such as racial tension and our role in the natural environment in a way that braids these issues with the writer’s more personal, individually felt traumas.

ENGL 4323-001 (3815) – Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

9:30 AM TTH – 156 DH – Wheeler

Readings of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales from perspectives of medieval thought and contemporary criticism. Open to majors and non-majors. Writing assignments: 3 short essays, commentaries.

Text: TBD

 

ENGL 4333-001 (5901) – Shakespeare

11:00 AM TTH – 152 DH – Rosendale

In his 2006 book Shakespeare & Co., Stanley Wells made the case that “Shakespeare has too often been isolated from his fellows.  He is the greatest of them, but he would not have been what he is without them.”  This course will pursue and test that claim by studying Shakespeare’s works alongside those of his contemporaries like Kyd, Jonson, Cary, Middleton, Webster, Ford, and especially Shakespeare’s violent and scandalous preceptor, Christopher Marlowe.  In some cases, we will see what he learned, adapted, or stole from them; in others, what they learned, adapted, or stole from him; in still others, we might see how their interests and techniques diverge, sometimes radically.  In all cases, our goal will be a fuller, deeper understanding of the dynamics and interests of English Renaissance drama and poetry, Shakespearean and otherwise.  Possible clusters include revenge tragedy, historical tragedy, comedy, magic, gender, romance, and sonnets.

 Readings: 10-12 plays (partially determined by the class) by Shakespeare and others, plus criticism and some nondramatic poetry.

Evaluation: midterm and final writing projects (20-25 pages total), final exam, presentation, attendance & participation.

UC:  Oral communication, Information literacy

 

ENGL 4343-001 (5902) – Topic: Sex and the City in the 18th Century

3:00 MW – 153 DH – Sudan

In September of 1666, a few short years after the restoration of Charles II to the throne in England, the Great Fire destroyed four-fifths of the commercial and topographical center of London in three days, and, in the process, destroyed everything that had represented London to Londoners. The social, historical, commercial, cultural, and physical city that had been in place for them was simply gone, and the task of rebuilding, re-imagining, and re-conceptualizing the “city” became the major task of Restoration London. Among the many tasks of social reconstruction Londoners had to face was the changing face of sexual identity: building the modern city on the ruins of the medieval city worked in tandem with building a modern sense of self, including a sexualized and gendered self, on older forms of social and national identity. Charles II, fresh from the French court in Paris, brought with him an entirely different concept of fashion, sense, sensibility, and sexual identity. This course examines the ways in which concepts of sexual—or, perhaps, more accurately, gendered—identities developed as ideologies alongside the architectural and topographical conception of urban life in England. And although the primary urban center was London, these identity positions also had some effect in shaping a sense of nationalism; certainly the concept of a rural identity and the invention of the countryside were contingent on notions of the city. Urbanity, in both senses of the word, is an idea that we will explore in various representations stretching from the late seventeenth-century Restoration drama to the Gothic novel of the late eighteenth century.

 

 

ENGL 4356-001 (5904) – American Poetry 1945- Present

3:30 TTH – 157 DH – Spiegelman

This course is an introduction to some of the major poets and poetic currents in the USA, roughly from 1945 to the present, including Beat and Confessional poetry, formalism and the avant-garde. We shall discuss, albeit peripherally, the changing place of poetry in culture, and issues of gender, and the relationship of poetry to the public realm, but our primary focus will center on the reading of particular poems, and the ways in which an individual poet arranges his or her creative life and output.  The aim is to help you develop the skills and perspectives you’ll need to appreciate---and write cogently about---recent poetry, in response to the aesthetic and speculative issues it raises.  This is a course in how to read contemporary poetry, and in why it matters.  Previous work in poetry is expected but not required. The focus will be on the following poets: Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, James Merrill, Allen Ginsberg, John Ashbery, Sylvia Plath, Louise Glück, and Jorie Graham. Other poets (Richard Wilbur, Anthony Hecht, Howard Nemerov, Frank O’Hara, Anne Carson) will be brought into the discussion.

There will be several short paper assignments, a mid-term exam, a final paper, and a final exam.

ENGL 4360-001 (2781) – Topic: Transnational American Literature

12:00 PM MWF – 142 DH –Sae-Saue

This course seeks to understand how key U.S. fictions anticipate the “transnational” and “inter-ethnic” turns in contemporary U.S. literature. We will investigate how important U.S. authors have imagined the particularities of racial difference in America within and beyond a Black/White paradigm, and we will study how their respective texts negotiate complex flows of cultural values between a range national boundaries. Students should note that this course will emphasize a formalist approach towards understanding how U.S. literatures  articulate national identities within a field of crisscrossing cultural symbols.  Can a formalist argument be made in order to theorize the aesthetic, rather than the thematic relationships between diverse U.S. texts? What do such investigations lend to current trends in “transnational” and “inter-ethnic” scholarship on U.S. literatures?   As these questions imply, this class will map past and current arguments in literary scholarship, and it will seek to make interjections by proposing formalist readings of cross-cultural contact and transnational symbolic traffic in American literary history.

 

ENGL 6340-001 (3820) – Victorian Fiction

2:00 PM W – 137 DH – Murfin

A reading-intensive survey of works by Charles Dickens, William Makepeace Thackeray, Anthony Trollope, Geroge Eliot, George Meredith, and Thomas Hardy.  The recurring theme of the course will be representation--within the novel, of the novel and its role, of a changing political reality by the novel, and of history via narrative strategies and techniques that are unavailable to historians.  The goal of the course is to ensure that every student taking it emerges from our Ph.D. program with a mastery of--and hence the ability to teach--six or seven works generally deemed to represent the best of Victorian fiction.  Because a significant amount of reading will be required, writing assingments will be limited to one short and one medium-length paper.  Each student will also make an oral presentation and take an essay final.

 

 

 

ENGL 6360-001 (3464) – Historical, Critical, and Ethical Issues in Children’s Literature

2:00 M – 137 DH – Satz

This course will explore children’s literature and the critical issues that have arisen within the field.  It will begin with children’s picture books, such as those of Maurice Sendak, confronting the psychoanalytic and ethical controversies advanced regarding his work and The Giving Tree and Love You Forever, engaging the philosophical and theological debates concerning the ideals of these works.  We will then proceed to the canonical body of children’s literature of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty first century reading, considering such writers as E.B. White, Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, E Nesbitt, Madeline L’Engle, Philip Pullman, and J.K. Rowling. We will explore how girls, ethnic and racial minority groups, minorities of sexual orientation, and the disabled have historically been portrayed in picture books  and books for older children.  Requirements:  Weekly response papers, role as seminar leader, 3 mid-length papers. 

 

 

ENGL 6370-001 (3821) – Migration Narratives: Urban Exodus, Ancestral Return, and Global Souths

2:00 T – 120 DH – Ards

An exploration of the migration narrative in the African American literary tradition from the turn of the twentieth century through the millennium with a special emphasis on the evolving field of New Southern studies. The course places the work of a range of cultural theorists (Farah Jasmine Griffin, Houston Baker, Paul Gilroy, Thadious Davis, Leigh Anne Duck, Jay Watson, Riché Richardson, Zandria Robinson, Keith Cartwright) in conversation with primary texts that may include Cane, Jean Toomer; 12 Million Black Voices, Richard Wright; If He Hollers, Let Him Go, Chester Himes; Thomas and Beulah, Rita Dove; Mumbo Jumbo, Ishmael Reed; Song of Solomon, Toni Morrison; Pym, Mat Johnson; Long Division, Kiese Laymon; The Men We Reaped, Jesmyn Ward; and Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Natasha Tretheway.

ENGL 7340-001 (3465) – Shakespeare

2:00 Th – 137 DH – Moss


When Shakespeare’s Antony complains that he has been “beguiled… to the very heart of loss,” he gives Cleopatra more credit than we realize, for the poets and philosophers of English Renaissance had long since mastered the art. It takes the heroes of Spenser’s Faerie Queene and Sidney’s Arcadia only a few pages to lose their ways and identities, for instance, while the flourishing genres of elegy and complaint were predicated on loss. The greatest political and religious writers of the period, meanwhile, never ceased to imagine lost islands and worlds, until Milton revisited the origin of loss itself. What kinds of loss do early modern English poems and fictions describe? How does loss figure into questions of theology and politics, national or personal calamity, memory and forgetting? How does the rhetoric of loss change across different modes and genres: utopia, pastoral, translation, allegorical romance, elegy, stage-drama, music? Who loses farthest and fastest in these texts? What does it mean to find one’s way or find oneself amid so much loss?  

Primary texts: More, Utopia; Philip Sidney, Arcadia; Mary Sidney, Triumph of Death; Spenser, Complaints; Faerie Queene, Books 1, 3, and 4; Shakespeare, King LearCymbeline; Bacon, New Atlantis; Donne, Anniversaries; Milton, Paradise Lost, Books 9 and 10; Paradise Regained; Purcell, Dido and Aeneas 

 

ENGL 7350-001 (3466) – Violent Subjects

9:30 AM TTH – 143 DH – Weisenburger

This seminar addresses violence in late-modern US novels (mainly) during the age of bipolar global Cold War rivalry and its aftermaths. This literature does pose important and wider questions.  Is violence opposite to or an aspect of discourse?  Is it the other of logos, thought, and philosophy? Is it law’s other, a mere anarchy loosed upon the world?  If not then how is violence embedded in representation, in the formation of subjects and identities?  As seminar mates are interested, dialogues will likely take up questions of violence and trauma, as well as violence and affect.  Yet the mainline of our studies, alongside the narratives, will involve 20th and 21st century critiques of violence from Benjamin, Arendt, Girard, Bourdieu, Agamben, Zizek, and Butler.  Our narrative texts:  Sherman Alexie, Indian Killer; Don DeLillo, White Noise: John Hawkes, The Cannibal; Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian; N. Scott Momaday, House Made of Dawn; Toni Morrison, A Mercy; Nathanael West, Day of the Locust; and Richard Wright, Black Boy.  This seminar will alot as much time as possible to our own scholarly writings, taken up in workshop format as we move through, and particularly at the end of, the semester. 

Cat. #

Sec. #

Cls #

Course Title

Instr

Day

Time

Room

UC Code

1360

001

2974

The American Heroine

Schwartz,Nina E

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL306

CA1 HD

1362

001

5888

Crafty Worlds

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL115

CA1 

1380

001

5933

Introduction to Literature

Cassedy,Timothy Blum

MWF

9:00 AM

HYER100

CA1

2302

001

2995

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL351

OC

2302

002

2996

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL351

OC

2310

001

3454

Imagination and interpretation

Kokic,Summer Hamilton

MWF

11:00 AM

HYER107

CA2 W

2310

002

3766

Imagination and interpretation

Nixon,Megan Kay

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL115

CA2 W

2311

002

2645

Poetry

Moss,Daniel D

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

2311

003

3182

Poetry

Newman,Beth S

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL138

CA2 W

2311

001

2724

Poetry

Bozorth,Richard

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL102

CA2 W

2312

002

3455

Fiction

Crusius,Timothy

MWF

9:00 AM

DALL156

CA2 W

2312

003

5889

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL115

CA2 W

2312

001

2678

Fiction

Booker,Kristina Lee

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

2312

004

5891

Fiction

Wadle,Meghan Mary

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL153

CA2 W

2312

005H

5974

Fiction

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL120

CA2 W

2314

001H

2767

Doing Things with Poems

Spiegelman,Willard

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL138

CA2 W

2315

002

3183

Introduction to Literary Study

Siraganian,Lisa M.

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

2315

001

2725

Introduction to Literary Study

Ards,Angela Ann

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

2390

001

3456

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes,David D.

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL106

CA1

2390

002

3457

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL138

CA1

2390

003

3458

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

TTh

11:00 AM

HYER107

CA1

2390

004

5893

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville,Greg Alan

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL142

CA1

3310

001

2342

Contemporary Approaches to Lit

Crusius,Timothy

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL156

 

3310

002

2343

Contemporary Approaches to Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

12:30 PM

HYER102

 

3320

001C

5949

Topics in Medieval Literature/CF3351

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL156

CA2 W

3340

001

5894

Topic: Love in the Age of Machines

Booker,Kristina Lee

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

3340

002

5895

Topic: Jane Austen

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

3347

001

5896

Topic: The White Whale

Cassedy,Timothy Blum

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL120

CA2 W

3348

001C

5898

History of Print and Digital Culture/ CF3374

Greenspan,Ezra

MW

3:30 PM

DALL157

KNW

3362

001

3186

African-American Literature

Carr,Darryl B.

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL143

CA2, HD, W

3365

001C

5899

Jewish American Literature/ CF3398

Greenspan,Ezra

MW

2:00 PM

DALL157

KNW

3366

001

3783

American Literary History Ii

Carr,Darryl B.

TTh

11:00 AM

FOSC127

CA2, HD, W

3367

001C

3784

Ethical Impl-Children's Lit

Satz,Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL115

CA2, KNW, HD

3374

001HC

6033

Literature of Religious Reflection/ CF3345

Newman,Beth S

TTh

3:30 PM

CLEM325

KNW, HD, W

3377

001

6070

Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality

Bozorth,Richard

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL102

CA2, W, IL, OC

3384

001

5900

Literature and Medicine

Foster,Dennis A

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL115

CA2, PREI2, W

3390

001

3526

Studies in Creative Writing

Haynes,David D.

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL153

CA2, W

3390

002

3527

Studies in Creative Writing

Brownderville,Greg Alan

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL343

CA2, W

3390

003

5935

Studies in Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL116

CA2, W

4323

001

3815

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL156

IL, OC

4333

001

5901

Shakespeare

Rosendale,Timothy

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL152

IL, OC

4343

001

5902

Topic: Sex and the City in the 18th C

Sudan,Rajani

MW

3:00 PM

DALL153

IL, OC

4356

001

5904

American Poetry 1945-Present

Spiegelman,Willard

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL157

IL, OC

4360

001

2781

Topic: Transnational American Literature

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL142

IL, OC

6340

001

3820

Victorian Fiction

Murfin,Ross C

W

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

6360

001

3464

Historical, Critical, and Ethical Issues in Children's Literature.

Satz,Martha G

M

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

6370

001

3821

Migration Narratives: Urban Exodus, Ancentral Return, and Global Souths

Ards,Angela Ann

T

2:00 PM

DALL120

 

7340

001

3465

Shakespeare

Moss,Daniel D

Th

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

7350

001

3466

Violent Subjects

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL143

 

 

Cat. #

Sec. #

Cls #

Course Title

Instr

Day

Time

Room

UC Code

1380

001

5933

Introduction to Literature

Cassedy,Timothy Blum

MWF

9:00 AM

HYER100

CA1

2312

002

3455

Fiction

Crusius,Timothy

MWF

9:00 AM

DALL156

CA2 W

2312

001

2678

Fiction

Booker,Kristina Lee

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

2390

001

3456

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes,David D.

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL106

CA1

2312

003

5889

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MWF

10:00 AM

DALL115

CA2 W

3340

001

5894

Topic: Love in the Age of Machines

Booker,Kristina Lee

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

3310

001

2342

Contemporary Approaches to Lit

Crusius,Timothy

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL156

 

2390

002

3457

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL138

CA1

2310

001

3454

Imagination and interpretation

Kokic,Summer Hamilton

MWF

11:00 AM

HYER107

CA2 W

3367

001C

3784

Ethical Impl-Children's Lit

Satz,Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL115

CA2, KNW, HD

2315

002

3183

Introduction to Literary Study

Siraganian,Lisa M.

MWF

11:00 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

2312

004

5891

Fiction

Wadle,Meghan Mary

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL153

CA2 W

4360

001

2781

Topic: Transnational American Literature

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MWF

12:00 PM

DALL142

IL, OC

3347

001

5896

Topic: The White Whale

Cassedy,Timothy Blum

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL120

CA2 W

2310

002

3766

Imagination and interpretation

Nixon,Megan Kay

MWF

1:00 PM

DALL115

CA2 W

3365

001C

5899

Jewish American Literature/ CF3398

Greenspan,Ezra

MW

2:00 PM

DALL157

KNW

3390

001

3526

Studies in Creative Writing

Haynes,David D.

MWF

2:00 PM

DALL153

CA2, W

6360

001

3464

Historical, Critical, and Ethical Issues in Children's Literature.

Satz,Martha G

M

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

6340

001

3820

Victorian Fiction

Murfin,Ross C

W

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

4343

001

5902

Topic: Sex and the City in the 18th C

Sudan,Rajani

MW

3:00 PM

DALL153

IL, OC

3348

001C

5898

History of Print and Digital Culture/ CF3374

Greenspan,Ezra

MW

3:30 PM

DALL157

KNW

2315

001

2725

Introduction to Literary Study

Ards,Angela Ann

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL120

CA2 W

3340

002

5895

Topic: Jane Austen

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

7350

001

3466

Violent Subjects

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL143

 

4323

001

3815

Chaucer: Canterbury Tales

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

DALL156

IL, OC

3366

001

3783

American Literary History Ii

Carr,Darryl B.

TTh

11:00 AM

FOSC127

CA2, HD, W

2390

003

3458

Intro Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

TTh

11:00 AM

HYER107

CA1

2311

002

2645

Poetry

Moss,Daniel D

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL137

CA2 W

4333

001

5901

Shakespeare

Rosendale,Timothy

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL152

IL, OC

2314

001H

2767

Doing Things with Poems

Spiegelman,Willard

TTh

11:00 AM

DALL138

CA2 W

1362

001

5888

Crafty Worlds

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL115

CA1 

3377

001

6070

Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality

Bozorth,Richard

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL102

CA2, W, IL, OC

3390

002

3527

Studies in Creative Writing

Brownderville,Greg Alan

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL343

CA2, W

3310

002

2343

Contemporary Approaches to Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

12:30 PM

HYER102

 

2311

003

3182

Poetry

Newman,Beth S

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL138

CA2 W

2302

001

2995

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL351

OC

2312

005H

5974

Fiction

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

12:30 PM

DALL120

CA2 W

6370

001

3821

Migration Narratives: Urban Exodus, Ancentral Return, and Global Souths

Ards,Angela Ann

T

2:00 PM

DALL120

 

2302

002

2996

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL351

OC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3362

001

3186

African-American Literature

Carr,Darryl B.

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL143

CA2, HD, W

3390

003

5935

Studies in Creative Writing

Diaconoff,Cara Denise

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL116

CA2, W

3384

001

5900

Literature and Medicine

Foster,Dennis A

TTh

2:00 PM

DALL115

CA2, PREI2, W

7340

001

3465

Shakespeare

Moss,Daniel D

Th

2:00 PM

DALL137

 

2311

001

2724

Poetry

Bozorth,Richard

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL102

CA2 W

2390

004

5893

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville,Greg Alan

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL142

CA1

3374

001HC

6033

Literature of Religious Reflection/ CF3345

Newman,Beth S

TTh

3:30 PM

CLEM325

KNW, HD, W

4356

001

5904

American Poetry 1945-Present

Spiegelman,Willard

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL157

IL, OC

3320

001C

5949

Topics in Medieval Literature/CF3351

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

3:30 PM

DALL156

CA2 W