English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Fall 2016

NOTE: We are in the process of updating University Curriculum tags for 2016. Please visit our website for the most current information:

www.smu.edu/Dedman/Academics/Departments/English/UndergraduateStudies

 

ENGL 1330-001: The World of Shakespeare

10 AM MWF, 100 Hyer Hall, Neel

Introductory study of eight major plays, with background material on biographical, cultural, historical, and literary topics.  Assignments: ten unannounced quizzes, written mid-term and final exams, and one extra credit opportunity. Texts: Royal Shakespeare Company’s William Shakespeare: Complete Works, 2007 and Arp’s Synopses of the Plays.

 

ENGL 1362-001: Crafty Worlds

9:30 AM TTh, 107 Hyer, Holahan

An introductory study of selected twentieth-century novels emphasizing both ideas of modernity and the historical or cultural contexts of catastrophe that generated these ideas. Topics include traditions of family and wealth, representations of world war, new effects of capital and society, war and sensibility, race and the novel, Big D. Writing assignments: quizzes, one short essay, mid-term, final examination. Texts: TBD

 

ENGL 1365-001: Literature of Minorities

2 PM TTh, 110 Hyer, Levy

The course interrogates from historical and literary perspectives the category of "minority" as a cultural paradox, one that simultaneously asserts and marginalizes identity. Particular attention will be paid to the issue of identity as  self-selected and imposed, as fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, and as local and global.

 

ENGL 1400-001: Developmental Reading and Writing

8 AM TTh, 137 DH, Pisano

English 1400 is a class that has been created to respond to the unique needs of some students whose writing and reading skills suggest that they would have little chance of succeeding in the DISC series. In an effort to prepare them for that experience, these students take a 4-hour course, ENGL 1400, that offers intensive work  on reading and writing skills. Annie Maitland and Pat Pisano have crafted a class in which the students receive instruction in reading for 1 hour per week specifically in regard to the texts about which Pat Pisano is having them write in the writing portion of the class (3 hours per week). Writing instruction focuses on sentence-level correctness, vocabulary, paragraphing, and the thesis sentence.  Reading instruction is explicit and systematic, with a focus on the general outcomes of reading. Specific areas of instruction include comprehension strategies, fluency, vocabulary, and word study skills. The goal is for students to emerge from the class more fully prepared to tackle essay-length writing assignments with an understanding of critical reading and analysis of texts.

 

 

ENGL 2302-001: Business Writing

12:30 PM TTh, 351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2302-002: Business Writing

2 PM TTh, 351 DH, Tongate

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks, and the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. The course meets in a computer lab, and may not be counted toward requirements for the English major. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Texts: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 10th ed. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage, 2013.

 

ENGL 2310, Imagination and Interpretation: Page and Stage

9 AM MWF, 101 DH, McKelvey

How do we know who we are? How do we distinguish between authentic and performed versions of self? This course will introduce students to a variety of texts and authors as they appear on the private page and the public stage. Students will learn how to read and discuss texts with an analytical eye and how to write a short literary analysis of a text. Authors will include Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Wordsworth, Austen, Woolf, and others. Requirements: 2 papers, midterm, final exam, and some quizzes. 

 

ENGL 2311-001: Introduction to Poetry

11 AM TTh, 137 DH, Holahan

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

 

ENGL 2311-003:  Introduction to Poetry

2PM TTh, 137 DH, Murfin

In this course, we will introduce ourselves to the formal elements and literary-historical evolution of English and American poetry.  Each week we will emphasize a different technical or generic aspect of poetry, focuing on a representative poet in each case.  Hence, we will learn rhythm with William Blake, rhyme with Emily Dickinson, sonnet-form with William Shakespeare, persona with Langston Hughes, free verse with Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg, and so forth.  Requirements:  in-class writing assignments, a short essay, a midterm, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 2312-001: Introduction to Fiction

2 PM TTh, 106 Hyer, Miskin

Femme fatales, wanton women, and coquettes – this introductory fiction course will investigate literary examples of such “bad girls” to open up questions about how writers have used literature to confront dominant gender ideologies. We will read a range of literary works – across various time periods and genres –  including Daniel Defoe’s Roxana (1724), Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret (1862), Kate Chopin’s The Awakening (1899), Toni Morrison’s Sula (1973), and Susanna Kayson’s Girl Interrupted (1993). Throughout the course of the semester, we will grapple with questions such as: How has the ideal of the “good woman” changed over time? In what ways has fiction both registered and challenged this ideal? What about “bad” men? Do different genres endorse different standards for women’s behavior? You will learn to think through these questions using the interpretative strategies of literary theory. Requirements: two short essays, a midterm, final exam, and regular class participation.

 

ENGL 2312-002: Introduction to Fiction

1 PM MWF, 149 DH, McKelvey

Introduction to the study of fiction with an emphasis on U.S. novels and short stories. We will explore a range of storytelling strategies and formal techniques as we move through various stages in the past 150 years of U.S. fiction: we’ll begin with the rise of realism in the late 19th century, then turn to modernist and postmodernist aesthetic experiments in the 20th century, and detour through science fiction, fantasy, and cyberpunk before wrapping up with contemporary fiction and interactive narratives (video games and others) in the 21st century. Writers will include Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Henry James, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Pynchon, Octavia Butler, Nathaniel Mackey, and others. Assignments will include a few short essays and quizzes, a midterm, and a final exam.

 

ENGL 2312-003H: Introduction to Fiction

1 PM MWF, 102 DH, Sae-Saue

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels.  The primary goals of the class are that students to learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions.  Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities. Yet how does a text construct a cultural identity, comment on a determinate historical moment, and organize human consciousness around social history? How does literature articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction?  As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social matters. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected works organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically, understanding how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of literary representation. Texts: Maxine Hong Kingston: The Woman Warrior, John Okada: No-No Boy, Karen Tei Yamashita: Tropic of Orange, Junot Díaz: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Oscar Casares: Brownsville, Luis Alberto Urrea, Devil’s Highway

 

ENGL 2315-001: Introduction to Literary Study: Texts and Contexts.

11 AM TTh, 149 DH, Weisenburger

In this course we will study and practice two fundamental ways that skilled readers engage with, learn from, and take delight in literary texts. First they regard the ways a particular a play, book of poems, novel, or book of short stories illustrates and innovates on prior texts of its kind. And they train themselves to be aware of the ways a text will engage, often critically, with particular contexts of cultural and socio-political life and struggle. The traces left by texts and contexts thus define our work in this course, and what we write about in scheduled essays. In fact the other main goal of this class is to improve students’ writing—one sentence, page, and essay at a time. Our texts: Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, T. S. Elliott’s The Waste Land and Other Poems, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, James Joyce’s Dubliners, Herman Melville’s Billy Budd, Sailor, William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Natasha Trethewey’s Native GuardRequirements: expect to write four papers, a mid-term, and a final exam. 

 

ENGL 2315-002: Introduction to Literary Study

12:30 TTh, 156 DH, Dickson-Carr 

ENGL 2315 is an introduction to the pleasing art of literary study and to the English major. We will read, contemplate, and discuss poetry, short stories, essays, and novels from different nations and literary traditions to enjoy their many rich complexities. We will begin with different ways of defining literature, then proceed to examine how and why we read various genres and the roles that literature may play in our world. In addition, we will discover and discuss a few of the more prominent issues in contemporary literary studies. By the end of the course, the student should be able to read and write critically about literary works. This skill will serve each student well in other courses in English and elsewhere. Assignments: regular writings (in class and at home), three papers, and five short benchmark exams will be required.  NOTE: We will watch a few selected films outside of regular class time. Tentative texts: A Handbook to Literature, Twelfth Edition, ed. William Harmon; James, The Turn of the Screw; Best American Essays of the Century, ed. Joyce Carol Oates; Shakespeare, King Lear; Wisława Szymborska, Poems: New & Collected, 1957-1997; Derek Walcott, Omeros; selected poems by Kay Ryan, et al.

  

ENGL 2390-001: Introduction to Creative Writing

12:30 PM TTh, 138 DH, Haynes

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction.  The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: Janet Burroway, Imagining Fiction, 4th edition (Pearson, 2014).

 

ENGL 2390-002: Introduction to Creative Writing

11 AM TTh, 343 DH, Brownderville

The subject of this course is powerful language. How do words move readers? To begin answering this question, students will write and revise poems, stories, and essays; respond both verbally and in writing to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. In-class workshops will demand insight, courtesy, and candor from everyone in the room, and will help students improve their oral-communications skills. Toward the end of the semester, each student must submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. There is no textbook; the instructor will provide handouts. As this is an introductory course, prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 2390-003: Introduction to Creative Writing

9 AM MWF, 137 DH, [Instructor TBA]

In this class students will write and revise stories, essays, and poems; respond to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

 

ENGL 3310-001: Contemporary Approaches to Literature

11 AM TTh, 156 DH, Murfin

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? What counts as "literature"? How can students make sense of and make use of literary criticism? This course addresses these questions by introducing the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, as well as by studying some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: weekly in-class short exercises, one short essay, one longer essay, final examination. Texts: Brontë, ‘Wuthering Heights’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Conrad, ‘Heart of Darkness’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism and ‘The Secret Sharer’: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism; Shelley, ‘Frankenstein: A Case Study in Contemporary Criticism

 

ENGL 3310-002: Contemporary Approaches to Literature

11 AM MWF, 138 DH, Schwartz

What is literature? How do we read it, and why? How can students make sense of and use literary criticism? This course introduces the linguistic, cultural, and theoretical issues informing contemporary literary discourse, and considers some literary texts and contemporary interpretations of them. Writing assignments: seven 2-page application exercises; 1 final essay; a final exam. Texts: Lois Tyson, Critical Theory Today: A User-Friendly Guide (second edition); F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Scribner); James Joyce, The Dead (Bedford Case Studies ed.); Shakespeare, The Tempest (Bedford Case Studies ed.); additional selected readings.

 

CLAS 3312-001: Classical Rhetoric

2 PM MWF, 137 DH, Neel

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world's first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE.  Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and the study of philosophy emerged into history.  Requriements: three out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and ten reading quizzes.  Satisfies UC Writing Proficiency; Pillars II Philosophy, Religion, and Ethical Inquiry; Pillars II Historical Contexts; one requirement for the Classical Studies program; and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.  Class attendance required.

ENGL 3346-001: American Literary History I

2 PM MWF, [Room TBA], Greenspan

This course will explore the literary responses of a wide array of major American writers from 1775-1900 to issues and problems of individual, group, and national identity emerging in the wake of American political and cultural independence. Central issues will include nationalism as political and cultural phenomenon, individualism and freedom, history of authorship, race and slavery, minority identity, the Civil War, capitalism and literary culture. Texts: The Norton Anthology of American Literature (8th ed.); Dreiser, Sister Carrie; James, Daisy Miller

 

ENGL 3362-001: African-American Literature: Dramatizing Revolution

11 AM TTh, 102 DH, Ards

This course explores representations of social movements in literature, drama, and film from the 1960s to the present. Class sessions will include lectures on literary and cultural history, screenings of films and documentaries, and guided discussion. Together, we will encounter a rich cross-section of cultural texts, productions, and traditions—from Lorraine Hansberry’s “genuine realism” and Amiri Baraka’s “revolutionary theater” to Eisa Davis’s “hip hop aesthetics” and Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Afro-futurism. Our explorations will probe the relationship between the formal properties of literary and cultural works and their sociopolitical contexts, as we ask: what can narrative strategies and aesthetic choices teach us about an era that has been widely touted as “post-civil rights” but is in fact defined by continuing struggles for justice? Sample Texts: Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Baraka, Dutchman; Baldwin, The Fire Next Time; Davis, Angela’s Mixtape; Rankin, Citizen; Coates, Between the World and Me; O’Hara, Insurrection. Sample films and docs to be shown in class: The Untold Story of Emmett Till, dir. Keith Beauchamp; 4 Little Girls, dir. Spike Lee; Free Angela Davis and All Political Prisoners, dir. Shola Lynch; Night Catches Us, dir. Tanya Hamilton; Twilight: Los Angeles, dir. Marc Levin; Ferguson: A Report from Occupied Territory, dir. Orlando de Guzman. Grading Scale: Class Presentation: 15%; Two exams: 40% Three critical papers: 45%







ENGL 3365 (CF3398): Jewish American Literature and Culture

12 PM MWF, [Room TBA] Greenspan

This course will provide a survey of modern Jewish American literature and culture (including film, comics, popular humor) running from the period of mass immigration of Jews from eastern Europe in the late 19th century through the present. It will sample leading works by a wide array of major Jewish writers, including Sholem Aleichem, Isaac Babel, Lamed Shapiro, Anzia Yezierska, Abe Cahan, Delmore Schwartz, Tillie Olsen, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Allen Ginsberg, Philip Roth, and Miriam Israel Moses; the humor of Lenny Bruce, Jerry Seinfield, Sarah Silverman, and Larry David; and the work of comic book artist-writers Art Spiegelman and Roz Chast.

 

ENGL 3367-001: Ethical Implications of Children's Literature

11 AM MWF, 101 DH, Satz

An opportunity to revisit childhood favorites and to make new acquaintances, armed with the techniques of cultural and literary criticism. Examination of children's literature from an ethical perspective, particularly notions of morality and evil, with emphasis upon issues of colonialism, race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Writing assignments: four essays, final examination. Texts: “Snow White,” accompanied by critical essays; picture books such as Where the Wild Things Are, The Giving Tree, Amazing Grace, Curious George, Babar; chapter books for young children such as Wilder, Little House on the Prairie; White, Charlotte’s Web; Erdrich, Game of Silence; books for young adults such as L’Engle, Wrinkle in Time; Alexie, The Absolute True Diary of a Part Time Indian; Yang, American Born Chinese; and one adult book, Morrison, The Bluest Eye.

 

ENGL 3377-001: Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality

10 AM MWF, 152 DH, Bozorth

Normal, perverted, evil, heavenly, unhealthy, beautiful, backward, queer: all ways to label same-sex desire and love for thousands of years. The course will focus on some of the most important literature by and about LGBT people since the modern "invention" of homosexuality. It will also set this writing in historical context, considering the ongoing influence of ancient Greek, Judaic, and Christian views of sex. Finally, it will examine how race, ethnicity, the Stonewall Rebellion, and HIV/ AIDS have shaped contemporary LGBT culture. Writing assignments: weekly response papers and longer essays, totaling twenty pages; final examination. Texts: Plato, Symposium; selections from the Bible and the writings of St. Augustine; Shakespeare, Sonnets; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being EarnestPortrait of Mr. W.H., Salome; Bechdel, Fun Home; selected poetry by Homer, medieval monks, Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, Christina Rossetti, Walt Whitman, Audre Lorde, and others.

 

 

ENGL 3379-001: Contexts of Disabilities

10 AM MWF, 102 DH, Satz

This course deals with the literary and cultural portrayals of those with disability and the knotty philosophical and ethical issues that permeate current debates in the disability rights movement. The course also considers the ways issues of disability intersect with issues of gender, race, class, and culture. A wide variety of issues, ranging from prenatal testing and gene therapy through legal equity for the disabled in society, will be approached through a variety of readings, both literary and non-literary, by those with disabilities and those currently without them. Writing assignments: three short essays, one longer essay; mid-term, final examination.

Texts: Kupfer, Fern, Before and After Zachariah: A Family Story of a Different Kind of Courage; Haddon, Mark, Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night; Rapp, Emily, Poster Chil ; Jamison, Kay Redfield, An Unquiet Mind; Lessing, Doris, The Fifth Child; Sarton, May, As We Are Now; Mairs, selected essays; O’Connor, selected stories; selected articles from a variety of disciplines.

 

ENGL 3383-001: Literary Executions: Imagination and Capital Punishment

2 PM TTh, 357 DH, Holahan

A study of the literary treatment of capital punishment. The aim is to locate a social issue of continuing importance within literary traditions that permit a different kind of analysis from that given in moral, social, and legal discourse. The literary forms include drama, lyric, novel, and biography; the periods of history represented range from the English Reformation and the Elizabethan Renaissance to the English Civil War, the French Revolution, and contemporary America. Writing assignments: three short essays, final examination. Texts: TBA.

 

ENGL 3390-001: Studies in Creative Writing: Craft-Focused Fiction Writing

Workshop

3:30 PM TTh, 156 DH, Haynes

Building on basic techniques developed in Introduction to Creative Writing, students will further develop their skills, with particular attention to scenecraft and to increasing their range of technique.  In addition to fiction, students will write craft analyses of published fiction. Text: TBA

 

ENGL 3390-002: Studies in Creative Writing

2 PM TTh, 102 DH, Brownderville

In this workshop-intensive course, students will write, revise, and analyze poetry. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. Students will write five-page belletristic articles about published poetry. In addition, toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own poems. Texts will include chapbooks or slender volumes of poetry such as David Berman’s Actual Air, Evie Shockley’s The New Black, and Nicole Sealey’s The Animal After Whom Other Animals Are Named. Successful students will begin to imagine how their own voices might contribute to the exciting, wildly varied world of contemporary poetry.

 

ENGL 3390-003: Studies in Creative Writing

12 PM MWF, 138 DH, [Instructor TBA]

In this class students will write, revise, and analyze imaginative prose. Discussion will center on the students’ writing and on published work that demonstrates solid craftsmanship. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing. 

 

ENGL 4323-001: Chaucer

9:30 AM TTh, 156 DH, Wheeler

Study of Chaucer’s dream poems as well as his great love-and-war poem Troilus and Criseyde, along with a sprinkling of staggeringly long classics. Reading: The Wadsworth Chaucer and background texts. Assignments: regular reading comments, in-class oral presentations, short and longer paper.

 

ENGL 4330-001: Renaissance Writers

11 AM TTh, 105 DH, Rosendale

This course focuses on the amazing work of two of early modern England’s greatest (and most formally innovative) lyric poets and analysts of desire.  John Donne and George Herbert were two seventeenth-century Anglican clergymen—the latter a quiet country parson, the former a brilliantly urbane (and often scandalous) social climber and eroticist—who also happened to be remarkable poets, the best-known writers of what has retrospectively become known as “metaphysical poetry.”  Donne in particular is a fascinating figure, a writer of both magnificent devotional works and astoundingly dirty poems, and a famous preacher who both loved and resented God in deeply complex ways; Herbert, while less radically troubled, is one of the great masters of poetic form and spiritual self-analysis.  In ENGL 4330, we will intensively study the writings of these two figures, attending primarily to their knotty, challenging, conflicted, and deeply rewarding poetry, which has a peculiar power to make us better readers and thinkers.

 

ENGL 4341-001: Victorian Writers: The Brontës

12:30 PM TTh, 157 DH, Newman

When the novels of Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell (known to posterity as Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Brontë) appeared within three months of one another in 1847, they created a sensation.  Who were these unknown writers who produced such fresh, imaginative, compelling (or, as some thought, immoral, disgusting) stuff? Were they really one person, as some people claimed, and if so, male or female?  Today the novels of the three Brontë sisters are among the most widely read English novels in the world.  This is a good time to study them.  The year 2016 marks the bicentenary of Charlotte Brontë’s birth.  The often-invoked “Brontë myth”—the story of three sheltered, virginal, untutored sisters from a backward village in the north of England who lived austere lives but somehow understood passion—has been studied, corrected, debunked.  Meanwhile, films, novels based on the Brontës, novels about the Brontës, new biographies, and new scholarship continue to appear. 

Let’s see what the fuss is about.  We’ll read the six main novels; look at some of the poetry and possibly some of the juvenilia that constituted their apprenticeships; consider the lives, the reception of their work over the last century and three quarters, and the development of the “myth”; read one or more novels based on Brontë fictions or lives, and watch some films as well.  Texts:  C. Brontë: Jane Eyre; Shirley; Villette; E. Brontë: Wuthering Heights; A. Brontë: Agnes Grey; The Tenant of Wildfell Hall; Gaskell, The Life of Charlotte Brontë; other novels to be decided, but probably J. Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea; one or two others drawn possibly from M. Condé, Windward Heights; C. Firth, Branwell Brontë’s Barber’s Tale.  Requirements:  Possible short papers and/or quizzes or discussion board postings; one paper tracing the reception of one of the novels; one research paper on a topic to be determined in consultation with instructor; 1–2 in-class presentations; blue-book midterm and final.

  

ENGL 4360-001: Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Thin Fictions.

2 PM TTh, 101 DH, Weisenburger.  

Studies in the American novella from Henry James’s Daisy Miller (1878) to Don DeLillo’s Train Dreams (2011). What elements of narrative art, aside from an arbitrary word count (12,000 to 40,000 words) define the American novella? What readerly satisfactions define the novella’s enduring appeal, compared to thick, door-stopper novels? Can the novella be formally defined? If so, how does it respond to modern and contemporary ways of storytelling? To bring some rigor to our survey of nine thin fictions we will use Shlomith Rimmon-Kenan’s (also thin) Narrative Fiction: Contemporary Poetics (2002).  In between Daisy Miller and Train Dreams we will take up: Stephen Crane, Maggie, A Girl of the Streets (1893); Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (1891; 1924); Edith Wharton, Ethan Frome (1911); Nella Larsen, Passing (1928); Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49 (1966); Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It (1976); and Don DeLillo, Point Omega (2010).  Plan for 2 short papers; a mid-term; and a research paper.  

 

ENGL 5310-001: Distinction Seminar in Literary Theory: Trauma

3 PM MW, 101 DH, Schwartz

This course will consider a series of literary and theoretical texts organized around the topic of “trauma.” The term is one we hear constantly in contemporary life to describe a variety of overwhelming personal and social phenomena, from the death of a loved one to the experience of war to global famine. But what does it mean for an individual or a group to undergo “trauma,” and is this term stable: that is, does it mean the same thing from one historical period to another? Did Oedipus experience “trauma” upon discovering that he had murdered his father and slept with his mother? What happened to the contemporary audience watching the play upon “discovering” what he had done? What happens to us upon reading the play, given that, for most of us, the secret is well known? To address these questions, we will read a range of literary and theoretical texts (just a sample of which are listed here).

 

But because we will be analyzing literary and film representations of trauma, our goal is to think about not just what trauma is but also about its social functions: why are we so interested in it? What do we gain as readers and viewers from the experience of “vicarious” traumatization? And what kind of cultural work is achieved in these representations?

 

This seminar aims to prepare English Distinction students for the writing of their senior theses, so in addition to analyzing the texts and theory discussed above, we will also concentrate on effective analytical, critical, research and writing practices and skills used in humanities disciplines. Expect to produce several short responses, two short papers (4 – 5 pgs), and a research paper.

 

Representative reading list: Caruth, Unclaimed Experience: Trauma, Narrative, History; Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents; Leys, Trauma: A Genealogy; McEwan, Atonement; Roy, The God of Small Things; Sophocles, Oedipus

 

ENGL 6310-001: Advanced Literary Studies

3:30-6:20 PM Th, 137 DH, Foster 

This course is an introduction to advanced graduate work in literary studies.  We will approach literary studies both as an intellectual activity and as a profession. Issues will include: the distant and recent history of literary studies; the place of “literature” in literary studies; methods and tools of literary research; physical and digital archives; textual materiality; the digital humanities; major and minor genres of scholarly performance including the journal article and the conference paper.  In addition to short primary and secondary texts that foreground various interpretive strategies or problems, we will read Ulysses.

 

ENGL 6311-001: Survey of Literary Criticism and Theory

10-11:20 AM MW, 116 DH, Sae-Saue

How to read literature? How to make meaning of cultural forms, including language itself?  How to regard the imaginary representation of a real social situation? How to understand and to make use of “literary criticism”? How does language both make possible and limit our understanding of ourselves and the worlds in which we live? This class addresses these questions by exploring how theory offers us a logic with which to read literature, to critique culture, to understand historical conditions, and to imagine our identities. We will familiarize ourselves with a range of theoretical approaches in order to familiarize ourselves with contemporary approaches to literary interpretation and to consider representations of social relationships. In doing so, we will begin to apply theory in order to examine the ways literature and culture seek to make sense of the complex worlds through which we move. 

 

Throughout the course, we will look closely at key writings by some of the most influential (and most recognizable) linguistic, literary and cultural theorists of our field, including Ferdinand Saussure, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Fredric Jameson, Antonio Gramsci, Theodore Adorno, Louis Althusser, Roland Barthes, Raymond Williams, Frantz Fanon, Jean Baudrillard, Chinua Achebe, Edward Said, Judith Butler, Gloria Anzaldua, Donna Haraway, Stuart Hall, and many more.  We will familiarize ourselves with the main ideas and interjections of these thinkers and put them in conversation with one another to identify their major assumptions and the limitations of their work for contemporary critical practices.  

 

ENGL 6312-001: Teaching Practicum

2-4:50 PM F, [Room TBA], Stephens

English 6312 has two purposes: First, it serves as an introductory support structure for PhD candidates who are teaching their first first-year writing classes at SMU. Second, in a general way, it introduces graduate students to the field of composition studies that has emerged in North American English Departments in the last forty years. The course helps PhD students write syllabi for and plan their classes for the fall term; it also offers an ongoing conversation about grading, conferences, classroom management, etc. In addition, all students read three books that outline the development of the field of composition studies, and each student reads and reports on a fourth book that describes the field as it exists now. Texts:  TBA.

 

 

ENGL 6330-001: Early Modern British Literature: Sequence, Volume,

Miscellany

3-5:50 PM W, 137 DH, Moss

Those meddling anthologists have decimated Renaissance lyric: The Temple reduced to “Easter Wings” and (if professor and students are lucky) “The Collar”; Songs and Sonnets abridged to “The Sun Rising” and “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”; Shakespeare starved to little more than “Shall I Compare Thee” and “My Mistress’ Eyes.” In this survey, we’ll rebuild Herbert’s edifice, reassemble Donne’s playlist, revive the other 152 Sonnets in the most famous lyric sequence of all. Studying whole volumes and never excerpting, we’ll discuss patterns of form, metaphor, and allusion within texts and between them, allow detailed personas and narratives to emerge from paired poems and subsequences, and follow the logic (or endure the chaos) of the real anthologies and miscellanies of the early modern period.

 

Possible Primary Texts include Sidney, Astrophil and Stella; Shakespeare, Sonnets; Spenser, Amoretti and Complaints; Wroth, Pamphilia to Amphilanthus; Jonson, Epigrams and The Forest; Donne, Songs and Sonnets; Herbert, The Temple; Herrick, Hesperides; Milton, Poems (1645); Mary and Philip Sidney, Psalter; Tottel’s Miscellany; The Passionate Pilgrim. Critical and theoretical foci include close-reading, poetics, and related fundamentals; book history, paratext, and intertextuality; imitation and adaptation; reception and pedagogy.

 

ENGL 7340-001: Studies in British Literature

3:00–5:50 PM M, 138 DH, Sudan

James C. Scott argues that a certain level of abstraction is necessary for all forms of analysis and that often these forms of abstraction serve the fiscal interests of the state. This course examines the social, cultural, economic, political, and geographic territories that get abstracted in digital discourse in order to profit transnational corporations. To engage in this “restoration” of space, we will examine the genealogies of British empire-building of the late eighteenth through early-twentieth centuries to understand the economic shift of power from the nation-state/empire to twenty-first century transnational traffic in digital discourse. We will look at such landmarks as the Longitude Act of 1714, histories of land surveys, land reform acts, and definitions of “waste lands;” environmental histories of India and parts of Southeast Asia and Africa, and contemporary literature on ewaste sites. Literary works include Defoe, Austen, Collins, Stoker, Orwell, and others. Theoretical and historical works include David Abraham, Bill Brown, Herman Daly, Johanna Drucker, Elaine Freegood, Jonathan Lamb, Bruno Latour, Ulises Mejias, Kavita Philip, James C. Scott, Nicole Starosielski, and others.

 

ENGL 7350-001: Studies in Modern American Literature: Race and Real Estate

3:30-6:20 PM T, 137 DH, Ards

Narratives of race and real estate in the United States have usually focused on dispossession and forced segregation. This course acknowledges the validity of these histories while qualifying and complicating traditional notions of race, property, and citizenship. We will draw on the work of literary critics, legal scholars, sociologists and architects to examine intersections among race and architecture, homeownership, place/space, property, and narrative aesthetics as sites of social storytelling. Sample Primary Texts: Craft, The Bondwoman’s Narrative; Chesnutt, The Conjure Stories; Biggers, The House without a Key; Gonzalez, Caballero; Ellison, Invisible Man; Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun, Norris, Clybourne Park; Jordan, His Own Where; Cisneros, House on Mango Street; Thomas, Down These Mean Streets; Johnson, Hunting in Harlem; Tretheway, Native Guard; Danticat, The Dew Breaker; Kincaid, A Small Place; Secondary Texts: Brown and Smith, eds., Race and Real Estate (OUP, 2015); Gleason, Sites Unseen (NYU, 2011); Cheng, The Changs next door to the Diazes (U of Minnesota P, 2013)

We are in the process of updating the University Curriculum tags for 2016.  Please check back periodically.

Cat #

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel,Jasper

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

 CA1

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan,Michael

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 107

 TBD

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy,Bruce

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

 CA1, HD

1400

001

Dev Reading & Writing

Pisano,Patricia B

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 137

 OC

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

 IL, W, OC

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

 IL, W, OC

DISC 2305

001H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Goyne, Jo

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

KCRC 150

 

DISC 2305

002H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Goyne, Jo

TTh

11:00 AM

 12:20 PM

KCRC 150

 

DISC 2305

003H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

10:00 AM

 10:50 AM

VSNI 203

 

DISC 2305

004H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

11:00 AM

 11:50 AM

VSNI 203

 

DISC 2305

005H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper, Vanessa

MWF

12:00 PM

 12:50 PM

VSNI 203

 

DISC 2305

006H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Foster, Dennis

TTh

9:30 AM

 10:50 AM

MCEL 135

 

DISC 2305

007H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Forrester, Andrew

TTh

12:30 PM

 1:50 PM

 Loyd 104

 

DISC 2305

008H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hinton, Anna

TTh

12:30 PM

 1:50 PM

MCEL 135

 

DISC 2305

009H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Amsel, Stephanie

TTh

11:00 AM

 12:20 PM

CMRC 132

 

DISC 2305

010H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Rosendale, Timothy

TTh

2:00 PM

 3:20 PM

MCEL 135

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation:  Page and Stage

McKelvey, Chelsea

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 101

 CA1, W

2311

2311

2311

001

002

003

Poetry

Poetry

Poetry

Holahan,Michael

Bozorth, Richard

Murfin, Ross

TTh

MWF

TTh

11:00 AM

12:00 PM

2:00 PM

12:20 PM

12:50PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

DH 137

DH 137

 TBD

TBD

TBD

2312

001

Fiction

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

 TBD

2312

002

Fiction

McKelvey, Seth

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

 TBD

2312

003C/H

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 102

 TBD

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study: Texts and Contexts

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 149

 CA1, CA2, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study

Dickson-Carr, Darryl

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 AM

DH 156

 CA1, CA2, W

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes,David D

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

 CA2, W

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 343

 CA2, W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

 CA2, W

3310

001

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

 

3310

002

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Schwartz, Nina

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 138

 

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel,Jasper

MWF

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH 137

 HC2

3346 001 American Literary History l Greenspan, Ezra MWF 2:00 PM 2:50 PM TBA  HC2, CA2, W

3362

001

African-American Lit: Dramatizing Revolution

Ards,Angela Ann

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

 CA2, W, HD

3365 001 Jewish American Literature and Culture

Greenspan, Ezra

MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM TBA  CA2

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Childrens' Literature

Satz,Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 101

 CA2, HD

3377

001

Lit and the Construction of Homosexuality

Bozorth,Richard

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 152

 CA2. W, HD

3379

001C

Contexts of Disability-CFA 3379

Satz,Martha G

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

 CA2, W, HD, OC

3383

001C

Imagination/Captl Punishment/CF 3305

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

 TBD

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing

Haynes,David D

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

 CA2, W

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 102

 CA2, W

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

 CA2, W

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 156

 OC, IL

4330

001

Renaissance Writers

Rosendale,Timothy

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

 OC, IL

4341

001

Victorian Writers: THE BRONTËS

Newman, Beth

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 157

 OC, IL

4360

001

Studies In Modern American Lit: Thin Fictions

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 101

 CA2

5310

001

Distinction Seminar

Schwartz, Nina

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Foster, Dennis

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue,Jayson T

MW

10:00 AM

11:20 AM

DH 116

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens,Lori Ann

F

2:00 PM

4:50 PM

TBA

 

6330

001

Early Modern British Lit:  Spenser and Milton

Moss, Daniel D

W

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 137

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan, Rajani

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 138

 

7350

001

Studies in Modern American Lit

Ards, Angela

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

We are in the process of updating the University Curriculum tags for 2016.  Please check back periodically.

Cat#

Sec

Course Title

Instructor

Day

Start

End

Room

UC

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation

McKelvey, Chelsea

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 101

 CA1, W

2390

003

Intro Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

DH 137

 CA2, W

1330

001

The World of Shakespeare

Neel,Jasper

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 100

 CA1

DISC 2305

003H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper

MWF

10:00 AM

 10:50 AM

VSNI 203

 

3377

001

Lit and the Construction of Homosexuality

Bozorth,Richard

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 152

 CA2, W, HD

3379

001C

Contexts of Disability- CFA 3379

Satz, Martha G

MWF

10:00 AM

10:50 AM

DH 102

 CA2, W HD, OC

DISC 2305

004H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper

MWF

11:00 AM

 11:50 AM

VSNI 203

 

3310

002

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Schwartz, Nina

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 138

 

3367

001

Ethical Implications of Childrens' Literature

Satz,Martha G

MWF

11:00 AM

11:50 AM

DH 101

 CA2, HD

DISC 2305

005H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hopper

MWF

12:00 PM

 12:50 PM

VSNI 203

 

3365

001

Jewish American Literature and Culture

Greenspan, Ezra

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

            TBA

 CA2

3390

003

Studies In Creative Writing

Staff

MWF

12:00 PM

12:50 PM

DH 138

 CA2, W

2312

002

Fiction

McKelvey, Seth

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 149

 TBD

2312

003C/H

Fiction

Sae-Saue,Jayson

MWF

1:00 PM

1:50 PM

DH 102

 TBD

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

Neel, Jasper

MWF

2:00 PM

2:50 PM

DH 137

 HC2

3346 001 American Literary History I Greenspan, Ezra MWF 2:00 PM 2:50 PM TBA  HC2, CA2, W

6311

001

Survey of Literary Criticism

Sae-Saue, Jayson

MW

10:00 AM

11:20 AM

DH 116

 

5310

001

Distinction Seminar

Schwartz, Nina

MW

3:00 PM

4:20 PM

DH 101

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

Sudan, Rajani

M

3:00 PM

5:50 PM

DH 138

 

6312

001

Teaching Practicum

Stephens,Lori Ann

F

2:00 PM

4:50 PM

TBA

 

1400

001

Dev Reading & Writing

Pisano,Patricia B

TTh

8:00 AM

9:20 AM

DH 137

 OC

1362

001

Crafty Worlds

Holahan,Michael

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

Hyer 107

 CA1

DISC 2305

001H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Goyne

TTh

9:30 AM

10:20 AM

KCRC 150

 

DISC 2305

006H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Foster

TTh

9:30 AM

 10:50 AM

MCEL 135

 

4323

001

Chaucer

Wheeler,Bonnie

TTh

9:30 AM

10:50 AM

DH 156

 

DISC 2305

002H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Goyne

TTh

11:00 AM

 12:20 PM

KCRC 150

 

DISC 2305

009H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Amsel

TTh

11:00 AM

 12:20 PM

CMRC 132

 

2311

001

Poetry

Holahan,Michael

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 137

 TBD

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study:  Texts & Contexts

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 149

 CA1, CA2, W

2390

002

Intro Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 343

 CA2, W

3310

001

Contemp Approaches to Lit

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 156

 

3362

001

African-American Lit: Dramatizing Revolution

Ards,Angela Ann

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 102

 CA2, W, HD

4330

001

Renaissance Writers

Rosendale,Timothy

TTh

11:00 AM

12:20 PM

DH 105

 OC, IL

2302

001

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 351

 IL, W, OC

DISC 2305

007H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Forrester

TTh

12:30 PM

 1:50 PM

 Loyd 104

 

DISC 2305

008H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Hinton

TTh

12:30 PM

 1:50 PM

 MCEL 135

 

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study

Dickson-Carr, Darryl

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 AM

DH 156

 CA1, CA2, W

2390

001

Intro Creative Writing

Haynes,David D

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 138

 CA2, W

4341

001

Victorian Writers: THE BRONTËS

Newman, Beth

TTh

12:30 PM

1:50 PM

DH 157

 OC, IL

1365

001

Literature of Minorities

Levy,Bruce

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

Hyer 110

 CA1, HD

2302

002

Business Writing

Tongate,Vicki Lee

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 351

 IL, W, OC

DISC 2305

010H

Hon. Hum. Sem. I

Rosendale

TTh

2:00 PM

   3:20 PM

 MCEL 135

 

2312

001

Fiction

Murfin,Ross C

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 137

 TBD

3383

001C

Imagination/Captl Punishment/CF 3305

Holahan,Michael N

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 357

 

3390

002

Studies In Creative Writing

Brownderville, Greg

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 102

 CA2, W

4360

001

Studies In Modern American Lit:  Thin Fictions

Weisenburger,Steven

TTh

2:00 PM

3:20 PM

DH 101

 CA2

3390

001

Studies In Creative Writing

Haynes,David D

TTh

3:30 PM

4:50 PM

DH 156

CA2, W

7350

001

Studies in Modern American Lit

Ards, Angela

T

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137

 

6310

001

Advanced Literary Studies

Foster, Dennis

Th

3:30 PM

6:20 PM

DH 137