English Courses

Descriptions and Schedule, Spring 2018

ENGL 1320-001C/MDVL 3329-001C—Cultures of Chivalry: King Arthur for Love and Profit

TTh 12:30–1:50. 306 Dallas Hall. Wheeler. CA1, HC1, CA, HC, OC.

Courage! Honor! Intensity! Valor! Armour! Love! Romance! Youth! = CHIVALRY
In this course, we study the development of chivalric mentalities in literature, history, and culture from the Middle Ages to modern times. This course moves back and forth from the flowering of chivalry in twelfth-century Western culture to the current moment. Stories of King Arthur form the central thread around which we weave studies of chivalric education and variation, of chivalric rejection and renewal.

King Arthur is the most popular and most frequently revived Western hero from the Middle Ages to the current moment. This course examines aspects of the Arthurian story—Camelot, the knights of the Round Table, the Holy Grail—from its roots in the Middle Ages to its flourishing today. We focus our work on love—romantic love, family love, and love of friends—and profit—how stories of King Arthur can teach us to understand power and succeed in politics and even business organization.

ENGL 1360-001—The American Heroine. CA1, CA, HD.

MWF 11–11:50. 115 Dallas Hall. Schwartz.

Works of North American Literature by women as they reflect and comment upon the evolving identities of women, men, and culture from the mid-19th Century to the contemporary period. Novels, memoirs, and short stories will be supplemented by other readings. Writing: Midterm and final examination; regular quizzes; some short writing assignments. Texts: Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Morrison, The Bluest Eye; Chopin, The Awakening; Bechdel, Fun Home; and others.

ENGL 1363-001—The Myth of the American West.

TTh 2–3:20. 115 Dallas Hall. Weisenburger. HC1, CA1, CA, HC.

In this course we study how and why 19th century realities of conquering the American West morphed into 20th century legend and myth. We also ask what defines those forms, how they changed, and why they endure. Our case studies include Texas emigrant Cynthia Ann Parker’s captivity among the Comanche people, as presented in factual, fictional, and cinematic versions; and then make a similar study of Buffalo Bill Cody’s celebrity in the late-19th century. We next turn to the ways that the romance of horse culture and gunfighters in late-19th and early-20th century paintings and sculpture, fictions and films, brought the Myth of the American West to its fullest expression. We conclude by studying revisions of that myth in contemporary film and fiction. Readings include historical and biographical sources, three classic Western novels, and a selection of popular Western films from the Silent Era to the present. Course requirements: evening viewing of 3 feature films, brief response papers, mid-term, and final exam.

ENGL 1365-001—Literature of Minorities: Otherness and Identity in American Culture.

MW 3–4:20. 156 Dallas Hall. Levy. CA1, LL, HD.

The course interrogates questions of individual and collective identities from historical, contemporary and literary perspectives. We look closely at the many categories that have constituted identity in the US, including race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and the ways in which these categories have come to constitute our cultural conversation about identity. Among terms explored are: “Whiteness,” “Blackness,” “White Supremacy,” “Identity Politics,” “Queerness,” “Pluralism,” etc. We examine the ways these categories have been deployed to assert and marginalize both group self-selected and imposed, as both fixed and flexible, as located and displaced, as both secure and situational.

ENGL 2102-001—Spreadsheet Lit: Excel.

W 3–3:50.ULEE 243. Dickson-Carr, Carol.

An introduction to Excel as it is commonly used in the workplace. Students will learn to organize and analyze data, use and link worksheets, create tables & charts, and communicate results of their analyses in clear, readable prose. Laptops required.

ENGL 2302-001—Business Writing.

TTh 12:30–1:50. 351 Dallas Hall. Dickson-Carr, Carol. IL, OC, W.

This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

ENGL 2302-002—Business Writing. 

TTh 2–3:20. 351 Dallas Hall. Dickson-Carr, Carol. IL, OC, W.

  This course introduces students to business and professional communication, including a variety of writing and speaking tasks. It covers the observation and practice of rhetorical strategies, discourse conventions, and ethical standards associated with workplace culture. The course includes much active learning, which means students will attend events on campus and off and will conduct a detailed field research project at a worksite. Please note that this course may not be counted toward requirements for the English major, and that laptops are required. Writing assignments: summaries, analyses, evaluations, letters, reports, memoranda, and individual and collaborative research reports, both oral and written. Text: Kolin, Philip C. Successful Writing at Work, 11th ed.

ENGL 2310-001—Imagination and Interpretation: The (R)evolution of Gothic

Literature: Literal and Literary Horrors in Poetry and Prose.

TTh 8–9:20. 143 Dallas Hall. Stampone. CA, CA2, W.

Horace Walpole began a literary revolution in 1764 with the publication of his still famous Gothic tale, The Castle of Otranto. Haunting tales of ghosts and monsters quickly flooded literary markets in both the United Kingdom and America, as artists on both sides of the Atlantic employed, repurposed, and distorted tropes (i.e. erasing the distinction between “horror” and “terror”) from the growing corpus of Gothic Literature to write stories that darken their respective historical moments and deal with insidious problems such as race, gender, and national identity. Intertextuality thus attaches itself to Gothic stories like an ever-present shadow that curiously stalks an author’s text. This course introduces students to various modes of Gothic literature published during the Romantic Century and closely examines the mechanics and—more important—their thematic purpose and historical moment.

ENGL 2310-002—Imagination and Interpretation: What was the Harlem Renaissance?

MWF 8–8:50. 106 Dallas Hall. Kiser. CA, CA2, W.

The Harlem Renaissance can be broadly defined as a cultural, social, and artistic movement that spanned the 1920’s and 1930’s, a time when African American writers, artists, and musicians sought to represent themselves within American culture through their work. This course will explore why such a movement burgeoned around the end of WWI, what this group of intellectuals hoped to gain from their movement, and why they turned to the arts to reach their political, cultural, and social goals. We will ask questions such as, is art always political or can it exist just for art’s sake? If art is truly the best way for such a movement to reach its aims, then what forms of expression are best? Progressing towards answering, “What was the Harlem Renaissance?” we will explore the above questions through poems, novels, and prose essays.

ENGL 2311-001—Introduction to Poetry.

TTh 9:30–10:50. 110 Hyer Hall. Holahan. CA2, LL, W.

Introduction to the study of poetry and how it works, examining a wide range of poems by English and American writers. Special attention to writing about literature.

ENGL 2311-002—Introduction to Poetry.

MWF 2–2:50. 102 Dallas Hall. Newman. CA2, LL, W, OC.

A poem resists being boiled down to a simple “message”; cannot be adequately represented in a PowerPoint; is not written to be digested and deleted; defiantly offers nothing immediately practical or useful; and treats language as the medium of art instead of information. No wonder poetry sometimes seems alien to us—and we need to learn to read it. Learning to do so will provide you with something useful nevertheless: a sharpened awareness of how language works, which will help you as a reader and writer in whatever you do. And it will also provide you with a pleasure that may grow on you slowly—or all at once.
Requirements: four formal short papers; weekly short (2-sentence) postings to class discussion board; short exercises including one poem memorization; blue-book midterm and final exams.

ENGL 2312-001—Introduction to Fiction: The Gothic Novel

TTh 11–12:20. 137 Dallas Hall. Sudan. CA2, LL, W.

Gothic novels were wildly popular in nineteenth-century Britain. Starting with Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto, published in 1764, and continuing almost unabated until about 1820, the Gothic novel, characterized by gloomy landscapes, graveyards, secrets, ghosts, damsels in distress, mysterious heroes, bleeding nuns, and the like, became the most eagerly consumed genre. Net necessarily restricted by gender—almost as many (and arguably more) women published gothic novels as men—these novels represent not only the taste of the literate public but also reflect with an uncanny exactitude the social and cultural milieu of the late-eighteenth through late-nineteenth centuries. We will explore these contexts and, in the process, will learn about the process of textual and cultural analysis. We will also consider contemporary twentieth-century associations with this genre in Daphne Du Maurier’s novel Rebecca, thinking through the symptomatic changes that turn the gothic into something that reflects our current cultural and political climate.

Course Requirements
You have three writing requirements: two short essays and one longer essay. You will also have weekly quizzes and a group presentation scheduled toward the end of the semester. Attendance is mandatory. I will allow three absences, excused or not; after that, your absences will affect your final grade.

ENGL 2312-002—Introduction to Fiction: Ethnic Literary Imaginations.

MWF 10–10:50. 106 Dallas Hall. Sae-Saue. LL, W.

This course is an introduction to fiction with an emphasis on U.S. ethnic novels. The primary goals of the class are that students learn to recognize a range of narrative elements and to see how they function in key U.S. fictions. Each text we will read represents a specific set of historical and social relationships and they imagine particular U.S. identities. Yet how does a text construct a cultural identity, comment on a determinate historical moment, and organize human consciousness around social history? How does literature articulate political, social, and cultural dilemmas? And how does it structure our understandings of social interaction? As these questions imply, this course will explore how fiction creates and then navigates a gap between art and history in order to remark on U.S. social relationships. We will investigate how literary mechanisms situate a narrative within a determinate social context and how the narrative apparatuses of the selected works organize our perceptions of the complex worlds that they imagine. As such, we will conclude the class having learned how fiction works ideologically, understanding how the form, structure, and narrative elements of the selected texts negotiate history, politics, human psychology, and even the limitations of literary representation.

ENGL 2312-003H—Introduction to Fiction: Look Again.

MWF 2–2:50. 137 Dallas Hall. Foster. LL, W, OC.

In ordinary speech and writing—in the language of everyday life, in memos and news, in text books and manuals—we expect a familiar discourse, one where we feel at ease with the meaning and intentions. Literary language, by contrast, tends to make us off center, sometimes uncomfortable, even as it delights us, shifting our perspective so we can see what ordinary life ignores or conceals. This class will look at works of fiction in which someone or something is out of place, looking awry at the ordinary world. We will read, for example, Junot Diaz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, whose characters have left and returned to the Dominican Republic, and Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things, whose characters leave and return to India. But we will also read Allison Bechdel’s Fun Home in which she looks back on a childhood in a funeral home could not understand at the time. That is, we will take displacement as a narrative technique and a theme. Expect to write four short papers and to talk a lot.

ENGL 2313-001—Introduction to Drama.

TTh 2-3:20. 116 Dallas Hall. Neel. CA1, LL, W, OC.

Course begins with the first great period in Western theatre in Ancient Athens by looking at Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes; then moves to the first great period in English drama with Shakespeare; then, in order, studies plays by Aphra Behn (the first woman author in English to earn her living as a professional writer), George Bernard Shaw (sometimes called the “second Shakespeare”), David Hwang’s Tony and Drama Desk Award winning M. Butterfly, and concludes with Alejándro González Iñárritu’s recent trilogy, concluding with Babel (starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett). Two out of class papers, one in-class paper, and five reading quizzes.

ENGL 2314-001H—Doing Things with Poems.

MWF 3–3:50. 157 Dallas Hall. Bozorth. LL, W, OC.

Now in 4D: how to do things with poems you never knew were possible, and once you know how, you won’t want to stop. You’ll learn to trace patterns in language, sound, imagery, feeling, and all those things that make poetry the world’s oldest and greatest multisensory art form, appealing to eye, ear, mouth, heart, and other bodily processes. You will read, talk, and write about poems written centuries ago and practically yesterday. You will learn to distinguish exotic species like villanelles and sestinas. You’ll discover the difference between free verse and blank verse and be glad you know. You will impress your friends and family with metrical analyses of great poems and famous television theme songs. You’ll argue (politely but passionately) about love, sex, roads in the woods, the sinking of the Titanic, witches, God, Satan, and trochaic tetrameter. You’ll satisfy a requirement for the English major and a good liberal-arts education. Shorter and longer papers totally approximately 20 pages; midterm; final exam; class presentation. Text: Helen Vendler, ed., Poems, Poets, Poetry, Compact 3d ed.

ENGL 2315-001—Introduction to Literary Study: Knights, Drama Queens, and Working Women.

MWF 9–9:50. 105 Dallas Hall. Schwartz. CA, CA2, W.

This course prepares students to read imaginative literature in many of its forms, from drama to fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and film. Writing: Two out of class papers; one in-class essay; five reading quizzes; final exam. Texts: Oedipus; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Twain, Huck Finn; Egan, A Visit from the Goon Squad; selected poetry and essays.

ENGL 2315-002—Introduction to Literary Study: What Makes Sense.

TTh 9:30–10:50. 137 Dallas Hall. Cassedy. CA, CA2, W.

You’ve probably had the experience of reading a story or a poem, or watching a film or a TV show, or listening to a piece of music, or seeing an advertisement, and sensing that there's something about what it's doing that you can't quite put into words. This class is about learning to put it into words how meaning works — an introduction to the practice of analyzing how words and other symbols add up to meaning in a cinematic, visual, musical, or especially a literary text. You will also learn how to write a compelling interpretation and argument about the meaning of things that are incredibly difficult to pin down. Reading: Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita; William Shakespeare, King Lear; Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams; poetry by Emily Dickinson; short fiction by Edgar Allan Poe and Jorge Luis Borges. Grading: Class participation (30%), four papers of 4–5 pp. each (40%), midterm and final (15% each). University Curriculum: Creativity and Aesthetics (CA), Writing (W).

ENGL 2390-001—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 9–9:50. 156 Dallas Hall. Haynes. CA, CA1, W.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: The Practice of Creative Writing: A Guide for Students; Heather Sellars

ENGL 2390-002—Introduction to Creative Writing.

MWF 10–10:50. 120 Dallas Hall. Haynes. CA, CA1, W.

This course will introduce the techniques of writing fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. The semester will be divided between the three genres; in each students will study the work of published writers and create a portfolio of their own original writing in each genre. Texts: The Practice of Creative Writing: A Guide for Students; Heather Sellars

ENGL 2390-003—Introduction to Creative Writing.

TTh 11–12:20. 138 Dallas Hall. Rubin. CA, CA1, W.

An introductory workshop that will focus on the fundamentals of craft in the genres of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Students will learn the essential practice of "reading like a writer" while developing their own work and helpfully discussing that of their classmates.

ENGL 2390-004—Introduction to Creative Writing.

TTh 3:30–4:50. 153 Dallas Hall. Smith. CA, CA1, W.

In this class students will write and revise stories, essays, and poems; respond to one another’s work; and analyze published texts in short critical essays. A significant portion of class time will be devoted to workshop. Toward the end of the semester, each student will be required to submit a carefully revised portfolio of his or her own writing in all three genres. Prior experience in creative writing is not necessary.

ENGL 3310-001—Contemporary Approaches

TTh 12:30–1:50. 102 Dallas Hall. Siraganian.

Is there a meaning in a text? If so, how do we figure out the meaning of cultural forms—whether novels, poems, movies, or tweets—including language itself? And how do we understand and use literary criticism? This class addresses these questions by exploring the different theoretical and methodological approaches we use to read literature, to critique culture, and to understand the world. We will familiarize ourselves with a range of theoretical approaches, including structuralism and semiotics, feminism and gender studies, Marxism and cultural studies, psychoanalysis, New Historicism, and queer theory. Along the way, we will interpret both canonical and less familiar literary texts, examining the ways literature and culture make sense of the complex worlds in which we live. Writing assignments: short essays and a final examination. Texts will include Tyson, Critical Theory Today, Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Shakespeare, The Tempest, short stories by Hemingway, Chopin, and Joyce, poetry by Hughes, Rich, Frost, Bishop, and Toomer (among others), plus some additional essays.

CLAS 3312-001—Classical Rhetoric: Ancient Athens During the Rise and Fall of the World’s First Democracy.

TTh 11–12:20. 357 Dallas Hall. Neel. HSBS, W, WK.

Course introduces students to the study of Classical Athens from 509 BCE with the reforms of Ephialtes that began the world’s first formal democracy through the final defeat of Greek autonomy after the Lamian War in 322 BCE. Extensive readings from Thucydides, Lysias, Plato, Isocrates, Demosthenes, and Aristotle as the study of rhetoric and study of philosophy emerged into history. Two out-of-class papers, one in-class paper, and five reading quizzes. Satisfies three UC 2016 requirements: Writing Proficiency; Ways of Knowing; and Depth: History, Social, and Behavioral. Satisfies one course requirement for the Classical Studies program and one elective credit for both the English major and the English minor.

ENGL 3340-001—Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen’s Novels.

TTh 12:30–1:50. 102 Hyer Hall. Holahan. CA2, HFA, W.

This course covers the six major novels by Jane Austen. It considers the repeated variations of courtship, proposal, rejection or acceptance, and marriage. Along the way, it also studies the literary techniques of narration, characterization, plot development, and style. Certain topics (e.g., Austen’s various ‘limitations’) are studied in relation to historical background as well as in relation to stylistic or literary concerns. Attention also goes to Austen’s idea of the novel and to the purposes of writing novels. This topic inevitably raises issues of authorial self-consciousness. Some (Henry James) claim that she had little or none; others (this instructor) claim that she had a good deal, that she plants the garden of the modern novel. Norton Critical Editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion. Essays of short to middle length; and a final exam.

ENGL 3348-001—History of Print and Digital Culture in America.

MWF 2–2:50. 105 Dallas Hall. Greenspan. CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W.

This course will offer an overview of the history of written communications in America from the introduction of the first printing press in the English colonies to the present era of digital and multimedia culture. In moving across four centuries of writing, it will introduce students from various disciplinary tracks to the sprawling multidiscipline of the history of the book in its basic theoretical, methodological, and practical dimensions. Its goals will be to expose them, first, to a literary history of the United States; second, to a narrative of the history of cultural production, dissemination, and consumption of writing – broadly and inclusively defined – in North America; third, to communications issues crucial to our culture, such as literacy, intellectual property, and freedom of speech; and, fourth, to the formation of the institutions (including schools, libraries, bookstores, print shops, publishing houses, and houses of worship), laws (especially copyright and freedom of speech), and technologies that have mediated our communications history and given rise to our literature, culture, and society.

Major topics: history of American literature; local, regional, and national formation through print; print and race, ethnicity, and gender; history of authorship, reading, and publishing; history of journalism; censorship v. freedom of speech; uses of literacy; formations of lowbrow, middlebrow, and highbrow culture; the history of libraries and archives, with and without walls; and the ongoing shift from print-based to digital-based culture.

ENGL 3362-001—African American Literature: Hurston, Walker, Morrison.

MWF 1–1:50. 115 Dallas Hall. Satz. CA2, HD, HFA, W.

The study of three important figures in twentieth century literature—Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison--with attention to the interrelationships among the writers and their works as well as to the relation of the works to important events and movements in American history, such as slavery, segregation, and the Civil Rights movement. Various critical approaches to the works. GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM Diversity credit by petition. Writing assignments: four essays, mid-term, final examination. Texts: Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, selected short stories; Walker, Meridian, The Color Purple, Possessing the Secret of Joy; Morrison, The Bluest Eye, Sula, Beloved,Jazz; essays by Hurston and Walker.

ENGL 3366-001—American Literary History II: American Identities.

MWF 11–11:50. 107 Hyer Hall. Greenspan. CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W.

This course will offer a survey of the literary and cultural history of the United States from the late 19th century to the present. It will introduce students to a wide variety of leading writers of the period: Charles Chesnutt, Willa Cather, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Nathaniel West, Arthur Miller, Flannery O’Connor, Toni Morrison, Art Spiegelman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Louise Erdrich, and Michael Chabon.

ENGL 3377-001—Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality: LGBTQ Writing Since the Ancient World.

MWF 12–12:50. 153 Dallas Hall. Bozorth. CA2, HD, HFA, W.

Normal, perverted, evil, non-existent, heavenly, unhealthy, beautiful, backward, queer: all ways to label same-sex desire and love for thousands of years. The course will focus on some of the most important literature by and about LGBT people since the modern "invention" of homosexuality. It will also set this writing in historical context, considering the ongoing influence of ancient Greek, Judaic, and Christian views of sex. We will examine how race, ethnicity, the Stonewall Rebellion, and HIV/ AIDS have shaped contemporary LGBT culture. Requirements: analytical writing totaling twenty pages; directing discussion; final examination. Reading: Plato, Symposium; selections from the Bible and the writings of St. Augustine; Shakespeare’s sonnets; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest, Portrait of Mr. W.H., Salome; Alison Bechdel, Fun Home; Cleve Jones, When We Rise: My Life in the Movement; selected poetry by Homer, medieval monks, Sor Juana Inez de la Cruz, Christina Rossetti, Walt Whitman, Audre Lorde, and others.

ENGL 3384-001— Literature and Medicine: How We Talk about Illness, Doctors, and Bodies.

MWF 11–11:50. 120 Dallas Hall. Foster. CA2, PRIE2, HD, HFA, W.

The course will explore the literary understandings of illness and medicine. We will discuss how people experience illness as both practical and spiritual matters; the practices of doctors, nurses, and others who attend to the ill; the role of sickness and cure in our culture. We will consider how power, knowledge, and authority revolve around societies’ need to care for the body. And we will ask how ethical choices are expressed through the roles of individuals, institutions and governments.

ENGL 3390-001—Studies in Creative Writing: Poetry and Song.

T 2:00–4:50. 138 Dallas Hall. Brownderville. CA2, HFA, W.

When songwriter Bob Dylan won the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature, poets and songwriters across the world fiercely debated the appropriateness of the decision. The debate wasn’t only about Dylan and his Nobel Prize. It was really about the relationship between poetry and song. Do song lyrics qualify as “literature”? Are poetry and song distinct art forms, or are they variants of the same form?

This course, which will explore these fascinating questions, will be a cross between a creative-writing workshop and a discussion seminar. In addition to writing songs and poems of our own, we will talk about songs, poetry that partakes of song tradition, and the historical relationship between song and poetry. Along the way, we will study a large array of poets and musical acts such as Bob Dylan, Bon Iver, Lisa Hannigan, Robert Burns, The National, Lucinda Williams, Hank Williams, Regina Spektor, Robert Johnson, Leonard Cohen, Shakespeare, Tom Waits, and William Butler Yeats. Students will introduce each other to music, producing playlists for the purpose of class discussion. Students need not have musical training or musical skill, though Meadows students focusing on songwriting and performance are encouraged to take the class. Projects will vary in accordance with students’ interests and abilities: some students might focus on analyzing songs, some might write song lyrics or lyric poems, and others might compose songs and perform them for the class.

ENGL 3390-002—Studies in Creative Writing: Short Story Masterpieces.

TTh 12:30–1:50. 138 Dallas Hall. Rubin. CA2, HFA, W.

Franz Kafka famously said that a book "must be the axe for the frozen sea within us." How do great stories function as axes? And why would we want them to? In this class, students will workshop their own short stories while studying masterworks of the form, those that bring about the startling effect Kafka described. Students will develop their own fiction, both in focused exercises and more free-ranging assignments, and helpfully read and critique one another's.

ENGL 4321-001—Studies in Medieval Literature: From the Historical to the Hysterical: Medieval English Holy Women.

TTh 3:30–4:50. 157 FOSC. Keene. HC2, KNOW, W, IL, OC, HSBS.

This course studies writings by, about, and for medieval English holy women – from the historical to the hysterical, including violent virgins, visionary recluses, and holy heretics. Through the interdisciplinary study of primary texts within their historical context the class will investigate the unique and powerful intersection of religion and women’s history, focusing in particular on such topics as: how women fashioned their own piety, society’s anxieties regarding holy women, and the political uses of female saints’ cults.

Readings include: Bede’s Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Ælfric’s Saints Lives, The Life of Christina of Markyate, John Capgrave’s Life of Saint Katherine of Alexandria, Julian of Norwich’s Revelations of Divine Love, The Book of Margery Kempe, and others.

ENGL 4333-001—Shakespeare: Shakespearean Histories.

TTh 9:30–10:50. 120 Dallas Hall. Rosendale. IL, OC.

Shakespeare is best known for his comedies and tragedies, but about a third of his dramatic corpus consists of remarkable plays on English and Roman history that contain some of his most memorable characters: the delightfully malicious Richard III, the wastrel Prince Hal who becomes the heroic Henry V, the hilarious and perpetually-intoxicated Falstaff, the passionately doomed Antony and Cleopatra. As these characters demonstrate, Shakespeare doesn’t waste his (and our) time with dull recitations of history; he brings it to life, invests it with meaning, and uses it to explore questions and problems of power, ethics, gender, representation, justice, governance, desire, and politics, most of which are as urgent today as they were 400 years ago. In this course we’ll read ten or so of these amazing plays, and think hard—with the help of each other and some relevant literary criticism—about what Shakespeare is up to, and how he can deepen our understanding of power and politics in his time and ours.

Evaluation: midterm and final writing projects; class participation; final exam; presentation.
University Curriculum: OC, IL

ENGL 4343-001—Studies in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Multiplot Novel.

MWF 11–11:50. 138 Dallas Hall. Newman. IL, OC.

This course is devoted to three big Victorian novels: Charles Dickens’s Dombey and Son (1848), Anthony Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her? (1865), and George Eliot’s Middlemarch (1872). These novels are big because that’s how the Victorians grew them: novels were their version of the best current series TV, a form of mass entertainment that grew into art. All three deal with important questions while entertaining, cajoling, provoking, and moving their readers.
Dombey was the first of Dickens’s novels to attempt a critique of society through a look at its class structure, and (not coincidentally) the first in which he began to work towards an aesthetics of the novel as an organic totality. Can You Forgive Her? chillingly depicts political ambition and women’s agency. Middlemarch, one of the greatest novels in the language, provides panoramic views of a society in the midst of profound change, while also offering shrewd and moving insight into the psychology of individuals. All three novels were published serially over a year or so. We will spend a month on each, together with relevant critical and theoretical readings, considering thematic as well as formal issues, including the implications of serial form.
Assignments: Frequent postings to a class web-based discussion board; 1-2 presentations; 2 short papers; 1 project making use of current scholarly technologies, possibly a bibliography, but possibly using on-line tools with specific relevance to this course; a final research paper of 10-12 pages. If you intend to purchase the books in advance to get cracking, please purchase the following editions, since you must have hard copy.
Dickens, Dombey and Son: Penguin Classics 978-0140435467
Eliot, Middlemarch: Penguin Classics 978-0141439549
Trollope, Can You Forgive Her: Oxford World Classics 978-0199578177

(Or start with the free texts at Project Gutenberg, but make sure to purchase these editions in hard copy for class.)

ENGL 4349-001—Transatlantic Studies II: The Umbrella Man.

TTh 2–3:20. 157 Dallas Hall. Cassedy. IL, OC.

“If you put any event under a microscope,” a private detective said a few years ago, “you will find a whole dimension of completely weird, incredible things going on.” This class is about that weird dimension. We’ll dig into the lives of obscure individuals from the nineteenth century, most of whom have never been researched before. We’ll read their diaries, love letters, scrapbooks, and whatever else they left behind in both physical and digitized archives. We’ll find out what books they read, and read those books. We’ll try to see what the nineteenth century looks like through their eyes, and we’ll compare that with what it looks like through the eyes of several canonical authors (likely some subset of: Jane Austen, Samuel Coleridge, Edgar Allan Poe, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, and Herman Melville). By the end of the course, each student will have written a narrative essay that uses one of our obscure individuals as a lens to understand the cultural and literary history of the nineteenth century.
Grading: Class participation (30%), brief response papers (20%), presentation (10%), essay (40%). University Curriculum: Information Literacy (IL), Oral Communication (OC). Why this course is called "The Umbrella Man": see here.

ENGL 4360-001—Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands.

MWF 12–12:50. 102 Dallas Hall. Sae-Saue. CA2, HFA, IL, OC.

This class will focus specifically on literatures of the U.S.-Mexico border where a range of cultures conjoin and intermingle, all with the effect of producing unique transnational space that cannot be understood simply as a place where the U.S. ends, and Mexico begins. As such, we will examine how our selected texts articulate this region as the “borderlands,” a cultural space of “in betweeness” which cannot be regarded properly using traditional national paradigms. This does not suggest that we will ignore the important national histories that have culminated in the formation of this unique political divide. Indeed, students should expect to contextualize each of our texts within the complex and oftentimes violent national histories that continue to shape political and social life in the region. However, our primary focus in the class will be to examine how our selected texts communicate and theorize life at the border beyond national vocabularies by using unique literary means. This means that we will pay particular attention to the ways literary forms at the border articulate important cultural and political issues at the periphery of two nation-states by using distinct means of cultural representation. Note: our readings will negotiate a range of political and cultural matters, including Native American genocide, expansionism, Mexican American racial segregation and civil rights, border policy, immigration, migrant labor, deportations, cross-cultural exchange, bi-cultural identity, NAFTA (economic trade), racism, and more

COURSE #

SECTION #

COURSE TITLE

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

DAY

START

END

UC

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry: King Arthur for Love & Profit

DH 306

Wheeler

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA, CA1, HC1, HC, OC

1360

001

The American Heroine

DH 115

Schwartz

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA, CA1, HD

1363

001

Myth of the American West

DH 115

Weisenburger

TTh

2:00

3:20

CA, HC, CA1, HC1

1365

001

Literature of Minorities: Otherness & Identity in American Culture

DH 156

Levy

MW

3:00

4:20

LL, HD, CA1

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

ULEE 243

C. Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

 

2302

001

Business Writing

DH 351

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

IL, OC, W

2302

002

Business Writing

DH 351

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

IL, OC, W

Engl/Disc 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

KCRC 150

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

KCRC 150

Goyne

 

11:00

12:20

 

Engl/Disc 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

VSNI 303

Hopper

MWF

11:00

11:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

VSNI 303

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

MCEL 135

Richardson Duke

TTh

9:30

10:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

MCEL 135

Evans

TTh

2:00

3:20

 

Engl/Disc 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

CMRC 132

Amsel

TTh

11:00

12:20

 

Engl/Disc 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 120

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 106

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 343

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Literal and Literary Horrors in Poetry and Prose

DH 143

Stampone

TTh

8:00AM

9:20 AM

CA, W, CA2

2310

002

Imagination and Interpretation: What was the Harlem Renaissance?

DH 106

Kiser

MWF

8:00 AM

8:50 AM

CA, W, CA2

2311

001

Intro to Poetry

Hyer 110

Holahan

TTh

9:30

10:50

CA2, LL, W

2311

002

Intro to Poetry

DH 102

Newman

MWF

2:00

2:50

CA2, LL, W, OC

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: The Gothic Novel

DH 137

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

CA2, LL, W

2312

002

Intro to Fiction: Ethnic Literary Imaginations

DH 106

Sae-Saue

MWF

10:00

10:50

LL, W

2312

003H

Intro to Fiction: Look Again

DH 137

Foster

MWF

2:00

2:50

LL, W, OC

2313

001

Intro to Drama

DH 116

Neel

TTh

2:00

3:20

CA1, LL, W, OC

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems (Honors Course)

DH 157

Bozorth

MWF

3:00

3:50

LL, W, OC

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study: Knights, Drama Queens & Working Women

DH 105

Schwartz

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CA, CA2, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: What Makes Sense

DH 137

Cassedy

TTh

9:30

10:50

CA, CA2, W

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 156

Haynes

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CA, CA1, W

2390

002

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 120

Haynes

MWF

10:00

10:50

CA, CA1, W

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 138

Rubin

TTh

11:00

12:20

CA, CA1, W

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 153

Smith

TTh

3:30

4:50

CA, CA1, W

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

DH 102

Siraganian

TTh

12:30

1:50

 

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

DH 357

Neel

TTh

11:00

12:20

HSBS, W, WK

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen

Hyer 102

Holahan

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA2, HFA, W

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

DH 105

Greenspan

MWF

2:00

2:50

CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W

3362

001

African American Literature: Hurston, Walker, Morrison

DH 115

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

CA2, HD, HFA, W

3366

001

American Literary History II: American Identities

Hyer 107

Greenspan

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W

3377

001

Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality: LGBTQ Writing Since the Ancient World

DH 153

Bozorth

MWF

12:00

12:50

CA2, HD, HFA, W

3384

001

Literature and Medicine: How We Talk About Illness, Doctors, and Bodies

DH 120

Foster

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA2, PRIE2, HD, HFA, W

3390

001

Studies in Creative Writing: Poetry and Song

DH 138

Brownderville

T

2:00

4:50

CA2, HFA, W

3390

002

Studies in Creative Writing: Short Story Masterpieces

DH 138

Rubin

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA2, HFA, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: From the Historical to the Hysterical-Medieval English Holy Women

FOSC 157

Keene

TTh

3:30

4:50

HC2, KNOW, W, IL, OC, HSBS

4333

001

Shakespeare: Shakespearean Histories

DH 120

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

IL, OC

4343

001

British Lit in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Multiplot Novel

DH 138

Newman

MWF

11:00

11:50

IL, OC

4349

001

Transatlantic Studies II: The Umbrella Man

DH 157

Cassedy

TTh

2:00

3:20

IL, OC

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

DH 102

Sae-Saue

MWF

12:00

12:50

HFA, CA2, IL, OC

6320

001

Medieval Literature

DH 351

Wheeler

T

3:00

5:50

 

6340

001

British Lit in the Age of Revolutions: Disability Literature

DH 137

Satz

M

3:00

5:50

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

DH 351

Moss

W

3:00

5:50

 

7350

001

Seminar in American Literature

DH 357

Siraganian

Th

3:30

6:20

 

COURSE #

SECTION #

COURSE TITLE

ROOM

INSTRUCTOR

DAY

START

END

UC

2310

002

Imagination and Interpretation: What was the Harlem Renaissance?

DH 106

Kiser

MWF

8:00 AM

8:50 AM

CA, W, CA2

Engl/Disc 2306

009H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 106

Arbery

MWF

9:00

9:50

 

2315

001

Intro to Literary Study: Knights, Drama Queens & Working Women

DH 105

Schwartz

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CA, CA2, W

2390

001

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 156

Haynes

MWF

9:00 AM

9:50 AM

CA, CA1, W

Engl/Disc 2306

010H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 343

Arbery

MWF

10:00

10:50

 

2312

002

Intro to Fiction: Ethnic Literary Imaginations

DH 106

Sae-Saue

MWF

10:00

10:50

LL, W

2390

002

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 120

Haynes

MWF

10:00

10:50

CA, CA1, W

1360

001

The American Heroine

DH 115

Schwartz

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA, CA1, HD

Engl/Disc 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

VSNI 303

Hopper

MWF

11:00

11:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

003H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

VSNI 303

Hopper

MWF

11:00

11:50

 

3366

001

American Literary History II: American Identities

Hyer 107

Greenspan

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W

3384

001

Literature and Medicine: How We Talk About Illness, Doctors, and Bodies

DH 120

Foster

MWF

11:00

11:50

CA2, PRIE2, HD, HFA, W

4343

001

British Lit in the Age of Revolutions: The Victorian Multiplot Novel

DH 138

Newman

MWF

11:00

11:50

IL, OC

Engl/Disc 2306

004H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

VSNI 303

Hopper

MWF

12:00

12:50

 

3377

001

Literature and the Construction of Homosexuality: LGBTQ Writing Since the Ancient World

DH 153

Bozorth

MWF

12:00

12:50

CA2, HD, HFA, W

4360

001

Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature: Literature of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

DH 102

Sae-Saue

MWF

12:00

12:50

HFA, CA2, IL, OC

3362

001

African American Literature: Hurston, Walker, Morrison

DH 115

Satz

MWF

1:00

1:50

CA2, HD, HFA, W

2311

002

Intro to Poetry

DH 102

Newman

MWF

2:00

2:50

CA2, LL, W, OC

2312

003H

Intro to Fiction: Look Again

DH 137

Foster

MWF

2:00

2:50

LL, W, OC

3348

001

History of Print and Digital Culture in America

DH 105

Greenspan

MWF

2:00

2:50

CA2, HC2, HFA, HSBS, W

2314

001H

Doing Things with Poems (Honors Course)

DH 157

Bozorth

MWF

3:00

3:50

LL, W, OC

1365

001

Literature of Minorities: Otherness & Identity in American Culture

DH 156

Levy

MW

3:00

4:20

LL, HD, CA1

6340

001

British Lit in the Age of Revolutions: Disability Literature

DH 137

Satz

M

3:00

5:50

 

2102

001

Spreadsheet Lit: Excel

ULEE 243

C. Dickson-Carr

W

3:00

3:50

 

7340

001

Seminar in British Literature

DH 351

Moss

W

3:00

5:50

 

2310

001

Imagination and Interpretation: Literal and Literary Horrors in Poetry and Prose

DH 143

Stampone

TTh

8:00AM

9:20 AM

CA, W, CA2

Engl/Disc 2306

001H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

KCRC 150

Goyne

TTh

9:30

10:50

 

Engl/Disc 2306

005H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

MCEL 135

Richardson Duke

TTh

9:30

10:50

 

2311

001

Intro to Poetry

Hyer 110

Holahan

TTh

9:30

10:50

CA2, LL, W

2315

002

Intro to Literary Study: What Makes Sense

DH 137

Cassedy

TTh

9:30

10:50

CA, CA2, W

4333

001

Shakespeare: Shakespearean Histories

DH 120

Rosendale

TTh

9:30

10:50

IL, OC

Engl/Disc 2306

002H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

KCRC 150

Goyne

TTh

11:00

12:20

 

Engl/Disc 2306

007H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

CMRC 132

Amsel

TTh

11:00

12:20

 

2312

001

Intro to Fiction: The Gothic Novel

DH 137

Sudan

TTh

11:00

12:20

CA2, LL, W

2390

003

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 138

Rubin

TTh

11:00

12:20

CA, CA1, W

CLAS 3312

001

Classical Rhetoric

DH 357

Neel

TTh

11:00

12:20

HSBS, W, WK

1320

001

Cultures of Medieval Chivalry: King Arthur for Love & Profit

DH 306

Wheeler

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA, CA1, HC1, HC, OC

2302

001

Business Writing

DH 351

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

12:30

1:50

IL, OC, W

Engl/Disc 2306

008H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

DH 120

Rosendale

TTh

12:30

1:50

 

3310

001

Contemporary Approaches

DH 102

Siraganian

TTh

12:30

1:50

 

3340

001

Topics in British Literature in the Age of Revolutions: Jane Austen

Hyer 102

Holahan

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA2, HFA, W

3390

002

Studies in Creative Writing: Short Story Masterpieces

DH 138

Rubin

TTh

12:30

1:50

CA2, HFA, W

1363

001

Myth of the American West

DH 115

Weisenburger

TTh

2:00

3:20

CA, HC, CA1, HC1

2302

002

Business Writing

DH 351

C. Dickson-Carr

TTh

2:00

3:20

IL, OC, W

Engl/Disc 2306

006H

Honors Humanities Seminar II

MCEL 135

Evans

TTh

2:00

3:20

 

2313

001

Intro to Drama

DH 116

Neel

TTh

2:00

3:20

CA1, LL, W, OC

4349

001

Transatlantic Studies II: The Umbrella Man

DH 157

Cassedy

TTh

2:00

3:20

IL, OC

2390

004

Intro to Creative Writing

DH 153

Smith

TTh

3:30

4:50

CA, CA1, W

4321

001

Studies in Medieval Literature: From the Historical to the Hysterical-Medieval English Holy Women

FOSC 157

Keene

TTh

3:30

4:50

HC2, KNOW, W, IL, OC, HSBS

3390

001

Studies in Creative Writing: Poetry and Song

DH 138

Brownderville

T

2:00

4:50

CA2, HFA, W

6320

001

Medieval Literature

DH 351

Wheeler

T

3:00

5:50

 

7350

001

Seminar in American Literature

DH 357

Siraganian

Th

3:30

6:20