Graduate Students

Anthropology

Carrie Perkins

Graduate Student

Heroy Hall 438A
254-338-4137
Email

Carrie Perkins is a cultural anthropologist, specializing in applied work with refugee communities. She is a 2017 visiting study fellow at the University of Oxford's Refugee Studies Centre (Hilary term) and holds both a MA in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University as well as a MSc in Applied Anthropology from the University of North Texas. She is currently a PhD candidate in Anthropology at Southern Methodist University, focusing specifically on issues related to protracted refugee situations and the repatriation of Karen refugees in Southeast Asia. Carrie's previous thesis work examined food adjustment and cultural identity in resettled Burmese refugees in Dallas, Texas and she has continued to conduct research related to refugees in Myanmar (Burma), Mae La refugee camp on the Thai-Burma border and Domiz refugee camp in Iraqi Kurdistan. Additional areas of interest include urban agriculture and community gardens, specifically in the context of refugee communities, as well as material culture and art as expressions of movement and migration.

Website: https://smu.academia.edu/CarriePerkins

Entered program in 2014

Region of Study:

Southeast Asia (Refugee Studies)

Awards and Honors:

Visiting Study Fellow at the University of Oxford's Refugee Centre (Hilary term 2017)
Recipient of the Hunt Foundation Dissertation Research Grant
Recipient of the Kemper Endowment Fund for Research in Social and Cultural Anthropology (Pre-Dissertation Fieldwork Award)

Publications:

Perkins, C., Adam-Bradford, A., Tomkins, M. (2017) Thriving Spaces: Greening Refugee Settlements. The Forced Migration Review 55 (June) pp. 46-48 http://www.fmreview.org/sites/fmr/files/FMRdownloads/en/shelter/perkins-adambradford-tomkins.pdf

Adam-Bradford, M., Tomkins, M., Perkins, C., van Veenhuizen, R., Binego, L., Hunt, S. and Belton, J. (2016) Transforming Land, Transforming Lives: Greening Innovation and Urban Agriculture in the Context of Forced Displacement. Lemon Tree Trust, Dallas, USA.